Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019
Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 2 1/28/19 12:55 PM

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

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Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

OFFICERS Robert F. Finke, Chair David Casper, Vice Chair and Chair, Finance & Investment, and Treasurer Jill M. Delaney, Vice Chair and Chair, Buildings, Gardens, and Visitor Experience Timothy A. Dugan, Vice Chair, Nominating & Governance Peter Ellis, Vice Chair, Government Relations John L. Howard, Vice Chair Thomas E. Lanctot, Vice Chair Catherine M. Waddell, Vice Chair, Science and Education Susan A.

Willetts, Vice Chair & Immediate Past Chair Nicole S. Williams, Vice Chair, Finance & Investment Jean M. Franczyk, President & CEO DIRECTORS Russell F. Bartmes Martha D. Boudos Jennifer Brown, ex officio Neville F. Bryan John H. Buehler Michael J. Busch Heidi B. Capozzi Robin Colburn James W. DeYoung Jean M. Franczyk, ex officio Dorothy H. Gardner Steven J. Gavin Arthur J. Gibson Nancy Gidwitz Christopher E. Girgenti Ellis M. Goodman John K. Greene Charles V. Greener Joseph P. Gromacki Gillian Growdon William J. Hagenah Jonathan S. Holloway Jane Irwin Gregory K. Jones Peter Keehn Angela Korompilas Nancy Kurz, ex officio M.

James Leider Benjamin F. Lenhardt, Jr. Anne Leventry Diane vS. Levy Laura M. Linger Anne Loucks Michael J. McMurray Christopher Merrill William E. Moeller Gregory Moerschel Lois L. Morrison Jane Park George A. Peinado Toni Preckwinkle, ex officio Bob Probst Arnold Randall, ex officio John C. Robak James Robinson Ryan S. Ruskin Darren Serrao Robert E. Shaw Tom Skilling Maria Smithburg Harrison I. Steans Pam F. Szokol Kim Vender Moffat, ex officio Andrew J. Warzecha Melvin F. Williams Jr. Michael R. Zimmerman LIFE DIRECTORS Marilynn B. Alsdorf J. Melfort Campbell Barbara Whitney Carr Gary P.

Coughlan Peter R. Crane Suzanne S. Dixon Thomas A. Donahoe Peter B. Foreman Ralph F. Fujimoto James J. Glasser Caryn L. Harris Pamela K. Hull Thomas B. Hunter III Posy L. Krehbiel Bill Kurtis Donna La Pietra Daniel I. H. Linzer Josephine P. Louis Mary L. McCormack Jeanine McNally William A. Osborn Homi B. Patel Susan L. Regenstein Anne O. Scott David Byron Smith Susan Stone Richard L. Thomas Howard J. Trienens Ernest P. Waud III Arthur M. Wood, Jr. We cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life. It is no wonder #plantsmakepeoplehappy is a very popular hashtag. Yes, they do. And, just as important, they also allow us to eat and breathe.

Whether at the main campus in Glencoe or at one of our ur- ban farms or research sites, our gardens resonate with people. We know that people want to spend time in gardens and green spaces, and that gardens are fundamentally important to our mental and physical well-being. In sharing those ideas, and all of our work, we aim to shape how people value, perceive, and care for the environment. This is a big, joyous responsibility, and it is the central idea that drives the Chicago Botanic Garden’s new five-year strategic plan. The plan will serve as our guide to decision-making as we move into the second half of our first century.

The Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe is the foundation from which everything builds. The completed plant production facilities, which include the newly named Robert F. Finke Greenhouses, are the heart of the Garden. They allow us to support our living collection, conduct research, preserve rare and endangered species, and maintain the high-quality hor- ticultural displays for which we are famous. This facility gives us the means to grow in stature and experience. In addition, the plan challenges us to change the perception of the Garden from a destina- tion to a generous idea that motivates people to get involved in preserving and protecting our planet.

When we have a model that works, we will invest in that program to magnify its impact. Take, for instance, Windy City Harvest. It began nearly 15 years ago as an idea to grow food locally and help build healthier communities. We now run 13 farms in cooperation with 80 community organizations, and produce more than 130,000 pounds of vegetables and fruits a year. We intend to leverage Windy City Harvest’s well-established partnerships to offer more services such as horticultural therapy to communities. In addition, we are sharing Windy City Harvest’s model and best practices with organizations around the country that see urban agriculture as a way to improve communities, and we are investigating ways to make Windy City Harvest a more integral part of our Glencoe campus.

“I’ve never been more excited about my neighborhood in my life.” That was the reaction from one of our Farm on Ogden neighbors. The Farm, a partnership between the Garden and Lawndale Christian Health Center, is located in North Lawndale, a Chicago commu- nity where 46 percent of residents live below the poverty line. Its farm stand, the commercial kitchen, aquaponics system, and purple-glowing LED lights signal to the community and beyond the power of plants and the ever-growing potential of the Chicago Botanic Garden. You help us do that. Thank you.

Jean M. Franczyk President and CEO Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 4 1/28/19 12:55 PM

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

3 chicagobotanic.org Spring at the Garden Features 6 Unearth Science festival 8 Spring Calendar 14 20 years of the Model Railroad 16 Investing in the Garden’s Future 18 Honoring Board Chair Bob Finke 20 Safeguarding the Tallgrass Prairie 25 Budburst Helps Students Grow 26 The Garlic Guy 28 The Fleeting Beauty of Spring Ephemerals 30 Finding Your Center Through Tai Chi 32 Across the Forest Preserves 34 Ask the Experts 36 Smart Gardener 38 Joseph Regenstein, Jr.

School of the Chicago Botanic Garden 79 Membership Resources Time for a class? Grow your own bouquet in a new class, Creating a High-Yield Cutting Garden. See page 45.

Do you miss campouts? Now there’s a camping night at the Garden just for adults. See page 63. Did you know? The official flower of Cook County is the coneflower. The Garden’s Jim Ault was an early leader in coneflower (Echinacea) breeding, and Richard Hawke has conducted extensive evaluations over the years on this important pollinator plant. See more about our plant breeding program in This Season in the Garden on page 80. THE ORCHID SHOW The luminous feel of an endless summer, with more than 10,000 orchids in bloom. Wouldnʼt you rather be In the Tropics? Get your tickets now.

Through March 24.

chicagobotanic.org/orchid Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 3 1/28/19 12:55 PM

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

Spring 2019 The Chicago Botanic Garden is one of the treasures of the Forest Preserves of Cook County. The Chicago Botanic Garden is smoke-free. Keep Growing is a registered trademark of the Chicago Botanic Garden and is a copyright of the Chicago Botanic Garden. No portion of this magazine can be used without written permission. Keep Growing (USPS 130) is published four times per year by the Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL 60022-1168. Volume 10, Issue 1, February 2019. Periodical Postage Paid at Glencoe, IL, and at an additional entry office in Pontiac, IL. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to Keep Growing, Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL 60022.

Keep Growing Director, Editorial and Content: Director, Design and Production: Senior Designer & Design Manager: Designers: Editors/Writers: Contributing Writers: Garden Photographer: Contributing Photographers: Linda Bergstrom Carol Abbate Wendy Griffiths Maria Ciaccio Erica Masini, Fran Sherman, and Renee Tawa Julianne Beck, Judith Hevrdejs-King, Nina Koziol, and Jeff Link Robin Carlson Donna Baiocchi, Ray McCollim, and Maria Rebelo Information Group Tours Lenhardt Library Membership/Donate Plant Information Service Private, Corporate Events Regenstein School Volunteer Services (847) 835-5440 (847) 835-6949 (847) 835-8201 (847) 835-8215 (847) 835-0972 (847) 835-8370 (847) 835-6801 (847) 835-8392 Call us: In Person Garden Website Garden Blog 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL chicagobotanic.org my.chicagobotanic.org Visit us: Join us: Membership Support us: Annual Fund chicagobotanic.org/member chicagobotanic.org/donate Since 1991 Follow us: Gail McGrath - Publisher & President Sheldon Levin - Publisher & Director of Finance A.J.

Levin - Director of Operations Tahira Merchant - Graphic Design Joy Morawez, Josie Negron - Accounting Willie Smith Sprv., Earl Love, Wilfredo Silva - Operations Account Managers Rand Brichta, Arnie Hoffman Southeast, Michael Hedge (847) 770-4643 Southwest, Betsy Gugick & Associates (972) 387-1347 Midwest, David L. Strouse, Ltd. (847) 835-5197 East Coast, Manzo Media Group (610) 527-7047 Steve Dunn - Web & Internet Development 3453 Commercial Avenue, Northbrook, IL 60062 | performancemedia.us Performance Media & Gail McGrath & Associates, Inc. is a Woman Owned Business. This magazine is viewable on your mobile device.

For advertising information call (847) 770-4620. To see our Terms and Conditions relating to advertising orders, visit our website at performancemedia.us. All contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reproduced in any manner without written permission. © 2019 O N T H E C O V E R Poppies fill the English Oak Meadow in one of the Garden’s most popular spring displays.

I N S I D E C O V E R S P R E A D Crabapples in bloom signal spring. eNewsletter Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 4 1/28/19 3:18 PM

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019
Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

6 chicagobotanic.org Are you an explorer? The Unearth Science festival lets you experience science in ways you never would have imagined. April 13 & 14 Unearth Science festival Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 6 1/28/19 12:55 PM

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

chicagobotanic.org 7 When: Saturday & Sunday, April 13 & 14, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Regenstein Center. Free, regular parking fees apply.

New! Science After Hours: Friday, April 12, 6 to 9 p.m.; Regenstein Center. Member tickets: $8 in advance, nonmem- bers: $11 in advance ($2 more on day-of). Science workshops: Saturday & Sunday, April 13 & 14, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; in the Plant Science Lab. Member tickets: $8, nonmem- bers: $10; preregistration is required. Tom Skilling: Talk with the WGN-TV meteorologist and Chicago Horticultural Society Board member, Saturday, April 13, 1:30 p.m.; Alsdorf Auditorium. Night Sky Viewing with the Adler Planetarium: Saturday, April 13, 7:30 to 9 p.m.; Esplanade.

Documentary screening: The Guardians, featuring monarch migration, Sunday, April 14, 2 p.m.; Alsdorf Auditorium. chicagobotanic.org/sciencefestival Lounge on larger-than-life pollen grains. Create an artistic native bee- house using twigs and natural materi- als. Dissect flowers to see how they re- ally work. All weekend long, there are free, hands- on activities for young scientists (and scientists of all ages) in Nichols Hall around these four themes: pollinators, flowers, fruits, and seeds. You can also sign up for more in-depth workshops with Garden scientists, horticulturists, and staff (fee required).

New this year, the Unearth Science fes- tival includes two exciting evening events: On Friday, April 12, Science After Hours gives adults their own time to experience all the festival activities, with themed drinks and food available for purchase. On Saturday evening, April 13, all are welcome to see the moon and evening sky at a Night Sky Viewing with the Adler Planetarium (weather permitting). See what happens when a science fair comes to life. Unearth Science festival Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 7 1/28/19 12:56 PM

Chicago Botanic Garden Spring 2019

Interested in finding even more programs and activities at the Chicago Botanic Garden? Go to chicagobotanic.org/calendar for a day-by-day listing.

Please check our website and social media for any updates or changes to events. Hours Open daily, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. through June 2. Dining The Garden View Café is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily; from April 1 to June 2, open until 5 p.m. Shopping The Garden Shop is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily; from April 1 to June 2, open until 5 p.m.; on Thursdays during the Orchid Show, open until 8 p.m.

Reference The Plant Information Service is open from noon to 2 p.m. Wednesday through Friday (closed holidays). Beginning April 1, it is open from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Send your plant questions to plantinfo@chicagobotanic. org or call (847) 835-0972. The Lenhardt Library is open from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday (closed holidays). Send your reference questions to library@chicagobotanic.org. Tram Tours Begin Monday, April 22 Learn about the history and science of the Garden on a 2.3-mile Grand Tram Tour, or enjoy an intimate .8-mile Bright Encounters tour, which features the main island’s seasonally chang- ing colors and landscape.

Optional stops allow passengers to explore the 27 distinct gardens and four natural areas on their own. Garden Plus members ride free on Wednesdays. Fees apply. Supported in part by the John J. Louis, Jr. Bright Encounters Fund Calendar chicagobotanic.org/calendar In the Tropics: The Orchid Show 8 chicagobotanic.org The Orchid Show Spring 2019 February 9 through March 24 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

(Closes at 3 p.m. on March 20) This year’s Orchid Show brings to mind rejuvenating tropical islands, beaches, and rainforests. Picture more than 10,000 orchids in bloom, paired with sweeps of bromeliads and other tropical plants— lush, vibrant, intoxicating. The tropics are closer than you think. Fee applies. Generously supported by American Airlines Saturdays & Sundays, February 9 – March 24 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Orchids After Hours 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays; tropical bites and tiki drinks for sale.

Special photographers’ hours: 8:15 to 9:45 a.m. Tuesdays; tripods and monopods allowed. Regular ticket fee applies; limited tickets available.

Saturday & Sunday, March 9 & 10 Illinois Orchid Society Show and Sale 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, March 10 Free Library Talk: “Picturing Tropical Orchids” 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 13 Evening with Orchids: Cocktail Tasting 6 to 8 p.m.; fee applies. Tuesdays & Thursdays, through March 21 Morning Music with Orchids 10 a.m. Through March 24 Rare Book Exhibition: Picturing Tropical Orchids Noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday; Lenhardt Library.

Thursday, March 28 Post-Orchid Show Plant Sale 10 a.m. to noon: Garden Plus, Director’s Circle, and President’s Circle members only Noon to 2 p.m.: All Garden members 2 to 4 p.m.: Public welcome While supplies last Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 8 1/28/19 12:56 PM

chicagobotanic.org 9 Get Growing Plant Sale Get Growing Plant Sale Friday, May 17 10 to 11 a.m.: President’s Circle 11 a.m. to noon: Director’s Circle Noon to 4 p.m.: All members Horticulture and Plant Shows Saturday & Sunday, March 23 & 24 Northern Illinois Gesneriad Show & Sale Noon to 4:30 p.m.

Saturday; 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Sunday, March 31 Midwest Fruit Explorers Grafting Workshop 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday & Sunday, April 27 & 28 Midwest Daffodil Society Display and Floral Design Show Noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Saturday & Sunday, May 4 & 5 Central States Dahlia Society Sale 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Saturday, May 11 World Bonsai Day 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday & Sunday, May 11 & 12 Midwest Bonsai Society Spring Bonsai Exhibition 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 15 through October 6 Discovery Programs in the Helen and Richard Thomas English Walled Garden, Malott Japanese Garden, and Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday to Friday; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Plant Giveaways in the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden While supplies last; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday to Friday; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Exhibitions Opens March 29 Spice Rack: Flora’s Flavor: Rare Book Exhibition Noon to 4 p.m.

Wednesday through Sunday; Lenhardt Library.

April 6 – April 28 Nature in View: Garden Photographic Society Exhibition 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Greenhouse Galleries, Regenstein Center. Opens May 11 A Pollinator’s Perspective: Bees & Beyond Exhibition 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Joutras Gallery. Saturday, May 18 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Public welcome While supplies last; please check our website for updates. A new splash of color or a bit of texture can help freshen up your garden for spring. Come early to a one-of-a-kind plant sale hosted by the Woman's Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society. Look for unique plants and planters, as well as arrange- ments designed by Garden horticulturists.

Need inspiration or advice? Our staff experts will lead demonstrations to get you started.

Generously supported by JULIE, Inc. Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 9 1/28/19 12:56 PM

Calendar chicagobotanic.org/calendar For Families Mondays through March 25 Story Time in the Lenhardt Library 10 to 11 a.m. Sunday, March 3 & Saturday, March 9 Weekend Family Class: Make Your Own Butter and Pancakes 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, March 16 & Sunday, March 24 Weekend Family Class: Pizza Party 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Monday – Friday, March 25 – 29 Spring Break Camp 9:30 a.m.

to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Saturday, April 6 Weekend Family Class: Homemade Granola 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, April 13 & Sunday, April 14 Unearth Science festival 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays, April 16 & 23 Books and Cooks 10 to 11 a.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, April 21 Easter Egg Brunch 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon, and 1 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, April 27 Scout Seasonal Workshop: Earth Day Celebration 12:45 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday & Sunday, April 27 & 28 Malott Japanese Garden Spring Festival 10 a.m.

to 3 p.m.

Generously supported by the Malott Family Endowment for the Japanese Garden Tuesdays, April 30 & May 7 Books and Cooks 1 to 2 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. February highlights Seed Library at Lenhardt Library Through March 31 Noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. March highlights Members-Only Plant Production Behind-the-Scenes Tour Friday & Saturday, March 22 & 23 Garden members are invited to the new Kris Jaran- toski Campus to discover what goes on behind the scenes at our plant production facilities. You’ll tour our new state-of-the-art greenhouses and see spring flowers before they are planted in the Garden.

Tours take place at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; $10 fee. Partici- pants should be able to walk and stand for about an hour. Register at chicagobotanic.org/membership. Tuesday, March 19 One Book, One Garden: Honeybee Hotel by Leslie Day 6:30 to 8 p.m.; preregistration required. April highlights Unearth Science festival Saturday & Sunday, April 13 & 14 Unearth the world of science like you’ve never seen it before. With a weekend full of activities, the Unearth Science festival celebrates science and nature in ways that will encourage you to see, touch, hear, and explore. New: On Friday, April 12, there is an evening for adults, with drinks and light fare for purchase.

The festival includes free programs and hands-on activities; some special events and work- shops have fees. See page 6 for more information. Generously supported by Baxter, ITW, and NorthShore University HealthSystem May highlights Model Railroad Garden: Landmarks of America Seasonal opening: May 11 It’s the 20th anniversary for this family favorite. Eighteen model G-scale trains run on 18 tracks, winding over bridges and trestles, and around nearly 50 models of American landmarks such as the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., and the White House. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily (weather permitting); until 8 p.m.

