Annual Report - For the year ended 30 June 2012

Annual Report - For the year ended 30 June 2012

Annual Report - For the year ended 30 June 2012

For the year ended 30 June 2012 Annual Report NZ Lottery Grants Board Te Puna Tahua

Annual Report - For the year ended 30 June 2012

G.7B Presented to the House of Representatives pursuant to section 295 of the Gambling Act 2003 For the year ended 30 June 2012 Annual Report NZ Lottery Grants Board Te Puna Tahua

Minister of Internal Affairs Wellington In accordance with section 295 of the Gambling Act 2003, I present the report of the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board and of each distribution committee for the 12 months ended 30 June 2012, together with a copy of the accounts of the New Zealand Lotteries Commission (NZ Lotteries) for the same period, certified by the Auditor-General.

Annual Accounts The New Zealand Lottery Grants Board is required to produce an annual report under section 295 of the Gambling Act 2003, and is a Crown entity for the purposes of sections 150(3), 154-156 and 158 of the Crown Entities Act 2004. As such, it is required to prepare its financial statements and an audit report in accordance with those provisions. The annual report must be tabled in the House of Representatives. The role of the Board is to determine the proportions in which the profits of New Zealand Lotteries are allocated for distribution. NZ Lotteries conducted lotteries throughout this financial year under section 238 of the Gambling Act 2003.

The profits of New Zealand Lotteries are paid by NZ Lotteries into a bank account established and operated under section 286 of the Gambling Act 2003. Grants and miscellaneous expenditure are paid out of this account. The Board has prepared its financial statements in accordance with section 154 of the Crown Entities Act 2004. The audit report for the year ended 30 June 2012 provided under section 156 of the Crown Entities Act 2004 is included along with the financial statements in this report.

Colin MacDonald Secretary Department of Internal Affairs New Zealand Lottery Grants Board c/o Department of Internal Affairs 46 Waring Taylor Street P O Box 805 WELLINGTON 6140 0800 824 824 www.communitymatters.govt.nz

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 1 Contents New Zealand Lottery Grants Board 2 Presiding Member’s Report 3 Secretary’s Report 4 Governance and Accountability Statement 6 New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Distribution of Funds 2011/12 8 Lottery Specialist Committees 9 Community Facilities 10 Community Sector Research 11 Environment and Heritage 12 Health Research 13 Individuals with Disabilities 14 Marae Heritage and Facilities 15 Outdoor Safety 16 Minister’s Discretionary Fund 17 Lottery Community Committees 18 National Community Committee 19 Regional Community Committees 21 Auckland 23 Bay of Plenty/Gisborne 24 Canterbury/Kaikoura 25 Hawke’s Bay 26 Manawatu/Whanganui 27 Northland 28 Otago/Southland 29 Taranaki 30 Waikato 31 Wellington/Wairarapa 32 West Coast/Nelson-Marlborough 33 Statutory Bodies 34 Financial Statements 36 New Zealand Lottery Grants Board 36 Independent Auditor’s Report 37 Profits of New Zealand Lotteries 43 Independent Auditor’s Report 44

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Annual Report 2012 2 Vision New Zealanders building strong, sustainable communities together. Ko te hunga no - Aotearoa e waihanga tahi ana i nga - hapori pakari ukauka. Mission/Te Whakatakanga Contribute funding to support the vision in a considered, responsive and timely way. Ko te tuku pu -tea hei tautoko i te kaupapa ma - te ara taute, ma -horahora, arotau hoki. Kaupapa The Lottery Grants Board recognises the aspirations and needs of Ma -ori and their protocols. E whakatau ana Te Puna Tahua i nga - wawata me nga - hiahia o te iwi Ma -ori, me o - ra -tou tikanga.

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Te Puna Tahua Board Members Photo: from left Maggie Burrill (Appointed by the Governor-General) Hon Ruth Dyson (Leader of the Opposition’s Representative) Hon Chris Tremain, Minister of Internal Affairs (Presiding Member) Ailsa Smaill (Appointed by the Governor-General) Tina Wehipeihana-Wilson (Appointed by the Governor-General) Nicky Wagner MP (Prime Minister’s Representative) This included funding for: Regional Community Committees $26,020,997 National Community Committee $13,483,346 Other committees that received allocations in 2011/12 included: Lottery Specialist Committees: Community Facilities $12,570,647 Community Sector Research $1,692,203 Environment and Heritage $8,845,925 Health Research $3,081,449 Individuals with Disabilities $4,269,492 Marae Heritage and Facilities $6,657,615 Minister’s Discretionary Fund $304,596 Outdoor Safety $8,004,544 Statutory Bodies: Creative New Zealand $29,584,104 New Zealand Film Commission (including the NZ Film Archive) $13,805,915 Sport New Zealand $39,445,472 Outputs In 2011/12, the Lottery Grants Board allocated:1 $39,504,343 to the Lottery community committees.2 1 For more detail on the allocation and purpose of each committee, see the committee reports that follow in this document.

