Affordable Housing - Columbus Consolidated Government

Affordable Housing - Columbus Consolidated Government

Affordable Housing - Columbus Consolidated Government
Affordable Housing - Columbus Consolidated Government

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 1 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Table of Contents Executive Summary . . 2 AP-05 Executive Summary - 24 CFR 91.200(c), 91.220(b . . 2 PR-05 Lead & Responsible Agencies – 91.200(b . . 6 AP-10 Consultation – 91.100, 91.200(b), 91.215(l . . 7 AP-12 Participation – 91.105, 91.200(c . . 16 Expected Resources . . 19 AP-15 Expected Resources – 91.220(c) (1, 2 . . 19 Annual Goals and Objectives . . 22 AP-35 Projects – 91.220(d . . 25 Projects . . 27 AP-38 Projects Summary . . 27 AP-50 Geographic Distribution – 91.220(f . . 35 Affordable Housing . . 37 AP-55 Affordable Housing – 91.220(g . . 37 AP-60 Public Housing – 91.220(h . . 38 AP-65 Homeless and Other Special Needs Activities – 91.220(i . . 40 AP-75 Barriers to affordable housing – 91.220(j . . 43 AP-85 Other Actions – 91.220(k . . 45 Program Specific Requirements . . 49

Affordable Housing - Columbus Consolidated Government

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 2 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Executive Summary AP-05 Executive Summary - 24 CFR 91.200(c), 91.220(b) 1. Introduction As required by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the City of Columbus prepared a Five Year Consolidated Plan for FY 2017 - 2021 to integrate planning efforts to meet the community needs. As an entitlement community, the City of Columbus receives an annual share of Federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnership Program funds. The goal and purpose of the Annual Action Plan (AAP) is to articulate the funding decisions for projects and activities that are expected to be implemented and funded with CDBG and HOME funding for the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Program Year 2017/City's FY 2018. The Consolidated Planning process helps to identify the needs of the community and adopts strategies to meet those needs while placing particular emphasis on low- and moderate-income (LMI) individuals and households. The Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP informs HUD and the community on the City of Columbus' intended use of federal funds. With meeting the community's needs in mind, the Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP strives to reflect the City's continued efforts and commitment to serve the needs of its low- and moderate-income residents.

2. Summarize the objectives and outcomes identified in the Plan This could be a restatement of items or a table listed elsewhere in the plan or a reference to another location. It may also contain any essential items from the housing and homeless needs assessment, the housing market analysis or the strategic plan. The goals and outcome of Columbus' Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP are taken from the Consolidated Plan's Strategic Plan section, which describes how federal funds and other resources will be utilized over the course of a five year period. All activities and funding priorities included in this Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP are guided by three overarching statutory goals set by HUD and applied accordingly to Columbus' need:  To provide decent housing by preserving the affordable housing stock, increasing the availability of affordable housing, reducing discriminatory barriers, increasing the supply of supportive housing for those with special needs and transitioning homeless persons and families into housing.

 To provide a suitable living environment through safer, more livable neighborhoods, greater integration of low and moderate income residents throughout the City, increased housing opportunities, and reinvestment in deteriorating neighborhoods.  To expand economic opportunities through more jobs paying self-sufficient wages, homeownership opportunities, development activities that promote long-term community

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 3 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) viability, and the empowerment of low and moderate income persons to achieve self- sufficiency. 3. Evaluation of past performance This is an evaluation of past performance that helped lead the grantee to choose its goals or projects. Each year, the City is required to submit a Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER) to HUD, which reports on the activities that were funded with CDBG and HOME dollars. The CAPER reports the amount spent on each project activity and the amount of beneficiaries assisted. The City has submitted the required reports each year, and HUD has accepted the reports each year. The City of Columbus will evaluate past performance and make adjustments as needed to better serve the needs of the community. The summary of past performance reports can be found on the City's Community Reinvestment Department's website at http://www.columbusga.org/CommunityReinvestment/Reinvestment.htm.

4. Summary of Citizen Participation Process and consultation process Summary from citizen participation section of plan. The City has a Community Development Advisory Council (CDAC) that consists of board members appointed by the mayor and council members to act as the voice of residents per the Citizen Participation Plan. This committee meets throughout the year to provide recommendations on the City’s consolidated planning process. The City’s current 5-year Consolidated Plan was adopted in May 2016. For the development of that plan, numerous public meetings and hearings were held in order to solicit public input in accordance with the Citizen Participation Plan. Public meetings were held prior to the adoption of the Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP. An announcement of the availability of a draft copy of the document for review at various public library locations throughout the City and the announcement of the holding of a public meeting was published in the Columbus Ledger- Enquirer Newspaper on July 6, 2017. A draft copy and the information of the availability of the draft and the date/time/place of the public meeting was also announced on the City’s website and Facebook page. A public meeting was held May 15, 2017 and a public hearing on July 20, 2017 to hear local needs and concerns for the Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP. In addition to the public meetings, staff from the Community Reinvestment Department held stakeholder interviews with various agencies and organizations on May 11, 2015 that are involved in affordable housing, homelessness, educational services, economic development, and services for the elderly and/or disabled.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 4 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) 5. Summary of public comments This could be a brief narrative summary or reference an attached document from the Citizen Participation section of the Con Plan. Major needs highlighted during the public meeting, public hearing, and stakeholder interviews are as follows: Affordable Housing Needs  Minor home repair  Quality affordable housing remains a major need, especially for those who are teetering with becoming homeless.

 Many blighted and dilapidated properties issues were identified Public Facilities and Infrastructure Needs  Street and sidewalk improvements in low-moderate income areas  ADA compliant construction and rehabilitation throughout the City  Improved youth recreation facilities and upgraded park facilities Public Service Needs  Continued recreational and educational programming for youth, especially STEM activities  Entrepreneurship and employment training programs  Substance abuse and prevention education and rehabilitation services  Improved mental health services  Homebuyer education and foreclosure prevention services  Increased affordable and/or transitional housing for those at risk of homelessness 6. Summary of comments or views not accepted and the reasons for not accepting them All comments and views were accepted. Comments outside the scope of the plan were not addressed.

7. Summary The City of Columbus will continue to utilize CDBG and HOME funding allocations to benefit the low- and moderate-income residents in the community. This document includes projects with objectives and outcomes that address priority needs and help meet goals set forth in the

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 5 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Consolidated Plan's Strategic Plan section, which describes how federal funds and other resources will be utilized over the course of a five year period. The City of Columbus will evaluate past performance and make adjustments as needed to better serve the needs of the community. As per the City’s Citizen Participation Plan, community residents and providers will continue to be informed and invited to participate in the consolidated planning process to ensure projects and activities meet community needs. With declining resources from various sources, the City and non-profit organizations will be unable to serve all persons who are in need of services and, in some cases, programs may cease to exist due to the decrease in funding. To the greatest extent possible, the Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP has been developed with community input and reflects the needs of the City.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 6 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) PR-05 Lead & Responsible Agencies – 91.200(b) 1. Agency/entity responsible for preparing/administering the Consolidated Plan Describe the agency/entity responsible for preparing the Consolidated Plan and those responsible for administration of each grant program and funding source. Agency Role Name Department/Agency CDBG Administrator COLUMBUS The Community Reinvestment Department HOME Administrator COLUMBUS The Community Reinvestment Department Table 1 – Responsible Agencies Narrative (optional) The City’s Community Reinvestment Department, as the lead entity/agency, will be responsible to the implementation of the Consolidated Plan which provides a comprehensive strategy to address the City’s housing and community development needs, over a five-year period, with the use of CDBG and HOME program funds.