Wednesdays from June 5 to August 28; fee applies. Free to Garden Plus members on Wednesdays.

Generously supported by Bank of America Mother’s Day Brunch Sunday, May 12 Treat mom to spring in the Garden and an elegant brunch buffet that includes a carving station and made-to-order omelets. Reservations are required; fees include parking. Seatings are at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 1 p.m. Parties of eight or fewer may share a table with other guests. Wednesday, May 1 Inspiring Nature Play: Innovations Conference 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, May 4 Garden Shop Double Discount Day for Members 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

Saturday, May 11 Meet the Rare Books 1 to 2 p.m.

10 chicagobotanic.org Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 10 1/28/19 12:56 PM

LAKE BLUFF 975 North Shore Dr. 847.615.2700 LAKE FOREST 695 N. Western Ave. www.pasquesi.com Watch for our Pansy Sale in April. PLANTS and GARDEN SUPPLIES CONTAINERS and STATUARY GARDEN FURNITURE HOME and GARDEN ACCENTS PET and BIRD SUPPLIES

12 chicagobotanic.org Butterflies & Blooms Seasonal opening: May 25 Immerse yourself in a garden habitat filled with hundreds of live butterflies from around the world, as well as some native to North America. This popular, family-friendly destination returns to the Regenstein Learning Campus. It’s free to Garden Plus members on Wednesdays and free to President’s Circle mem- bers every day.

Garden Chef Series Seasonal opening: May 25 Watch noted chefs prepare recipes in the Garden’s open-air amphitheater, using seasonal, garden-fresh produce. Seating is first come, first served for the demonstrations on Saturdays and Sundays, 1:30 and 2:30 p.m., in the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden’s open-air amphitheater.

Generously supported by Food Network Magazine Nature Play Garden Family Drop-in Activities June 1 – September 2 Activities provide hands-on, fun activities for fami- lies and children daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the Regenstein Learning Campus. Evenings June 4 – September 2 Long summer nights are the perfect time to unwind with friends and family during the Garden’s extended summer hours (until 9 p.m.). Pack a picnic and enjoy special live music performances for all ages, four nights a week.

Generously supported by BMO Harris Bank and NorthShore University HealthSystem bees beyond coming in spring Pollinators sustain life Nature Play Garden Coming in summer Throughout the year, the Garden is focusing on Bees & Beyond, a program that inspires a genuine appreciation for the vital role pollinators play in our everyday lives and in maintaining a healthy, diverse planet.

Beginning in spring, look for pollinator-themed display gardens; topiaries; a months-long interactive exhibition, Pollinator’s Perspective; and more, including After Hours Buzz, a series of cocktail events with scientists. Explore the stunning diversity of pollinators and the ways you can help protect these important creatures. chicagobotanic.org/beesandbeyond Generously sponsored by Boeing Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 12 1/28/19 3:19 PM

368 PARK AVENUE • GLENCOE • 847.501.3100 BOOK ONLINE • WWW.PASCALPOURELLE.COM your hair is90% ofyour selfie 2015 •2016 2018

14 chicagobotanic.org Engineers celebrate 20 years of keeping the trains running The Model Railroad Garden: Landmarks of America is one of the Chicago Botanic Garden’s most popular exhibitions. But it had a very modest start as a Ju- nior Railroad Exhibit, with seven trains traveling a temporary lay- out around a profusion of plants. Now celebrating its 20th anniver- sary, the Model Railroad has more than 1,600 feet of track with 18 trains navigating past almost 50 miniature American landmarks in miniature.

Making it all work are the train exhibi- tion engineers. You should be able to spot them easily enough—they usually wear a blue denim shirt, dark pants, and an engineer’s hat with its classic pleated crown. And they possess a life- long love of model railroads that they share with the youngest visitors. Perhaps Dick Jacobs, Lynn Sirovatka, or Dave Perez will be there, keeping tabs on the G-scale trains that navigate the 18 tracks through 7,500 square feet of plants and across 26 bridges. They and chief train exhibition engineer Steve Kocian are among the 15 or so engineers who care for the railroad.

Or you may see Dave Rodelius. He was the Model Railroad Garden’s first chief engineer until he retired last year. Hired to drive a Garden tram, he soon spot- ted garden specialists from Applied Imagination in Alexandria, Kentucky, installing the railroad and chatted with its founder Paul Busse. Not long after that, Rodelius was offered a chance to manage the railroad. He then tapped seven hobbyists from the model rail- road industry to work that first year. Dave Rodelius was the Model Railroad Garden’s first engineer. Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 14 1/28/19 12:56 PM

The first year’s success prompted the Garden to continue the outdoor rail- road. Each year, the exhibition’s team discusses what equipment might be needed—the outdoor railroad trains travel more than 22,000 miles each sea- son—and what new elements might be added. “The first year we had Wrigley Field and some people complained, so White Sox park was built,” Rodelius said, laugh- ing. Now there’s a Golden Gate Bridge, Old Faithful, Mount St. Helens, and dozens of natural wood buildings depicting iconic American structures. “The Model Railroad Garden has been a passion of mine for 19½ years, and it still is a passion for me,” he said.

“I absolutely love that place. The people who work there are just spectacular.” Although some engines make sounds, said Sirovatka, engineers decided to add more sound. “We have a circus area, and the children push a button and dance around to the calliope mu- sic,” added Sirovatka, who’s been with the team for five years.

All that action on the railroad layout can be demanding. “The biggest chal- lenge is in the springtime and the level- ing of uneven tracks brought on by the winter frost. That may require the re- pair or replacing with new track,” said Perez, the maintenance technical engi- neer for 15 years. The engineers need to make sure the trains run smoothly throughout the season, which this year runs from May 11 through October 13. That can be daunting. There are weather challenges and necessary maintenance. “We’re crawling in the dirt, we’re digging holes, we’re putting pipes in, we’re put- ting track in,” said Jacobs, who has more than 17 years with the railroad.

“Unless (visitors) just stumble upon us…you see the finished product and don’t realize how much it took to do this.” Every morning, the tracks are cleared of leaves and twigs, trains are set on the tracks, and buildings checked. And with Old Faithful regularly shooting a spray of water into the air, the engi- neers must faithfully refill the attrac- tion’s 5-gallon bucket with water, Ro- delius said.

Even in the off season, there is work to do: Trains and tracks need care and Ap- plied Imagination rebuilds bridges and rejuvenates any sun- or rain-damaged buildings. The bonus for these engineers? They enjoy working on this railroad, but they treasure seeing the smiles on kids’ faces and the giggles they hear when the Old Faithful spurts water or Mount St. Helens belches a steamy smoke. “The biggest thing that keeps me going is the kids who just marvel at the trains and their reaction seeing so many,” Sirovatka said. “They just don’t know where to look and where to run first.” Learn more chicagobotanic.org/gardens/railroad Fun fact: The outdoor railroad trains travel more than 22,000 miles each season.

Each year, the tracks and trains are inspected and repaired. Generously sponsored by chicagobotanic.org 15 Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 15 1/28/19 12:56 PM

16 chicagobotanic.org Give back to your Garden It starts with an idea—to honor a loved one or share the Chicago Botanic Garden’s beauty with generations to come. With a gift to the Garden’s endowment, you help us shape the future. Meet these generous donors: King and Hope Poor Beginning in the 1970s, King Poor and his family would often visit the fledg- ling Chicago Botanic Garden. His mother, Janet Meakin Poor, was an early supporter of the Garden and in 1987, became the first woman to chair the Garden’s Board of Directors.

As chair, she fostered a commitment to plant science and helped establish the Garden’s Plant Science and Conserva- tion Department.

King’s mother never lost her fascina- tion with plants, her delight in learning about them, and her dedication to pro- tecting them. A week before she died in June 2017, Janet Meakin Poor attend- ed a research symposium named for her at the Garden. King and his wife, Hope, have created an endowment in her honor for the graduate program in plant biology and conservation through the Garden and Northwestern University. Their gift helps the next generation of plant sci- entists continue the plant stewardship and environmental advocacy so impor- tant to Janet Meakin Poor—and to us. “Her generation had the vision to create the Garden, and we’re called to be good stewards of that legacy.” — King Poor, referring to his mother, Janet Meakin Poor, Chicago Botanic Garden board chair, 1987 – 1993 Glenn Kohlmeyer Penny and Glenn Kohlmeyer, married 45 years, were a team.

Together they grew their marriage and their home garden, and together they volunteered at the Garden. Penny focused on the What’s in Bloom plant display outside the Visitor Center, assisting Boyce Tankersley, director of living plant doc- umentation. Glenn also joined Boyce’s team, digitizing plant photos from slides.

Glenn lights up when he describes Pen- ny, who died in 2017. To honor his be- loved wife and the volunteer work she adored, he created the Penny Kohlmey- er Endowment Fund for Living Plant Documentation. Penny was always up for a new task, like helping to form a team leader program for volunteers. “Thanks to Penny’s guidance, we’ve been able to establish a successful pro- gram,” said Boyce. “Both she and Glenn have been exceptionally sup- portive of the Garden over the years.” “Penny was such a big part of the living plant col- lections group. Contribut- ing to her area is a way to carry her volunteer work into the future.” — Glenn Kohlmeyer Hope and King Poor Penny Kohlmeyer Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 16 1/28/19 12:56 PM

A.C. Buehler III A.C. Buehler III is at home in the gar- den his parents established at the Garden to address the needs of the dis- abled. He moves among raised beds bursting with flowers and dips a finger into a horizontal fountain, the inter- rupted flow making watery patterns. “My father loved this fountain. See how it’s situated for people in wheel- chairs to access?” he asked. A.C. continues the legacy of his par- ents, A.C. Buehler, Jr. (Bert) and Patri- cia (Pat), along with his brother John, a Garden board member. Bert and Pat were convinced that gardening should be accessible to all, and they helped the Garden create an award-winning, enduring place of refuge and empower- ment.

“Everyone should be able to experience horticulture. We’re proud to have been a part of the Garden’s vision for excellence.” — A.C. Buehler III Invest in the Future With your help, we can continue to in- spire and touch lives through the natural world, and work to protect and sustain our planet’s fragile ecosystem. Please consider a gift to ensure that the Garden you value has permanent support. How you can make a difference Your gift of $50,000 or more establishes a named endowed fund at the Garden. Your gift of any amount supports general endowment or a field of interest fund (such as science or the beauty of the Garden).

For more information on giving options, please contact: Patty Shanahan Associate vice president of development (847) 835-6838 pshanaha@chicagobotanic.org 17 Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 17 1/28/19 12:56 PM

18 chicagobotanic.org Garden briefs Honoring a champion of the Garden The ribbon-cutting of the greenhouses at the Kris Jarantoski Campus included a special honor for Bob Finke, chairman of the Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society. Thanks to an anonymous donor, the greenhouses were named the Robert F. Finke Green- houses in recognition of his hard work and achievement on the Jarantoski Campus project.

Veggie Rx expands A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture will expand Windy City Harvest’s Veggie Rx program to Loyola Univer- sity Health System clinics in Chicago’s western suburbs. Veggie Rx provides boxes of produce, grown and packed by Windy City Harvest trainees, to patients with diet-related diseases who are also food insecure.

HEALTH for Little Village The Garden and its partner Instituto del Progreso Latino received an award from the Institute of Museum and Li- brary Services to support HEALTH, a new horticultural therapy program. The program will help high school stu- dents get the message to their Little Village communities about the impor- tance of being in nature for mental and physical health. Other collaborators include the Forest Preserves of Cook County and the Chicago Center for Youth Violence Prevention at the Uni- versity of Chicago.

Jim Boudreau, Jean M. Franczyk, Fred Spicer, Bob Finke, and Kris Jarantoski cut the ribbon for the Jarantoski Campus greenhouses.

Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 18 1/28/19 12:56 PM

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Conserving our prairie, one seed at a time Medard and Elizabeth Welch Senior Director, Ecology and Conservation. It aims to preserve at least one representa- tive sample of each of the roughly 3,000 species found in the tallgrass prairie ecosystem that produce seeds capable of surviving cold storage and multiple samples of more than 500 species important for restoration.

This is important work. Throughout North America, the tallgrass prairie has lost nearly all its former distribution to agricultural and other human activi- ties. Seeds in the bank are being used for research and plant conservation ef- forts that are protecting rare plants from extinction and restoring habitats, including degraded Forest Preserves of Cook County sites, with resilient prai- rie species.

Here is a closer look at this valuable resource. Why does the Garden have a seed bank? First, many of the represented plants are rare, and it’s important to store seeds to prevent their extinction. For example, many of our native ashes were hit hard by the emerald ash borer. We’ve been collecting genetically di- verse samples of ash species in the hope we can preserve them before they die. If scientists and land managers find a way to get emerald ash borer under control, we may be able to restore them or man- age afflicted areas by propagating bor- er-resistant cultivars and providing seed stock for large-scale restorations.

Ash is only one example. With wave after wave of new diseases and insect threats, many species are not currently rare but may be in the future. We need to have genetic material in the bank to restore plant communities after a blight or infestation.

The Dixon National Tallgrass Prairie Seed Bank safeguards an endangered habitat From the outside, the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Dixon National Tallgrass Prairie Seed Bank resembles the freezer of a commercial kitchen, the sort of large, double-doored, stainless steel chamber you’d find contestants racing toward on a Food Network competi- tion. But inside lies something far more consequential. On shelves lined with vacuum-sealed foil bags is a collection of physical seed specimens, stored at minus 18 degrees Celsius, that repre- sent species integral to the tallgrass prairie biome of the midwestern Unit- ed States, one of earth’s most endan- gered habitats.

Most seed banks in the United States focus on preserving the seeds of crops and crop relatives, but the seed bank in the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center has a dif- ferent goal, says Kayri Havens, Ph.D., By the numbers 200 years: The potential storage time for each collection | 3,000 species: In the tallgrass prairie ecosystem that are suitable to be preserved | 15 percent: The level of humidity of the dried seeds Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 20 1/28/19 12:56 PM

What is in the Dixon National Tallgrass Prairie Seed Bank? The Seed Bank contains 10,238 seed accessions, representing 1,713 species, collected from 15 states in the Upper Midwest.

In partnership with the Cen- ter for Plant Conservation, a national consortium of 48 botanic gardens that collect seeds and do research on rare species, we are banking 11 of the rarest species in the Upper Midwest region. This includes plants such Pitcher’s this- tle, eastern prairie white fringed orchid, and Mead’s milkweed.

What other ways are the seeds being used? Right now, we have a project focused on collecting tough native species that provide nectar for monarchs and native bees. Milkweed and other nectar-pro- ducing plants are collected from road- sides and other parcels with adverse growing conditions. We are restoring test plots in the Forest Preserves of Cook County, including the Bartel Grassland in Matteson, Illinois. We’re hoping these genetically resilient “na- tive winners” will perform important ecosystem services in marginal areas awaiting full-scale restoration. How do we get the seeds? Staff and graduate students in the joint graduate program in plant biology and conservation through Northwestern University and the Garden go on col- lection trips throughout the Upper Midwest.

We also acquire seeds, for a fee, from knowledgeable contract col- lectors in the region.

To capture genetic diversity, collectors look for large, healthy populations. They obtain appropriate permits from landowners, document where popula- tions occur using GPS devices, and ac- quire information about soil and cli- mate conditions and nearby plants. Seed samples representing at least 50 maternal plants are put in paper bags and sent with a data sheet to the Dixon National Tallgrass Prairie Seed Bank and National Tallgrass Prairie Prepara- tion Laboratory. How are they preserved? A team of Garden staff and volunteers led by Seed Bank Manager David Sol- lenberger prepare seeds for storage.

In the Seed Quarantine Room, seeds are separated from other plant material by hand or with small tools such as sieves, rubbing boards, and blowers. After be- ing counted, weighed, and cleaned, they are X-rayed to determine whether there is embryo viability. All but about 25 seeds (which are sent to the Repro- ductive Biology Laboratory) are slowly dried to 15 percent humidity, carefully labeled and packaged in heat-sealed foil containers, and—finally—stored in the Dixon National Tallgrass Prairie Seed Bank.

How do we share the seeds and seed data? Each seed collection is divided and we send half to the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Center for Ge- netic Resource Preservation in Fort Collins, Colorado. In the event of a natural disaster, we don’t want all of our seeds in one place. Records for these collections are available through the Germplasm Resources Information Network database. Our data also is shared with the national Seeds of Suc- cess program, a program led by the Bu- reau of Land Management that serves to record, preserve, and safeguard im- portant flora for restoration and con- servation science activities within the United States.

Any researcher who wishes to use seed for a project can send us a proposal to obtain seed. For in- stance, we currently send plant materi- al resulting from seed cleaning to re- searchers at the University of Chicago’s Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy to test for possible medicinal uses.

Learn more chicagobotanic.org/research Seeds are stored at minus 18 degrees Celsius. chicagobotanic.org 21 Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 21 1/28/19 12:56 PM

22 chicagobotanic.org The collection: Magnolias Magnolia trees are the prom dresses of the garden. Their magnificent, showy flowers blanket the branches long be- fore the leaves unfurl. The size and abundance of the blossoms make mag- nolias one of the most stunning trees come spring. The white-flowered star magnolia (Magnolia stellata) and the pale pink saucer magnolia (Magnolia xsoulange- ana) are popular trees, especially for home landscapes.

But there are many others from which to choose, includ- ing those with yellow, purple, red, and bicolored flowers, and many that are fragrant.

There are 153 taxa of Magnolia at the Garden, and the best time to see them is from April to early May. You’ll find ‘Alexandrina’, a saucer magnolia, in the Helen and Richard Thomas Eng- lish Walled Garden, where its large fragrant flowers are a light reddish- purple on the outside and white on the inside. In the Farwell Landscape Garden, there are ‘Jane’, ‘Randy’, and star magnolias. Many others can be found in the Graham Bulb Garden, the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden, the Sensory Garden, and Lakeside East.

