Advisory Circular

Advisory Circular

Advisory U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Circular Administration Subject: Instructions for Continued Airworthiness Date: DRAFT Initiated By: AIR-140 AC No: 20-ICA 1 PURPOSE. 1.1 This advisory circular (AC) provides guidance to design approval holders (DAH) and design approval applicants on developing and distributing Instructions for Continued Airworthiness (ICA). For the purposes of this AC, a DAH is the holder of a type certificate (TC) or a supplemental type certificate (STC), including an amended TC or STC. A design approval applicant is an applicant for a TC, STC, or amendments to a TC or STC.

The regulatory requirements to develop and furnish ICA are codified in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 21.50, 23.1529, 25.1529, 25.1729, 27.1529, 29.1529, 31.82, 33.4, and 35.4; part 26; and referenced appendices (all collectively referred to as the “applicable airworthiness standards”). 1.2 This AC is not mandatory and does not constitute a regulation. This AC describes an acceptable means, but not the only means, for DAHs and design approval applicants to develop and furnish ICA to aircraft owners and other persons who are required to comply with them, in accordance with applicable airworthiness standards.

However, if you use the means described in the AC, you must follow it in all important respects. 2 APPLICABILITY.

2.1 This AC applies to DAHs who are required by the applicable airworthiness standards to develop, furnish, and make available ICA for their products. This AC also applies to design approval applicants in their development of ICA for FAA acceptance/approval. Finally, it applies to other design approvals that do not directly involve TCs or STCs, but that may nevertheless affect a DAH’s ICA responsibilities. 2.2 This AC does not apply to individuals or entities that develop data to repair or alter aircraft, aircraft engines, or propellers pursuant to 14 CFR part 43. For more information on how to prepare or update maintenance information for repairs and alterations, refer to AC 43-210, Standardized Procedures for Requesting Field Approval of Data, Major Alterations, and Repairs.

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 2.3 This AC provides both general and detailed guidance on the format and content of ICA. Other documents, including ACs and orders, are referenced herein as necessary for specific ICA-related situations. For all ACs and orders referenced in this order, consult the most recent version. 3 REGULATORY BASIS. 3.1 The FAA first established its regulatory requirement to develop and disseminate ICA in 1980, under authorities derived from several sections of Title 49 of the United States 3.2 4 4.1 4.2 Code (49 U.S.C.). The current statutory authority is codified at 49 U.S.C.

106(g) and chapter 447.

Pursuant to § 21.50(b), a DAH must “furnish” to the owner of each type aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller at least one set of complete ICA for any design approval applied for after January 28, 1981. In addition to the requirement to furnish ICA, certain airworthiness standards (codified at §§ 23.1529, 25.1529, 25.1729, 27.1529, 29.1529, 31.82, 33.4 and 35.4, and related appendices) require design approval applicants to develop ICA for designs submitted for FAA approval after October 14, 1980. The airworthiness standard applicable to any particular design depends on the type of product at issue.

For example, the § 23.1529 requirement to develop ICA applies only to normal, utility, acrobatic, or commuter category aircraft; the § 25.1529 requirement applies only to transport category aircraft; and so on. The FAA has also imposed retroactive ICA requirements for certain types of aircraft in specific kinds of operations, including numerous requirements related to transport category aircraft in air carrier operations (such as fuel tank safety requirements).

ICA DEFINITION AND DEVELOPMENT. Instructions for Continued Airworthiness are the instructions and information necessary for the continued airworthiness of the aircraft, engine, propeller, parts, and appliances. ICA must be developed and/or referenced in accordance with the applicable airworthiness certification basis or standard (such as §§ 23.1529, 25.1529, 25.1729, 27.1529, 29.1529, 31.82, 33.4, and 35.4). Applicable airworthiness standards require a DAH or design approval applicant to develop ICA as part of the certification process; after certification, the ICA become the basis for operators’ maintenance of the product.

A DAH or design approval applicant must develop the maintenance documents that constitute ICA, and ensure the ICA contain sufficient information to maintain the product’s continued airworthiness and type design configuration control. 4.3 ICA provide—  A harmonized standard for aircraft, aircraft engine, and propeller maintenance data, replacing the various maintenance manual data standards previously in effect. 2

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA  Documentation of recommended tasks, intervals, procedures, and other required information as defined in the appropriate ICA airworthiness standards.

5 DESIGN APPROVAL HOLDER. 5.1 A DAH or design approval applicant should understand that the process for developing or revising ICA may vary depending on whether an application is for a new or amended TC or STC. The primary differences in the FAA’s review processes are determined by whether the applicant must make changes to pre-existing ICA, and if so, the scope of those changes.

5.2 Figure 1 below illustrates the process for determining whether ICA are required. 6 OTHER (NON-TYPE CERTIFICATE) DESIGN APPROVALS THAT AFFECT ICA. In addition to TCs and STCs, there are other design approvals that can affect a DAH’s ICA. 6.1 Parts Manufacturer Approval. 6.1.1 A parts manufacturer approval (PMA) is a combined design, production, and installation approval for modification or replacement articles. Although the FAA does not uniformly require all PMA applicants to provide ICA information, as a practical matter any applicant for a PMA should provide information to the FAA describing how the relevant article may affect the product for which it is designed, including any potential effects on the product’s ICA.