Several City departments are active stakeholders in community development projects and improvements, including Engineering, Inspections and Code, Parks and Recreation, the Planning Department, Workforce Investment, and Public Works. In addition, the Housing Authority of Columbus Georgia (HACG) will play a large role in providing and managing housing programs covered by this plan. Coordination with various non-profit organizations will also be important. Consolidated Plan Public Contact Information The Community Reinvestment Department CCG Annex Building 420 E. 10th St. Columbus, GA 31901 (706) 653-4613 (706)653-4486 fax

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 7 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-10 Consultation – 91.100, 91.200(b), 91.215(l) 1. Introduction In accordance with the Columbus Consolidated Government’s Citizen Participation Plan, an announcement of the availability of a draft copy of the Program Year 2017/City's FY 2018 AAP for review at various public library locations throughout the City and the announcement of the holding of a public meeting was published in the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer Newspaper on July 6, 2017. A draft copy and the information of the availability of the draft and the date/time/place of the public meeting was also announced on the City’s website. A public meeting was held May 15, 2017 and a public hearing on July 20, 2017 to hear local needs and concerns for the Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP. There were 8 persons who showed up at the May 15th meeting and 14 persons at the July 20th meeting to express their interest in HUDs policies and voice their concern. In addition to the public meeting, on May 11, 2017, staff from the Community Reinvestment Department conducted stakeholder interviews with various agencies and organizations involved in affordable housing, homelessness, educational services, economic development, and services for the elderly and/or disabled. Provide a concise summary of the jurisdiction’s activities to enhance coordination between public and assisted housing providers and private and governmental health, mental health and service agencies (91.215(l)) In preparing the Program Year 2017/City's FY 2018 AAP, the Community Reinvestment Department consulted with other City departments and outside agencies that have responsibility for administering programs covered by or affected by the Annual Action Plan. On May 11, 2017, various agencies and organizations were consulted during the development of this year’s Program Year 2017/City's FY 2018 AAP to understand how to best address the needs of the community in regards to affordable housing and social service programs. Every year, the City releases RFPs seeking applications for the expenditures of the CDBG and HOME funds. The Community Development Advisory Council (CDAC) helps oversee and award these funds. The City works directly with the following agencies and providers to enhance coordination:  NeighborWorks Columbus – this non-profit agency assists low- and moderate-income persons with purchasing homes that have been rehabilitated.

 Wynnton Neighborhood Housing – this non-profit agency assists low- and moderate-income individuals with purchasing homes that also have been rehabilitated.  Direct Service Corporation – provides home delivered meals to income eligible seniors.  Columbus Community Center – Provides literacy, educational and youth services low- and moderate-income eligible recipients aged 5 through 12.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 8 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015)  Columbus Literate Community Program/dba Literacy Alliance – provides both Youth and Adult Education Programs for kindergarten readiness and literacy readiness programs respectively.  Boys and Girls Club of the Chattahoochee Valley – provides educational and career development programs to youths aged 6 to 12.  Columbus Parks and Recreation – provides a swim program to income eligible youth aged pre-k to 5. Also provides recreational opportunities and services throughout the City.  Hispanic Outreach Committee – provides opportunities, connections, and collaborations amongst various agencies, individuals, and organizations who serve or desire to serve Latino Hispanic families.

 Mercy Medical – MercyMed provides care to low- and moderate-income individuals, most of whom have no insurance or is underinsured with Medicaid or Medicare.  Access to Independence – provides services and education to individuals with disabilities to improve their economic condition and quality of living.  ColumbusMakesit! – is a creativity and entrepreneurship center that provides the education, tools, technology, and mentoring that support activities to encourage and inspire innovation. All of these agencies conduct their own services for low- and moderate-income households throughout the City of Columbus. The Housing Authority of Columbus Georgia separately administers the Section 8 Program and public housing.

Describe coordination with the Continuum of Care and efforts to address the needs of homeless persons (particularly chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans, and unaccompanied youth) and persons at risk of homelessness. The City of Columbus participates in the Columbus-Muscogee/Russell County Continuum of Care (CoC). The City undertakes extensive consultation as part of its consolidated planning process by regularly attending monthly meetings and coordinating between the CoC’s lead agency Home for Good, the Homeless Resource Network, and the Open Door Community House.

On May 11, 2017, members of the CoC were consulted during the development of this years Program Year 2017/City's FY 2018 AAP to understand how to best address the needs of homeless persons and persons at risk of homelessness. The City works directly with the following agencies and providers to enhance coordination:  Homeless Resource Network – assists income eligible clients in securing affordable housing within the City.  Home for Good – assists homeless clients in securing affordable housing within the City.  Open Door Community House – Project is Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA). This organization assists low- and moderate-income persons in transitioning from homelessness and/or shelters into rental housing.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 9 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) The CoC provides agencies and allied partners with education on the housing first model and best practices for ending veterans and chronic homelessness, which encourages improved data collection efforts through participation in the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS), and establishing community-wide goals for a coordinated entry system. Through the CoC, the Project for Assistance in the Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program has been established, which provides a “feet to street” outreach to the unsheltered chronic homeless population. The main objective of PATH is to transition chronically homeless individuals into permanent housing. The path program also provides mental health and recovery services as well as other supportive services as needed to achieve housing stability. Describe consultation with the Continuum(s) of Care that serves the jurisdiction's area in determining how to allocate ESG funds, develop performance standards for and evaluate outcomes of projects and activities assisted by ESG funds, and develop funding, policies and procedures for the operation and administration of HMIS Although the City of Columbus is not a recipient of Emergency Solution Grant funding, the City coordinates the CoC’s strategy for prioritizing housing for veterans and the chronically homeless is largely driven by national best practices, HUD’s program priorities, the City’s Five-Year Consolidated Plan, and the City’s Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness. 2. Describe Agencies, groups, organizations and others who participated in the process and describe the jurisdiction’s consultations with housing, social service agencies and other entities

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 10 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Table 2 – Agencies, groups, organizations who participated 1 Agency/Group/Organization NEIGHBORWORKS COLUMBUS, INC. Agency/Group/Organization Type Housing Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Housing Need Assessment Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 2 Agency/Group/Organization Wynnton Neighborhood Housing, Inc.

Agency/Group/Organization Type Housing Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Housing Need Assessment Market Analysis Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 3 Agency/Group/Organization Columbus Makes IT Agency/Group/Organization Type Services-Children Services-Education Business and Civic Leaders What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Market Analysis Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 4 Agency/Group/Organization Friends of Historic Claflin, Inc. Agency/Group/Organization Type Historic Preservation, Non-Housing Community Development Needs What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Non-Housing Community Development Needs Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 5 Agency/Group/Organization ENRICHMENT SERVICES PROGRAM Agency/Group/Organization Type Services-Children Services-Health Services-Education

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 11 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Housing Need Assessment Non-Homeless Special Needs Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 6 Agency/Group/Organization Columbus-Muscogee/Russell County CoC Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing Services-homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Homeless Needs - Chronically homeless Homeless Needs - Families with children Homelessness Needs - Veterans Homelessness Strategy Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 7 Agency/Group/Organization DIRECT SERVICE CORPORATION Agency/Group/Organization Type Services-Elderly Persons Services-Persons with Disabilities What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Homelessness Strategy Non-Homeless Special Needs Anti-poverty Strategy Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 8 Agency/Group/Organization Home for Good Agency/Group/Organization Type Services-homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Homelessness Strategy Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 9 Agency/Group/Organization HOMELESS RESOURCE NETWORK INC.

Agency/Group/Organization Type Services-homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Homelessness Strategy

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 12 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 10 Agency/Group/Organization Columbus Area Habitat for Humanity Agency/Group/Organization Type Housing Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Housing Need Assessment Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 11 Agency/Group/Organization Access to Independence Agency/Group/Organization Type Services – Persons With Disabilities What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Non-Housing Community Development Needs Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 12 Agency/Group/Organization Parks and Recreation Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other government - Local What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Non-Housing Community Development Needs Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 13 Agency/Group/Organization Engineering Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other government - Local What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Non-Housing Community Development Needs Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 14 Agency/Group/Organization Inspections and Code Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other government - Local What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Non-Housing Community Development Needs

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 13 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 15 Agency/Group/Organization UPTOWN COLUMBUS, INC Agency/Group/Organization Type Business and Civic Leaders What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Economic Development Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 16 Agency/Group/Organization Columbus Chamber of Commerce Agency/Group/Organization Type Business Leaders What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Economic Development Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 17 Agency/Group/Organization MidTown, Inc. Agency/Group/Organization Type Business and Civic Leaders What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Economic Development Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 18 Agency/Group/Organization River Valley Regional Commission Agency/Group/Organization Type Regional organization What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Economic Development Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 19 Agency/Group/Organization Columbus State University Agency/Group/Organization Type University What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Economic Development Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 14 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) 20 Agency/Group/Organization METRA Transit System Agency/Group/Organization Type Transit Agency What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs Market Analysis Anti-poverty Strategy Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 21 Agency/Group/Organization HOUSING AUTHORITY OF COLUMBUS, GA Agency/Group/Organization Type PHA What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Public Housing Needs Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 22 Agency/Group/Organization Planning Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other government - Local What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Housing Need Assessment Market Analysis Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 23 Agency/Group/Organization OPEN DOOR COMMUNITY HOUSE, INC.