2 For more detail on individual regional community committee allocations, see pages 21-33.

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 3 2011/12 has been another fantastic year for the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board (Board). With the help of Lottery funding, community events and exhibitions were held throughout New Zealand to celebrate the Rugby World Cup 2011. These showcased our arts, culture, heritage and national identity, and brought communities together. The year ended positively with a substantial increase in Lottery profits and the Board decision to allocate $17 million to commemorate the anniversary of World War One.

Strategic Direction A key focus for the Board this year was a review of the structure of the distribution committees to: • ensure available funding is used efficiently; • enable the existing purposes of distribution committees to be expanded, consolidated or realigned where required; and • reduce costs associated with distribution committees. The Board agreed with the results of this review that, while there is no need for any major changes to the existing committee structure, operational improvements will be implemented over the next financial year. The Board’s decision to make multi-year grants available through regional community committees was implemented in June 2012.

Multi-year funding gives more certainty to community groups, allowing them to engage in longer-term initiatives.

The Board wishes to see greater publicity and awareness-raising from community groups, as well as Creative New Zealand, NZ Film Commission and Sport New Zealand, regarding the benefits of Lottery funding. Work will continue in this area over the next 12 months. Presiding Member’s Report Allocations The Lotteries Commission forecast a profit for 2011/12 of $163.4 million. The Board decided to allocate only the forecast amount as a move towards a positive cash flow approach. As a result, all national committees received a small reduction in their allocations. However, the end of year saw a much higher profit than forecast of $26.603 million, and so allocations for 2012/13 were increased.

The regional committee allocation formula was updated using census data. Where population had declined (Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay, and West Coast/Nelson-Marlborough), the 10 to 20 per cent reduction in some allocations was supplemented, in part, with the unspent amounts carried forward from 2010/11. The carry forward was available to assist with the implementation of the multi-year funding. Support for Canterbury In July 2011, a grant of $6.044 million was made by the Minister’s Discretionary Fund to the Christchurch Earthquake Appeal Trust. This grant was possible as the actual profits for 2010/11 were higher than forecast, and therefore available for allocation in 2011/12.

The Board also made additional allocations to the Lottery Outdoor Safety Committee ($750,000) and Canterbury/Kaikoura Regional Committee ($250,000). Board and Committee Changes This year there has been a considerable change to the membership of the Board. In April I took up the role of Presiding Member and joined two experienced community Board members - Tina Wehipeihana-Wilson and Maggie Burrill. Other new members included Nicky Wagner MP (representative for the Prime Minister), and Hon Ruth Dyson (representative for the Leader of the Opposition). Ailsa Smaill, a former Presiding Member of the Lottery Welfare Dunedin Regional Committee, is the new community representative appointed by the Governor-General.

I look forward to working with my Board colleagues to ensure the profits of the Lotteries Commission are distributed for maximum benefit to communities. The terms for the members of the NZ2011 Festival Lottery Community Distribution Committee expired in February 2012. On behalf of the Board, I would like to express my appreciation to the members for their work in distributing $9.8 million to community organisations. On behalf of the Board, I extend my sincere appreciation to the outgoing members of all distribution committees for their valuable service to the community. I also welcome the newly appointed committee members who bring with them a range of skills and specialist knowledge.

The Year Ahead Looking ahead to 2012/13, the Board is focusing on a positive cash flow approach and will no longer carry reserves. For the coming year, all distribution committees have received increased allocations resulting from significantly higher than expected profits from the Lotteries Commission in 2011/12 and significantly higher forecasts for 2012/13. The Board will assist with the commemoration of the centenary of World War One through funding a diverse range of community events, activities and capital projects. Priority will be given to: • preserving aspects of New Zealand’s cultural heritage associated with World War One; • enabling New Zealanders to gain a better understanding of the impact of World War One on society; and • showing how wartime history and/or New Zealand’s contribution to global peace and security has shaped New Zealand’s identity.

The Board is also involved in celebrations relating to 25 years of Lotto, and developing further publicity regarding the benefits that Lottery grants bring to all sectors of New Zealand.

Through the provision of Lottery grant funding, the Board will continue to support the valuable work of community groups. Lotteries funding plays an important part in addressing local issues and improving services, and is in a strong position for the year ahead. Hon Chris Tremain Minister of Internal Affairs

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Annual Report 2012 4 The 2011/12 year has been a busy time for the Secretariat of the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board (Board), overseeing the introduction of multi- year funding, introducing changes to the information and accountability requirements for high value grants, assisting the Lottery Grants Commission in sourcing material for their 25 year celebration of Lotteries in August 2012 and reviewing the committee structure.

Funding from the NZ 2011 Festival Lottery Fund enabled a wide range of community events to take place across New Zealand during the Rugby World Cup 2011. Events were held in many different communities, from the rurally isolated through to large metropolitan venues, enhancing the enjoyment of the Rugby World Cup 2011 for both residents and visitors to New Zealand. Grants Administration The Secretariat received 5315 applications in 2011/12 of which 3119 were approved. This translates to $28 million in grants being sought against the $105 million available. A total of $96 million was administered by the Secretariat and granted by committees.

In 2011/12, $82.8 million was allocated to Creative New Zealand, the New Zealand Film Commission (including the New Zealand Film Archive), and Sport New Zealand.