After the FAA issues a PMA, the PMA holder should distribute this information to purchasers to ensure the part is used safely and as intended. Note, however, that the FAA does not require any ICA for products with a TC application date before January 28, 1981.

6.1.2 If a PMA article is life-limited, the Airworthiness Limitations section (ALS) of the product ICA appendix (for example, 14 CFR part 23, appendix G, paragraph G23.4) requires the PMA holder to submit, for FAA approval, a supplement to the ALS of the appropriate product’s ICA. The supplement must identify the affected part numbers and associated life limits. 6.1.3 Figure 2 below illustrates the PMA ICA process. 3

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA Figure 1. ICA Process Flow for Type Certificated Projects TC, Amended TC, STC, Amended STC holder or applicant TC, ATC, STC, ASTC applied for after 1/28/81? Retroactive ICA (i.e., transport)? Does SFAR 88 or Part 26 apply? * FAA determines not enough info for continued airworthiness? ICA not required.

End New TC Amended TC STC or Amended STC Prepare ICA in accordance with appropriate airworthiness standards Change to baseline ICA of TC? Submit impact assessment to FAA** Prepare ICA in accordance with appropriate airworthiness standards to address changes Submit ICA to FAA for acceptance ** Distribute ICA to owner/operator End ICA required Change to baseline ICA of TC or STC?

Submit impact assessment to FAA** Prepare ICA in accordance with appropriate airworthiness standards to address changes Make ICA available to others who need it to maintain airworthiness No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes End End NOTES: * For transport category aircraft special requirements for ICA in support of continued airworthiness and safety improvements ** Any submission of documents to the FAA may require iterations if the documents are not found acceptable or approved. *** Some portions of ICA (e.g. ALS, EWIS, part 26, etc.) require approval.

Prepare ICA in accordance with appropriate airworthiness standards to address update ICA acceptable to FAA *** Assessment acceptable to FAA Assessment acceptable to FAA 4

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA Figure 2. ICA Process Flow for PMA Parts PMA holder or applicant Is PMA article intended for installation on product whose TC, amended TC, STC, or amended STC applied for after 1/28/81? Provide updated or supplemental ICA in accordance with appropriate airworthiness standards to FAA for acceptance * No ICA required. Provide PMA item recommended maintenance information with part End No Yes End Change to baseline ICA? No Yes Distribute ICA with PMA part ICA acceptable to FAA * Submit impact assessment to FAA** End Assessment acceptable to FAA NOTES: * Some portions of ICA (e.g.

ALS, EWIS, part 26, etc.) require approval. ** Any submission of documents to the FAA may require changes if the documents are not found acceptable or approved.

6.2 Technical Standard Order. 6.2.1 A technical standard order (TSO) is a minimum performance standard issued by the FAA for specified materials, parts, processes, and appliances used on civil aircraft. After the FAA establishes a TSO for a particular article, the FAA may grant one or more manufacturers the authority to produce the TSO article by granting a manufacturer either a TSO authorization (TSOA) or letter of TSO design approval (LODA). The FAA does not require a TSOA or LODA holder to submit ICA to owners (unless the TSO specifically requires ICA). However, a TSO typically requires a TSOA or LODA holder to provide one copy of the TSO article maintenance information to whomever they may furnish articles.

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mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 6.2.2 Although a TSO article itself typically does not require ICA, the applicable airworthiness standards may require the installing DAH or design approval applicant to develop ICA describing a TSO article’s installation requirements, within the context of the product, to the extent necessary to ensure the product’s continuing airworthiness. In addition, an installing DAH or design approval applicant should review all TSO article maintenance and inspection instructions. It may be necessary for the DAH or design approval applicant to incorporate these instructions into its ICA to ensure the TSO article continues to satisfy the terms of its TSO after installation.

Any DAH who wishes to install a TSO article should refer to AC 21-50, Installation of TSOA Articles and LODA Appliances.

6.3 Major Repairs and Alterations. 7 7.1 7.2 7.2.1 7.2.2 Condition 2. The procedures for developing maintenance information or ICA for major repairs and alterations are contained in AC 43-210, and will not be discussed further in this AC. ICA AVAILABILITY. Section 21.50(b) requires the DAH to “furnish at least one set of complete Instructions for Continued Airworthiness to the owner of each type aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller . Thereafter, the holder of a design approval must make those instructions available to any other person required ... to comply with any of the terms of those instructions.” The same section also requires that “changes to the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness shall be made available to any person required ...

to comply with any of those instructions.” Persons required to comply with ICA include the owners of a product as well as persons authorized to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alterations as specified in 14 CFR 43.3 (such as mechanics, repairmen, repair stations, air carriers, persons working under the supervision of those certificate holders, pilots performing preventive maintenance, and manufacturers). If the person requesting ICA from a DAH is not the product owner, the DAH must make ICA available if conditions 1, 2, and 3 below apply.