Agency/Group/Organization Type Services-homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Homelessness Strategy Anti-poverty Strategy Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. 24 Agency/Group/Organization Hispanic Outreach Committee Agency/Group/Organization Type Business and Civic Leaders What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Non-housing Community Development Needs Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 15 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) 25 Agency/Group/Organization Mercy Medical Agency/Group/Organization Type Services – Health What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation? Health Services Briefly describe how the Agency/Group/Organization was consulted. What are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The agency was consulted through meetings and/or engagement through correspondence. Identify any Agency Types not consulted and provide rationale for not consulting To the greatest extent possible, the City of Columbus made every effort to consult all agency types that administer programs covered by or affected by the Annual Action Plan. Other local/regional/state/federal planning efforts considered when preparing the Plan Name of Plan Lead Organization How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan?

Continuum of Care Home for Good The Strategic Plan's goals to address homelessness align with Continuum of Care's goals and strategies. Columbus 2025 Greater Columbus Georgia Chamber of Commerce The Strategic Plan's goals of economic development align with the Columbus 2025 goals of reducing poverty, increasing prosperity and improving the quality of life. City Village Vision Plan Historic Columbus The Strategic Plan's goals to improve access to and quality of housing align with the City Village Vision Plan to provide affordable housing opportunities within the City Village Neighborhood.

Liberty District Master Plan Columbus Consolidated Government: Planning Department The Strategic Plan's goals to improve access to and quality of housing, remove slum and blight, and improve public facilities and infrastructure align with the Liberty District Master Plan for targeted revitalization and redevelopment within the Liberty District. Table 3 – Other local / regional / federal planning efforts

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 16 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-12 Participation – 91.105, 91.200(c) 1. Summary of citizen participation process/Efforts made to broaden citizen participation. Summarize citizen participation process and how it impacted goal- setting. The City has a Community Development Advisory Council (CDAC) that consists of board members appointed by the mayor and council members to act as the voice of residents per the Citizen Participation Plan. This committee meets throughout the year to provide recommendations on the City’s consolidated planning process. The City’s current 5-year Consolidated Plan was adopted in May 2016. For the development of that plan, numerous public meetings and hearings were held in order to solicit public input in accordance with the Citizen Participation Plan. Public meetings were held prior to the adoption of the Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP. An announcement of the availability of a draft copy of the document for review at various public library locations throughout the City and the announcement of the holding of a public meeting was published in the Columbus Ledger- Enquirer Newspaper on July 6, 2017. A draft copy and the information of the availability of the draft and the date/time/place of the public meeting was also announced on the City’s website. A public meeting was held May 15, 2017 and a public hearing on July 20, 2017 to hear local needs and concerns for the Program Year 2017/ City's FY 2018 AAP. In addition to the public meetings, staff from the Community Reinvestment Department consulted with various agencies and organizations on May 11, 2017 that are involved in affordable housing, homelessness, educational services, and services for the elderly and/or disabled. All comments received through the public comment period will be considered and included in the submission of the Action Plan to HUD.

Major needs highlighted during the public meeting, public hearing, and stakeholder interviews are as follows: Affordable Housing Needs  Minor home repair  Quality affordable housing remains a major need, especially for those who are teetering with becoming homeless.  Many blighted and dilapidated properties issues were identified Public Facilities and Infrastructure Needs  Street and sidewalk improvements in low-moderate income areas  ADA compliant construction and rehabilitation throughout the City  Improved youth recreation facilities and upgraded park facilities

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 17 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Public Service Needs  Continued recreational and educational programming for youth, especially STEM activities  Entrepreneurship and employment training programs  Substance abuse and prevention education and rehabilitation services  Improved mental health services  Homebuyer education and foreclosure prevention services  Increased affordable and/or transitional housing for those at risk of homelessness

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 18 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Citizen Participation Outreach Sort Order Mode of Outreach Target of Outreach Summary of response/attendance Summary of comments received Summary of comments not accepted and reasons URL (If applicable) 1 Public Meeting Non-targeted/broad community 8 Summarized above None N/A 2 Newspaper Ad Non-targeted/broad community N/A Summarized above None N/A 3 Stakeholder Interview Housing, community development, and social service organizations 7 Summarized above None N/A 4 Public Hearing Non-targeted/broad community 14 Summarized above None N/A 5 Internet Outreach Non-targeted/broad community N/A Summarized above None URL Link 6 Internet Outreach Non-targeted/broad community N/A Summarized above None URL Link Table 4 – Citizen Participation Outreach

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 19 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Expected Resources AP-15 Expected Resources – 91.220(c) (1, 2) Introduction Currently, Columbus receives CDBG and HOME funds for housing construction, rehabilitation initiatives, public service activities, economic development, and other eligible activities. These funding sources are expected to be available over the next five years. For this year’s FY 2018 annual allocation, the City received $1,371,525 and $646,179 in CDBG and HOME entitlement funds respectively. In addition to its annual allocation, the City has $438,822 in CDBG prior year resources and $141,209 in HOME prior year resources for projects to be completed for the Program Year 2017/City's FY 2018. This amount includes $238,822 in CDBG Program Income and $115,053 in HOME Program Income. The complete breakdown of this years expected resources is displayed in the table below.

In addition to its annual allocation and prior year resources, the City has available program income from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program. To provide financial relief during the 2008 recession, congress enacted the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA). This Act provided emergency assistance to state and local governments through the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP). The U.S. Congress has appropriated three rounds of NSP Funding, with the first being through HERA which later became known as NSP1. This round of funding allocated $3,117,039 of federal funds to the City of Columbus. The second round of NSP funding (NSP2) was a competitive grant authorized under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. However, the City of Columbus was not a recipient of NSP2. The third round of NSP funding (NSP3) made available under the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 allocated an additional $1,128,174 of funds to Columbus. Through various projects and activities, the use of NSP1 and NSP3 funds generated revenue known as program income. This revenue amounts to $1,082,677 and can be used in continuation of the Neighborhood Stabilization Program’s eligible uses and activities. The City has proposed to allocate this funding towards Land Banking activities to foster and maintain neighborhood stability.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 20 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Priority Table Program Source of Funds Uses of Funds Expected Amount Available Year 1 Expected Amount Available Reminder of ConPlan $ Narrative Description Annual Allocation: $ Program Income: $ Prior Year Resources: $ Total: $ CDBG Public- federal Acquisition Admin and Planning Economic Development Housing Public Improvements Public Services 1,371,525 238,822 200,000 1,810,347 3,942,387 Block Grant from HUD to address housing, community development, and economic development needs in the City. HOME Public - federal Acquisition Homebuyer assistance Homeowner rehab Multifamily rental new construction Multifamily rental rehab New construction for ownership TBRA 646,179 115,053 26,156 787,388 1,933,025 Grant from US Department of Housing and Urban Development to address affordable housing needs in the City.