Although it’s hard to narrow down fa- vorites, Phil Douglas, director of plant collections, likes ‘Henry Hicks’ mag- nolia.

“It’s our best performing sweet- bay magnolia (M. virginiana),” he says. Magnolias are native to eastern and southeastern Asia and eastern North America, Central America, and South America. Fossils of magnolias date back more than 90 million years—sci- entists think they were pollinated by beetles because bees were not present at that time. While many magnolias can reach 35 to 40 feet in height, there are smaller ones like ‘Genie’, ‘Jane’, and ‘Betty’ that are 10 to 15 feet tall.

Then there’s the yellow-flowered mag- nolia ‘Judy Zuk’. The tree and flowers are upright, and the flowers smell like Froot Loops cereal—tropical and fruity. Inspired? Come see the Magnolia collection this spring. Learn more chicagobotanic.org/collections Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 22 1/28/19 12:56 PM

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chicagobotanic.org 25 Budburst is popping up in local schools this spring, as a part of a recent expansion of the Chicago Botanic Gar- den’s citizen scientist pro- gram. Students in select public schools in Waukegan and Chicago work on-site or in nearby gardens, where they are learning to collaborate, manage a living laboratory, follow the scientific process, and collect data on the life cycle of plants. “It’s really exciting to see youth so ex- cited about nature,” remarked Jennifer Schwarz Ballard, Ph.D., vice president of Learning and Engagement at the Chicago Botanic Garden. She has been involved with Budburst since it began in 2007.

“The schools that we are working with are all really enthusiastic, and we are looking forward to begin- ning data collection this spring.” The first school gardens were planted last fall by students in Waukegan Dis- trict 60. Black-eyed Susan, eastern red columbine, foxglove beardtongue, and New England aster are among the flow- ers now beginning to leaf out during their first growing season. The students will be collecting that phenology and pollinator visitation information and sharing it via Budburst.

All participants will gather data for a Budburst research initiative that began in 2017 to measure the unique rela- tionships between native plants and their cultivars, aptly called nativars, with pollinators. Each school will re- ceive a research garden that includes three replicates each of the selected na- tives species and its associated cultivars. Budburst was designed to encourage citizen scientists to participate in long- term data collection for use by scientists in research and publications. Since Gar- den leaders reimagined Budburst in 2017, this work continues with the ad- dition of programs that appeal to a larger number of people at different ages.

The program’s new elements “pro- vide opportunities to involve people in the entire scientific process, from hy- pothesis to conclusion, in a manageable time frame,” said Dr. Schwarz Ballard. The public is also welcome to gather and contribute data to the nativars project either by growing their plants at home or by monitoring the research site at the Garden.

Learn more budburst.org Students become citizen scientists through Budburst gardens Anne Zahn, administrator for science STEM and accelerated programs in District 60, is eager for the students from grades 3 through middle school to expand their classroom studies into the gardens. “We look at ecosystems, we look at life cycles of plants and pollinators, so all of the pieces of Budburst fit very well into the Next Generation Science Stan- dards,” she said. The program reaches 450 students at three elementary schools with on-site gardens, plus 100 students at a middle school with a garden. Nearly 3,000 ad- ditional students in nearby district schools will also collect data at these gardens.

“Students love to see something they did, and create a change, so just the growth of the plants will be a big deal to them,” Zahn said. Plus, “there’s a whole list of social emotional things that this will address beside the aca- demic curriculum,” she added, noting that some students may even be in- spired to grow a garden at home. Students at five Chicago schools are planting their study gardens this spring with help from Openlands’ Space to Grow program. Data collection begins this fall.

Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 25 1/28/19 12:56 PM

26 chicagobotanic.org Volunteer John Swenson knows his garlic John Swenson has driven from Illinois to a certain Italian grocery and liquor store in Wisconsin many times.

It’s where he buys all of his garlic sauces, and it’s where he promises a delicious reward: the best garlic this side of Italy. You’d better believe him. Swenson, a longtime volunteer at the Garden, happens to be an expert on all things Allium, the genus that includes garlic, onions, and leeks. When he’s not tending to his home garlic garden, he’s sharing his passion with visitors at the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden, where he has served as a volunteer since 2002. Prior to that, he reviewed countless library books as a volunteer in Plant Information and completed the University of Illinois Extension Master Gardener program at the Garden in 1996.

“My attitude is: What good is knowl- edge if you can’t share it? And the same is true of garlic,” Swenson said. Call it smelly all you want. Swenson loves to talk garlic with Garden visitors. “People want to know about garlic. On a busy day, I might talk with 30 peo- ple,” he said. “We talk about how to grow it, where to buy it. Most people think garlic originated in Italy but it didn’t—it came from Central Asia. It took thousands of years for it to get to Italy.” Swenson’s interest in alliums has taken him all across the globe. In 1989, Swen- son was one of three American members of an expedition to Central Asia and Russia to collect onions, garlic, and car- rots.

The team came back with more than 180 plant materials and seeds, in- cluding new varieties of garlic and many wild Alliums, and all were added to U.S. Department of Agriculture collections. His passion has also taken him deep into the regional history of his hometown, Chicago. For nearly a decade, Swenson conducted research to better understand the origin of the name Chicago. In his essay, “Chicagoua/Chicago: The Origin, Meaning, and Etymology of a Place Name,” published in 1991 in the Illinois Historic Journal, he debunked the com- mon myth that Chicago is named after a wild onion. It is named after Allium tri- coccum, a wild garlic, he said.

“I can prove it in court,” said Swenson, a for- mer lawyer.

Swenson traces his love for alliums back to 1975, when he was flipping through the pages of a seed catalog. At the time, he was living in his Glencoe home with his late wife, Helen, and paying regular visits to the Garden (Helen was a volunteer at the Garden, which inspired him to volun- teer, too). He remembers seeing an ad for rocambole garlic bulbs, and he or- dered several. Later that year, he learned about the Seed Savers Exchange. Over 33 years, he has donated 150 varieties to the Seed Savers Exchange’s seed bank collection.

The rest, as they say, is history. Now, he grows almost 30 different gar- lic varieties in his garden.

And, come summertime, Swenson, who will turn 90 in May, expects to harvest, “Oh, lordy, probably 2,000 garlic plants.” What will he use them for? “I like to give it away to people who are growing garlic,” he said. “But the other day I did use some garlic with hot peppers, on- ions, and bratwurst.” After all, as the tile above Swenson’s cooktop says, “Cooking without garlic is like painting without color.” Learn more chicagobotanic.org/volunteer 26 chicagobotanic.org Historic Journal, mon myth that Chicago is named after a wild onion. It is named after coccum prove it in court,” said Swenson, a for- mer lawyer.

Swenson traces his love for alliums back to 1975, when he was flipping through the pages of a seed catalog. At the time, he was living in his Glencoe home with his late wife, Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 26 1/28/19 12:56 PM

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The magical, fleeting allure of spring’s woodland wildflowers Trout lilies Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 28 1/28/19 12:56 PM

chicagobotanic.org 29 thers to the sun—and pollinators. There are also a few annual spring ephemerals. False mermaid (Floerkea proserpinacoides) is inconspicuous in that it is a small, ferny green plant with tiny greenish flowers. Portions of the nature trail in the McDonald Woods are surrounded with acres of this spe- cies in spring, but even then, it is diffi- cult to tell when they are in flower. This species is dependent on its flowers, pro- ducing one to three large seeds to be able to reproduce itself after the plant turns yellow and dies.

“The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours, lights and shades—these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” —Anonymous lines found on an old tombstone in Cumberland, England “While life lasts.” In the narrow win- dow that exists between thawing ground and the leafing out of the tree canopy, spring ephemerals—those woodland wildflowers that emerge, then quickly go dormant—live their life. This brief visible appearance makes it sweeter when you happen upon these blooms in the McDonald Woods at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

You often have to be there on the day they bloom.

Sometimes all you find are petals scattered on the ground, and you realize you have to wait another year. This is particularly true of species like bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis), whose blossoms only last for a day be- fore they drop. Additionally frustrating is that cloud cover can hamper catch- ing the full glory of the blooming of species like spring beauties (Claytonia virginica), which will only open in the full sun. Some ephemerals might pro- vide longer viewing opportunities, since they hold their flowers for a lon- ger period of time, or have many more plants that flower on different days.

Most spring ephemerals are perennial. They have underground organs— bulbs, corymbs, etc.—that store nutri- ents to be used for producing leaves and flowers in succeeding years. White trout lilies (Erythronium albidum) spread by underground rhizomes that form clumps, often covering large patches in the woodland, the mottled leaves camouflaging their abundance, only to become dazzling drifts of white when the sun appears. Come to the woodland early in the morning and watch the white petals of the trout lilies curl back and expose their yellow an- While these plants often have specialist pollinators associated with them, they usually have several different pollina- tors that can visit, including native bees and many species of flies.

For ephemerals in the genus Dicentra, such as Dutchman’s breeches and squir- rel corn (Dicentra canadensis), queen bumblebees are an important pollina- tor. These ephemerals have tightly closed flowers, requiring significant strength to enter the flower and access the pollen and nectar. The large queen bumblebees are among the few pollina- tors equipped to gain access. Besides being important sources of nectar and pollen for native insects, the spring ephemerals also serve the pur- pose of saving soil and reducing water runoff during a time of year when few other plants are growing. Trout lilies, for example, have very efficient photo- synthetic abilities and take advantage of the high light levels available in the spring woodland.

This strong photo- synthetic response requires large quan- tities of water to maintain the process. Therefore, abundant populations of this species and other ephemerals ab- sorb large quantities of water that would otherwise move off site, often carrying valuable nutrients and soil with it.

With spring on the horizon, you should make plans to visit the McDonald Woods to view the diversity of colorful spring wildflowers. For those of you taking pictures, pay attention to weath- er forecasts, and be mindful of the po- tential to damage other vegetation while attempting to get the perfect shot. Adapted from a blog post by James F. Steffen, senior ecologist, woodlands, and David Byron Smith Curator of Natural Areas. Visit the blog: chicagobotanic.org/blog. Dutchman’s breeches (Dicentra cuccularia) Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 29 1/28/19 12:56 PM

Do you want to increase your range of motion, improve bal- ance, and increase energy? Tai chi could be the exercise for you.

“Imagine you are oiling your joints, loosening things up,” said Gordon Lock, who has been teaching tai chi classes at the Chicago Botanic Garden for more than six years. “Your mind is really powerful. If you imagine things are, they will be.” The Garden began offering tai chi in 1998, and students found that moving in such a fluid way while surrounded by the rhythms of nature was a perfect fit. The Garden now offers 10 classes, including a new tai chi basics session on Saturdays.

Student Barbara Rosenberg recently started taking classes at the Garden. “It is an amazing way of working out and an amazing way of getting your center,” she said. “It is movement meditation.” Lock is trained in the three major forms of tai chi, but teaches mainly in the Sun and Yang styles. Yang is the second old- est form of tai chi and the most popular globally. The Sun style is newer, and Say ahhhh to 20 years of tai chi at the Garden involves a more upright form, which is easier on the knees. The Garden is one of the few places in the area to offer Sun style.

Tai chi was originally developed for self-defense, but its series of gentle, fluid motions have become more Here are just some of the benefits of tai chi: The fluid motions are suitable for any age: Tai chi is easy on joints and muscles and requires only comfortable shoes and clothing.

It promotes a mind-body connection: While students focus their minds on their sur- roundings, they discipline their bodies physically and reduce stress through controlled breathing. It’s a triple threat: Tai chi helps improve posture, strengthen muscles, and promote flexibility.

Learn more chicagobotanic.org/wellness known for the physical and mental benefits. Lock offers a simple formula for students as they work on the gentle, relaxing exercise: “Remember your ABCs: alignment, breathing, and calm- ness (or concentration).” Wellness programs are generously supported by NorthShore University HealthSystem. Gordon Lock demonstrates the gentle, fluid motions of tai chi. 30 chicagobotanic.org Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 30 1/28/19 12:57 PM

“ T o p l a n t a g a r d e n i s t o b e l i e v e i n t o m o r r o w . ” - A u d r e y H e p b u r n r o c c o f i o r e & s o n s landscape architecture .

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Dramatic views included Beautiful indoor and outdoor spaces at the Chicago Botanic Garden are perfect for events large and small, from wed- dings to business meetings. Guests will be delighted by exclusive catering, natu- ral beauty, and year-round spaces made for memorable experiences. Visit chicagobotanic.org/events or call (847) 835-8370 Across the Preserves Discover the signs of spring on the move Each spring, millions of birds migrate through the Chicago area. In the Forest Preserves of Cook County, you can see such visitors as black-throated green warblers and green herons on their way to their summer homes.

But look close- ly on your next visit, and you will spot a few more subtle movements also tak- ing place this season.

There are eight different species of bats in the Forest Preserves, and all but one migrate in the spring. Some stay for the summer, while others only stop for a day or two on their way further north. Even if you don’t see one, be happy they’re here. All our local bats eat in- sects: A single half-ounce little brown bat can eat half its body weight in in- sects each night. After five months of overwintering in Mexico, monarch butterflies come north, each generation hatching the next en route. The butterflies that reach southern Canada may be the great- great-grandchildren of those that start- ed the trip.

Monarchs lay their eggs exclusively on milkweed plants during their migration. Adding milkweed to your garden is an easy way to support this incredible journey.

Turtles hibernate for the winter, spend- ing the snowy season with a dramati- cally lower metabolism, buried in mud or near water. When the weather con- sistently warms, the six species that can be found in the Forest Preserves awak- en. Please don’t disturb any turtle eggs you see! We want to keep adding to our population of young turtles in the pre- serves. Plan a trip to the Forest Preserves to see these spring movers. Learn more map.fpdcc.com Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 32 1/28/19 12:57 PM

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34 chicagobotanic.org Ask the experts Do you have a question for our experts in the Plant Information Service? If so, contact them at plantinfo@chicagobotanic.org or call (847) 835-0972. Q. How do I know if there’s a reason to treat yellowing leaves on my plants? A. Gardeners should start to monitor plants when they be- gin active growth in the late winter or spring. It is impor- tant to know what is “normal” for particular plants in order to determine if a plant is in distress. An accurate diagnosis depends upon careful observation of the plant. Look for signs and symptoms to help determine if plants are affected with a disease pathogen or if cultural practices or environ- mental conditions are the cause of a plant’s decline.

Differ- ent pests, diseases, and disorders can produce similar symp- toms.

Keep an eye out for changes that are out of the ordinary, including leaf discoloration, reduced bloom, dying twigs, or increased numbers of insects and wildlife. Take note of changes—did they appear suddenly or spread gradually? Are symptoms or signs in a random or uniform pattern? An infectious pathogen or insect usually causes a random distribution of symptoms. Uniform patterns are generally associated with cultural problems or environmental issues. Is only one plant affected? Is only one species of plant af- fected or are symptoms visible on many different plant spe- cies? It is important to be familiar with up-to-date disease and insect pest reports for northeastern Illinois to make an accurate diagnosis.

Contact the Plant Information Service for diagnostic help as soon as unusual activity or patterns appear. Q. Can you identify a plant from a photo? If so, how should I photograph the specimen? A. In order for us to properly identify your plant based on a photo, we will need several pictures. It is important that we see the leaf arrangement along the branch—this will be at least several inches long; some plants have an alternate leaf arrangement and some have an opposite leaf arrange- ment. Make sure to include pictures of the flower(s) and/or seedheads, if they are present. In addition, please include a picture of the plant in its entirety so we can observe its growth habitat.

Try to place an object next to the plant so we can get a sense of scale. Once you have taken the proper pictures, please email them as attachments, to enable us to zoom in and observe fine details. In your email, include all pertinent information, such as if it grows in full sun or shade, its size, and where the plant is located—was it taken on a trip to Florida or does it live in your backyard? We may ask additional questions after we receive your inquiry, but often this will be enough information for us to posi- tively identify your mystery plant.

Plant Information Service is sponsored by Learn more Send your plant questions to plantinfo@chicagobotanic.org or call (847) 835-0972. You may also bring plant samples to the certified University of Illinois Extension Master Gardeners at the Plant Infor- mation Desk in the Regenstein Center. For more tips: chicagobotanic.org/plantinfoservice Sign up for adult education classes on plant care: chicagobotanic. org/education Three different views of ‘Miss Kim’ Manchurian lilac Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 34 1/28/19 12:57 PM

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36 chicagobotanic.org Smart Gardener chicagobotanic.org/smartgardener It’s time to divide and multiply perennials Perennials are the darlings of many gardens. They emerge each spring to add color, texture, and sometimes wonderful fragrance to the garden. Because many perennials form clumps of leaves that grow larger each year, the plants benefit from being dug out of the ground, divided, and replanted. There’s a bonus too: more plants! Spring is a good time for this task because temperatures are cool and the soil is usually moist. A spade with a sharp edge, a garden fork, and a bread knife or a trowel with a serrated edge are some of the tools that make the job fairly simple.

Dividing perennials in spring also allows the roots to become well established throughout the summer. Hostas These are among the easiest perennials to divide. This task can be done in late April and May, when their leaves are just a few inches tall.

Dig up the entire clump with a spade or fork and brush or water away the soil so you can see where the clusters of fleshy roots join the leaves. Each cluster is a separate plant. Care- fully tease the individuals apart, so that each cluster has a few leaves and a good clump of roots. Set the new divisions in the ground at the same depth at which they had been grow- ing and water thoroughly. This method also works for daylil- ies, lungwort (Pulmonaria), and coneflowers. Ornamental grasses After a few years of growth, ornamental grasses such as fountain grass (Pennisetum) and switchgrass (Panicum) de- velop a dead spot in the center, and the leaves grow in a ring or doughnut shape.