Condition 1. The relevant product’s latest design approval application was made after January 28, 1981. The ICA requester is a repair station or operating certificate holder currently rated for the relevant product or an individual performing work for the product owner or operator under the authority of a mechanic certificate. “Currently rated” is defined as either appropriately class rated for the product or appropriately limited rated for the product that is on the repair station’s capability list or operations specifications, as applicable. 6

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 7.2.3 Condition 3.

The ICA requester (organization or individual) has a valid need to comply with the ICA. Not every maintenance provider has a valid need for the ICA of all products. A requester’s need for a particular set of ICA is valid when the requester has a demonstrable need to comply (for example, the requester possesses a product or component to be worked on, or has a document such as a contract or work order, for a particular product). For additional guidance, review the FAA’s Letter of Interpretation to Sarah MacLeod, Aeronautical Repair Station Association, dated August 9, 2012, which can be found at 7.3 For rotorcraft, § 21.50(a) requires the DAH to make any changes related to “any the ICA “available upon request to any operator of the same type of rotorcraft.” 7.4 ICA can be furnished or made available by various means (including paper copies, 8 8.1 those instructions be made available to other individuals or entities authorized by the FAA to perform maintenance on the particular product or component thereof, and who are required by the FAA regulations to comply with the ICA.

8.2 A DAH should not restrict the shared use of its ICA as between an owner or operator and the maintenance provider, regardless of whether the maintenance provider is appropriately rated for the relevant product. An unrated maintenance provider, or one who is seeking the appropriate FAA rating to perform maintenance on the owner or operator’s products, may nevertheless obtain ICA from the owner or operator. For those maintenance providers that already have the necessary FAA rating and have an impending need to comply with the instructions, the DAH is required to make the ICA and any subsequent revisions available directly to them upon request.

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/agc/pol_adjudicati on/agc200 /interpretations/.

Note: For example, if an owner requests service from a repair station lacking the proper rating, the maintenance provider would need to obtain the necessary ICA from a source that is entitled to the ICA, such as the owner. The owner can provide it to the maintenance provider(s) of choice. The maintenance provider may then seek the proper rating from the FAA under the provisions of 14 CFR part 145. replacement time, inspection interval, or related procedure[s]” contained in the ALS of electronic documents, or web-based access). Regardless of format, the DAH is expected to furnish or make available the ICA in a means that is readily accessible and useable by any person required to comply with the ICA.

ICA DISTRIBUTION. The intent of § 21.50(b) is to provide for the development and distribution of all information necessary to maintain products in an airworthy condition. As described above, the FAA requires that complete ICA be furnished to product owners and that 8.3 A DAH may not inhibit an owner or operator from distributing ICA to current or potential future maintenance providers. It is therefore unacceptable for a DAH to limit 7

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA the distribution of ICA through restrictive access or use agreements, or by adding restrictive language that would control the use of ICA by an owner or operator with respect to the maintenance of the product.

8.4 As noted, § 21.50(b) requires a DAH to furnish a complete set of ICA to the product’s owner and make them available to any other person required to comply with those ICA. A DAH must therefore furnish all information that is part of the product’s ICA, including copyrighted and otherwise proprietary information. 8.5 The FAA will not accept ICA documents with overly restrictive statements or terms, or with restrictive access or use agreements that unreasonably limit the availability or use of ICA.

8.6 The following list, which is not exhaustive, highlights several examples of restrictive practices that the FAA considers inconsistent with § 21.50(b) and related ICA airworthiness requirements:  Requiring the owner to install only DAH-produced or authorized replacement parts, articles, appliances, or materials.  Requiring that alterations or repairs be provided or otherwise authorized by the DAH.  Requiring the use of only maintenance providers or other persons authorized by the DAH.  Establishing, or attempting to establish, any restriction on the owner or operator preventing the disclosure of the ICA to persons authorized by the FAA to implement the ICA.

9 ACCEPTABLE AND APPROVED. The FAA airworthiness standards require ICA to be prepared in a manner “acceptable to” the FAA. ICA may be “acceptable” without requiring any particular form of FAA review and affirmative acceptance before distribution. The FAA’s discretion allows the agency to judge what to review and accept with respect to ICA. In any event, the applicant has the burden of showing that the item meets the performance standards if asked. Under the applicable regulations, only certain portions of ICA, such as the ALS, require FAA approval.

ICA CONTENT. ICA typically apply to a particular product.