Table 5 - Expected Resources – Priority Table

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 21 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Explain how federal funds will leverage those additional resources (private, state and local funds), including a description of how matching requirements will be satisfied The nonprofit organizations funded have additional financial capacity through foundations and fundraising campaigns. In addition, the City encourages applicants and subrecipients to seek out other public and private resources that address the needs and goals identified in the Consolidated Plan. Federal funds provide these organizations with the opportunity to expand their services to benefit low- and moderate-income persons. The City of Columbus receives a 50% HOME match reduction. It requires organizations who receive home assistance to provide the necessary match using non-federal funds, which is verified through a report submitted to the City on an annual basis. If appropriate, describe publically owned land or property located within the jurisdiction that may be used to address the needs identified in the plan The City is currently in the process of identifying properties in its portfolio that can be surplus and conveyed as affordable housing. Additionally, the Columbus Land Bank Authority has a stated goal of providing land to be used in the creation of affordable housing and jobs for LMI citizens through residential, commercial, and industrial development. Discussion Through the use of federal, state, and local funds the City plans to carry out the objectives set forth in this Action Plan. The City works in partnership with public institutions, private and nonprofit partners to implement activities and projects that require multiple funding sources. The reduction of funding at the local, state, and federal levels will significantly limit the resources available to meet the needs of low and moderate income residents. With declining resources from various sources, the City and non-profit organizations will be unable to serve all persons who are in need of services and, in some cases, programs may cease to exist due to the decrease in funding. With this in mind, the City continues to place more emphasis on its efforts at leveraging funds with other agencies/organizations to meet the short fall.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 22 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Annual Goals and Objectives AP-20 Annual Goals and Objectives - 91.420, 91.220(c)(3)&(e) Goals Summary Information Sort Order Goal Name Start Year End Year Category Geographic Area Needs Addressed Funding Goal Outcome Indicator 1 Improve access to and quality of housing. 2017 2021 Affordable Housing Citywide Expand affordable housing opportunities Preserve existing affordable housing units CDBG: $229,829 HOME: $685,145  Rental units constructed: 4 Household Housing Unit  Homeowner Housing Added: 2 Household Housing Unit  Homeowner Housing Rehabilitated: 24 Household Housing Unit  Tenant-based rental assistance / Rapid Rehousing: 15 Households Assisted 2 Remove slum and blight 2017 2021 Non-Housing Community Development Citywide Blight removal CDBG: $76,711  Buildings Demolished: 10 Buildings 3 Economic development 2017 2021 Non-Housing Community Development Citywide Reduce poverty/expand economic opportunity CDBG: $270,000  Jobs created/retained: 54 Jobs  Businesses assisted: 2 Businesses Assisted

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 23 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Sort Order Goal Name Start Year End Year Category Geographic Area Needs Addressed Funding Goal Outcome Indicator 4 Provide public services 2017 2021 Non-Homeless Special Needs Non-Housing Community Development Citywide Public services CDBG: $111,970  Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit: 3925 Persons Assisted  Public service activities for Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit: 1100 Households Assisted 5 Housing/services for persons who are homeless 2017 2021 Public Housing Homeless Citywide Housing/services for the homeless/at-risk CDBG: $100,000  Homelessness Prevention: 1548 Persons Assisted 6 Improve public facilities and infrastructure 2017 2021 Non-Housing Community Development Citywide Public facility and infrastructure improvements CDBG: $700,000  Public Facility or Infrastructure Activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit: 200 Persons Assisted  Public Facility or Infrastructure Activities for Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit: 106 Households Assisted 7 Planning and administration 2017 2021 Administration Citywide Planning and administration CDBG: $321,837 HOME: $102,243  Other: 1 Other Table 6 – Goals Summary

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 24 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Goal Descriptions 1 Goal Name Improve access to and quality of housing. Goal Description Creation/preservation of affordable housing including housing rehabilitation assistance, down payment/closing cost assistance, and new construction. 2 Goal Name Remove slum and blight Goal Description Demolition of blighted structures throughout Columbus through the Codes and Inspections Department. 3 Goal Name Economic development Goal Description CDBG funding would be used to rehabilitate the current space being occupied at the River Valley Regional Commission into a small business incubator/virtual office space. Additional CDBG funding would be used to issue loans to small businesses within targeted redevelopment areas.

4 Goal Name Provide public services Goal Description Expand and continue non-housing community development supportive services. 5 Goal Name Housing/services for persons who are homeless Goal Description Funding will go towards the preservation of short- and long-term homeless facilities and associated services. 6 Goal Name Improve public facilities and infrastructure Goal Description Improvements and expansion of public facilities and infrastructure. 7 Goal Name Planning and administration Goal Description Administrative and planning costs to operate the CDBG and HOME program successfully.

Table 7 – Goal Descriptions Estimate the number of extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate-income families to whom the jurisdiction will provide affordable housing as defined by HOME 91.215(b): The City of Columbus is committed to allocating funds that serve the needs of the lowest income and most disadvantaged residents. Low-moderate income families and homeless families in Columbus will benefit from administration of the CDBG and HOME programs.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 25 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-35 Projects – 91.220(d) Introduction The following project information for FY 2018 provides a comprehensive overview on the ranges of CDBG and HOME activities: # Project Name 1 CDBG Administration 2 HOME Administration 3 Demolition 4 Economic Development - Business Incubator Project 5 Economic Development - Revolving Loan Program 6 NeighborWorks Duplex Development 7 NeighborWorks Gap Subsidy 8 Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) 9 Direct Service Corporation 10 Boys & Girls Club 11 Parks and Recreation - Swim Program 12 Fair Housing 13 The Urban League/Housing 14 The Urban League/STEM Program 15 Mercy Medical 16 BTW/Columbus Commons Redevelopment 17 Home for Good/CoC 18 Homeless Resource Network 19 Minor Home Repair/Project Care 20 Minor Home Repair/Accessibility 21 NeighborWorks Acquisition/Rehabilitation 22 City Village - 2nd Avenue Improvements Table 8 – Project Information Describe the reasons for allocation priorities and any obstacles to addressing underserved needs The City of Columbus is committed to allocating funds that serve the needs of the lowest income and most disadvantaged residents, which is reflected in the table of projects selected above.

The following are obstacles to meeting underserved needs in the City:  The reduction of funding at the local, state, and federal levels will significantly limit the resources available to meet the needs of low and moderate income residents. With declining resources from various sources, the City and non-profit organizations will be unable to serve all persons who are in need of services and, in some cases, programs may cease to exist

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 26 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) due to the decrease in funding.  As the population of Columbus continues to grow, continuing limitations on affordable housing will become a major barrier.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 27 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Projects AP-38 Projects Summary Project Summary Information 1 Project Name CDBG Administration Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $321,837 Description CDBG Program Administration. HUD Matrix Code: 21A Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Low-moderate income families and homeless families in Columbus will benefit from administration of the CDBG and HOME programs. Planned Activities Planning and administration 2 Project Name HOME Administration Target Area Citywide Funding HOME: $102,243 Description Planning and administration for HOME program.HUD Matrix Code: 21A Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Low-moderate income families and homeless families in Columbus will benefit from administration of the CDBG and HOME programs. Planned Activities Planning and Administration 3 Project Name Demolition Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $76,711 Description The City's Codes and Inspections Department will use this funding to demolish blighted properties throughout the City. HUD Matrix Code: 04 Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Families that live adjacent to blighted buildings will benefit from their demolition as it will reduce health and safety hazards and foster a more suitable living environment.

Planned Activities Remove slum and blight

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 28 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) 4 Project Name Economic Development - Business Incubator Project Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $150,000 Description Provide financial assistance for a creativity and entrepreneurship center that provides education, tools, technology, and mentoring that support activities for innovation. HUD Matrix Code: 18C Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities This project will produce an estimated 54 new jobs created. Of those jobs, 26 will be available to LMI persons.

Planned Activities Economic development 5 Project Name Economic Development - Revolving Loan Program Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $120,000 Description A revolving loan fund to assist eligible businesses. HUD matrix code 18A Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities This project will assist 2 eliglble businesses Planned Activities Economic development 6 Project Name NeighborWorks Duplex Development Target Area Citywide Funding HOME: $200,000 Description NeighborWorks will be constructing two single-family duplex style homes. HUD Matrix Code: 12 Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Four LMI households will be assisted through this project. Planned Activities New Construction 7 Project Name NeighborWorks Gap Subsidy Program Target Area Citywide Funding HOME: $40,000

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 29 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Description Funds will be used for the acquisition and/or rehabilitation of homebuyer properties; new construction of homebuyer properties; and/or direct financial assistance to purchasers of HOME-assisted housing that has been developed with HOME funds. HUD Matrix Code: 13 Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities LMI households will benefit from the proposed activities Planned Activities Acquisition and/or rehabilitation of homebuyer properties; new construction of homebuyer properties; and/or direct financial assistance to purchasers of HOME-assisted housing that has been developed with HOME funds.