These grasses are usually too big to dig out of the ground. Use long-handled hedge shears to cut the old leaves as close to the ground as possible. That’s the easiest way to see the “doughnut” that has developed—the inside of the clump is usually soil or debris. Next, use a sharp spade and slice a few sections of roots from the outside ring. You can move the pieces elsewhere in the garden. Siberian irises Siberian irises (Iris sibirica) also will develop a central dead spot and, if not divided, will produce fewer, smaller flowers. Siberian irises benefit from division every three years or so.

To divide, dig up the entire plant with a fork or spade and set the clump on a tarp or the ground. Cut through the emerging leaves and rhizomes (thick underground stems that produce the shoots and root systems of new plants) with a serrated trowel, a bread knife, or a small handsaw. Each division should have a hefty rhizome or two. Discard any woody, dead-looking pieces. Set the plants back in the ground at the same depth they were growing, add compost or other organic matter, and water them well. Asters Some runaway perennials, like asters, yarrow, summer sun- flower (Helianthus), and bee balm (Monarda) spread by underground runners and may need dividing every other year to keep the plants healthy and to prevent them from running wild.

When the leaves are just a few inches tall in spring, it’s easiest to slice a few sections with a spade, lift them out of the ground, and use them elsewhere or com- post them. This technique also works on Coreopsis, Epime- dium, Lysimachia, Pulmonaria, lily-of-the-valley, sedges, and sweet woodruff (Galium).

Hostas are easy to divide. Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 36 1/28/19 12:57 PM

chicagobotanic.org 37 Membership Questions? Contact the Member and Donor Services staff at (847) 835-8215 or visit the Membership Desk in the Visitor Center. chicagobotanic.org/member Become a Garden Plus member: • Free parking year-round for two cars • Discounts for family classes, camps, programs, and many events • Advance purchase for some events • 10 percent discount at the Garden View Café every day • Free tram tours and admission to Butterflies & Blooms and the Model Railroad Garden on Wednesdays.

Share your Garden love; give a gift membership Online: chicagobotanic.org/member Call: (847) 835-8215 Visit: Membership Desk, Visitor Center Why become a member Your annual membership contribu- tion supports the Garden’s mission: We cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life.

Did you pick up your gift? When you renew on your first notice or online, you receive a gift voucher with your membership package. Select your gift at the Membership Desk in the Visitor Center from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Gift selections are subject to availability. The benefits of Garden membership Take advantage of all that the Chicago Botanic Garden has to offer. Visit as often as you want, from dawn to dusk. As a member, you will enjoy many members-only privileges: Free parking year-round Discounts • On Butterflies & Blooms, the Model Railroad Garden: Landmarks of America, tram tour tickets, and tick- eted Garden events and programs • 20 percent on most classes • 10 percent in the Garden Shop • Discounts for the Garden View Café based on membership level Members-only access • To special events, plus members-only hours • The Midwest’s finest gardening resources, including the Plant Infor- mation Service and checkout privi- leges at the Lenhardt Library • Free admission to 300 botanic gardens and arboreta nationwide • Access to exclusive travel tours to gardens around the world • Facility rental privileges A new perk of your Garden membership Members now have first chance to reserve space at the Garden’s most popular events—before tickets go on sale to the public.The members’ presale for Moth- er’s Day Brunch and Easter Egg Brunch runs from March 7 to 14.

In addition,Wednesdays in the spring and summer are special for Garden Plus members. That’s the day for free tram tours and free admission to Model Railroad Garden: Landmarks of America and Butterflies & Blooms. Members-only calendar Friday & Saturday, March 22 & 23: Discover what goes on behind the scenes at our new plant production facilities on the Kris Jarantoski Campus. Tours take place at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; $10 fee. chicagobotanic.org/membership Thursday, March 28: The post-Orchid Show plant sale is open first to mem- bers; 10 a.m. to noon: Garden Plus, Director’s Circle, and President’s Circle only; noon to 2 p.m.: all Garden mem- bers; while supplies last.

chicagobotanic. org/orchid Saturday, May 4: Members receive double discounts—20 percent off—in the Garden Shop. chicagobotanic.org/ visit/shop Friday, May 17: Get first selection of the one-of-a-kind plants and specialty containers offered at the Get Growing Plant Sale, presented by the Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society. chicagobotanic.org/calendar Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 37 1/28/19 12:57 PM

Adult Education 41 Bonsai Workshops 42 Weekend Gardener Classes 44 Horticulture 46 Horticulture Certificate of Merit Program 49 Nature Studies 50 Garden Design 51 Garden Design Certificate of Merit Program School Joseph Regenstein Jr. of the Chicago Botanic Garden Shinrin-Yoku Forest Bathing p. 64 New! Pollinator Container Workshop p. 46 New! Bees, Butterflies, and Bugs, Oh My! p. 54 Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 38 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Urban Agriculture p. 66 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 39 52 Botanical Arts 53 Botanical Arts Certificate of Merit Program 56 Photography 57 Focus on Photography Certificate of Merit Program 60 Cooking 62 Wellness & Fitness 66 Urban Agriculture Youth & Family Education 69 Nature Preschool 69 Family Programs 69 Birthday Parties 70 Scouts 70 Camp Programs Teacher & Student Education 75 Teacher Workshops 76 Custom Programs 76 Student Field Trips 76 Homeschool Groups 78 Programs for Children with Special Needs 78 Traveling Programs Birthday Parties p.

69 Student Field Trips p. 76 Members: Take advantage of discounts on classes! Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 39 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Adult Education Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 40 1/25/19 10:34 AM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 41 Symposium New! Pollinators Need You! A Janet Meakin Poor Research Symposium Celebrate pollinator week by learning more about pollinators, why they are important, the threats they face, and what you can do to help them. Presenters will focus on native polli- nators, bees and climate change, supporting pollinators in gardens and other natural areas, supporting bees in urban areas, and current pollinator conservation efforts.

Attendees choose from three hands-on workshops relat- ed to creating pollinator habitat in your yard or neighborhood park.

$47.20/$59 | Alsdorf Auditorium, Regenstein Center $29 with student ID, call (847) 835-6801 to register at this rate Saturday, June 22, 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Campout Adults-Only Campout Experience the Chicago Botanic Garden the way few can—by sleeping over on the Regen- stein Learning Campus. Connect with nature and enjoy a low-stress camping experience in one of Chicago’s most inspirational settings. Campers can set their own schedule, choosing from activities like yoga, a tram tour, board games, s’mores, a bird walk, and more. You can choose between sleeping outside in the Nature Play Garden or sleeping inside the Learning Campus.

Please plan to spend the night as the Garden is unable to accommodate evening-only participants. Activities are suitable for participants ages 21 and up. Please visit our website for details.

$150/$187.50 | Regenstein Foundation Learning Center Saturday, June 29, 5 p.m. – Sunday, June 30, 9 a.m. $ Members receive a 20 percent discount, listed in each class description before the full nonmember price. Bonsai Workshops Forest Planting Workshop Whether they are planted on a slab or in a container, forests are a great way to have instant impact with your bonsai. In this hands- on workshop, we cover all aspects of design, planting, and after-care of your new forest. You can either bring your own trees and pots, or we will provide them for you for an addi- tional fee of $69.

Chris Baker, curator of bonsai, Chicago Botanic Garden $39.20/$49 | Horticulture Conference Room, Rice Plant Resource Center Wednesday, March 20, 6 – 9 p.m.

New! Bonsai Air Layering Workshop The principle of air layering is to force a tree or branch to form new roots at a certain point by interrupting the stream of nutrients from the existing root system. Watch a demonstration and then practice the technique on your own trees. Please bring a tree to class, all other supplies will be provided. Chris Baker, curator of bonsai, Chicago Botanic Garden $39.20/$49 | Horticulture Conference Room, Rice Plant Resource Center Wednesday, April 3, 6 – 9 p.m. Root Over Rock Bonsai Workshop Root over rock is a unique and naturally occur- ring event in nature.

Tree roots grow along and in rock crevices searching for nutrients. You will take a tree and learn methods to attach it to a rock so the roots take hold. Bring your own materials, or we can provide them for an additional fee of $69.

Chris Baker, curator of bonsai, Chicago Botanic Garden $39.20/$49 | Horticulture Conference Room, Rice Plant Resource Center Wednesday, April 17, 6 – 9 p.m. Bonsai: Beginner During this six-week basics and fundamentals course, discover principles and techniques to appreciate and participate in the art of bonsai. You will get a tree to work on in class and gain sufficient knowledge of bonsai care to maintain and develop your tree during its initial phases. Each session includes a detailed lecture and assistance with design, styling, and wiring. Chris Baker, curator of bonsai, Chicago Botanic Garden $240/$299 | Horticulture Conference Room, Rice Plant Resource Center 6 Tuesdays, May 7 – June 11, 6 – 9 p.m.

New! Bonsai Pest Management Bonsai trees are susceptible to various pests and diseases. You will become familiar with common maladies affecting bonsai, learn pre- vention methods, and explore how treat your trees if necessary.

Chris Baker, curator of bonsai, Chicago Botanic Garden $42/$52.50 | Horticulture Conference Room, Rice Plant Resource Center Wednesday, June 26, 6 – 9 p.m. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 41 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Weekend Gardener Classes Soils: Where Are Your Roots? Understanding soils is key to gardening suc- cess. Participate in an in-depth discussion of soils, including structure, fertilizers, pH balance, soil amendments, and water management. You will also explore proper horticultural techniques for a healthy soil ecosystem. Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $39.20/$49 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, March 16, 9:30 a.m.

– noon Fruit Trees for the Beginner Fruit trees enhance your landscape and your table. You will learn variety selection, site requirements and preparation, proper planting and pruning techniques, maintenance, and pest management. Dress for the weather, as part of the class will be outside. Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $39.20/$49 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, March 23, 9:30 a.m. – noon Success with Trees and Shrubs Learn all you need to know about growing woody plants, both deciduous and evergreen. Whether you are a beginning or experienced home gardener, you can improve your skills to choose, plant, and place the perfect tree or shrub, as well as short- and long-term care techniques.

Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $39.20/$49 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, April 6, 9:30 a.m. – noon Spring Lawn Care for Homeowners Here’s your chance to learn the basics of home lawn care. Using the Garden’s holistic turf-management program as a model, you will learn how to cultivate a thriving lawn while lessening pesticide use. You will be introduced to turf culture, mowing, aerating, watering, fertilizing, weeding, and insect and disease control. Dress for the weather. Tom Fritz, plant health care specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $31.20/$39 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Saturday, April 13, 9 – 11 a.m.

Brambles and Berries for the Beginner Would you love to harvest fresh berries from your own backyard? If so, this class shows you how easy it is to successfully grow berry fruits. Learn how to choose the best varieties, select and prepare a site, use proper planting and pruning techniques, and understand mainte- nance. Dress for the weather.

Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $39.20/$49 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, April 27, 9:30 a.m. – noon Get Started with Perennials Perennials create a lovely and interesting garden that blooms throughout the season. Choose the right combination of perennials for the right location, explore pruning and pinching techniques, deadheading, dividing, and other methods to keep your garden healthy and strong. Time is allotted for Q & A regarding your own perennial garden. Heather Sherwood, senior horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $32/$40 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, April 27, 1 – 3 p.m.

Get Started with Annuals Annuals provide constant color in your flower beds, containers, window boxes, and perennial borders. Learn the most dependable varieties as well as the new and unusual. Topics include soil preparation, plant selection, care and main- tenance, and some propagation techniques. Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $32/$40 | Classroom 1, Learning Center Saturday, May 11, 9 – 11 a.m. Get Started With Roses This is a great course for the first-time rose grower or a refresher for the enthusiast. General planting, pruning, protection, and care will be discussed, along with examples of low-maintenance rose varieties suitable for the Chicago area.

Thomas Soulsby, senior horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $32/$40 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Saturday, May 18, 8:30 – 10:30 a.m. Summer Garden Maintenance Proper watering, fertilizing, pruning, edging, deadheading, staking, and mulching practices make the difference between a healthy, well- kept garden and a landscape that gets ahead of you. You will have a hands-on opportunity to practice what you learn, so bring along a pair of pruners. Please dress for the weather. Tim Johnson, director of horticulture, Chicago Botanic Garden $32/$40 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Sunday, May 19, 1 – 3 p.m.

Bonsai Basics Learn the horticulture, art, and philosophy of bonsai through the history, fundamental aesthetic elements, and basic style types. You will learn about tools, wiring, soils, fertilizers, and year-round care. A walk to view part of the Garden‘s Bonsai Collection is included. Dress for the weather.

Chris Baker, curator of bonsai, Chicago Botanic Garden $32/$40 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Sunday, June 2, 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 42 1/25/19 10:34 AM

BERNSTEIN & SONDHEIM A coproduction of Lyric Opera of Chicago, Houston Grand Opera, and Glimmerglass Festival. Lyric premiere of Bernstein’s West Side Story generously made possible by Lead Sponsor The Negaunee Foundation and cosponsors an Anonymous Donor, Randy L. and Melvin R. Berlin, Robert S. and Susan E. Morrison, Mrs. Herbert A. Vance and Mr. and Mrs.

William C. Vance, and Northern Trust. Major in-kind audio support provided by Shure Incorporated. JOIN US FOR ONE OF THE MOST THRILLING BROADWAY MUSICALS OF ALL TIME MAY 3 – JUNE 2, 2019 LYRICOPERA.ORG 312.827.5600 COREY COTT AS TONY MIKAELA BENNETT AS MARIA TRAVIATA-Program-Ad-FullPage-Bleed-WEST-SIDE-STORY -8.25x10.5.indd 1 1/22/19 11:03 AM

44 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Horticulture courses help students acquire the information and techniques needed to grow ornamental plants and maintain a healthy garden or lawn. Class locations are subject to change. Some classes may be held outdoors as weather permits. Exciting Annuals: Preparing for Spring With the arrival of seed catalogs in your mail- box, it’s time to get excited about spring. Learn hot new plants, what to look for at garden centers, and new garden trends. Find out how to use annuals in containers, window boxes, and hanging baskets, what plants do best in shade or full sun, and how to incorporate vegetables to enhance your garden.

Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $31.20/$39 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Tuesday, March 19, 6 – 8 p.m. Growing a Cook’s Garden If you have a spot in your garden, balcony, or deck that receives more than six hours of direct sunlight, you can grow herbs and vegetables. Discover how to grow tomatoes, onions, peppers, squash, garlic, and leafy greens. Learn plant selection, soil preparation, potting methods, pest protection, extending crops into fall, and food preparation.

Nina Koziol, garden writer $31.20/$39 | Classroom 1, Learning Center Tuesday, March 19, 1 – 3 p.m. Backstage: Production Greenhouses The Chicago Botanic Garden grows nearly a half-million plants every year. Take a behind- the-scenes tour of the greenhouses and nursery. Be the first to see the spring annuals for the 2019 display beds, hanging baskets, containers, and hanging hayracks, plus preview the fall chyrsanthemum preparation. Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $31.20/$39 | Meet at Production Greenhouses Saturday, March 23, 9 – 11 a.m. Chronicle of a Vegetable Garden Experience a full season of a Chicago vegetable garden from an expert midwestern home gar- dener.

You will learn all the steps to create your own successful home vegetable garden from plant selection through harvest with details on what to do, why it is done, and when to do it. Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $39.20/$49 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, March 30, 9:30 a.m. – noon Horticulture Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 44 1/25/19 10:34 AM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 45 Horticulture Organic Vegetable Gardening Series Spend an entire season in the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden learning about organic vegetable gardening. All sessions will be taught by Lisa Hilgenberg, horticulturist, Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden, Chicago Botanic Garden. Classes are a combination of lecture, demonstration, and outdoor practice; bring your gardening gloves. Dress for the weather. Register for all three sessions at once and receive a ten percent discount. $86.10/$108 The Organic Vegetable Garden in Spring Learn about early-season vegetables that thrive in the cool spring temperatures.

Discuss and practice early-season bed preparation, seed sowing, and harvesting techniques. $32/$40 | Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Learning Center Saturday, April 6, 9 – 11 a.m. The Organic Vegetable Garden in Summer Through classroom discussion and outdoor ac- tivities, learn about heat-loving vegetables and herbs to grow in your summer garden. Related topics include direct sowing, transplanting, sustainable watering techniques, and more. $32/$40 | Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Learning Center Saturday, May 18, 9 – 11 a.m. The Organic Vegetable Garden in Autumn The end of summer doesn’t mean the end of home-grown vegetables.

Discuss and practice how to get the most out of the growing season by adding cool-season vegetables to your fall garden. Learn about variety selection, mulching, and extending the season. $32/$40 | Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Learning Center Saturday, July 20, 9 – 11 a.m. New! Installing Bees In Your Hive Learn to install a package of bees and a nuc colony. View a live bee installation demonstra- tion, including a step by step on the install- ment process and troubleshooting. A bee suit is required to participate.

Wil Pilipauskas, head beekeeper, Willie’s Honey Company $42/$55.50 | Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Learning Center Saturday, April 13, 9 a.m. – noon New! Managing Overwintered Bees You got your bees through the winter, now what do you do? Learn to manage your bees in the erratic spring weather and avoid a swarm. You will have an opportunity to view live hives. Wil Pilipauskas, head beekeeper, Willie’s Honey Company $42/$55.50 | Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Learning Center Saturday, April 13, 1 – 4 p.m. New! Pollinators in the Fruit Orchard Many insects besides honeybees can pollinate your orchard.

A fruitful orchard depends on good soil, a congenial climate, appropriate pruning, and pollinators.You will learn which pollinators are most effective, and how to pro- vide care and habitat for these hard-working, indispensible creatures.