Changes in Practice In 2011/12, the Secretariat implemented a number of Board policies including multi-year grants which will enable grants for one to three years to be made by Lottery National and Regional Community Committees. Training and support was provided to committee members and staff prior to the regional committees considering the first applications for multi-year funding in June 2012. Secretary’s Report Sixty-one applications for multi-year funding were considered in June and grants were approved for 33 organisations with a proven record of delivering a strong community benefit.

A grant may be approved for either ongoing operational costs or one-off project costs, for up to three years, providing an assurance of funding for that period. Security of funding enables organisations to engage in more long-term planning, concentrate on delivering the programme and fulfilling the identified community need, while reducing grant administration for both the organisation and the Secretariat. The Secretariat has also improved the information applicants receive on the reason an application has been approved or declined. This work addresses one of the recommendations from the Office of the Auditor-General’s Performance Audit.3 Many committees have now moved from three to two meetings per year, and have changed the timing of their meetings to align them with the availability of funding from the Lotteries Commission.

This reduction in the number of meetings has also achieved some small savings in administration costs for committees, enabling more grant money to be available to the community. Grant Monitoring The NZ 2011 Festival Lottery Fund Committee approved 165 applications and $9.8 million to fund a range of community events throughout New Zealand. Accountability reports have been received from 92 per cent of grant recipients with most of the remaining organisations waiting for annual accounts to be completed before submitting their reports. The reports provided interesting comment on the success of the events and the community’s appreciation for the funding received.

This one-off fund was formally disestablished on 5 April 2012. In 2011/12, audits of 38 grants were completed. The findings showed that 18 grants were fully compliant with all grant terms and conditions. A further 20 had minor issues of non-compliance relating to either spending or grant conditions which have been addressed by the Secretariat. An audit of high value grants has resulted in improved requirements for large grants, and the introduction of grant agreements to provide assurance of appropriate spending of the grant. This addresses a further recommendation from the Office of the Auditor-General’s Performance Audit.

3 Department of Internal Affairs: Administration of two grant schemes, November 2010, http://www.oag.govt.nz/2010/dia-grants/index.htm Grant Applications and Approvals 7000 350.0 6000 300.0 5000 250.0 4000 200.0 3000 150.0 2000 Number $ millions 100.0 1000 2006-07 2011-12 50.0 0 0.0 Grants approved Amount approved Amount requested Applications received 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 5 The Grants Audit and Review team continues to work with the Secretariat and assists with proactive advice and education for staff. New Grants and Client Management System During 2011/12, work to replace Grants Online was incorporated into a project developing an all-of-government grants management system. Following a period of investigation, an all-of-government solution was not found and so in April 2012, the Department’s Executive Leadership Team gave the Secretariat approval to undertake a new procurement process to seek an appropriate vendor and solution.

By June 2012, the request for information from the market had been completed. The Request for Proposal will be released later in 2012. The technical requirements for the new grants and client management system will incorporate elements which will assist with the implementation of the Board’s Outcomes Framework and will improve the efficiency of granting processes.

Committees There have been a number of changes in the membership of the distribution committees, mostly due to appointment terms expiring. I thank members for their time, guidance and the valuable contribution in supporting New Zealand communities. New members have been appointed to various committees during the year and staff have been busy providing inductions and support for members in their new roles. A review of the committee structure was undertaken during 2011/12 to determine if changes were required or if some committees, which had not been allocated funding, would be disestablished.

The Board decided to retain the existing structure at present and make some operational changes to improve administration. Increasing Awareness of Lottery Grants The Secretariat has continued to work closely with the Lotteries Commission to increase public awareness of the community benefits arising from the support of Lottery grants. New stories are published regularly by the Secretariat on www.communitymatters.govt.nz as well as through our printed Community Matters magazine and circulation of material to the media.

With the 25th year celebration of Lotto occurring in late 2012, the Secretariat has supported the development of publicity material for the Lotteries Commission by researching historical information about grants awarded to groups, and the resulting benefits to the wider community. Looking Ahead Following on from the 2012/13 Board funding allocation announcements, interest in funding for World War One Commemoration events has been high. Applications received by 28 November 2012 will be considered in April 2013. In 2012/13 the Secretariat will oversee the full implementation of multi-year funding, review and redraft the Lottery Grants Board Statement of Intent 2013-2018 and develop a new induction programme for Committee members.

I would like to welcome new Committee members and look forward to working with the new Board. A number of Board and Committee members will be attending the Philanthropy NZ conference in April 2013 which will provide a broader awareness of supporting community development through effective funding of their initiatives. An Appreciation The restructuring of Community Operations management during the past year has been a challenging time for my staff. I would like to thank them for their commitment to carrying out the Secretariat function efficiently and for fully supporting Committees while in the midst of major change.

My sincere thanks go to the many Departmental staff who support Community Operations in providing secretariat services and to the Committee members who give generously of their time, knowledge and expertise. Their commitment to the grants allocation process enables numerous community groups to continue their work of growing, strengthening and supporting their local communities.