In the FAA’s experience, applicants often rely too much on standard practices or other general guidance as the only installation and maintenance details. Type design data packages often refer to AC 43.13-1, Acceptable Methods, Techniques, and Practices—Aircraft Inspection and Repair, for installation and maintenance instructions. The guidance in AC 43.13-1 is general and is acceptable only when there are no manufacturer repair or maintenance instructions. If a set of ICA references AC 43.13-1, the reference should be specific to a particular 8 10

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA chapter, paragraph, etc. Although some standard practice manuals are acceptable for use on a specific task, they are not acceptable as the “complete set” of ICA. Applicants should substantiate any use of standard practices documents applicable to the configuration being certificated, and provide specific instructions that apply to the product at issue. 10.1 Even when a particular design approval does not affect an existing ALS, the airworthiness standards require that ICA contain an ALS statement documenting that the ALS has been approved by the FAA (such as part 23, appendix G, 10.2 10.3 paragraph G23.4).

If the DAH or design approval applicant provides ICA in a paper or hardcopy format, the DAH or design approval applicant should list the documents that constitute a complete set of ICA as early as practical in the project and submit that list to the FAA. This list itself also becomes part of the ICA.

Possible hardcopy documents or portions thereof that may constitute ICA include the—  Aircraft maintenance manual,  Engine and/or propeller maintenance manual,  Engine and/or propeller overhaul manual,  Component maintenance manual(s) (CMM) (if referenced in ICA),  Maintenance Review Board (MRB) report,  Maintenance Type Board (MTB) report,  Airworthiness limitations (may be in a separate document if referenced appropriately in the “primary manual”),  Electrical wiring interconnection systems (EWIS) (may be in a separate document),  Maintenance planning document,  Wiring diagram manuals,  Weight and balance manuals,  Electrical loads analyses,  Structural repair manual (or portions of it),  Extended operations maintenance document (for engines),  Rotorcraft one engine inoperative maintenance document,  Minimum Equipment List,  Illustrated parts catalog,  Commercial parts lists, and 9

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA  Other documents that the DAH or design approval applicant determines necessary for ICA. 10.4 If the DAH or design approval applicant provides ICA in a completely electronic format without hardcopy, the DAH or design approval applicant should clearly identify what information and data constitute a complete set of ICA as early as practical in the project and submit that information and data to the FAA. Design approval applicants may use the checklists in appendices A through G of this AC as a basis for identifying and developing information that must be included in the ICA.

10.5 Airworthiness Limitations Section. 10.5.1 The applicable airworthiness standards require ICA for any aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller to include a separate and distinguishable section titled “Airworthiness Limitations” that is dedicated to airworthiness limitations. The ALS must also prominently display a statement regarding FAA approval, as shown in the appendix of the applicable airworthiness standards (such as part 23, appendix G, paragraph G23.4). In addition, at a minimum, the applicable airworthiness standards require the ALS to set forth the following:  Mandatory replacement times, including life limits, for type certification;  Mandatory inspection times for type certification; and  Inspection procedures for those approved mandatory times.

10.5.2 If the ICA consists of multiple documents, the FAA’s applicable airworthiness standards require applicants to include the ALS in the “principal manual.” In general, the principal manual will be the document used for maintenance. However, to ensure all required inspections and associated limitations are contained within a single document, the principal manual may also be the document used for scheduled maintenance. The type of product and the ICA’s complexity will determine the appropriate form and designation of the ICA’s principal manual.

10.5.3 A product’s airworthiness could be compromised if the owner or operator does not ensure compliance with the inspection and replacement times and procedures in the ALS. DAHs and design approval applicants typically develop these maintenance procedures while performing safety assessments on the product’s structure and systems during product development. 10.5.4 As discussed above, the principal manual’s ALS must contain, at a minimum, the times (in thresholds or intervals, preferably as flight hours or flight cycles) and descriptions of procedures for required maintenance or replacement actions.

To avoid duplication, information that is not expressly required by the relevant airworthiness standards to be included in the ALS may be contained in the maintenance instructions portion of the ICA. If the applicant elects to do so, this information must be sufficiently referenced and identified to prevent confusion as to the mandatory nature of the inspection methods and details, as well as protected against unauthorized or inadvertent changes. 10

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 10.5.5 For specific regulatory requirements, refer to—  Section 23.1529 and appendix G to part 23 (normal, utility, acrobatic, and commuter category airplanes),  Sections 25.1529 and 25.1729 and appendix H to part 25 (transport category airplanes),  Section 27.1529 and appendix A to part 27 (normal category rotorcraft),  Section 29.1529 and appendix A to part 29 (transport category rotorcraft),  Section 31.82 and appendix A to part 31 (manned free balloons),  Section 33.4 and appendix A to part 33 (aircraft engines), and  Section 35.4 and appendix A to part 35 (propellers).

10.5.6 An applicant for an STC or amended STC should contact the FAA Aircraft Certification Office (ACO) managing the applicant’s project for evaluation of the proposed ALS and, if warranted, the FAA’s approval. If the applicant is not the DAH for the original product (that is, the product that would be modified by the applicant’s new design), the applicant’s ACO will coordinate with the ACO managing the original product’s TC, as necessary.