8 Project Name Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) Target Area Citywide Funding HOME: $100,000 Description In partnership with Open Door Community House, TBRA vouchers will be provided to 15 low-income individuals who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. These vouchers will assist individuals with security deposits, utility deposits, and rental assistance for 24 months.HUD Matrix Code: 05S Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities The program seeks to provide tenant-based rental assistance for up to 15 homeless or at risk of becoming homeless individuals and families. Planned Activities Improve access to and quality of affordable housing 9 Project Name Direct Service Corporation Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $25,000 Description Provides home delivered meals to 25 income eligible senior citizens. HUD Matrix Code: 05A Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Provides home delivered meals to 25 income eligible senior citizens. Planned Activities Provision of home delivered meals to income eligible senior citizens

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 30 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) 10 Project Name Boys & Girls Club Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $17,500 Description Provides educational and career development programs to youths ages 6 to 12. HUD Matrix Code: 05D Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities The families of approximately 2,000 children will benefit from these activities. Planned Activities Provision of educational and career development programs 11 Project Name Parks and Recreation - Swim Program Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $25,000 Description Provide swim program to 500 income eligible youths aged Pre-K to 5. HUD Matrix Code: 05D Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities The Learn to Swim program will benefit 500 income eligible youth Planned Activities Provide swimming lessons 12 Project Name Fair Housing Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $1,970 Description The City will carry out fair housing activities to promote awareness of the fair housing model. HUD Matrix Code: 05J Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities About 1,100 families will benefit from the proposed activities. Planned Activities Fair housing education and outreach 13 Project Name The Urban League/Housing Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $12,500

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 31 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Description The Urban League First-time Homebuyer Education & Housing Counseling Program will prepare homebuyers for the entire home buying, credit and mortgage lending process by educating first-time homebuyers to become responsible homeowners. HUD Matrix Code: 05U Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities The First-time Homebuyer Education & Housing Counseling Program will serve up to 500 first-time homebuyers, low- to moderate-income families and individuals, as well as, renters and current homeowners. The program will also serve families with disabilities, economically disadvantaged and underserved communities.

Planned Activities First-time homebuyer education and counseling services 14 Project Name The Urban League/STEM Program Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $12,500 Description The Urban League STEM Youth Education and Summer Program provides youth education and summer employment training. HUD Matrix Code: 05D Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Approximately 400 youth (250 STEM students & 150 summer employment opportunities) will benefit from this program Planned Activities The Urban League STEM Youth Education and Summer Employment Training program consists of three components:  The Urban League STEM Youth Employment and Job Training Program serves high school students, ages 16 to 18, and college students, ages 18 to 24 by providing job training and summer employment.

 The Urban League STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) Summer Program for kids grades K through 8th leaving no kid behind during the summer.  The Urban League STEM Medical Technology Program serves high school juniors and seniors as well as college freshman and sophomores who are interested in going into the medical field to give them access and exposure to the field of medical technology. 15 Project Name Mercy Medical Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $17,500 Description MercyMed will provide affordable, quality healthcare for the physical, spiritual, and emotional needs of the underserved. HUD Matrix Code: 05M

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 32 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities MercyMed will provide care for 500 low- and moderate-income individuals, most of whom have no insurance or is underinsured with Medicaid or Medicare. Planned Activities Provide health care services for the underserved 16 Project Name BTW/Columbus Commons Redevelopment Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $500,000 Description Remaining balance on Booker T. Washington/Columbus Commons site work and improvements. HUD Matrix Code: 03 Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities The Booker T. Washington (BTW) complex structure is scheduled for a two-phase demolition and redevelopment. The redevelopment of the site will include 106 mixed-income units.

Planned Activities Improve access to and quality of housing 17 Project Name Home for Good/CoC Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $75,000 Description As the lead agency for the Continuum of Care, Home For Good coordinates and performs all federally mandated activities necessary to secure federal homeless funds on behalf of the community's Continuum of Care document, including the annual enumeration, annual funding application, administration of the homeless management information system, and collection and dissemination of performance data. HUD Matrix Code: 05 Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities The Home for Good/CoC will provide services to 1,500 homeless individuals.

Planned Activities Preservation of short- and long-term homeless facilities and associated services 18 Project Name Homeless Resource Network Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $25,000 Description The Homeless Resource Network will assist 48 income eligible persons who are homeless and residing in a shelter in securing affordable housing within the City. HUD Matrix Code: 05U

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 33 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities About 48 persons experiencing homelessness who are residing in an emergency homeless shelter will be assisted in securing affordable housing opportunities. Planned Activities Improve access to and quality of housing 19 Project Name Minor Home Repair/Project Care Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $149,829 Description The Project Care program will assist income eligible homeowners with much needed repair, maintenance, weatherization, safety, and beautification of homes. HUD Matrix Code: 14A Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities The Project Care program will assist up to 12 income eligible homeowners with much needed repair and maintenance on their homes. Planned Activities Provide home repair and maintenance related activities 20 Project Name Minor Home Repair/Accessibility Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $80,000 Description Provide accessible home repairs usable by persons with disabilities. HUD Matrix Code: 14A Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities About 10 homeowners with disabilities will benefit from ADA compliant improvements.

Planned Activities Provide accessibility changes such as ramps, lever handles, or door modifications etc. 21 Project Name NeighborWorks Acquisition/Rehabilitation Target Area Citywide Funding HOME: $345,145 Description Acquisition/Rehabilitation/Resale of homes to income eligible residents. HUD Matrix Code: 14G

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 34 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Approximately 2 income eligible households will benefit from proposed activities. Planned Activities Improve access to and quality of housing 22 Project Name City Village - 2nd Avenue Improvements Target Area Citywide Funding CDBG: $200,000 Description The installation of sidewalk, METRA bus stop shelters, and ADA ramps along 2nd Avenue in City Village. HUD Matrix Code: 03L Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Infrastructure improvements will provide a public benefit within a low/mod area (LMA) through the installation of sidewalk, METRA bus stop shelters, and ADA ramps along 2nd Avenue in City Village. Planned Activities Improve public facilities and infrastructure Table 9 – Project Summary

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 35 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-50 Geographic Distribution – 91.220(f) Description of the geographic areas of the entitlement (including areas of low- income and minority concentration) where assistance will be directed The City of Columbus was founded in 1828 as a trading post on the Chattahoochee River in Western Georgia. It is the third largest city in the state of Georgia and the principle city for Muscogee County. Columbus is located in the west central portion of the State of Georgia approximately 90 miles southwest of Atlanta and approximately 80 miles east of Montgomery. The City of Columbus will prioritize its CDBG and HOME funds in areas where the percentage of low- to moderate-income persons is 51% or higher. Additionally, the City will take into consideration areas of "minority concentration" and "poverty concentration", defined as census tracts that have concentrations of minority populations or poverty, respectively, statistically and significantly larger than the minority population or poverty rate for the City as a whole. These areas are highlighted in the attached maps, “LMI Areas”, “Minority Concentration”, and “Poverty Concentration” in the unique appendices section.

Geographic Distribution Target Area Percentage of Funds Citywide 100% Table 10 - Geographic Distribution Rationale for the priorities for allocating investments geographically Federal CDBG funds are intended to provide low- and moderate-income persons with viable communities, including decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunities. As such, the City will use its CDBG and HOME funds throughout the jurisdiction to serve low- and moderate-income persons. A portion of CDBG and HOME funds will be used for new affordable housing and to rehabilitate existing housing units in low-income neighborhoods to improve the housing conditions within those neighborhoods. By utilizing federal dollars in predominantly low-income neighborhoods the City will serve the most disadvantaged residents given the limited source of funds.

Discussion In order for a project to recieve funding, it must qualify as meeting one of the three national objectives: 1. Principally benefit a majority of low- and moderate-income persons 2. Aid in the prevention of slum or blight, or 3. Meet community development needs having a particular urgency all activities are guided by three overarching statutory goals set by HUD and applied accordingly

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 36 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) to Columbus' need. 1. To provide decent housing by preserving the affordable housing stock, increasing the availability of affordable housing, reducing discriminatory barriers, increasing the supply of supportive housing for those with special needs and transitioning homeless persons and families into housing. 2. To provide a suitable living environment through safer, more livable neighborhoods, greater integration of low and moderate income residents throughout the City, increased housing opportunities, and reinvestment in deteriorating neighborhoods. 3. To expand economic opportunities through more jobs paying self-sufficient wages, homeownership opportunities, development activities that promote long-term community viability, and the empowerment of low and moderate income persons to achieve self- sufficiency.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 37 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Affordable Housing AP-55 Affordable Housing – 91.220(g) Introduction The City will use HOME funds and a portion of CDBG funds for new affordable housing and to rehabilitate existing housing units. The City does not run a public housing or Section 8 voucher program. Those specific programs are done through the Housing Authority or Columbus Georgia (HACG). Both the special needs population and the homeless population will be served through grants to local service providers. Therefore, these two groups do not have easily quantifiable goals.