Dan Bussey, apple historian and preservationist $32/$40 | Classroom 1, Learning Center Saturday, April 13, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Spring Containers at the Garden Tour the Garden’s spring containers to collect ideas for your own. Create a take-home container with plants perfect for varying spring temperatures and a full-sun to partial-shade location. Pansies, forced bulbs, and other spring treasures may be used. Please bring gloves. Dress for the weather. Kathryn Deery, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $71.20/$89 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Tuesday, April 16, 10 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

New! Hands-on Gardening: Dividing Perennials Do you have areas in your Garden with lots of beautiful perennials? Learn tips and tricks to spread the wealth to other areas by dividing perennials in the spring. Explore the basics, then head outside for a hands-on demonstra- tion. Please bring gloves. Dress for the weather. Heather Sherwood, senior horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $19/$23.75 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Wednesday, April 17, 10 – 11 a.m. New! Water Garden in a Vase Workshop Learn proper methods to grow a living plant arrangement in a water-filled vase, including which plants do best in water and how to care for them to keep them happy and healthy.

With rocks, pebbles, sand, or moss, you can create your own personal design. All materials are provided. Please bring gloves. Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $71.20/$89 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Wednesday, April 24, 6 – 8 p.m. Living Pansy Wreath Workshop Welcome the arrival of spring with a pansy wreath to brighten your front door. Create a lush, colorful living wreath by planting a moss- lined wire frame with pansies and ivy. Wreath care options will also be discussed. Please bring an apron, rubber gloves, and scissors. All other materials are provided.

Karen Thomson, topiary designer, Thomson Topiaries $69/$86.25 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Tuesday, April 30, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Hydrangeas Hydrangeas showcase an old-fashioned charm that is hard to resist. Through photos of a va- riety species in full bloom, discover all aspects of successfully growing hydrangeas, hardiness issues and pruning techniques by species, as well as how to manage bloom color. Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $42/$52.50 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, May 4, 9:30 a.m. – noon Strawberries and Cream Hanging Basket Workshop Cascades of strawberries and nasturtiums growing in moss-lined baskets will beautify your porch or patio.

Learn how to create a beautiful (and delicious) hanging basket to take home. Get planting and watering tips and recipes. Please bring gardening gloves. All materials are included.

Lisa Hilgenberg, horticulturist, Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden, Chicago Botanic Garden $62/$77.50 | Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Learning Center Thursday, May 9, 10 – 11:30 a.m. New! Creating a High-Yield Cutting Garden Would you like to grow your own bouquet? Discover new ideas on what to plant and how to care for cut flowers. Learn simple techniques for creating beautiful arrangements and create a small cut-flower arrangement to take home. Nina Koziol, garden writer $42/$52.50 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Saturday, June 8, 10 a.m. – noon Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 45 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Regenstein School | Adult Education 46 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. New! Pollinator Container Workshop Learn how to welcome pollinators to your home with a diverse array of flowering annuals that will also give you season-long color. Then prepare a warm-season mixed container suit- able for a sun or partial shade location. Please bring gloves. Kathryn Deery, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $79/$98.75 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Tuesday, May 14, 10 a.m. – noon Summer Succulent Container Workshop Succulent containers are trendy gardens to be enjoyed from spring through fall.

Study design examples and then create your own take-home container. Learn how to care for your contain- er, and how to extend it into the following year. All materials will be provided. Please bring gloves, an apron if desired, and pruning shears. Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $79/$98.75 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Thursday, May 23, 6 – 8 p.m. Summer Containers at the Garden Enjoy a tour featuring the Chicago Botanic Garden’s summer containers. Then prepare your own take-home, warm-season, mixed container suitable for sun or partial shade. Your container may include annuals, perennials, herbs, and decorative foliage.

Please bring gloves. Dress for the weather. Kathryn Deery, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $71.20/$89 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Tuesday, June 11, 10 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

New! Creating a Tropical Feel in Your Garden Learn how to create a tropical look and feel in your garden without breaking the budget. Plant selections, sun and shade requirements, and hot new plants are discussed. A Garden walk is included, so please dress for the weather. Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $32/$40 | Classroom 6, Learning Center Tuesday, June 11, 6 – 8 p.m. New! Insect Topiary Create a portable, whimsical topiary using insect-shaped galvanized wire frames. You will stuff the frame with long-fibered sphagnum moss and plant with a variety of stunning annuals and perennials.

Insect frames include bees, praying mantis, ladybugs, and more. Karen Thomson, topiary designer, Thomson Topiaries $79/$98.75 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Wednesday, June 5, 6 – 9 p.m. Horticulture Certificate of Merit Program Any individual may register for a certificate program course as long as the prerequi- site(s) noted in the course description have been met.

Deciduous Flowering Shrubs Study more than 60 different deciduous flowering shrubs, cultivars, and related species suitable for commercial landscapes and home garden use in the Chicago region. During weekly slide lectures and Garden walks, the identification, cultural information, aesthetic qualities, and landscape uses of both common and more unusual shrubs will be emphasized. Upon completing this course, you will be able to select the most appropriate shrubs for your garden space and gardening style. OPC, PGL1, PGL2, GDC requirement Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $319.20/$399 | Classroom 1, Learning Center 7 Tuesdays, March 12 – April 23, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Also includes Garden Walks (select one) Meet at Visitor Center 6 Thursdays, March 14 – April 18, 9 – 11 a.m. or 6 Saturdays, March 16 – April 20, 9 – 11 a.m. New! Advanced Pruning Techniques This class is ideal for those interested in prun- ing topiaries, espalier, and some of the more challenging plants such as arborvitae, yew, juniper, and other conifers. On a walk, learn how best to prune some of the more interest- ing plants in the Garden. Dress for the weather. The School’s CEUs=2 hours OPC elective Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $51.20/$64 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Thursday, March 14, 11:30 a.m.

– 1:30 p.m. Botany 1, Spring Session Why, botanically speaking, is a tomato a fruit? What is the difference between a fern and a moss? Learn the answers to these questions and more as you explore subjects such as the importance of plants to our lives; taxonomy and classification; plant life cycles, distinguish- ing features and diversity of plants. OPC, PGL 1, PGL 2, and GDC requirement Ellen Phillips, horticulture educator $279.20/$349 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 5 Mondays & 5 Wednesdays, March 18 – April 17, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Gardening Techniques: Session C Learn tips and techniques used by professional gardeners through a combination of lecture and hands-on activities.

Acquire solid garden- ing skills, learn a variety of techniques, and de- termine best management practices in the field of horticulture. Gain applicable skills in plant selection, spring assessment and planning, spring perennials and annuals, soil preparation, pruning shrubs and hedges, and control of spring weeds. Dress for the weather. PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement William Moss, horticulture educator $249.60/$312 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 6 Saturdays, March 23 – April 27, 7:30 – 10:30 a.m.

New! Plants for Containers & Rooftop Gardens Gardening on roofs and balconies is increasingly popular. Some plants struggle and others thrive in these often hot, dry, and windy environments. Learn which plants are known to do well in our climate. Dress for the weather, as a Garden walk is included. The School’s CEUs=2 hours OPC elective Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $51.20/$64 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Saturday, March 30, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Soil Basics Soil is an irreplaceable natural resource that affects plant selection and growth. Learn to maintain healthy soil; use compost, fertilizers, soilless and potting mixes, and other amend- ments.

Discover how water cycles through a garden and affects soils and plants. Course fee includes a professionally analyzed test of your garden soil. Prerequisite: Botany 1 recommend- ed.

PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Ellen Phillips, horticulture educator $269.60/$337 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 6 Thursdays, April 11 – May 23, 6:30 – 9 p.m. (no class April 25) and Saturday, May 4, 1 – 4 p.m. Best New Annuals for 2019 Explore many new annual cultivars along with several wonderful, yet underutilized, species for both container and in-ground plantings in sun and shade. Focus on what makes each unique, including morphological characteristics, garden performance, cultural requirements, design use, recommended planting combinations, and sources. The School’s CEUs=3 hours OPC elective Jim Nau, Ball Horticultural Company $59.20/$74 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, April 13, 1 – 4 p.m.

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April 26–28 The One of a Kind Spring Show returns to The Mart from April 26-28 with more than 300 talented artists and makers from across North America. Enjoy a one-of-a-kind experience while browsing and shopping from a variety of categories of handmade work. For details and tickets, visit oneofakindshowchicago.com. 4 T H A N N U A L S P R I N G S H O W Produced by

Regenstein School | Adult Education 48 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. New! Introduction to Mushroom Collection and Identification Cover the basics of mushroom collection and identification for the Chicago region.

Learn simple, easy-to-find characteristics of common fungi including distinguishing cap gills and stipe features. Time will be spent outdoors identify- ing and collecting a few specimens. Dress for the weather. The School’s CEUs=5 hours OPC elective Moira OKeefe, wild mushroom expert $92/$115 | Classroom 6, Learning Center Saturday, May 4, 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Common Weed Identification and Control Weeds are a common problem in every land- scape lawn and garden. Their control depends on correct identification and treatment. Learn to identify common weeds and various control options available. The School’s CEUs=3 hours OPC elective Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $59.20/$74 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Monday, May 6, 6 – 9 p.m.

Botany 2, Spring Evening Session How do seeds germinate and develop into mature plants? How do plants move water up through their roots to their topmost branches? Explore subjects such as the plant cell; anatomy and growth of roots, stems, and leaves; photo- synthesis; and the symbiotic association of plant roots with beneficial fungi and bacteria. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

PGL 2 and GDC requirement Jeffrey Gorra, biologist, X-Bar Diagnostics Systems, Inc. $279.20/$349 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 6 Mondays & 6 Wednesdays, May 6 – June 17, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. (no class May 27) Annuals and Biennials Annuals and biennials have a rich tradition and exciting future. Focus on the most popular cool- and warm-season species along with a selection of new cultivars and unusual plants, all of which are well-suited to container and in-ground gardening in the Midwest. During the lectures and Garden walks, learn plant identification and cultural information. See examples of refined plant combinations and intriguing planting styles.

PGL1, PGL2, GDC and OPC requirement Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $319.20/$399 | Classroom 1, Learning Center 7 Tuesdays, May 7 – June 18, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Also includes Garden Walks (select one) Meet at Visitor Center 6 Thursdays, May 9 – June 13, 9 – 11 a.m. or 6 Saturdays, May 11 – June 15, 9 – 11 a.m. New! How to Prepare Herbarium Sheets An herbarium is a collection of plant species preserved for scientific study. Understand gen- eral herbarium history, how herbarium sheets are used, their future importance, and different collecting approaches for a variety of plants. Collect, press, dry, and mount specimens during class.

Flower presses will be provided. The School’s CEUs=5 hours OPC elective Hilary Noble, coordinator, research labs and undergraduate program, Chicago Botanic Garden $105/$131.25 | Seminar Rooms A & B, Plant Science Center Saturday, May 11, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. and Saturday, May 18, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. New! Planting for Pollinators The plight of pollinators and nectar-feeding insects is well known. Honeybees, native bees, monarch butterflies, moths, and many lesser-known insects rely mainly on native plants for survival and reproduction. Explore recommended pollinator-attracting plants for Midwest gardens including native and non- native cultivars, and nectar-rich varieties.

The School’s CEUs=2 hours OPC elective Nina Koziol, garden writer $51.20/$64| Classroom 4, Learning Center Saturday, June 8, 1 – 3 p.m. Recognizing Sedges in the Field See details on page 49 OPC elective Tuesday, June 11, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Gardening Techniques: Session D Learn tips and techniques used by profes- sional gardeners through a combination of lecture and hands-on activities. Acquire solid gardening skills, learn a variety of techniques, and determine best management practices in the field of horticulture. Gain applicable skills in plant selection, perennial and annual care and maintenance, pruning techniques, tool maintenance, and identification and control of common weeds.

Dress for the weather. PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $249.60/$312 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 6 Saturdays, June 15 – July 27, 8 – 11 a.m. (no class July 6) Herbaceous Perennials Discover ornamental qualities, identification techniques, cultural practices, and landscape uses of more than 60 herbaceous perennials for the Midwest. Plants studied will include favorites such as astilbe and hosta, in addition to lesser-known plants including meadow rue and toad lily. Prerequisite: Botany 1. OPC, PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Jill Selinger, manager, adult education, Chicago Botanic Garden, and William Moss, horticultural educator $319.20/$399 | Classroom 1, Learning Center 7 Tuesdays, July 9 – August 20, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Also includes Garden Walks (select one) Meet at Visitor Center 6 Thursdays, July 11 – August 15, 9 – 11 a.m. or 6 Saturdays, July 13 – August 17, 9 – 11 a.m. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 48 1/25/19 10:34 AM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 49 The Chicago area contains a wide range of plants and animals living in different types of natural communities, from woodlands to wetlands, prairies to savannas. Class lo- cations are subject to change. Some classes may be held outdoors as weather permits. New! Oaks, Elms, and Beeches: A Natural History Oak, elm, and beech once dominated mid- western forests.

Discover ways humans, birds, animals, and insects have used and treasured these revered trees. Explore native habitat, historic uses, appearance in folklore, and contemporary species and cultivars available in the Chicago area today. A Garden walk will be included. Dress for the weather. Heather Prince, horticulturist and landscape consultant $119.20/$149 | Lakeside Room, Visitor Center 3 Tuesdays, March 12 – 26, 9:30 a.m. – noon New! Deluge and Drought: Rain Water Gardens Rain gardens bring delight to homeowners while providing valuable water management. We will discuss a brief history of these gardens and will learn how they can solve water prob- lems and bring unique beauty to the land- scape.

Learn how and where to place a rain garden at home; please bring a plat of survey for your property.

Julia Bunn, eco-functional landscape designer, Spirited Gardener, Inc. $32/$40 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Wednesday, March 20, 7 – 9 p.m. Spring Bird Walk Explore the best spots at the Chicago Botanic Garden for locating late-winter bird residents and the early migrants of spring. Each walk is approximately one to two hours long. Bring binoculars and a field guide, if you have one. Dress for the weather. Alan Anderson, research committee chairman, Chicago Audubon Society $15.20/$19 | Meet at Visitor Center Saturday, March 23, 7:30 – 9 a.m. or Saturday, April 13, 7:30 – 9 a.m. or Saturday, May 18, 7:30 – 9 a.m.

New! Creating Natural Plant Community Gardens Be an environmental partner and learn how to mimic nature by creating mini-ecosystems at home. Discuss natural plant communities and see how to use the iNaturalist app to help you discern what belongs (and what does not) in the “wild garden.” Julia Bunn, eco-functional landscape designer, Spirited Gardener, Inc.

$32/$40 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Saturday, March 23, 1 – 3 p.m. The Native Oaks The mighty oaks (Quercus) have been a signature species in Midwest landscapes for thousands of years. Learn the different species and varieties within their respective ecosystems along with their landscape usage and culture. Oak morphology and physiology of various species will be covered along with basic variety identification. John Raffetto, horticulture educator $32/$40 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Wednesday, April 10, 1 – 3 p.m. New! Build a Birdhouse Inviting birds into your garden is a great way to observe and learn about bird behavior, courtship, and nesting.

Using a prepared kit, have fun building a birdhouse to take home and hang. Learn which birds in our area use birdhouses, different box shapes, sizes, placement, cleaning, and also habitat tips. All materials included.

Pam Karlson; designer, illustrator, gardener and co-owner of Waxing Studio, Inc., and Andrew Swets, carpentry supervisor, Chicago Botanic Garden $60/$75 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Wednesday, April 17, 1 – 3 p.m. Introduction to Bird-Watching If you want to become a birder, join this class to learn the basics. On Thursday, you will learn about binoculars, how to use a field guide, and the field marks used to identify common birds of the Chicago area. During the Saturday bird walk, try out your newly acquired skills. Bring binoculars if you have them. Dress for the weather.

Jim Steffen, ecologist, Chicago Botanic Garden $63.20/$79 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Thursday, May 9, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

and Saturday, May 11, 7:30 – 9 a.m. Meet at Visitor Center A Walk in the Wildflowers Learn about native wildflowers while enjoying the beauty of Reed-Turner Woodland in Long Grove. The diverse habitat of this Illinois state nature preserve presents an opportunity to see a wide variety of spring blooms as we hike the trails through an oak woodland, ravine corridor, and sedge meadow. Bring a camera and a field guide, if you have one. Dress for the weather.

Sarah Schultz, steward, Lake County Forest Preserve Steward $23.20/$29 | Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve, Long Grove, Illinois Saturday, May 11, 1 – 3 p.m. Recognizing Sedges in the Field Many grass-like plants encountered in native habitats of the Chicago region are not actually grasses, but sedges. Learn about Carex, the largest and most diverse genus of the sedge family, including the taxonomy, structure, and ecology. This advanced course is for students who have already completed Botany I or are familiar with the use of taxonomic keys. The School’s CEUs=4 hours OPC elective Jim Steffen, ecologist, Chicago Botanic Garden $63.20/$79 | Seminar Room, Plant Science Center Tuesday, June 11, 9 a.m.

– 1 p.m. Nature Studies Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 49 1/25/19 10:34 AM

50 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. With a variety of courses ranging from site analysis and construction to garden art and history, students learn the principles of garden design and how design relates to the environment. Class locations are sub- ject to change. Some classes may be held outdoors as weather permits. Elements of the Garden: Patios The patio is a place to enjoy meals, relax, and spend time with family and friends. Consider design basics such as style, size, shape, and substance. Discover various paving materials such as brick, bluestone, concrete pavers, and lannon stone that complement the architectur- al style of your home and reflect the spirit of your garden.

Tim Lally, ASLA, PLA, principal, Timothy Lally Design $31.20/$39 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Tuesday, March 12, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. American Home Garden Design: 1830 – Present Draw inspiration for your own home, no matter what age or style, as you look at garden design evolution since the Midwest was first settled. Learn about design trends, the rise of the suburban lawn, foundation plantings, cottage gardens, moon gardens, and heirloom plants. Nina Koziol, garden writer $31.20/$39 | Classroom 1, Learning Center Tuesday, March 19, 10 a.m. – noon Alternative Garden Themes There are many variables to consider in developing a garden, including maintenance requirements, drought tolerance, four-season interest, and methods to recycle organic debris and increase sustainability.