10.5.7 Refer to paragraph 10.12 (Part 25 Airplanes) and appendix B to this AC for additional requirements for transport category aircraft. 10.5.8 When a DAH or design approval applicant provides ICA in a completely electronic format (to either the FAA or owners, operators, or required maintenance entities), the DAH or design approval applicant should clearly identify what information and data constitute the ALS of the ICA. 10.6 System Wiring Diagrams. System wiring diagrams for aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers cover the aircraft’s electrical or electronic circuits. These diagrams should include wire routing information with sufficient detail to enable maintenance personnel to troubleshoot, repair, and service the electrical system.

These diagrams also should include a method for determining connector type, wire type, and wire size. The FAA considers the system wiring diagrams to be descriptive data for the systems used on the product, and part of the ICA.

10.7 Nondestructive Test and Nondestructive Inspection. For aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers, the nondestructive test (NDT) or nondestructive inspection (NDI) manual or section covers testing techniques, instructions, and required equipment for all required NDT and NDI identified in the maintenance and inspection programs. Applicants may write this manual or section specifically for the product, or they may refer to a standard practices or standard procedures document. 11

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 10.8 Commercial Parts. Section 21.50(c) sets out the application requirements for a DAH seeking to designate a part as a “commercial part” listed on the commercial parts list in an ICA.

For more information on designating parts as commercial parts, refer to AC 21-45, Commercial Parts. 10.9 Configuration Control. ICA should contain information describing a method for parts configuration control, to ensure the product can be maintained in a configuration that conforms to type design. 10.10 Maintenance Review Board and Maintenance Type Boards.

A MRB or MTB may be used by operators as a basis for developing and designing a maintenance program and will be submitted to the FAA for acceptance or approval. For more information on MRBs and MTBs, refer to AC 121-22, Maintenance Review Boards, Maintenance Type Boards, and OEM/TCH Recommended Maintenance Procedures. 10.11 Part 23 Airplanes. Refer to the checklist in appendix A to this AC. 10.12 Part 25 Airplanes. In addition to the airworthiness requirements of § 25.1529, there are several unique ICA requirements for transport category aircraft. For more detailed information, refer to the checklist in appendix B to this AC.

10.12.1 Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations. For affected transport category airplanes, § 25.981 requires the ALS to include all critical design configuration control limitations (CDCCL) approved for the fuel tank system. If the CDCCL references a CMM and the CMM is not yet FAA-approved, the maintenance data in that CMM cannot be used for component repair until the CMM is approved. Information for operators is contained in AC 120-97, Incorporation of Fuel Tank System Instructions for Continued Airworthiness into Operator Maintenance or Inspection Programs.

10.12.2 Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems.

Section 25.1729; part 25, appendix H, paragraph H25.5; and § 26.11 contain the regulatory requirements for EWIS. The appropriate ACO office will evaluate and, if appropriate, approve this portion of the ICA. Specific guidance for DAHs is contained in AC 25.1701-1, Certification of Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems on Transport Category Airplanes, and AC 25-27, Development of Transport Category Airplane Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems Instructions for Continued Airworthiness Using and [sic] Enhanced Zonal Analysis Procedure. Information for operators is contained in AC 120-102, Incorporation of Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems Instructions for Continued Airworthiness into an Operator’s Maintenance Program.

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Certification Maintenance Requirements. Certification maintenance requirements (CMR) are required scheduled maintenance tasks established during the design certification of the airplane systems as an operating limitation of the TC or STC. CMRs are developed to achieve compliance with 14 CFR 25.1309 and other regulations requiring safety analyses. Specific guidance for CMRs is contained in AC 25-19, Certification Maintenance Requirements. Part 27 Rotorcraft. Refer to the checklist provided in appendix C to this AC. Part 29 Rotorcraft.

Refer to the checklist provided in appendix D to this AC.

Part 31 Balloons. ICA for balloons must include ICA for all balloon parts and the interfaces of those parts with the balloon, as required by part 31. For more information, refer to the checklist provided in appendix E to this AC. Part 33 Engines. Because of their complexity, there are several unique ICA requirements for aircraft engines as listed in part 33, appendix A. In general, the manuals or sections of an engine ICA must explain the engine’s features and provide information necessary to conduct aircraft engine maintenance or preventive maintenance, as well as overhaul instructions. ICA for engines must also include ICA for all engine parts.

For more information, refer to the checklist provided in appendix F to this AC.

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 10.12.3 Part 26 Requirements. The standards in part 26 may require performing assessments, developing design changes, and revising ICA for transport category airplanes. AC 26-1, Part 26, Continued Airworthiness and Safety Improvements, provides general guidance concerning the safety initiatives that may be issued under part 26, as well as the roles and responsibilities of TC and STC holders, manufacturers, owners, and operators. It also provides guidance on the processes for developing compliance plans, data, and information that would be available to operators to meet the safety objectives, including the development of ICA.