The numbers in the tables below are derived from the Goals Summary Information table in AP- 20, Annual Goals and Objectives. Tenant-Based Rental Assistance/Rapid Rehousing for FY 2018 serves homeless households. Non-homeless households are served by other types of affordable housing programs. The Minor Home Repair Project Care & Accessibility programs are targeted to income eligible elderly and disabled individuals respectively. One Year Goals for the Number of Households to be Supported Homeless 15 Non-Homeless 8 Special-Needs 22 Total 45 Table 11 - One Year Goals for Affordable Housing by Support Requirement One Year Goals for the Number of Households Supported Through Rental Assistance 15 The Production of New Units 4 Rehab of Existing Units 24 Acquisition of Existing Units 2 Total 45 Table 12 - One Year Goals for Affordable Housing by Support Type Discussion The estimates in the tables above are derived from the estimates of this year’s projects and activities that are expected to utilize CDBG and HOME funding.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 38 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-60 Public Housing – 91.220(h) Introduction The Housing Authority of Columbus Georgia serves as the primary public housing authority for the Columbus Consolidated Government. The HACG was founded in 1938. Its mission is to be the foremost provider of quality, affordable housing in the Columbus region by developing, revitalizing, and managing contemporary housing communities. Publicly supported housing can be a bridge for families aiming to escape poverty and obtain decent, affordable housing. Actions planned during the next year to address the needs to public housing According to HUD’s latest Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH) data, there were 1,717 public housing units in Columbus. Although the public housing stock is generally in good condition, maintaining units at this level is cost-prohibitive for the HACG. Consequently, aging units are being removed from the public housing stock and converted to project-based vouchers as a result of HUD’s Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program. The Booker T. Washington (BTW) complex, which is over 72 years old, has reached a point of overwhelming cost to operate and maintain. The City will allocate $500,000 of CDBG funds for FY 2018 towards the redevelopment of these units. The redevelopment of the site will include 106 mixed-income units. Additionally, as a result of its redevelopment activities at BTW, HACG was awarded 302 tenant-protection vouchers (TPV) in FY2015 to assist with the relocation of BTW residents. The HACG seeks to continue improving the living environment through regular unit and building maintenance and repair, which includes: HVAC improvements, interior modernization, roof replacement, fencing, wireless internet access and painting. Maintaining the City's public housing stock expands the housing choice for the community's low-income residents. Actions to encourage public housing residents to become more involved in management and participate in homeownership The HACG continues to expand services to promote and support self-sufficiency programs that focus on improving their resident’s economic mobility and standard of living. These programs, Resident Opportunities and Self-sufficiency (ROSS) and Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS), are voluntary self-sufficiency programs that provide participating families with the opportunity to improve skill sets and establish economic independence. Both the ROSS and FSS programs enlist Program Coordinators that link participating families with resources to help them achieve their goals. HACG’s self-sufficiency programs provide families with:  A plan specifically tailored to their family or individual goals.  A link to community organizations geared towards education, job training and placement

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 39 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) programs, computer and financial literacy, and increased self-sufficiency.  Aiding residents through barriers preventing self-sufficiency. If the PHA is designated as troubled, describe the manner in which financial assistance will be provided or other assistance HUD has not designated the HACG as troubled. Discussion (This part is optional and intentionally left blank)

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 40 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-65 Homeless and Other Special Needs Activities – 91.220(i) Introduction As a participant in the local CoC, led by Home for Good, the City is a partner in its plan to address homelessness and the priority needs of homeless individuals and families, including homeless subpopulations. As the lead agency and Collaborative Applicant for the CoC, Home for Good coordinates and performs all federally mandated activities necessary to secure federal homeless funds on behalf of the community’s CoC document. The CoC document includes the annual enumeration, annual funding application, administration of the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS), and collection and dissemination of performance data. The City continues to support a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) database to track the effectiveness of service providers. This system provides information on services to provide eligible clients by local non-profit organizations in the City. The City provides funding to the CoC's Collaborative Applicant on an annual basis, and will continue to contribute CDBG funds to help assist local service agencies provide services.

Describe the jurisdictions one-year goals and actions for reducing and ending homelessness including: 1.) Reaching out to homeless persons (especially unsheltered persons) and - assessing their individual needs Individuals/families can access support services either by self-presenting at most of the shelter facilities or through referrals. Regional emergency shelters refer participants to agencies that will assist them in obtaining mainstream resources so that they will have the financial ability to start along the road to self-sufficiency. Transitional housing programs generally refer participants to permanent housing programs/locations and provide the assistance necessary in obtaining resources to be successful when they make this transition. The City will continue to support the region’s CoC, Home for Good, with CDBG funds in FY18, with an allocation of $75,000. Additionally, the City will allocate $25,000 in FY18 CDBG funds and $100,000 in FY18 HOME funds for TBRA to the Homeless Resource Network and Open Door Community House respectively, who will assist income eligible individuals who are homeless or at-risk of being homeless in securing affordable housing within the City of Columbus.

2.) Addressing the emergency shelter and transitional housing needs of homeless persons Each year, the CoC conducts a Point-in-Time count of the persons residing in emergency shelters and transitional housing facilities, as well as those living unsheltered, in the Columbus region. This information is used to understand the emergency and transitional needs of

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 41 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) homeless persons so that they can be addressed adequately and efficiently. The City plans to continue to fund non-profit organizations such as Home for Good who provide services to homeless individuals and families. Helping homeless persons (especially chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans and their families, and unaccompanied youth) make the transition to permanent housing and independent living, including shortening the period of time that individuals and families experience homelessness, facilitating access for homeless individuals and families to affordable housing units, and preventing individuals and families who were recently homeless from becoming homeless again Increasing the amount of permanent and affordable housing with supportive services is a top priority for the City. The majority of chronically homeless persons have severe mental illness and/or substance abuse issues. They require long-term, affordable housing options with supportive services in order to make the transition to residential stability. In addition to permanent affordable housing, the City’s strategy for ending chronic homelessness addresses each of the issues that most often cause this problem:  The high prevalence of substance abuse among chronically homeless individuals  Inadequate education and/or job skills among many homeless persons  The shortage of affordable housing in the City of Columbus The City will maintain coordination and collaboration with local non-profit agencies serving the homeless population. Columbus will continue to use its entitlement grant funds to assist nonprofit organizations that serve homeless individuals and families in Columbus and to continue funding for its CoC Collaborative Applicant who creates the application for the CoC and assists in coordination of homeless resources throughout the City. Helping low-income individuals and families avoid becoming homeless, especially extremely low-income individuals and families and those who are: being discharged from publicly funded institutions and systems of care (such as health care facilities, mental health facilities, foster care and other youth facilities, and corrections programs and institutions); or, receiving assistance from public or private agencies that address housing, health, social services, employment, education, or youth needs.

The City recognizes a need for neighborhood-based homelessness prevention programs, such as a crisis response and stabilization team, a street outreach program, housing search placement specialists, and increased employment opportunities that provide temporary rental assistance and other services. The following action items comprise the City’s strategy for

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 42 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) homelessness prevention:  Development of a Coordinated Entry System;  Development of a detoxification unit for persons in danger of becoming homeless;  Development of programs and systems that help overcome barriers to housing and employment;  Provide childcare;  “Agreement of Discharge” memorandums;  Design of an intervention and eviction prevention program;  Rental and utility assistance payments;  Implementation of a referral and outreach team;  Development of a reunification program;  Foreclosure intervention and prevention program;  Encourage participation in national healthcare plan;  Establish a critical document fund;  Expand and update homeless resource guides. Discussion The Columbus-Muscogee/Russell County Continuum of Care is tasked with the following:  Promote community-wide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness:  Provide funding for efforts by nonprofit providers and local governments to re-house homeless individuals and families rapidly while minimizing the trauma and dislocation caused to homeless individuals, families, and communities as a consequence of homelessness;  Promote access to and effective utilization of mainstream programs by homeless individuals and families;  Optimize self-sufficiency among individuals and families experiencing homelessness One year goals for the number of households to be provided housing through the use of HOPWA for: Short-term rent, mortgage, and utility assistance to prevent homelessness of the individual or family N/A Tenant-based rental assistance N/A Units provided in housing facilities (transitional or permanent) that are being developed, leased, or operated N/A Units provided in transitional short-term housing facilities developed, leased, or operated with HOPWA funds N/A Total N/A Note: The City of Columbus is not a recipient of HOPWA funding.