Robyn Nicholas Secretary New Zealand Lottery Grants Board

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Annual Report 2012 6 Governance and Accountability Statement The New Zealand Lottery Grants Board (Board) is governed by the Gambling Act 2003 to distribute the profits of New Zealand state lotteries, such as Lotto and Instant Kiwi, for community purposes4 and for specified statutory purposes. The Board is made up of six members. The Minister responsible for the Lottery Grants Board as Presiding Member, a representative of the Prime Minister and a representative of the Leader of the Opposition are ex-officio members.

Three members are appointed by the Governor-General.

The Board is empowered by the Gambling Act 2003 to make allocations to: • distribution committees established by the Minister responsible for the Board to distribute Lottery profits for community purposes • the Minister responsible for the Board for distribution for community purposes • three specified statutory bodies – Creative New Zealand, New Zealand Film Commission, including the New Zealand Film Archive, and Sport New Zealand – for expenditure in accordance with their own Acts. The Board has governance protocols that express its expectations of members. The Board monitors the operations of its distribution committees and the provision of administration services, including the investment of undistributed Lottery profits by the Secretary for Internal Affairs.

The Board and the distribution committees are not part of the Crown and are not subject to direction by Government. Although the Board and the committees are not bound by Government policy, it is taken into account where the Board or a committee considers it to be relevant and appropriate.

The Board determines general policies and issues general directions with which the distribution committees must comply when distributing grants. A policy advisory group comprising the Presiding Members of distribution committees provides advice to the Board on strategic and policy issues, and promotes consistent Lottery grant policy development. The Board liaison members also attend these meetings. Distribution Channels In addition to the Minister’s Discretionary Fund, there are 19 Lottery distribution committees. The statutory bodies and committees funded by the Lottery Grants Board are shown on page 8.

Each distribution committee distributes grants for a specified range of community purposes. Committees determine their own priorities for funding, while complying with general Board policies and directions. Committees determine the frequency of their distribution meetings. Most committees now schedule two distribution meetings each year, but some have one funding round, or consider applications as they are received. Distribution committees may comprise three to five members, appointed by the Minister responsible for the Board for terms of up to three years. The three Board members appointed by the Governor-General are responsible for liaising with specific distribution committees.

Each attends committee meetings as an observer. The Gambling Act 2003 authorises distribution committees to delegate decision-making powers to subcommittees.

Applications that are for a community purpose described by the Gambling Act 2003, but not within the scope of a distribution committee, are referred to the Minister for decision. The Minister’s Discretionary Fund was set up to receive an allocation from the Board for distribution by ministerial decision. Distribution of Lottery Funding Distribution committees endeavour to ensure Lottery grants are equitably distributed to demographic and geographic communities throughout the country. Decisions are guided by the principles of lawfulness, accountability, openness, integrity, fairness, and value for money.

Lottery grants are used exclusively for community purposes as defined in section 277 of the Gambling Act 2003, and preferably fund initiatives that address community needs identified by communities themselves. These initiatives include many developmental activities and services that neither government nor the private sector will provide, but which are sufficiently valued by communities for members to be prepared to contribute labour, money or materials voluntarily. The committees recognise that participation in community initiatives builds a sense of belonging and upskills individuals while providing services and activities tailored to the needs of particular communities.

When assessing an application, Lottery distribution committees consider: • the community need for the activity or service • community benefit assessment and support for the activity • the fit with Board and committee policy • the feasibility of the planned activity • the ongoing capability of the applicant to deliver the community benefits that will address a community need. Care is taken to ensure that Lottery funding supports sustainable activity that addresses community needs and that unrealistic expectations of future funding are not raised.

4 The Gambling Act 2003 came into effect on 1 July 2004. This Act allows Lottery profits to be distributed for community purposes – to contribute to the building of strong, sustainable communities. The needs of Ma -ori, Pacific and other ethnic communities, women, older people, youth and people with disabilities are also considered.

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 7 Statutory Bodies In accordance with Board policy, the Board allocates a guaranteed minimum percentage of 42 per cent of its annual income from the Lotteries Commission to the statutory bodies listed in section 279 of the Gambling Act 2003.

The percentages received by each are at least: Accountability The Board does not hold bank accounts. Instead, the Department of Internal Affairs operates the bank account into which all Lottery profits are paid and is responsible for the investment of undistributed Lottery profits. All allocations, grants, administration costs and other miscellaneous expenditure specified in the Gambling Act 2003 are paid for from this account. The Board accounts for its funds in its annual report, which is tabled in the House of Representatives. Creative New Zealand 15% New Zealand Film Commission (of which 0.5% is allocated to the New Zealand Film Archive) 7% Sport New Zealand 20% Creative New Zealand and the New Zealand Film Commission are accountable to the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage for the administration, distribution and expenditure of their Lottery allocations.

The New Zealand Film Archive is a charitable trust, and has a Memorandum of Understanding with the New Zealand Film Commission.

Sport New Zealand is accountable to the Minister for Sport and Recreation for the administration, distribution and expenditure of its Lottery funding. Administration of Lottery Grants The Board, Lottery distribution committees and the Minister’s Discretionary Fund are serviced by the Department of Internal Affairs. The Board is consulted on the annual administration budget before this is approved by the Minister of Internal Affairs. The Board is also consulted on the range of services purchased from the Department. These services are specified in an annual Memorandum of Understanding between the Minister of Internal Affairs and the Secretary for Internal Affairs.