For specific regulatory requirements, refer to part 26. 10.12.4 10.13 10.14 10.15 10.16 10.16.1 10.16.2 For engine-specific guidance, refer to AC 33.4-1, Instructions for Continued Airworthiness; AC 33.4-2, Instructions for Continued Airworthiness: In-Service Inspection of Safety Critical Turbine Engine Parts at Piece-Part Opportunity; and AC 33.4-3, Instructions for Continued Airworthiness; Aircraft Engine High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) and Lightning Protection Features. 10.16.3 For engine inoperative extended operations (ETOPS) eligible engines, the ICA (refer to part 33, appendix A, paragraph A33.3(c)) must include engine conditioning monitoring procedures to allow determination before flight that maximum continuous thrust and 13

application to an engine in service evaluation program. For further guidance, refer to AC 33-7, Guidance for 30-Second and 2-Minute One-Engine-Inoperative (OEI) Ratings for Rotorcraft Turbine Engines. For engine control systems, the ALS of the ICA should contain periodic maintenance actions necessary for finding and repairing both covered and uncovered fault conditions. This is referred to as time-limited dispatch (TLD). For further guidance, refer to AC 33.28-1, Compliance Criteria for 14 CFR §33.28, Aircraft Engines, Electrical and Electronic Engine Control Systems; AC 33.28-2, Guidance Material for 14 CFR §33.28, Reciprocating Engines, Electrical and Electronic Engine Control Systems; and AC 33.28-3, Guidance Material For 14 CFR § 33.28, Engine Control Systems.

For engines, the ALS (14 CFR 33.70(a)) must contain a list of the life-limited engine parts and the approved life for each part. For further guidance, refer to AC 33.70-1, Guidance Material for Aircraft Engine Life-Limited Parts Requirements. Part 35 Propellers.

As provided in part 35, appendix A, propeller ICA must explain propeller features and provide the information necessary to conduct propeller maintenance or preventive maintenance, as well as overhaul instructions. ICA for propellers must include ICA for all propeller parts. For more information, refer to the checklist provided in appendix G to this AC. For additional propeller-specific guidance, refer to AC 35.4-1, Propeller Instructions for Continued Airworthiness. COMPONENT MAINTENANCE INFORMATION. mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA necessary bleed air and power extraction levels are available simultaneously, within approved limits, for the relevant ETOPS diversion.

For further guidance, refer to AC 33.201-1, Extended Operations (ETOPS) Eligibility for Turbine Engines. 10.16.4 For rotorcraft engines with 30-second and 2-minute one-engine-inoperative (OEI) ratings, the ALS (refer to part 33, appendix A, paragraph A33.4(b)) must prescribe the mandatory post-flight inspection and maintenance actions following the use of either or both of these two ratings, regardless of the frequency and before the next flight. The ALS should also define the data that an operator must provide to support that operator’s 10.16.5 10.16.6 10.17 10.17.1 10.17.2 11 The requirements to furnish and make available current component maintenance information vary depending on the situation.

11.1 Meeting the Requirements of § 21.50. There are two general cases in which component maintenance information should be provided as ICA: 11.1.1 Case 1. 14

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA If a product’s DAH incorporates component maintenance information in the product’s ICA, and the FAA finds that information acceptable through the certification or continued airworthiness process, the component maintenance information becomes part of the product’s ICA. Pursuant to § 21.50, the product’s DAH must then furnish that component maintenance information to product owners, and must make it available to “any other person required ...

to comply” with the information. The DAH should work with the supplier to ensure these requirements are met.

Note: If component maintenance information is incorporated into ICA, the FAA will not accept any inappropriate restrictions on the distribution of that component 11.1.2 11.2 11.2.1 maintenance information. Furthermore, in such a case, the burden to furnish the complete ICA is on the DAH. Refer to paragraph 8 (ICA Distribution) for more information on inappropriate restrictions. Case 2. If a supplier holds a design approval for a component that is independently subject to the § 21.50(b) ICA requirements, that supplier may be required by the terms of the design approval to distribute the component maintenance information as ICA, regardless of whether that component is also incorporated into a product and covered by that product’s separate ICA.

The supplier should provide and make the component ICA available to any owner of that component, as well as to “any other person required ... to comply” with the instructions. If the maintenance provider has a direct relationship with the component supplier, the maintenance provider may also work directly with the component supplier to resolve any issue. If the issue cannot be satisfactorily resolved, the maintenance provider should contact the appropriate FAA aviation safety inspector to determine a further course of action.

Note: If a supplier creates a part that is subject to the requirements of § 21.50 independently from its use in a particular product, the FAA will not accept any inappropriate restrictions on distribution of the part’s ICA. In cases where a part is independently subject to § 21.50, the burden to furnish ICA is on the part supplier. Refer to paragraph 8 (ICA Distribution) for more information on inappropriate restrictions. Failing to Meet the Requirements of § 21.50. If a product DAH’s ICA indicate that a component is to be removed and replaced as a remedial action, but make no reference to component maintenance information, any such component maintenance information that exists does not constitute ICA and therefore is not subject to the distribution and availability requirements of § 21.50(b).

11.2.2 Likewise, if a supplier does not hold a design approval for a component subject to the requirements of § 21.50(b), the supplier’s component maintenance information is not subject to the distribution and availability requirements.