Discover ideas to address these variables including mandala gar- dens and stumperies, using recycled materials to build garden structures, composting on-site, and “no mow” green space instead of lawns. John Eskandari, owner of Urban Plantsman, LLC; arborist, horticulturist, educator $32/$40 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Thursday, March 28, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Painting Your Garden with Plants: Sun and Shade Register for both sessions and save ten percent. $57.60/$72 Designing the Sunny Border The well-designed border wears a combination of perennials, annuals, and shrubs that provide three seasons of color and winter interest.

Discuss how to artfully combine plants with an emphasis on the use of color, texture, and form. Whether you are a new gardener or have an established border that could use updating, this class is for you.

Nina Koziol, garden writer $32/$40 | Linnaeus Room, Regenstein Center Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. – noon Designing the Shade Garden A garden shaded by trees or buildings is often a challenge for the gardener who is faced with low light levels, tree roots, and soil that is often dry. This class provides solutions and ideas for artful plantings that can help you create effective com- binations with optimal color, texture, and form. Nina Koziol, garden writer $32/$40 | Linnaeus Room, Regenstein Center Saturday, March 30, 1 – 3 p.m. Elements of Garden Design: Garden Walks and Paths Whether formal or informal, garden walkways create style and overall mood, and are usually a visitor’s first impression of your garden.

Learn the basics of the design and construction of garden walks and paths. Many paving options will be explored, such as concrete pavers, bricks, gravel, and natural stone. Weigh the pros and cons of each material and decide which is best for your garden. Tim Lally, ASLA, PLA, principal, Timothy Lally Design $32/$40 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Tuesday, April 23, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Garden Design Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 50 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Garden Design Certificate of Merit Program Any individual may register for a certificate program course as long as the prerequisite(s) noted in the course description have been met. Principles of Garden Design Apply knowledge and skills developed in previous design courses to understand spatial properties of landscape materials and their application to design principles. Discover the components of three-dimensional spaces and how they can refine your concept design plans and construction-level drawings. Prerequisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice. PGL 2 and GDC requirement Tony Wasemann, ASLA, senior landscape designer, Scott Byron & Co.

$449.20/$562 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 8 Wednesdays, April 3 – May 22, 6:30 – 9 p.m. and Linnaeus Room, Regenstein Center 2 Saturdays, April 6 & 27, 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. New! Perennial Planting Design Discover how to transform a landscape with perennials. Focus on the selection, design, and installation of herbaceous perennials in the midwestern landscape. Apply the principles of garden design, including combinations, season- al color, and layout, to enhance your overall garden design. Prerequisite: Previous garden design coursework or experience recommend- ed. The School’s CEUs=15 hours GDC elective Julie Sajtar, senior associate, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects $279.20/$349 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 6 Tuesdays, April 2 – May 7, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

New! Master Class: Enhance Your Plan Graphics A well-developed professional landscape plan is the best tool for portraying your design concept to clients. Bring a completed design plan to work on during class. Focus on elevat- ing, strengthening, and enhancing your plan to create the best product for presentation. Prerequisite: Previous garden design graph- ics coursework or experience. The School’s CEUs=2.5 hours GDC elective Gary E. Topalian, ASLA, PLA, senior landscape architect, Scott Byron and Company $59.20/$74 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Monday, April 22, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Hardscape Basics Elevate your garden designs by incorporating hardscape elements.

These structural compo- nents of a landscape provide both functional and aesthetic benefits. Create garden design plans that integrate hardscape structures such as paving, landscape lighting, and garden walls to achieve your landscape design goals. Prereq- uisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice, Principles of Garden Design. PGL 2 and GDC requirement TBD $479.20/$599 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 10 Thursdays, May 30 – August 8, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

(no class July 4) and Off-site Saturday, June 15, 1 – 4 p.m. Introduction to Grading and Drainage Apply knowledge and skills developed in previous design courses to basic grading and drainage concepts as they relate to design. Acquire a critical understanding of key earth forms and drainage patterns in residential landscapes through active discussions and hands-on projects. Prerequisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice, Principles of Garden Design. PGL 2 and GDC requirement Tony Wasemann, ASLA, senior landscape designer, Scott Byron & Co. $479.20/$599 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 8 Wednesdays, June 5 – July 31, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

(no class July 3) and Classroom 4, Learning Center 2 Saturdays, July 13 & 20, 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 51 1/25/19 10:34 AM

52 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Throughout history, plants and images of plants have been woven into the arts— painting, literature, and photography. Class locations are subject to change. Some classes may be held outdoors as weather permits. Mosaic Workshop Pique assiette, or “broken plates,” incorporates a blending of color, form, and texture. This folk art can be found in many cultures and is popu- lar today as a way to recycle a favorite piece of china or broken heirloom.

Complete a unique mosaic from shards of china, ceramic, or glass. A supply list is given at the first class, but you can start collecting dishes now!

Bonnie Arkin, artist and designer $191.20/$239 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 8 Thursdays, March 21 – May 9, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. or 8 Thursdays, May 30 – July 25, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. (no class July 4) or 8 Thursdays, May 30 – July 25, 7 – 9 p.m. (no class July 4) Fiber Arts Workshops Natasha Lewis of Esther’s Place Fiber Arts Studio in Big Rock, Illinois, will share her love of fiber arts and inspire you to create. Register for both sessions and save ten percent. $79.92/$99.90 Wet Felted Flower Pin Make a beautiful wet felted flower pin, perfect to cheer up any spring day. Use layers of hand- dyed wool, silk, bamboo, sparkles, and beads, to add the finishing touches.

Learn a new tech- nique and enjoy an exquisite flower to adorn your bag, coat, or hat.

$39.20/$49 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Monday, March 25, 10 a.m. – noon Shibori-dyed Scarf Make a tranquil river scene come to life with creative dyeing techniques. Wrap simple ob- jects like sticks and stones into silk, paint with vivid colors, and watch your scarf come to life. You will leave with an exquisite 14 x 72 inch habotai silk scarf to wear or give as a gift. $49.60/$62 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Monday, March 25, 1 – 4 p.m. Beginning Watercolor Watercolor is a delightfully fun medium. You will learn a variety of watercolor techniques, including washes and how to make a range of textures on paper, plus some color theory to get you started.

No prior experience is necessary. Patsy Welch, artist and educator $239.20/$299 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 8 Wednesdays, March 27 – May 15, 9 – 11:30 a.m. Intermediate Watercolor After you complete Beginning Watercolor, con- tinue to learn various techniques and color the- ory while exploring different ways to combine light, color, and textures in watercolor painting. Patsy Welch, artist and educator $239.20/$299 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 8 Wednesdays, March 27 – May 15, 1 – 3:30 p.m. Learn How to Make Goat Milk Soap Learn to make small-batch artisan goat milk soap. Learn the old-fashioned cold-process method, us- ing farm-fresh goat milk and organic, sustainable vegetable oil and essential oils.

Take home a bar of this mild, moisturizing, chemical-free soap. Gretta Winkelbauer, owner and organic farmer, Gretta’s Goats $111.20/$139 | Classroom 5, Learning Center Saturday, April 6, 1 – 3 p.m. or Thursday, April 11, 1 – 3 p.m. New! Weaving the Chair in Cane Do you have a vintage chair in need of new caning? Learn the basic, seven-step method of hand caning in this relaxed, hands-on class. Discussion focuses on weaving chair backs and seats with sustainable materials such as cane. Other weave designs, styles, and materials will be demonstrated. Fee includes all materials. Mui Baltrunas, artisan $259/$323.75 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 8 Tuesdays, April 9 – May 28, 1 – 3 p.m.

Watercolor: Painting the Natural World Express the beauty of nature in watercolor. Each week focuses on a specific technique, such as ways to mix greens or show natural textures, with a goal of a more satisfying painting ex- perience. In the last two weeks, you will focus on landscape techniques such as composition, color, and focus to create the impression of a beautiful natural place. Beginners welcome. Judith Joseph, artist and educator $345/$431.25 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 8 Thursdays, April 18 – June 6, 12:30 – 3:30 p.m. Advanced Rejuvenated Jewelry So, you’ve taken Rejuvenated Jewelry—are you ready to delve deeper, learn more tech- niques, and explore many creative ideas? Create spectacular jewelry from vintage broken jewelry, watches, tin, and china.

Bring your grandma’s jewelry box and collected treasures. Prerequisite: Rejuvenated Jewelry or consent of the instructor. Bonnie Arkin, artist and designer $191.20/$239 | Classroom 6, Learning Center 8 Wednesdays, April 24 – June 12, 7 – 9 p.m. Botanical Arts Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 52 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Botanical Arts To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 53 New! Meditations in Ink: Iris and Swallow or Bamboo and Dragonfly Asian Brush Painting Workshops with Bruce Iverson Join a relaxing, meditative exploration into the nature and techniques of painting in the hsieh-i style of brush painting, called sumi-e in Japan. Through demonstrations and hands-on paint- ing, learn to paint this elegant flower and guest bird or traditional bamboo with a high-flying dragonfly in ink and color. In each class, you will come away with two completed projects. Previous art experience is not necessary.

All class materials are provided.

Bruce Iverson, artist $151.20/$189 | Classroom 6, Learning Center Saturday, April 27, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. (Iris and Swallow) or $151.20/$189 | Classroom 5, Learning Center (Bamboo and Dragonfly) Sunday, April 28, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. New! Nature in the Sketchbook, in the Garden, in the Museum Use resources of the Chicago Botanic Garden and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to learn how artists and scientists understand ideas of nature. Complete an exploratory sketchbook of observational paintings, draw- ings, and notes that serve as an investigative record. Activities include outdoor painting and sketching, discussions with scientists, art historical lectures, and a visit to the Prints and Drawings Collection.

This class is designed for students who have some experience painting and drawing.

This course is presented in partnership between the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Chicago Botanic Garden. Jeane Cohen, artist $468/$585 | Chicago Botanic Garden and Art Institute of Chicago 5 Saturdays & 5 Wednesdays, May 1 – June 1, 9 a.m. – noon Rejuvenated Jewelry Inspired by the little treasures you save and love, combine old and new elements to create spectacular jewelry. Bring your special and sentimental keepsakes, single earrings, buttons, charms, chains, family photos, and found objects. You will learn to solder, wire wrap, and string. A supply list is given at the first class, but you can start collecting treasures now.

Bonnie Arkin, artist and designer $191.20/$239 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 8 Tuesdays, May 7 – June 25, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. or $191.20/$239 | Classroom 5, Learning Center 8 Tuesdays, May 7 – June 25, 7 – 9 p.m. Botanical Arts Certificate of Merit Program Any individual may register for a certificate pro- gram course as long as the prerequisite(s) noted in the course description have been met. New! Colored Pencil: Enchanting Orchids The luscious colors of orchids, combined with the fine detail required to accurately depict their elaborate structures, make them ideal subjects for colored pencils on paper or Mylar drafting film.

Visit the Orchid Show for inspiration, and draw live specimens to produce high-quality orchid paintings. Prerequisites: Colored Pencil Drawing or Colored Pencil Workshop courses. The School’s CEUs=18 hours ART elective Claudia Lane, freelance artist $279.20/$349 | Linnaeus Room, Regenstein Center Friday – Sunday, March 8 – 10, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Color Mixing Learn to mix accurate, exciting color including the vivid, specific hues of flowers, the bright and subdued greens of leaves, and the deep, subtle colors in shadows. You will make charts for permanent reference and then apply this knowledge as you paint flowers and leaves from live specimens.

You will work in water- color, but exercises apply to all media. ART requirement Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Chicago Botanic Garden and The Field Museum $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Saturdays, March 9 – April 13, 9 a.m. – noon New! Expressive Watercolor: Open Studio The freedom and fluidity of watercolor allow a bolder, larger, looser approach to your work. You will explore wet into wet and wet into dry techniques. This course is designed to build on foundational watercolor techniques with individualized personal instruction. Prerequisite: Previous watercolor coursework or experience.

The School’s CEUs=18 hours ART elective Thomas Trausch, artist, TWSA master status $279.20/$349 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Saturdays, March 9 – April 13, 1 – 4 p.m. Botanical Drawing 2 Continue to build your drawing skills with advanced graphite techniques, light and dark media on toned paper, and carbon dust. Prerequisite: Botanical Drawing 1. ART requirement Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Chi- cago Botanic Garden and The Field Museum $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Sundays, March 17 – April 28, 1 – 4 p.m. (no class April 21) New! Colored Pencil: Exotic Plants The Chicago Botanic Garden’s Greenhouses contain many exotic plants, displayed in facsim- iles of their native habitats.

Compose studies of the intricate plant structures and colors in the Greenhouses, then return to the studio to translate into compositions. Work in graphite leading to finished work in colored pencil, using techniques introduced in earlier courses. The School’s CEUs=15 hours ART elective Claudia Lane, freelance artist $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 5 Thursdays, March 21 – April 18, 9 a.m. – noon New! Go Figure: Incorporating Life into Watercolor Art Animate and enliven your watercolor painting by incorporating human or animal figures into the landscape. The figures will provide a focal point that adds interest, storytelling, scale, and perspec- tive to your paintings.

Learn techniques to simplify the figure and gesture in your artwork. Prerequi- site: Previous watercolor coursework or experience recommended. The School’s CEUs=17.5 hours ART elective Thomas Trausch, artist, TWSA master status $279.20/$349 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 5 Tuesdays, April 16 – May 14, 5:30 – 9 p.m. New! Colored Pencil: A Mixed-Media Approach You will learn how colored pencil can be mixed with various mediums—graphite, watercolor, pas- tel, and ink. These techniques can speed up the process of colored pencil and create some unique looks. Prerequisite: Colored Pencil Workshop, Col- ored Pencil Drawing Course, or previous colored pencil coursework.

The School’s CEUs=12 hours ART elective Kimberly Mullarkey, freelance artist $279.20/$349 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 4 Saturdays, April 20 – May 11, 1 – 4 p.m. English Watercolor Techniques Use live plant materials and build on techniques learned in Watercolor I. Emphasis is on realistic portrayal of botanical subjects and traditional methods of dry brush watercolor painting, with attention to detail and color accuracy. Demonstrations and individual instruction will be given. Prerequisites: Botanical Drawing 1, Color Mixing, and Watercolor 1.

ART requirement, traditional track Nancy Halliday, freelance artist and naturalist $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Thursdays, May 2 – June 6, 6 – 9 p.m. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 53 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Regenstein School | Adult Education 54 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. New! Botanicals on Coquille Board Coquille board’s pebble-like surface encourages fast, fun, and beautiful renderings of botanical subjects. You will start in full-value black and white and advance to color. The School’s CEUs=9 hours ART elective Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Chicago Botanic Garden and the Field Museum $148.20/$186 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m.

– 4 p.m. and Sunday, May 5, 1 – 4 p.m. Composition Students at all levels will learn the components of fine botanical composition in this studio class. You will explore composition, design, and execution. ART requirement Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Chicago Botanic Garden and the Field Museum $238.40/$298 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 6 Saturdays, May 11 – June 22, 9 a.m. – noon (no class May 25) Introduction to Oil Painting Open to all levels, this class will immerse you in the painting process from day one. You will learn how to select, compose, and paint based on strong design, values, and colors.

This won- derful medium allows for extended manipula- tion and nuances of interpretation. Dress for the weather. Prerequisite: Botanical Drawing 1 ART requirement option, expressive track Thomas Trausch, artist, TWSA master status $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Saturdays, June 1 – July 20, 1 – 4 p.m. (no class June 15 or July 6) Open Studio, Spring Session This studio class is open to all levels. You may bring a project of your choice, any medium, or work with plant subjects to create a new art piece. Lecture and demonstration illustrate principles that pertain to all media.

The School’s CEUs=12 hours ART elective Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Chicago Botanic Garden and the Field Museum $191.20/$239 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 4 Sundays, June 2 – 30, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (no class June 16) Colored Pencil Drawing Course Start with the fundamentals, then delve into working with dry and wet media of colored pencil. Develop your drawing skills through col- or exploration of value, intensity, and tempera- ture. Learn dry applications, layering, washes, and color-mixing techniques. Work from live specimens. Each class includes demonstration and explanation, as well as individual guidance and instruction.

The School’s CEUs=18 hours ART elective Claudia Lane, freelance artist $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Mondays, June 3 – July 15, 6 – 9 p.m. (no class July 1) New! Bees, Butterflies, and Bugs, Oh My!

Animate your floral paintings in this exploration of nature's mighty mites. Use insect specimens and photos to highlight your landscape floral paintings with close-up views of pollinators. Adding these critters to your work highlights the unique relationship between flowers and insects. All media welcome. Dress for the weather. The School’s CEUs=12 hours ART elective Thomas Trausch, artist, TWSA master status $279.20/$349 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 4 Tuesdays, June 4 – 25, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Pastel Dust Pastel dust is a medium that lends itself to great vibrancy and soft blending, perfect for botanical subjects.

Used in conjunction with pastels and pastel pencils, it combines an expressive painterly approach enhancing your ability to achieve greater detail. The School’s CEUs=8.5 hours ART elective Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Chicago Botanic Garden and the Field Museum $148.20/$186 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Saturday, June 29, 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday, June 30, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. New! Reflecting on Water From the Great Basin, to the fountain in the North Lake, to the Waterfall Garden, to the Water Gardens, you will paint the reflective qualities, the movement, the sparkle, and the tranquility of water.

Learn to analyze and paint water in differ- ent ways to apply to your landscape paintings. All media welcome. Dress for the weather. Prerequi- site: Previous painting experience or coursework. The School’s CEUs = 20 hours ART elective Thomas Trausch, artist, TWSA master status $319.20/$399 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 5 Mondays, July 8 – August 5, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Watercolor 1 Watercolor is an ideal medium to achieve a naturalistic style in botanic art. You will learn basic color mixing and paint-handling exercises, progressing to rendering textures and form in color, and using paint-layering techniques.