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 43 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-75 Barriers to affordable housing – 91.220(j) Introduction The City’s housing market presents significant impediments to development of an adequate supply of affordable housing for LMI individuals and families. Loss of major manufacturing employment opportunities coupled with rising construction costs has created a significant barrier to affordable housing. The City’s 2016 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) examined a number of areas in which barriers to the development of affordable housing might exist. Barriers identified in the AI and over the course of the outreach for the development of this Consolidated Plan, include:  Property tax freeze, meaning that tax assessments are based on the value at the time of sale and frozen at that value until the property is sold or improved. This presents a disincentive to new residential investment and rehabilitation and a loss of real estate property tax that increases in real time with the market value or appraised value of the housing stock.

 Limited supply of quality affordable housing stock.  Zoning ordinances restrict the development of affordable supportive housing (group living)  Limited access to and availability of public transportation means that affordable housing is not necessarily located within a reasonable commute of employment centers and amenities Actions it planned to remove or ameliorate the negative effects of public policies that serve as barriers to affordable housing such as land use controls, tax policies affecting land, zoning ordinances, building codes, fees and charges, growth limitations, and policies affecting the return on residential investment In order to continue to address and eliminate any potential barriers to affordable housing, the City has identified the following areas where the City could take action to minimize barriers to affordable housing over the next five years.

1. Develop partnerships to build and increase the number of affordable units; 2. Support and coordinate with developers for housing tax credit project applications proposed within the City 3. Provide homebuyer education 4. Make efforts to coordinate the Land Bank Authority of Columbus Georgia in the provision of affordable housing units Discussion The Columbus Consolidated Government has prepared an Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice to satisfy the requirements of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended. This act requires that any community receiving Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds and Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME) funds

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 44 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) affirmatively furthers fair housing. As a result, the City is charged with the responsibility of conducting its CDBG and HOME programs in compliance with the federal Fair Housing Act. As such, the City will follow its Fair Housing Action Plan in addressing the barriers to affordable housing. These goals are listed below: 1. Ensure that persons with limited English proficiency can access the affordable housing services and programs offered 2. Ensure that the City's UDO allows for a wide range of residential housing options to meet existing and future market needs for all income levels 3. Enable Housing Choice Vouchers recipients to move into higher-opportunity neighborhoods 4. Make affordable housing development in higher opportunity areas a priority 5. Remove barriers to access of community assets for members of the protected classes 6. Advocate the public transit systems to connect lower income neighborhoods with major employment centers 7. Work to increase the financial readiness of qualifying minority homebuyers

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 45 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) AP-85 Other Actions – 91.220(k) Introduction The following information illustrates other actions that the City of Columbus will take to address its priority needs. Actions planned to address obstacles to meeting underserved needs The primary impediment to the City’s ability to meet underserved needs is the limited amount of CDBG funding to address identified priorities. The City will continue to seek public and private resources to leverage its entitlement funds in assisting with implementation of policies and programs.

The Columbus Consolidated Government is working with local partner agencies and neighborhood organizations to strategically target projects that will preserve and expand quality, safe and affordable housing choices; prevent and end homelessness; provide opportunities to improve quality of life; support vibrant neighborhoods and expand economic opportunities. Actions planned to foster and maintain affordable housing The City will continue to support its goals of maintaining and expanding affordable housing by utilizing its CDBG and HOME allocations to create new opportunities for affordable rental and homeownership and rehabilitate existing affordable units. The amount of funds allocated for these activities for FY18 is $914,974.

Given the high demand for affordable housing, the City recognizes the importance of fostering affordable housing development and maintaining existing affordable housing stock. The City, through its partnership with Open Door Community House, also provides Tenant Based Rental Assistance to extremely low-income/homeless families to create affordable housing options at market rate rental housing located across the City. The City fosters relationships with both for- profit and nonprofit (including CHDO) housing developers when soliciting HOME Program funding proposals. The City currently partners with Neighborworks Columbus on in-fill housing developments through acquisition and rehabilitation of abandoned properties, and through new construction for homeownership. This year the City will offer developers the opportunity to leverage limited City HOME funding with Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, State Historic Tax Credits, housing bonds, and Federal Home Loan Bank funds. The City HOME funds will account for only a fraction of the total cost but will deliver large projects providing a large number of long-term affordable rental housing units. The City maintains its HOME investment in affordable housing by monitoring rental housing occupancy and physical condition over HUD’s minimum compliance periods required by 24 CFR 92.254. The City will also grant and loan CDBG funds to repair low-income owner-occupied homes enabling existing homeowners to enjoy a safe and healthy home that they can afford to operate and maintain. The Columbus Land Bank Authority has a stated goal of providing land to be used in the

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 46 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) creation of affordable housing and jobs for LMI citizens through residential, commercial, and industrial development. Through the use of the NSP Program Income funds, the Columbus Land Bank Authority can be used to acquire, manage, maintain, and repurpose vacant, abandoned, and foreclosed properties. Actions planned to reduce lead-based paint hazards The City will continue to ensure compliance with the HUD lead-based paint regulations that implement Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992, which covers the CDBG and HOME programs, among others. The City plans to continue using a certified private contractor to remove lead from housing units where funds will be invested for rehabilitation or other purposes. A private contractor is also used to conduct lead-based paint testing and Lead Risk Assessments. In any cases where testing indicates the presence of lead, it will be properly removed or abated.

The City’s Project Care/Accessibility (Single Family Rehabilitation) and Acquisition/Rehab programs will be active in identifying and repairing lead-based paint hazards in eligible owner housing. HUD Title X and EPA Renovator (RRP) requirements are integrated into CDBG and HOME funded programs that rehabilitate housing units constructed prior to 1978. Typical lead hazard control begins with an XRF lead inspection to guide the scope of work. Certified workers complete lead hazard control work in compliance with HUD’s Title X and EPA RRP regulations. These projects typically include wet scraping, painting, eliminating friction/impact surfaces, mulching bare soil, and cleaning to Clearance. Each rehabilitated housing unit will achieve Clearance as part of project completion by a certified lead-based paint contractor, as proscribed by HUD’s Title X regulation.

Actions planned to reduce the number of poverty-level families Specifically, the City will continue to provide assistance to LMI residents through the following initiatives:  Provide non-profit organizations such as The Urban League with funding to assist City residents with housing and financial counseling and a youth STEM program.  Provide assistance to non-profit organizations such as NeighborWorks to provide affordable homeownership opportunities for LMI residents.  Continue to implement its Section 3 policy. Additionally, the City will encourage nonprofit organizations to expand housing development programs to incorporate job-training opportunities as part of their operations.

 Provide CDBG funding to ColumbusMakesIt! for the development of a business incubator. Furthermore, the City’s anti-poverty strategies are implemented through the following established goals of the Consolidated Plan: preserving and increasing quality, safe, affordable housing choices and reducing discriminatory barriers; providing suitable living environments through safer, more livable neighborhoods; and, expanding economic opportunities. The CDBG

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 47 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) and HOME program are the principle funding sources targeted at reducing the number of poverty-level families, but the ESG program, which is applied for and administered through the Continuum of Care (CoC), also seeks to stabilize families and individuals so they are able to return to self-sufficiency. Importantly, the resource management responsibilities of the CDBG and HOME programs provide staff of the Community Reinvestment Department an opportunity to facilitate coordination among a range of social and housing programs, operated by other City departments, governmental agencies and the nonprofit community, that together enhance the opportunities to reduce poverty for families.