11.2.3 Component maintenance information can, however, be used in performing maintenance. Such supplemental or alternative maintenance instructions may represent acceptable 15

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA methods, techniques, and/or practices under existing FAA regulations and guidance. The component maintenance information must be current. 12 ICA REQUIREMENTS FOR NEW OR CHANGED PRODUCTS. 12.1 New Type Certificate. ICA for a new TC must have all information required by the appendix of the applicable airworthiness standards. for periodic performance checks must also be included in the ICA.

12.3.3 If a design change does not affect or change the existing ICA, the DAH or design approval applicant may submit an impact assessment to the ACO showing that there is no change to the ICA and that the existing ICA are acceptable. The assessment should show that the STC project does not change any information, procedures, processes, requirements, or limitations in the current ICA or maintenance documentation. 12.4 Other Changes to Products.

12.2 Change in Type Design. 12.2.1 ICA for an amended TC or any other change in type design that designates a new model product must include all required information in the appendix of the applicable regulations. 12.2.2 A DAH or design approval applicant may use information from the baseline product ICA wherever the processes and procedures are identical with the new model. However, a DAH or design approval applicant should ultimately develop a complete new ICA for the new model of the product. 12.2.3 If the design change does not affect or change the existing ICA, a DAH or design approval applicant can submit an impact assessment to the ACO showing that there is no change to the ICA and that the existing ICA are acceptable.

The assessment should show that the amended TC project does not change any information, procedures, processes, requirements, or limitations in the current ICA. 12.3 New or Amended Supplemental Type Certificate. 12.3.1 ICA for an STC or amended STC should cover only the items changed or affected (including other systems, parts, or areas of the product) by the design change for which the application is made. For STCs and amended STCs, the FAA considers ICA covering only the affected design change, including all areas of the product affected by the change, as complete pursuant to § 21.50(b).

12.3.2 For example, if an STC describes how to install a global positioning system (GPS), the installation will not affect—and the ICA therefore need not address—the aircraft engine. However, the ICA must include any appropriate information about the GPS antenna and its installation. If the GPS is critical to operations, requirements 16

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 12.4.1 ICA for all other changes to products should cover the systems, parts, or areas of the aircraft affected or changed by the design change for which application is made. Other product changes may include changes to type design approved pursuant to 14 CFR 21.95, 21.97, and 21.99 and PMAs.

Contact the managing ACO, Aircraft Evaluation Group (AEG), or Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) as appropriate for help with final content requirements. 12.4.2 If the design change does not affect or change the existing ICA, the design approval applicant may perform and submit to the ACO an impact assessment showing no need for ICA changes and a statement to that effect. This satisfies the “complete set” requirement of § 21.50(b). The assessment should show that the certification project did not change any information, procedures, processes, requirements, or limitations in the current ICA or maintenance documentation.

In this situation, the original DAH’s ICA still apply.

12.4.3 The procedures for developing maintenance information or ICA for major repairs and alterations are contained in AC 43-210. 13 ICA FORMAT. 13.1 Applicants should prepare ICA in a format, standard, and media acceptable to the FAA. The ICA information and data must be in English. All ICA are expected to have a method of recording updates to their contents, which should be readily apparent to those who are required to comply with the ICA. The following are examples of acceptable industry standards that may be used:  AeroSpace and Defence Industries Association of Europe (ASD), ASD-S1000D, International Specification for Technical Publications Utilizing a Common Source Data Base, latest edition;  The Air Transport Association’s (ATA) iSpec 2200, Information Standards for Aviation Maintenance, latest edition (ATA is now Airlines for America (A4A) but the standard is still listed as ATA); or  General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) Specification No.

2, Specification for Manufacturers Maintenance Data, latest edition. 13.2 If the DAH or design approval applicant develops and furnishes (to the FAA or owners, operators, and others) the ICA information and data in a standard data format such as the Scheduled Maintenance Data Standard (SMDS), then the ICA information and data should be identified, complete, and useable by those who are required to comply with the ICA.

13.3 If the DAH or design approval applicant develops and furnishes the ICA in a manual format, each chapter or section should provide detailed instructions for completing a task. If there are multiple manuals, there should be a principal manual that describes the other manuals and how to apply them. The principal manual should also have a table of contents of all other manuals that make up the complete ICA. The principal manual is 17

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA the one used for day-to-day maintenance of the aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller. Overhaul manuals, CMMs, MRB reports, and service bulletins may not offer this information.

13.4 If previous ICA or maintenance documents do not exist or were developed before January 28, 1981, the ICA submitted for a subsequent design change after January 28, 1981, should follow the format requirements in the currently applicable airworthiness standards. Regardless of the format, a DAH or design approval applicant should ensure any ICA submission contains the essential information required for acceptance by the FAA. The applicable airworthiness standards may also require affirmative FAA approval of some portions of ICA, such as ALS, EWIS, or part 26. 14 ICA SPECIAL CASES.