Pre- requisites: Botanical Drawing 1 and Color Mixing ART requirement Nancy Halliday, freelance artist and naturalist $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Thursdays, July 11 – August 15, 6 – 9 p.m. Outdoor Sketching Composing quick studies in the field is an important skill. You will gain the experience to create these sketches, complete with notes on field conditions, colors, plant measurements, and textures, for a complete work-up in the studio. Folding chairs are provided. In case of inclement weather the class will draw in the Greenhouses. Dress for the weather. ART requirement Kimberly Mullarkey, freelance artist $238.40/$298 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Saturdays, July 13 – August 17, 9 a.m.

– noon New! Essentials of Perspective Drawing Successfully illustrating proper positioning of objects in space is an essential component of drawing. Through sketching structural ele- ments in the Garden and in the classroom set- ting, you will gain an understanding of linear perspective, shadows, and reflections. Explore how you think about the visual representation of a landscape to improve the realism of your artwork. Dress for the weather. Prerequisites: Botanical Drawing 1 or a course in basic draw- ing. The School’s CEUs=5 hours ART elective Nancy Halliday, freelance artist and naturalist $99.20/$124 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Saturday, July 27, 9 a.m.

– 3 p.m. Drawn from Nature: Annual Student Botanical Arts Exhibition Registration deadline: Monday, June 24 Get your paintbrushes ready and your pencils sharpened! Registration is now open for the 2019 Drawn from Nature: Annual Student Botanical Arts Exhibition. Students of all levels are welcome, but you must register and submit your entries by June 24 to participate. Detailed information online.

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56 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Discover the joy of nature and garden pho- tography with the Garden as your studio. Advance your artistic and technical skills in classes and workshops for students of all levels led by outstanding photography professionals. Class locations are subject to change. Some classes may be held outdoors as weather permits. New! How to Buy a Camera Have you been thinking about buying a digital camera but find it too confusing? Remove the mystery by exploring features, sizes, and price points of many levels and brands of cameras.

Whether you haven’t taken a picture since film days or are completely new to the hobby, all are welcome and no camera is required. Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $47.20/$59 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Sunday, March 24, 9 a.m. – noon Beginning Abstracts in Nature Create poetic images using the tools of aper- ture priority, shutter speed priority, exposure compensation, and reflective materials. An emphasis will be placed on conceptual design using symbols and metaphors. This beginning class is designed for students new to mirrorless or SLR camera who have a strong interest in abstract art.

Be prepared to use your camera’s manual and be able to download and email images.

Dianne Kittle, fine art photographer $231.20/$289 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 6 Wednesdays, March 27 – May 1, 1 – 3:30 p.m. New Camera Workshop Did you receive a camera as a gift recently? Is your camera still sitting in the box? This workshop will help you set up your camera and learn basic operations through hands-on instruction. To get the most out of class, bring your digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera, mirrorless camera, or an advanced point-and- shoot camera. Paul Lucas, nature photographer and instructor $95.20/$119 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 2 Saturdays, March 30 & April 6, 1 – 4 p.m.

iPhone Photography There are hundreds of photography apps for iPhones, and many have similar features. Explore some of the better-known apps and how to use them for nature photography. Learn the basics of iPhone photography along with fieldwork. We will examine photos taken during class and discuss how they can be enhanced, manipulated, or altered to create a personal statement. iPhones are mandatory. Dress for the weather.

Tobin Fraley, photographer $95.20/$119 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 3 Fridays, May 3 – 17, 1 – 3 p.m. Photographing the Garden With 27 gardens, nine islands, six miles of shoreline, and four nature areas spread across 385 acres, the Chicago Botanic Garden is a dream environment and a challenge for pho- tographers. Discover places and techniques for creating captivating images, review easy-to- apply compositional ideas, and explore how to capture the essence of the Garden. Dress for the weather.

Paul Lucas, nature photographer and instructor $63.20/$79 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 2 Saturdays, May 4 & 11, 9 – 11 a.m.

New! Garden and Travel Photography The best souvenirs of your trip are photographs of the buildings and gardens you visit. Combining buildings and gardens often presents a challenge. Learn how to create lead- lines in addition to using light, angle, and time of day to optimize your pictures. Classes will be held at the Garden and other locations. Dress for the weather. Prerequisite: Beginning Pho- tography class or general camera competence. Digital camera (no tablets or cell phones, please) and tripod strongly encouraged. Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $183.20/$229 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 4 Thursdays, May 16 – June 6, 9 a.m.

– noon Photography Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 56 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Photography To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 57 Advanced iPhone Photography Workshop Take iPhone photography to the next level with updated and new apps, plus a look at updated iPhone features. Prerequisite: iPhone Photography Tobin Fraley, photographer $47.20/$59 | Classroom 4, Learning Center Friday, May 24, 1 – 4 p.m. Focus on Photography Certificate of Merit Program Beginning Digital Photography Learn the techniques and principles of photog- raphy. You will explore the basics of photogra- phy, including image composition rules, how the camera works, proper exposure, and the functions of lens aperture and shutter speed.

Some minimal photo processing will also be covered. The course requires a digital SLR cam- era. No previous experience is required. FPC requirement Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $232/$290 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 4 Mondays, March 25 – April 15, 9 a.m. – noon Abstracts in Nature—Spring Apply photographic techniques to create a portfolio of abstract fine art photographs in this intermediate class. Using design concepts, you will craft images with mood and message. A review of technical SLR tools, in addition to developing your creative eye, will help you capture abstracts.

Class will include lecture, critique, and practice time in the Garden, along with making a book using Blurb Bookwright. Digital SLR camera and tripod required. Proficiency with aperture and shutter speed is required.

FPC fundamental course, fine art track Dianne Kittle, fine art photographer $231.20/$289 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 6 Wednesdays, March 27 – May 1, 9:30 a.m. – noon New! Creating Photographic Series Join us for an introduction to the various approaches to creating a photographic series. The second session will be a discussion of your series plans to help you refine and create a compelling series of work. After taking time to independently work on the series idea formu- lated within class, we'll meet again for a final share, critique, and refinement of your work. The School’s CEUs=10 hours FPC elective, master track Angie McMonigal, fine art photographer $232/$290 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 3 Mondays, April 1, 10 a.m.

– noon, April 15 & May 6, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Photographing in Natural Light Photographers often find themselves in a situ- ation where flash photography is not allowed, or where artificial light disturbs the honesty of a photo. Learn techniques that use natural light from available sources to capture realistic and untouched images.

FPC fundamental course, nature and landscape track Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $232/$290 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 4 Thursdays, April 4 – 25, 9 a.m. – noon Photography Techniques: Using the Proper Lens Learn the differences among focal lengths of lenses and how to select the appropriate lens for each particular subject. Other topics include matching the lens to the light level, depth of field, and how to obtain maximum image sharpness, as well as using the hyperfocal length setting with manual focus. The School’s CEUs=3 hours FPC elective Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $47.20/$59 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Sunday, April 7, 9 a.m.

– noon New! Creating Composite Images in Photoshop Harness the power of Photoshop to combine your photographs into new creations. Work through different projects and learn the tools you need to create your own composite imag- es. Techniques include combining and blending layers, selecting and masking, and applying adjustment layers. Use your imagination to cre- ate new versions of reality, fantastic abstracts, and surreal worlds. A personal laptop with Photoshop installed is required. Prerequisite: Photoshop 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. School’s CEUs=15 hours FPC elective, master track Anne Houde, fine art photographer $299/$373.75 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 6 Thursdays, April 11 – May 16, 9:30 a.m.

– noon Photoshop I The Chicago Botanic Garden is a spectacu- lar place to take photographs. Make your images even better with Adobe Photoshop Elements—a user-friendly photo editor that has the same concepts as the full version of Photoshop. Apply selection tools, layers, and smart brushes. Requirements for the course are a laptop computer with Adobe Photoshop Elements or Adobe Photoshop CS5 installed and a digital camera.

FPC requirement Iris Allen, freelance photographer and instructor $299/$373.75 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 6 Mondays, April 15 – June 3, 1 – 3:30 p.m. (no class April 29 & May 27) Photographing Signs of Spring Spring is often subtle in its arrival. You will learn the best camera and lens settings to use when capturing small hints of the changing season. Learn to recognize which perspectives will best highlight these small-scale buds and shoots. Macro or close-focusing lens is helpful, but not required. Dress for the weather. Prereq- uisites: Beginning Digital Photography or con- sent of the instructor.

Class limited to digital cameras only. The School’s CEUs=12 hours FPC elective Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $232/$290 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 4 Tuesdays, April 23 – May 21, 9 a.m. – noon (no class May 7) The Philosophy of Photography Explore how the medium of photography has affected society and how it continues to evolve as it compresses recent history into a series of images and creates a sense of false memory. How do photographic images represent truth, and how do the trillions of photographs taken each year affect our daily communication? Reading assignments and class participation are required.

Bring your camera, your mind, and your opinions. The School’s CEUs=12.5 hours FPC elective, master track Tobin Fraley, photographer $248/$310 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 5 Tuesdays, April 23 – May 21, 9:30 a.m. – noon Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 57 1/25/19 10:34 AM

Regenstein School | Adult Education 58 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Advanced Black & White Photography Black and white photography helps you create stunning images. Learn cover printing on a variety of papers, the use of black and white adjustments in Photoshop, and enhanced tonal variations within the final image. You will also learn from the work of three iconic twenti- eth-century photographers. Prerequisite: Black & White Photography or approval of instructor. The School’s CEUs=15 hours FPC elective, master track Tobin Fraley, photographer $299/$373.75 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 5 Tuesdays, April 23 – May 21, 1 – 4 p.m.

Photographing Wildflowers Discover how to capture images of both native wildflowers and garden flowers. The emphasis will be on color and tonal balance, close-ups, backgrounds, natural and flash lighting, and composition. Wildflowers change quickly in the spring, so each week will offer a new array of subjects. Dress for the weather. Digital SLR cameras are mandatory along with a general working knowledge of your camera's func- tions.

FPC fundamental course, nature and landscape track Tobin Fraley, photographer $248/$310 | Design Studio, Regenstein Center 5 Fridays, April 26 – May 24, 9:30 a.m. – noon Intermediate Digital Photography Thoughtful processes are key steps in learning to identify, then capture, an impressive and artistic image as an intermediate photographer. Use lead lines, selective manual focus, and appropriate aperture settings to enhance your photos. Prerequisite: Beginning Digital Photog- raphy or the consent of the instructor. FPC requirement Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $349/$436.25 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 6 Mondays, May 13 – June 24, 9 a.m.

– noon (no class May 27) New! Lightroom 2: Realizing Your Vision Build your skills in Lightroom and make images that realize your vision. Learn to fine-tune the look of your images with global and local adjustments. Then learn to print your own images on premium photographic and fine art papers. Use the capabilities of Lightroom to produce your own photobook to showcase your images. A personal laptop with Lightroom Classic CC installed is required. Prerequisite: Lightroom 1 or consent of instructor. The School’s CEUs=15 hours FPC elective Anne Houde, fine art photographer $299/$373.75 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 6 Thursdays, May 23 – June 27, 9:30 a.m.

– noon The Fine Art Water Portfolio Water, the essence of life, will be your canvas for creating artistic images. You will freeze patterns of design formed by water and learn to isolate images reflecting the water’s surface. Using slow shutter speed, polarizers, and neutral density filters, you will direct your camera to paint works of water art. You must understand how to use your digital camera. Intermediate to advanced level. FPC fundamental course, fine art track Dianne Kittle, fine art photographer $299/$373.75 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 6 Tuesdays, June 4 – July 16, 9:30 a.m. – noon (no class July 2) Fine Art Photography Portfolio A The Garden serves as a natural laboratory for a variety of photographic design techniques to turn your ordinary snapshot into art.

You will study the work of contemporary fine art pho- tographers. Emphasis will be on finding your own artistic style while advancing your photo- graphic skills to create your own portfolio. This course is designed for intermediate photogra- phers. Digital SLR cameras are mandatory. FPC required course, fine art track Dianne Kittle, fine art photographer $399.20/$498.75 | Classroom 4, Learning Center 7 Tuesdays, June 4 – July 23, 1 – 4 p.m. (no class July 2) Urban Photography Take advantage of the photographic opportuni- ties presented by the beautiful city of Chicago and its environs. You will learn to integrate the photography of landscape and hardscape and explore the use of camera settings beyond the everyday.

The School’s CEUs=15 hours FPC elective Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $299/$373.75 | Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center 5 Fridays, June 14 – July 19, 9 a.m. – noon (no class July 5) Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 58 1/25/19 10:34 AM

fpdcc.com 70,000 acres of wild and wonderful. The Forest Preserves of Cook County

60 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Hands-on classes allow participants to fully participate in cooking. Demonstration classes include some interactive portions. All classes include take-home recipes and tastings. Depending on availability, some ingredients and recipes may change. Closed-toed shoes are required. We will make every attempt to accommodate par- ticipants with food restrictions by substi- tuting alternative ingredients as available, however, our kitchen is not certified gluten-free and it is not kosher.

Kindly con- sider your dietary needs before enrolling. Demonstration Cooking: Whole Grains Adding whole grains to your diet helps create a healthier you. In this cooking class, discover techniques to incorporate whole wheat flour and other fiber- and vitamin-rich ingredients to your meals. Learn to make waldorf salad with steel cut oats and mushroom-barley-cashew burgers. Take home a portion of morning glory muffins.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $44.80/$56 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Wednesday, April 3, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Demonstration Cooking: Umami Explore bold ingredients that add umami, the savory fifth taste, to your meals. In this cooking class, learn recipes and techniques to prepare spinach salad with warm bacon mushroom dressing; flank steak with bloody mary relish; cornbread panzanella with squash; and miso caramel sauce, a portion of which you will take home. Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $48/$60 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Sunday, April 7, noon – 1:30 p.m.

New! Hands-on Cooking: Easy Skillet Dinners Mastering sauté and pan sauce techniques allows you to improvise with on-hand ingre- dients. In this cooking class, you’ll prepare martini mustard chicken; chicken with lemon, prosciutto, and sage sauce; sweet and sour chicken; spicy green beans; and cauliflower salad with pomegranates. Alcohol will be served in this class; participants must be 21 years of age or older.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $89.60/$112 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Thursday, April 11, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Demonstration Cooking: Indian Chickpeas Discover the possibilities of cooking with chickpeas—high in fiber and protein, and glu- ten-free. You will learn how to incorporate the vibrant flavors of India in a variety of different gluten-free dishes including chickpea avocado salad and chickpea masala curry served with basmati rice. Shilpi Saxena, culinary instructor $50.40/$63 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Saturday, April 13, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. New! Hands-on Cooking: Seasoning Techniques Using proper seasoning adds personality to your dishes.

In this cooking class, learn how to apply salt, balance acidity, and add character with fresh herbs or warm spices as you prepare lemon sage brined pork chops; chicken arti- choke kabobs; and chickpea arugula and pick- led carrot salad. Make and take home a bag of brine and a portion of Provençal herb rub. Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $60/$75 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Sunday, April 14, 1 – 3:30 p.m. New! Demonstration Cooking: Rice and Spice Differently spiced and flavored rice dishes appear as a staple across many cuisines. In this cooking class, enjoy calypso rice and beans; Thai fragrant basmati rice; and risotto-stuffed eggplant.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $44.80/$56 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Wednesday, April 24, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Demonstration Cooking: Stalks Celebrate diverse ways to use spring stalks in this cooking class. You will enjoy stir fry noodles with asparagus, mushrooms, tofu, and cashews; artichoke and goat cheese tart; and spiced rhubarb ketchup. Learn puff pastry tech- niques and take home a portion of ketchup. Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $44.80/$56 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Sunday, April 28, noon – 1:30 p.m. New! Demonstration Cooking: Herbs and Alliums Explore full-flavored ingredients from the plant world in this cooking class.

Learn to use chives in orange and red onion salad; tarragon and parsley in leek, scallion, and fennel gratin; and oregano and basil in roasted garlic-shallot- ricotta sauce with pasta.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $44.80/$56 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Saturday, May 4, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Hands-on Cooking: All About Rhubarb Learn everything you need to know about rhubarb in this cooking class. Cover the how- tos of water-bath canning, an easy method of home food preservation. Safety concerns and equipment needs will be addressed. You will make and take home a jar of rhubarb chutney, which is delicious when paired with cheese. Emily Paster, cookbook author and blogger $55/$68.75 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Sunday, May 5, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. New! Hands-on Cooking: Substantial Salads Fresh and filling, salads make for easy spring entertaining.

In this cooking class, you will prepare four different hearty, main-course salads: Israeli couscous with tuna; spicy shrimp avocado salad; sesame chicken noodle salad with plums; and antipasto pasta salad. Alcohol will be served in this class; participants must be 21 years of age or older.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $89.60/$112 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Thursday, May 9, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Cooking Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 60 1/25/19 10:34 AM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 61 Demonstration Cooking: Classic Indian Meal Experience an evening in New Delhi as you learn to prepare an authentic North Indian vegetarian meal. Watch how to make lentils in a slow-cooked style and discover ways to use herbs and spices in a variety of recipes: dal makhani; cumin-flavored long-grain basmati rice; and cool cucumber mint yogurt dip.

Shilipi Saxena, culinary instructor $56/$70 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Friday, May 10, 5 – 7:30 p.m. Demonstration Cooking: Spring Herbs Gain inspiration for a spring brunch menu highlighting flavors and textures of herbs. In this cooking class, you will explore working with phyllo dough to prepare veggie quiche cups; spinach salad with frisee and strawber- ries; crispy polenta triangles; and chicken sau- sage patties. Pot up a miniature herb garden of fresh basil, parsley, and thyme to take home and enjoy.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $56/$70 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Saturday, May 11, 10 a.m. – noon New! Demonstration Cooking: Smart Snacks Satisfy between-meal cravings with home- made, healthy snacks. Learn how to prepare orange chipotle spice pecan mix; pickled vege- tables; and spinach white bean and tofu spread with baked pita chips. You will also take home a snack-size portion of maple chile popcorn. Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $44.80/$56 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Wednesday, May 15, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. New! Hands-on Cooking: Spring Desserts Indulge your sweet tooth in this cooking class, featuring tasty desserts incorporating bright spring flavors.