Secretariat and advisory staff are bound by normal Public Service codes of conduct, integrity and accountability.

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Annual Report 2012 8 Allocates Funds Provides Profits Specialist Committees Community Facilities Community Sector Research Environment and Heritage Health Research Individuals with Disabilities Marae Heritage and Facilities Outdoor Safety Minister’s Discretionary Fund Regional Auckland Bay of Plenty/Gisborne Canterbury/Kaikoura Hawke’s Bay Manawatu/Whanganui Northland Otago/Southland Taranaki Waikato Wellington/Wairarapa West Coast / Nelson-Marlborough Statutory Bodies Creative New Zealand New Zealand Film Commission Sport New Zealand Community Committees New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Distribution of Funds 2011/12 National National Community Committee

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 9 Lottery Specialist Committees Lottery specialist committees consider applications for funds to assist with community facilities, projects with environmental or heritage benefits, health research, community sector research, marae heritage and facilities, and outdoor safety. A Minister’s Discretionary Fund considers projects that fall outside the responsibility of other distribution committees and have demonstrable community benefit. • Community Facilities • Community Sector Research • Environment and Heritage • Health Research • Individuals with Disabilities • Marae Heritage and Facilities • Outdoor Safety • Minister’s Discretionary Fund

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Annual Report 2012 10 Community Facilities Committee Te Tahua Hapori Nga - Whakaurunga Committee Members Mary Bourke (Presiding Member) George Sue Janie Annear William Plunket Andrew von Dadelszen (from August 2011) Mission To provide opportunities for the development of and access to community facilities that contribute to community cohesion. Kaupapa The Lottery Community Facilities Committee recognises the aspirations and needs of Ma -ori and their protocols. E whakatau ana te Tahua Hapori Nga - Whakaurunga i nga - hiahia me nga - tu -manako o te Ma -ori me o ra -tou kawa.

Outcome Statement Increased participation and social cohesion in the community through the development of community facilities.

Committee Priorities Priority is given to projects that: • meet clearly identified community need, provide opportunities for widespread and significant community interaction and cohesion, have wide community support or result from community initiative • provide facilities for •  rural and isolated communities •  disadvantaged groups •  those who do not have ready access to similar or suitable facilities •  locations of need • are multi-purpose or shared facilities accessible to other community groups, as well as the applicant • are an appropriate size for the community to develop, run and maintain the facility in the long term independent of further support from the LGB • provide for collaboration between community groups for social services programmes.

Meeting Community Needs During the year, the Committee was heavily oversubscribed with applications and, as a result, experienced significant pressure on its funds. The quality of applications from community groups was very strong and the amount requested from the Committee by applicants was very high.

Seismic strengthening of existing community facilities featured as an emerging theme of applications. This was a direct result of the recent Canterbury earthquakes and the introduction of new building codes or council regulations. These applications will continue to be considered on a case by case basis by the Committee. These types of applications placed further pressure on the available distribution budget. The current wider fundraising environment continues to be challenging for many community groups. Many potential applicants struggle to fundraise successfully for their capital projects.

This issue is particularly evident for rurally-based applicants, who do not have access to a wide variety of funding sources.

Projects that featured collaboration between community groups have continued to be a high priority for the Committee. A notable example was the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Hawke’s Bay which received a grant of $268,589 in November 2011. This project enabled a variety of child-centred services to operate in one building, increasing efficiencies and enhancing connectivity. Committee The Lottery Community Facilities Committee experienced a stable year in terms of membership with Andrew von Dadelszen being the sole new committee member to join during the term. The Committee is appreciative of the role it can play in the construction and upgrade of community facilities throughout New Zealand.

Mary Bourke Presiding Member Community Facilities Committee 2011/12 Allocation $12,570,647 Brought forward from 2010/11 $821,102 Grants written back during 2011/12 $24,973 Grants refunded during 2011/12 $20,000 Total amount available for distribution $13,436,722 Total amount requested $47,795,095 Total amount approved $13,411,290 Percentage of amount requested that was approved 28% Applications Number of applications received 188 Number of applications considered 126 Number of applications approved 69 Percentage of applications approved 55% Smallest approved grant $7,475 Average approved grant $19,436 Largest approved grant $750,000 Online applications Number of applications submitted online 164

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 11 Community Sector Research Committee Te Tahua Rangahau mo Nga - Hapori Committee Members From 25 August 2011: Conway Powell (Presiding Member) Carolyn Cordery Lorraine Campbell Graham Smellie Nan Wehipeihana To 24 August 2011: Allison Kirkman (Presiding Member) Terrence Loomis Ruth de Souza Peggy Fairbairn-Dunlop Donovan Ryan Mission The Committee’s mission is to provide funding for community organisations enabling them to: • undertake research for the communities they serve • grow and improve the community knowledge base • apply new knowledge to their operations • strengthen the practice of Ma -ori-centred and kaupapa Ma -ori research.