14.1 ICA in Manufacturer’s Service Documents. Service documents, as defined in AC 20-176A, Service Bulletins Related to Airworthiness Directives and Indicating FAA Approval on Service Documents, may be an acceptable method of transmitting ICA information. Refer to AC 20-176 for more information. 14.2 ICA for Special Classes of Aircraft. Section 21.17(b) applies to special classes of aircraft and includes the aircraft engines and propellers installed on them. These classes of aircraft include gliders, airships, and other nonconventional aircraft for which airworthiness standards do not exist.

For such aircraft, the content requirement of a “complete set” of ICA depends on which airworthiness standards the FAA finds to be appropriate and applicable. Because of the unique nature of these aircraft, the FAA makes this determination on a case-by-case basis.

14.3 ICA for Former Military (Surplus) Aircraft. 14.3.1 Section 21.25(a) provides for restricted category type certification of aircraft that are manufactured to meet the requirements of (and authorized for use by) one of the U.S. Armed Forces and are later modified for a special purpose. Before the FAA issues a TC under this category, the FAA requires ICA for the aircraft, aircraft engines, and alterations for the special purpose or purposes. The applicant should submit enough data to the FAA to show that these ICA are technically valid for the aircraft’s intended civil use. The baseline ICA or maintenance instructions for a restricted category aircraft and its aircraft engines and propellers are those instructions approved and used by the U.S.

military in the maintenance of the aircraft and its components, or a civil counterpart that is type certificated. These data include— 14.3.1.1 Identification of the parts of the military technical publications that are not used for the restricted category special purpose, such as instructions on uniquely military equipment, weapons, armor, and military avionics. These parts are removed for civil certification. 18

mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA 14.3.1.2 ICA for equipment that replaces the existing products and appliances, and installation of new products and appliances for the special purpose. 14.3.2 Section 21.27 describes the type certification of normal, utility, acrobatic, commuter, or transport category aircraft, as appropriate, for certain surplus aircraft of the U.S. Armed Forces. When seeking a TC pursuant to § 21.27 for military surplus aircraft with a previously type-certificated civil counterpart, applicants must provide ICA if— 14.3.2.1 The regulations required ICA when the aircraft was authorized for operational use by the Armed Forces, or 14.3.2.2 The applicant applied for a civil counterpart TC after January 28, 1981.

The ICA should contain the information required by the applicable airworthiness standards for the aircraft type and category. 14.4 ICA for Imported Products.

The ICA requirements in § 21.50 also apply to imported aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers seeking U.S. type certification. The FAA must approve the ICA ALS and any other sections requiring approval by the applicable airworthiness standards. The rest of the ICA must be acceptable to the FAA. 15 OPTIONS FOR PROVIDING COMPLETE ICA. Many ICA tasks (such as troubleshooting) are not performed on a scheduled basis. As such, predicting when they will be needed during the aircraft service life is not always possible. Therefore, these ICA components should be available at delivery or upon issuance of the first standard certificate of airworthiness.

The FAA acknowledges, however, that at the time of delivery or upon issuance of the first standard certificate of airworthiness, a design approval applicant cannot foresee and make provisions for all unscheduled events that may occur during the aircraft life. Furthermore, the FAA understands that a number of tasks are used both for scheduled maintenance and unscheduled maintenance (for example, a functional check of a system is planned as a scheduled task at a certain point in time, but is also required as part of the installation procedure to determine the operational status of the system).

For these reasons, the FAA has two options for a DAH or design approval applicant to develop and submit complete ICA. These options are outlined in table 1 and described in greater detail below.

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mm/dd/yy DRAFT AC 20-ICA Table 1. Applicants’ Options for ICA Development and Processing Option 1 (Default) Option 2 Applicability, Certificate Types Available to any applicant (domestic or foreign) for a TC (new or amended) or STC (new or amended). Available only to domestic and foreign applicants for a new or amended TC (for major model changes). Applicability, Product Types Any product, including aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers. Available only for transport category aircraft. General Content Requirements for “Complete” ICA ICA must meet the content requirements for—  The entire product,  All the applicable standards appendices, and  The entire expected operational life of the product.

ICA must meet the content requirements for—  The entire product, and  The applicable standards appendices, but only up to a temporary operational limit. Note: This temporary operational limit results from a lack of data at the time of the application, but the temporary limit may be revised or lifted at a future date, when more data is available. Limitations on the Use of a Product as a Result of Using this Option None. Temporary operational limit. How the FAA Requires Maintenance Information to Be Presented For all required maintenance tasks, the ICA must include the task method, schedule, and procedures.

Applicants must provide all task methods and schedules, but not all task procedures (see “Content That May Be Deferred”), through the allowable operational life of the product. Content That May Be Deferred None. Applicants may defer structural task procedures related to long-term testing (such as damage tolerance or limit of validity (LOV)), but only when those task procedures will not need to be used for unscheduled purposes (such as troubleshooting, functional checks, general procedure, or accidental damage assessment).

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