CDBG program resources are targeted to meet the community development, infrastructure and economic opportunities needs in the community. The City will allocate CDBG funding for several economic development activities providing opportunities for both low and moderate income family members to receive living wage employment and low and moderate income business owners to improve and expand their businesses, increasing their profitability and income. Public services activities also include programs for stabilizing families, while the housing rehabilitation program reduces and stabilizes low and moderate income homeowner’s housing expenses. CDBG public services activities, such as the housing counseling and the job training programs, assist low and moderate income families on the edge of poverty to help them to economic security. HOME program resources are allocated to address the needs for safe, affordable housing. Program activities that are designed to reduce housing expenses and offer the opportunity to help move families out of poverty are tenant-based-rental assistance and the in- fill and multifamily housings development program, which maintains and expands affordable housing.

Actions planned to develop institutional structure The City’s Community Reinvestment Department plans to continue to strengthen its working relationships with social service agencies. Public and autonomous agencies that are critical to the institutional structure work cooperatively in executing required tasks. Agency staff have the ability and expertise to deliver services efficiently and effectively, and often have years of expertise in their respective fields. Additionally, nonprofit organizations work closely with the Community Reinvestment Department and often bring a significant amount of experience and expertise to the service delivery system. The City plans to improve coordination among its partner agencies to promote a broadly shared understanding of community needs, collaborative and complementary approaches to addressing needs, and responsiveness to changes in conditions.

The Columbus Consolidated Government continues to work closely with partner agencies and community stakeholders to develop social response programs based on community need. Examples include the Continuum of Care board and subcommittees, 211 response line through the United Way of the Chattahoochee Valley, the Columbus 2025 Initiative for Economic, Community and Workforce Development, and Neighborhood CDBG Programs. Each program provides a response by the City to respond to the institutional needs of community partners and

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 48 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) the individuals they serve. Actions planned to enhance coordination between public and private housing and social service agencies Regular evaluations of the current system will highlight areas where improvements are necessary. Greater technical assistance will be provided to social service and housing providers to assist them in attaining their goals, particularly when they overlap with those of the City. The City has established a number of cooperative partnerships and collaborations with public and supportive housing providers, local government, and mental health and social service agencies to address its priority needs and will continue to do so. Examples include:  Single- and Multi-family Housing: the City partners with NeighborWorks Columbus, Inc. and the Housing Authority of Columbus to coordinate the funding, development and monitoring of single- and multi-family housing units funded through the HOME and CDBG programs.  Tenant-Based Rental Assistance: the City partners with a local non-profit, Open Door Community House, to manage the HOME tenant-based rental assistance program. The TBRA program has been prioritized for homeless individuals and households. Support Services are offered to all TBRA households through CoC Programs.  Fair Housing: the City partners with a local non-profit, Access 2 Independence, to fund, plan and host Fair Housing activities throughout the year.

 The City provides CDBG funding annually and partners with Home for Good (a local non- profit homeless provider) who serves as the Collaborative Applicant for the Muscogee/Russell County Continuum of Care (CoC). Home for Good coordinates a number of homelessness reduction system-wide strategies involving both public and private agencies such as Coordinated Assessment, Housing First and Rapid Rehousing through the Continuum of Care.  For health services the City will provide funding to Mercy Medical in which they will provide affordable, quality healthcare for low- and moderate-income individuals, many of whom have no insurance or is underinsured with Medicaid or Medicare.

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Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 49 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) Program Specific Requirements AP-90 Program Specific Requirements – 91.220(l)(1,2,4) Introduction This section describes program specific requirements for CDBG and HOME funds. Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) Reference 24 CFR 91.220(l)(1) Projects planned with all CDBG funds expected to be available during the year are identified in the Projects Table. The following identifies program income that is available for use that is included in projects to be carried out.

1. The total amount of program income that will have been received before the start of the next program year and that has not yet been reprogrammed $238,822 2. The amount of proceeds from section 108 loan guarantees that will be used during the year to address the priority needs and specific objectives identified in the grantee's strategic plan. 0 3. The amount of surplus funds from urban renewal settlements 0 4. The amount of any grant funds returned to the line of credit for which the planned use has not been included in a prior statement or plan 0 5. The amount of income from float-funded activities 0 Total Program Income: $238,822 Other CDBG Requirements 1. The amount of urgent need activities 0 2. The estimated percentage of CDBG funds that will be used for activities that benefit persons of low and moderate income.

(Overall Benefit - A consecutive period of one, two or three years may be used to determine that a minimum overall benefit of 70% of CDBG funds is used to benefit persons of low and moderate income. The years used to measure the overall benefit were: 2015, 2016, and 2017) 83.63% HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) Reference 24 CFR 91.220(l)(2) 1. A description of other forms of investment being used beyond those identified in Section 92.205 is as follows: No other forms of investment are contemplated for the use of the HOME funds except as

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 50 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) identified in 92.205. 2. A description of the guidelines that will be used for resale or recapture of HOME funds when used for homebuyer activities as required in 92.254, is as follows: The HOME recapture provisions are established at §92.254(a)(5)(ii), and permit the original homebuyer to sell the property to any willing buyer during the period of affordability while the City is able to recapture a portion of the HOME-assistance provided to the original homebuyer. The City will only recapture direct HOME Subsidy from the original buyer. Direct HOME subsidy is defined as the amount of HOME assistance, including any program income, which enabled the homebuyer to purchase the unit. The direct subsidy includes down payment, closing costs, interest subsidies, or other HOME assistance provided directly to the homebuyer.

In addition, direct subsidy includes any assistance that reduced the purchase price from fair market value to an affordable price. If HOME funds are used for the cost of developing a property and the unit is sold below fair market value, then the difference between the fair market value and the purchase price is considered to be directly attributable to the HOME subsidy. The City has chosen to recapture a portion of the net proceeds should the property sell during the period of affordability. Net proceeds are defined as the sales price minus the superior loan repayment (other than HOME funds) and any closing costs. Under no circumstances will the City recapture more than is available from the net proceeds of the sale. The City will not utilize recapture provisions when a project receives only a development subsidy and is sold at fair market value because there is no direct HOME subsidy to recapture from the homebuyer.

The form of recapture to be used by the City shall be “a sharing of net proceeds”. Sharing of net proceeds is defined as the sales price of the property LESS the outstanding mortgage debt owed to the primary lender LESS the homeowner’s contribution of the initial down payment and closing costs. Net proceeds will be shared between the City and the homeowner based on an annual pro-rata share during the term of affordability if the title of the property is changed before the period of affordability.

For example, if the property were to sell in Year 1 of the affordability period, and the affordability period was 5 years, then the City would receive 100% of the net proceeds and the homeowner would receive none of the net proceeds. If the property were sold in Year 2, then the City would receive 80% and the homeowner would receive 20%. If the property were sold in Year 3, the City would receive 60% and homeowner would receive 40% of the proceeds. If the property were sold in Year 4, then the City would receive 40% and homeowner would receive 60% of the proceeds. If the property were sold in Year 5, then the City would receive 20% and homeowner would receive 80% of the proceeds. After Year 5,

Annual Action Plan HUD Program Year 2017/City’s FY 2018 51 OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015) there would be no sharing of net proceeds; the homeowner would keep 100% of the sale proceeds. In the event of the property changing title due to foreclosure, the City will retain any remaining net proceeds following payment of the first mortgage. The City shall have the right of first refusal to buy out the first mortgage from the primary lender in the event of foreclosure. Enforcement mechanisms to be used to impose the City’s recapture provisions is a recorded mortgage and note that incorporates the recapture provisions and details the period of affordability based on the amount of direct HOME funds invested in the project. 3. A description of the guidelines for resale or recapture that ensures the affordability of units acquired with HOME funds? See 24 CFR 92.254(a)(4) are as follows: See above answer.

4. Plans for using HOME funds to refinance existing debt secured by multifamily housing that is rehabilitated with HOME funds along with a description of the refinancing guidelines required that will be used under 24 CFR 92.206(b), are as follows: The City does not have any plans to refinance existing debt secured by multifamily housing as described in the question, and therefore does not have any refinancing guidelines for that activity Discussion (This part is optional and intentionally left blank)

COLUMBUS, GA CP | UNIQUE APPENDICES

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