Outcome Statement Community-driven research and evaluation undertaken by and for community organisations is enhanced. Committee Priorities The Committee’s funding priorities for 2011/12 were applications that: • showed collaboration between community groups and their stakeholders • address the needs of hard to reach/ marginalised communities • support innovative processes/ideas. The Committee was also committed to prioritising applications that demonstrate kaupapa Ma -ori research methodology. Meeting Community Needs The Fund’s focus is on research that builds knowledge on which community sector programmes, services and project interventions will work best to meet the Lottery Grants Board overarching outcome of building strong, sustainable communities.

In assessing grant applications, key considerations for the Committee were that applications show a clear community need for the research or evaluation project and that participation in the project will enhance the applicant’s research and/or evaluation capabilities.

Grants made by the Committee in 2011/12 supported research into the needs of older people in a small urban/rural area, initiatives for youth transitioning from pre-teen to adolescence, and services to sexual assault survivors. A number of grants were made to evaluate services and programmes. The topics covered were family violence interventions, anger management programmes, restoration services to offenders on the verge of imprisonment, indigenous social services training, and community development initiatives. Grants were awarded to research proposals that showed good community engagement and community capacity development.

Successful applications showed a high level of applicant involvement in the research and/or evaluation process, and ownership of the use of the research findings. During 2011/12, the Committee returned $1 million of undistributed funds to the Lottery Grants Board. The undistributed funds balance had built up over the last three years due to a lack of grant applications that were well aligned with the Committee’s priorities. On average, approximately 30 per cent of Research Idea applicants are invited to submit a Full Research Proposal grant application. Of these, around 60 per cent receive a grant.

Committee The Committee has put in place a requirement that research reports are made available to the wider community through the Community Research Aotearoa website. It is anticipated that this will provide potential applicants with a better idea of what may be funded, and also avoid duplication of research. I would like to thank both the previous and current Committee members for their contribution over the last 12 months. Conway Powell Presiding Member Community Sector Research Committee 2011/12 Allocation $1,692,203 Brought forward from 2010/11 $1,366,425 Grants written back during 2011/12 $0 Grants refunded during 2011/12 $0 Total amount available for distribution $3,058,6285 Total amount requested $6,302,282 Total amount approved $1,010,261 Percentage of amount requested that was approved 16% Applications Number of applications received 84 Number of Research Idea applications 67 Number of Full Research Proposals considered 17 Number of applications approved 11 Percentage of applications approved 16% Smallest approved grant $21,370 Average approved grant $91,842 Largest approved grant $203,731 Online applications Number of applications submitted online 0 5 $1million refunded to the Board’s reserves during 2011/12.

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Annual Report 2012 12 Environment and Heritage Committee Te Tahua Taiao Nga - Taonga Tuku Iho Committee Members Sally Macauley (Presiding Member from August 2011) Bruce Hamilton John Nankervis Philippa Barriball (from August 2011) Te Taru White (from August 2011) Mission To foster the conservation, preservation and promotion of New Zealand’s natural, physical and cultural heritage. Kaupapa Lottery Environment and Heritage recognises the aspirations and needs of Ma -ori, and their protocols. E whakatau ana te Tahua Taiao Me Nga - Taonga Tuku Iho i nga - hiahia me nga - tu -manako o te Ma -ori me o ra -tou kawa.

Outcome Statement New Zealand’s natural, physical and cultural heritage is conserved, preserved and promoted.

Committee Priorities • Natural Heritage projects which conserve New Zealand’s native flora and fauna, conserve habitats and ecosystems, and improve education and awareness of issues affecting our native flora and fauna, including ecological restoration projects, and pest and predator management projects. • Physical Heritage projects for the restoration of places of proven historical significance, such as buildings, structures, archaeological sites, wa -hi tapu sites, pipe organs and locomotives. • Cultural Heritage projects which conserve and preserve New Zealand’s cultural heritage, such as capital works projects for museums, art galleries and archive institutions, conservation of movable cultural property, historical research and publication projects, and oral history projects.

Meeting Community Needs This Committee has awarded grants for a variety of projects nationwide within the three heritage project sectors it supports (natural, physical and cultural). The majority of grants made by this Committee continue to be towards cultural heritage projects (42 per cent) with the remainder being similar proportions for both natural and physical heritage applications. The Committee has not yet seen a significant number of applications from the Canterbury area for restoration of heritage buildings following the devastating earthquakes. One application from the area was, however, the recipient of the Committee’s largest single grant to date.

Taking into consideration the building’s heritage status and community value, Christchurch’s iconic Isaac Theatre Royal was awarded a grant of $1.9 million towards the restoration of its significant heritage features. Since the Canterbury earthquakes, groups now have a greater awareness of the need for heritage buildings to undertake seismic strengthening to future proof them. One challenging aspect resulting from the earthquakes is groups reporting difficulties in obtaining insurance for heritage buildings. The Canterbury earthquakes also led to a number of grants being written back during the year as some projects could, unfortunately, no longer be delivered.

Committee Three new members were appointed during the year, replacing those whose terms had expired. In the aftermath of several New Zealand disasters (the Canterbury earthquakes and Rena ship grounding and subsequent oil spill), the Committee was impressed by the galvanising of communities to respond and produce positive benefits. The Committee - with a breadth of knowledge and experience crossing natural environment, heritage, tikanga Ma -ori and community development - is grateful for the opportunity to also contribute towards the preservation of New Zealand’s fragile heritage. Sally Macauley Presiding Member Environment and Heritage Committee 2011/12 Allocation $8,845,925 Brought forward from 2010/11 $2,349,742 Grants written back during 2011/12 $1,167,251 Grants refunded during 2011/12 $554 Total amount available for distribution $12,363,472 Total amount requested $25,241,674 Total amount approved $9,531,121 Percentage of amount requested that was approved 38% Applications Number of applications received 185 Number of applications considered 132 Number of applications approved 95 Percentage of applications approved 72% Smallest approved grant $1,507 Average approved grant $100,327 Largest approved grant $1,908,266 Online applications Number of applications submitted online 126

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 13 Health Research Committee Te Tahua Rangahau Hauora Committee Members Andrew Connolly (Presiding Member) Bruce Scoggins Sarah Young Chris Cunningham Shelly Frost (until January 2012) Mission The health status of New Zealanders is improved through research. Kaupapa Lottery Health Research recognises the aspirations and needs of Ma -ori, and their protocols. E whakatau ana te Tahua Rangahau Hauora i nga - hiahia me nga - tu -manako o te Ma -ori, me o ra -tou kawa. Outcome Statement The health status of New Zealanders is improved through research.

Committee Priorities The Committee strategic funding priorities are: • support for emerging researchers • researchers who are productive in terms of publishing articles in both New Zealand and international journals • projects that demonstrate how the findings will be transferred into clinical practice and will contribute to knowledge on relevant health outcomes • projects that address a significant health issue • projects that demonstrate collaboration • projects that have received support from other funders • projects that support an area in which New Zealand has a world-leading reputation • projects addressing a unique gap.

Meeting Community Needs The overarching consideration when awarding grants was the size and nature of the population affected by the health issue a grant application sought to address, as well as the time period from research completion to delivering a tangible benefit. The potential benefit from the research funded this year is varied.

Some have the potential to develop an easy and immediately implementable change to current accepted practice. This could include palliative care protocols that provide better outcomes for patients, a pre-operation programme for weight loss surgery patients, or behaviours to minimise the incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Others offer a potential solution to a significant health problem. For example, a pharmacological therapy to treat drug dependency, advances in the effectiveness of the treatment of common diseases and ailments such as tuberculosis and diarrhoea, and new ways of treating cancer tumours.

Committee The process of assessing grant applications demands a considerable commitment from Committee members. In 2011/12, the varied availability of Committee members meant deliberations departed from usual practice. To manage the Committee’s workload, PhD Scholarship and Shared Research Equipment grant decisions were made in November 2011, and Research Project grant decisions were made in March 2012. Shelly Frost resigned from her role on the Committee in January 2012. During her term, Shelly contributed a valuable perspective to the Committee’s deliberations. I would also like to thank my colleagues on the Committee for their support and contribution to successfully managing the workload during the year.

Andrew Connolly Presiding Member Health Research Committee 2011/12 Allocation $3,081,449 Brought forward from 2010/11 $44,138 Grants written back during 2011/12 $13,221 Grants refunded during 2011/12 $63,264 Total amount available for distribution $3,202,073 Total amount requested $19,040,670 Total amount approved $3,119,366 Percentage of amount requested that was approved 16% Applications Number of applications received 205 Number of applications considered 201 Number of applications approved 54 Percentage of applications approved 27% Smallest approved grant $6,621 Average approved grant $59,988 Largest approved grant $150,000 Online applications Number of applications submitted online 0

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Annual Report 2012 14 Individuals with Disabilities Committee Te Komiti iti mo te Tangata Haua - Committee Members Beverley Grammer (Presiding Member from 10 August 2011) Jonathan Darby (from August 2011) Jim Webber (from August 2011) Tim Delaney (from August 2011) Catriona Williams (from August 2011) Mission The enhancement of quality of life for individuals with disabilities. Kaupapa Lottery Individuals with Disabilities Committee recognises the aspirations and needs of Ma -ori, and their protocols. E whakatau ana Te Komiti iti mo - te Tangata Haua - i nga - hiahia me nga - tu -manako o te Ma -ori, me o ra -tou kawa.

Outcome Statement Community participation by individuals with disabilities is maintained or increased. Committee Priorities Provision of: • mobility equipment to individuals with permanent and significant mobility- related disabilities • communication equipment to individuals with permanent and significant communication-related disabilities. Meeting Community Needs Many people with disabilities are unable to achieve modest activities essential for daily living because they are confined to their homes. This includes simple everyday tasks such as shopping, attending appointments, and numerous other social, cultural and local community and family activities related to schools, churches and clubs that others enjoy and take for granted.

The cost and lack of suitable public transport further disadvantages people with disabilities who need to travel either locally or outside of their own local communities given that many are on modest or low incomes.

Grants are approved for the purchase of mobility scooters, vehicles, vehicle modifications, and other mobility equipment that enables people with a disability to achieve independence in their lives and enjoy participating in everyday activities in their local communities. Grants are also approved for equipment to facilitate interactive communication both within and beyond the home for people with communication-related disabilities. The rising cost of vehicles, vehicle modifications and other mobility-related equipment and an ever-increasing ageing population continue to create additional pressure on available funds.

The Committee will continue to actively manage the applications so that as many people with disabilities as possible can attain self-sufficiency and participate in their communities.

Committee The Committee has come together well as a team, with four of the five committee members being new to the role. All members champion the vision of a fully-inclusive society that highly values the lives of all people in New Zealand and embraces the full participation of people with disabilities in that society. The Committee is strengthened by its members’ first-hand knowledge of disability and their ability to understand and apply that experience in their consideration of grant applications. Beverley Grammer Presiding Member Individuals with Disabilities Committee 2011/12 Allocation $4,269,492 Brought forward from 2010/2011 $36 Grants written back during 2011/2012 $724,890 Grants refunded during 2011/2012 $20,487 Total amount available for distribution $5,014,905 Total amount requested $12,290,100 Total amount approved $5,014,890 Percentage of amount requested that was approved 41% Applications Number of applications received 1139 Number of applications considered 1006 Number of applications approved 550 Percentage of applications approved 55% Smallest approved grant $480 Average approved grant $9,117 Largest approved grant $30,000 Online applications Number of applications submitted online 0

New Zealand Lottery Grants Board www.communitymatters.govt.nz 15 Marae Heritage and Facilities Committee Te Tahua Marae Tuku Iho Me Nga - Whakaurunga Committee Members Brian Joyce (Presiding Member) Paora Ammunson John Clarke Marina Sciascia Kevin Prime Mission/Te Whakatakanga Marae facilities are developed and conserved. Ka whanakehia, a - ka tiakina hoki nga - whakaurunga marae. Kaupapa The Lottery Marae Heritage and Facilities Committee will act as a responsible participant in the Treaty of Waitangi relationship with wha -nau, hapu -, iwi and Ma -ori. The Committee is committed to ensuring an equitable distribution of funds to wha -nau, hapu -, iwi and Ma -ori organisations for the development and conservation of marae facilities.

Ka tu - te Komiti Tahua Marae Tuku Iho Me Nga - Whakaurunga kaiwhakauru whaikawenga i roto i te whanaungatanga o te Tiriti o Waitangi i te taha o nga - wha -nau, hapu -, iwi me te iwi Ma -ori wha -nui hoki. Kua herea te Komiti Tahua Marae Tuku Iho Me Nga - Whakaurunga te tika o te tohatoha atu i te pu -tea ki nga - wha -nau, hapu -, iwi, me nga - ro -pu - Ma -ori hoki hei whanake, hei tiaki hoki i nga - whakaurunga marae. Outcome Statement Marae facilities are developed and conserved. Committee Priorities • Wharenui • Wharekai • Wharepaku The Committee prefers to fund staged applications where a marae facility is completed so that it can be used, before funding is sought for other parts of a marae development project.

Meeting Community Needs The Committee’s reduction to two meetings a year, from three, resulted in a rush of applications. The number of applications received increased by one-third in the 2011/12 year, and the number of applications that were funded remained at a similar level to the previous year. Many marae who put in their applications quickly were not able to provide the essential preparatory information, so could not be funded. The Committee is acutely aware that it needs to distribute its funds equitably across iwi throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. The largest grant distributed during this year was $550,000 to a South Island iwi, Te Runanga a Rangitane o Wairau Trust in Blenheim.

Rangitane o Wairau are well advanced in the construction of a completely new and extensive marae facility that will also serve as a cultural and community centre for Marlborough.

Papakai Marae, on the slopes of Tongariro, is a good example of the Committee’s preference for a staged approach to building projects, which means that marae can be completed and then have the use of one facility at a time. A significant Ngati Tuwharetoa marae, Papakai hosted its opening in June 2012. This marae received Lottery Marae Heritage and Facilities funding of $412,757 towards a new wharekai in August 2010, and $280,000 towards a new wharepaku in November 2011. Committee The membership of the Committee has not changed during this year. Committee members have tried to attend marae openings around the country so that they can see first-hand the benefits of Lottery Marae Heritage and Facilities funding.

The Committee has a commitment to engage ka -nohi ki te ka -nohi with different marae and iwi stakeholders around the country. In November 2011, the Committee held a hui in Gisborne, and were able to hear the issues for marae undertaking capital projects and engage with local funders and stakeholders.

Brian Joyce Presiding Member Marae Heritage and Facilities Committee 2011/12 Allocation $6,657,615 Brought forward from 2010/11 $5,984 Grants written back during 2011/12 $132,915 Grants refunded during 2011/12 $915 Total amount available for distribution $6,797,429 Total amount requested $18,436,327 Total amount approved $6,797,158 Percentage of amount requested that was approved 37% Applications Number of applications received 123 Number of applications considered 64 Number of applications approved 48 Percentage of applications approved 75% Smallest approved grant $3,500 Average approved grant $141,607 Largest approved grant $550,000 Online applications Number of applications submitted online 81