You will make and take home a portion of each recipe: coconut macaroons; lemon ginger ice box pie; and almond cherry biscotti.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $60/$75 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Sunday, May 19, 1 – 3:30 p.m. Hands-on Cooking: Indian Breads Layered with vegetables and butter, breads are the star of an Indian meal. In this cooking class, make fresh stuffed north Indian flat breads, known as paratha, such as aloo (potato), gobi (cauliflower), paneer (cottage cheese), palak (spinach), and lachha (layered). You will learn dough preparation and pairing options, and take samples home. Shilpi Saxena, culinary instructor $60/$75 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Monday, June 3, 5 – 7:30 p.m.

Demonstration Cooking: Instant Pot Make your meal preparation easier using the pressure cooker function of an instant pot. In this cooking class, learn to prepare all new rec- ipes including beer and mustard pulled turkey; caramelized onion with brown rice and lentil burgers; and farmhouse egg salad. Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $50.40/$63 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Tuesday, June 4, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Hands-on Cooking: Cooking with Beer Beer serves as a marinade, adds depth and fla- vor, and provides lift to batters. In this cooking class, you will explore techniques to make beer- glazed beans; sriracha almonds; tri-tip steak with fire beer marinade; beer-battered tofu tacos; and stout crème anglaise with seasonal fruit.

Alcohol will be served at this class; partici- pants must be 21 years of age or older. Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $89.60/$112 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Thursday, June 6, 6 – 8:30 p.m. New! Demonstration Cooking: Sourdough Bread If you love the flavor of sourdough bread but think you could never make it at home, this class will change your mind. Learn how to maintain a sourdough starter and the process of using it to create home-baked bread. Get ideas and recipes for other ways to use the starter, such as biscuits, pancakes, and pizza dough. Take home a portion of starter and get started baking.

Emily Paster, cookbook author and blogger $55/$68.75 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Saturday, June 8, 9 – 11 a.m. Hands-on Cooking: Five Ways to Preserve the Harvest Learn to eat more seasonally and locally throughout the year by canning, fermenting, dehydrating, and freezing. You will practice step-by-step methods for water-bath canning and fermentation. Safety concerns and equip- ment needs will be addressed. Emily Paster, cookbook author and blogger $55/$68.75 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Saturday, June 8, noon – 2 p.m. Hands-on Cooking: Knife Skills Improve your knife skills by practicing mince, dice, julienne, and chiffonade cuts in this cook- ing class.

You will put together mango spring rolls, prepare ingredients for lemon-beef stir fry, and assemble components to take home for an Asian ratatouille.

Mary Kay Gill, professional culinary instructor $52/$65 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Sunday, June 9, 2 – 4 p.m. New! Hands-on Cooking: Asparagus Asparagus is one of spring’s most anticipated and versatile vegetables. Learn to select the best asparagus, how to store them, and different preparation methods. Recipes include a spring risotto with asparagus, peas, and mint, and an Italian-inspired asparagus preserved in oil. You will make and take home a jar of pickled asparagus. Emily Paster, cookbook author and blogger $55/$68.75 | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Saturday, June 15, 9 – 11 a.m.

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62 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Energy Medicine Practice for Wellness Energy medicine empowers you to work with your body’s electromagnetic energy to improve health. It builds on Western science while drawing from Eastern disciplines such as acupuncture, yoga, and qi gong. Learn simple Eden Energy Medicine exercises for stress relief, clearing unwanted energies, and boosting your immune system. Exercises can be modified for those with limited mobility. Devi Stern, M.S., energy healer, and author of Energy Healing with the Kabbalah, Integrating Ancient Jewish Mysticism with Modern Energetic Practices Choose from two class levels: Energy Medicine Practice for Beginners $95.20/$119 | Classroom 1, Learning Center 6 Tuesdays, March 12 – April 16, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

or $96/$120 | Classroom 1, Learning Center 6 Tuesdays, April 23 – May 28, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Energy Medicine Practice for Wellness Prerequisite: Energy Medicine Practice for Beginners or instructor approval $95.20/$119 | Classroom 1, Learning Center 6 Tuesdays, March 12 – April 16, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. or $96/$120 | Classroom 1, Learning Center 6 Tuesdays, April 23 – May 28, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tai Chi Basics for the Weekend Tai chi is a low-impact, slow-motion practice with health benefits such as increased range of motion, improved balance, and increased energy. Explore gentle postures and exercises designed to improve your well-being.

This class may be practiced seated, and may be taken multiple times. Dress for the weather. Gordon Lock and Way Sun, instructors $124/$155 | Grainger Gallery, Plant Science Center Spring: 8 Saturdays, April 20 – June 8, 9 – 10 a.m.

or $140/$175 | Grainger Gallery, Plant Science Center Summer: 9 Saturdays, July 6 – August 31, 9 – 10 a.m. New! Tai Chi, Xing Yi, and Ba Qua Deep Study Explore an ancient practice of soft, internal, and intentional forms as you focus on single movements. If you have taken the advanced beginner, intermediate, or advanced classes at the Garden, this class is appropriate for you. Dress for the weather. Gordon Lock and Way Sun, instructors $124/$155 | Grainger Gallery, Plant Science Center 8 Saturdays, April 20 – June 8, 7:45 – 8:45 a.m.

Wellness & Fitness Wellness and fitness classes are designed enhance one’s self-care regimen.

Class locations are subject to change. Some classes may be held outdoors as weather permits. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 62 1/25/19 10:34 AM

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Regenstein School | Adult Education 64 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Shinrin-Yoku Forest Bathing Shinrin yoku, Japanese forest bathing, refers to the practice of immersing all of your senses in the healing forest to reduce stress hormones and increase immune function. Connect with forest life around you through mindful activities on a gentle walk, typically covering less than a mile, and ending with a simple tea ceremony utilizing native plants.

Dress for the weather. This class may be taken multiple times. Sally Peterson, certified nature and forest therapy guide $40/$50 | Meet at McDonald Woods Shelter Saturday, April 27, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. or $40/$50 | Meet at Circle Garden for a Wood- land Walk Saturday, May 18, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. or $40/$50 | Meet at Plant Evaluation Garden for Evening Island walk Saturday, June 15, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. New! Earth Day Forest Bathing $28/$35 | Meet at McDonald Woods Shelter Monday, April 22, 6 – 7:45 p.m. New! Summer Solstice Forest Bathing $28/$35 | Meet at the entrance to the Dwarf Conifer Garden Friday, June 21, 1 – 2:45 p.m.

New! Laugh it Off with Laughter Yoga Laughter is the best medicine. This fun, interactive workshop combines simulated laughter exercises with breathing techniques to produce a wide range of physical, psychological, and emotional benefits. Medical research shows even if you pretend to laugh, your body produces “happiness chemicals.” Suitable for all fitness levels. Dress for comfort. This class may be taken multiple times. Debbie Friend, M.S., owner LifeCurrents $20/$25 | Classroom 1, Learning Center Saturday, April 27, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. or $20/$25 | Classroom 1, Learning Center Saturday, May 4, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

or $20/$25 | Linnaeus Room, Regenstein Center Saturday, June 22, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. New! DIY Cleaning Supplies with Essential Oils The average person is exposed to 72,000 syn- thetic chemicals each year; some of them toxic. Reduce your body’s exposure to chemicals in the home and save money by making your own powerful and nontoxic cleaning products. Create and take home an all-purpose spray, wood polish, bathtub cleaner, and window cleaner with directions for use and recipes for refills. All supplies included.

Melissa Leger $56/$70| Classroom 4, Learning Center Saturday, April 27, 10:30 a.m. – noon Outdoor Walking Workout Exercising in “green space” stimulates your mind and body, providing benefits a gym could never surpass. Build endurance, work on pos- tural alignment, gain core strength, increase cardiovascular capacity, and improve balance. Suitable for all fitness levels. Wear comfort- able clothing and walking shoes. Dress for the weather. The convenient Flexible Pass option allows you to attend any five classes during the 2019 season. This class may be taken multiple times.

Esther Gutiérrez-Sloan, certified personal trainer and founder, SALSArobics, Inc.

$72/$90| Meet at Visitor Center All classes meet Saturdays, 8 – 9 a.m. Sessions are five weeks. Session 1: Begins May 4 (no class May 25) Session 2: Begins June 15 Session 3: Begins July 20 Session 4: Begins September 7 Session 5: Begins October 12 $84/$105 for five-session Flexible Pass New! Stress Reduction Techniques and Practice More than 76 percent of Americans indicate they experience mild to severe stress. Apply techniques used to release tension as you practice mindful breathing and enjoy a guided relaxation session. Class includes diffusing essential oils and tips for use at home.

Please bring a yoga mat or towel. Chairs are available if you prefer to stay upright.

Melissa Leger $24/$30| Linnaeus Room, Regenstein Center Thursday, May 23, 6:30 – 8 p.m. Meditation Walk: The Cycles of Life Walking meditation is an ancient, contempla- tive practice designed to encourage profound spiritual connections. Relax and renew as you slowly walk around the Great Basin, making four stops for guided meditation to focus on birth, growth, loss, and new life. Wear com- fortable clothing and walking shoes. Dress for the weather. Mary Ann Spina, teacher, writer, and counselor $20/$25| Meet at the Visitor Center Saturday, June 1, 2018, 8 – 10 a.m. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 64 1/25/19 10:34 AM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 65 Gentle Yoga April 8 – June 17 9 – 10 a.m. 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Steve Nakon and Patricia Nakon Yoga Flow Intermediate April 9 – June 11 8 – 9 a.m. Steve Nakon Tai Chi Beginner Sun-Style April 9 – June 11 8 – 9 a.m. Gordon Lock Tai Chi Beginner Yang-Style April 9 – June 11 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Gordon Lock Yoga Flow Beginner April 9 – June 11 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. 6 – 7 p.m.

Steve Nakon Tai Chi Intermediate Sun-Style April 10 – June 12 8 – 9 a.m. Gordon Lock Tai Chi Advanced Yang-Style April 10 – June 12 9:15 – 10:15 a.m.

Gordon Lock Gentle Yoga and Meditation April 10 – June 12 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Steve Nakon Tai Chi Basics April 10 – June 12 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Gordon Lock Yoga at Ease April 10 – June 12 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. 7 – 8 p.m. Steve Nakon Tai Chi Advanced Beginner Yang-Style April 11 – June 13 8 – 9 a.m. Gordon Lock Yoga Flow Intermediate April 11 – June 13 9 – 10 a.m. 6 – 7 p.m. Steve Nakon Tai Chi Intermediate Yang-Style April 11 – June 13 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Gordon Lock Yoga Flow Beginner April 11 – June 13 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Steve Nakon Tai Chi Advanced Sun-Style April 12 – June 14 8 – 9 a.m. Gordon Lock and Way Sun Tai Chi Advanced Beginner Sun-Style April 12 – June 14 9:15 – 10:15 a.m.

Gordon Lock and Way Sun Yoga and Tai Chi Classes Yoga is an ancient practice that unites body, mind, and spirit. Tai chi’s fluid movements make the Chicago Botanic Garden an ideal location for classes. Try one of our new single-session yoga or tai chi classes on the previous page, or see the chart below for a list of spring session yoga and tai chi classes that are fully explained at chicagobotanic.org/education/wellness_and_fitness. Summer session dates are available online. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Yoga All classes held in Classroom 2, Learning Center. Ten-class series is $155.20/$194 Tai Chi All classes held in the Regenstein Center.

Ten-class series is $155.20/$194 Look online for summer semester classes. Wellness programming is generously supported by NorthShore University HealthSystem. Adult Ed KG Spring v.4 - single pages.indd 65 1/25/19 10:35 AM

66 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Windy City Harvest is the Chicago Botanic Garden’s urban agriculture department, headquartered at the Farm on Ogden in Chicago. The goal of the department is to connect people with plants through engagement in growing and processing edible crops using the lens of food, health, and jobs. Short courses are intended as a gateway into Windy City Harvest or as a supplement to WCH’s career pathway. Most classes take place at the Farm on Ogden in the North Lawndale community, 3555 Ogden Avenue in Chicago. Saturday Intensives Saturday Intensives are appropriate for all gardening levels, but will be most effective for individuals with previous gardening/farming experience.

Classes all have a significant hands- on component and participants should be prepared to be outdoors in all weather. Each Saturday Intensive class costs $75. Crop Planning This workshop covers site analysis, vegetable garden plan components, space saving tech- niques and spacing, cool- and warm-season crops, crop and variety selection, three-season and succession planning. There will be crop plan examples and a template for you to start your own crop plan. Bring a drawing of your farm site with dimensions.

Melanie Bromberek, Windy City Harvest coordinator Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago February 16, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Starting Your Food Business—Food Safety and Cottage Food Laws This course is intended for aspiring food entrepreneurs and/or urban farmers who are hoping to create or expand their farm or local food business by providing seasonal, local food products all year long. We will cultivate an understanding of the basic techniques, food safety regulations, and business guidelines for producing value-added, local foods. Zina Murray, owner, Logan Square Kitchen Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago February 16, 10:30 a.m.

– 4:30 p.m. Cold-Season Growing: March, April & May This is a technical training course for aspir- ing growers who are interested in learning best-practice season-extension techniques. It will combine classroom and hands-on work to prepare students to get a jump on the spring growing season. It will involve farm work activities in all weather conditions. Students are expected to work indoors and outdoors. Jerrod Schober, Windy City Harvest coordinator Arturo Velasquez Institute, 2800 S. Western Avenue, Chicago March 16, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Value-added Products: Fermenting Krauts, Pickles, and Kimchi Fermented foods are both healthy and a great way to reduce food waste.

Join this hands-on class to learn about different types of fermen- tation. You will quickly put your new knowl- edge to action by preparing different fermenta- tions to taste and take home with you. Instructor TBD Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago March 16, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Small Farm Tools This class is a deep dive into the latest farm tools for creating efficiency and optimal growing in your garden or on the farm. We will discuss how to gauge the perfect timing for seeding your crops plus soil preparation and assessments.

Tim Wilson, farmer and educator, Windy City Harvest consultant Rodeo Farm, 2600 West 26th Street, Chicago April 13, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Urban Agriculture WCH Spring v.5-SINGLE PAGES.indd 66 1/25/19 10:46 AM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 67 Urban Agriculture Planning for Pollinators Bees & Beyond programs at the Chicago Botanic Garden inspired Windy City Harvest to offer this special course for gardeners to learn about the pollinators in their backyards and gardening techniques to support them. Rachel Kimpton, Windy City Harvest coordinator Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago April 27, 10:30 a.m.

– 4:30 p.m. Edible Landscapes Featuring Containers Transform a small space into a beautiful and functional garden. This class will show you the best practices for keeping edible and ornamental plants happy and healthy in your container garden. It includes hands-on work and an informative lecture with plenty of time for questions.

Ashley Luciani, Windy City Harvest coordinator Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago May 4, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Value-added Products: Flower Growing and Arranging Arranging locally grown flowers is both an art and a savvy business plan. Learn about local flower farmers and the businesses that celebrate their products. Spend the afternoon working on your own bouquets with the guid- ance of seasoned professionals. Instructor TBD Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago May 11, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Aquaponics Participants will learn the fundamental principles of aquaponics production as well as tips and tricks for building an at-home or small-scale aquaponics system.

This course will include hands-on work with the nursery system and the 52,000-gallon aquaponics production system.

Andy McGhee, Windy City Harvest aquaponics specialist Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago June 8, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Giulianna Ciocca, Windy City Harvest aquaponics coordinator Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago October 12 or December 7, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Seed Saving Learn the how and why of saving seeds for thrifty gardening and farming, biodiversity preservation, and food sovereignty. In this course, you will receive open-pollinated seeds to take home with you as well as information to help you feel confident saving seeds for future farm and garden seasons. Kris De la Torre, Windy City Harvest coordinator Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago September 7, 10:30 a.m.

– 4:30 p.m. Cold-Season Growing: September, October & November This is a technical training course intended for aspiring growers interested in learning best-practice season-extension techniques. It will combine classroom and hands-on work to prepare students to keep growing as the months get colder. It will involve farm work activities in all weather conditions. Students are expected to work indoors and outdoors. Britt Calendo, Windy City Harvest coordinator Arturo Velasquez Institute, 2800 S. Western Avenue, Chicago September 21, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Rooftop Farming Growing on a rooftop presents its own chal- lenges and rewards.

Learn from a seasoned rooftop farmer about what the city requires for a rooftop buildout. Participants will be guided through the decisions you’ll make as you begin or expand your rooftop farm or garden. Instructor TBD Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago September 21, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Fruit Tree Pruning: Managing Fruit Crops This hands-on class is for beginning to inter- mediate growers. The session will include an introduction to the different fruit tree pruning forms, when to prune, strategic pruning, and general fruit tree maintenance. We will also cover how to care for fruiting crops that thrive in Plant Hardiness Zones 5–7.

Instructor TBD Washington Park Youth Farm, 555 East 51st Street, Chicago October 19, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Value-Added Products—Canning, Dehydrating, and Jams Take some of your favorite summer crops and learn to preserve them for the winter months. This hands-on class will cover crop seasonality, food safety, and food-preservation techniques. Put your knowledge to work by preserving fruit and vegetables to take home.

Instructor TBD Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago October 19, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Value-Added Products: Vinegars, Shrubs, and Kombucha In this hands-on class, we will discuss how to use the abundance from the farm for vinegars, shrubs, and kombucha. Put your knowledge to work by starting your fermentation to take home. Instructor TBD Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago November 16, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Ten-Week Courses Ten-week offerings are best suited for indi- viduals working in the horticulture/agriculture industry or with growing experience who are looking to develop their practice.

Each course includes a final project and participants earn certificates upon completion. Each ten-week course costs $600 ($300 with scholarship). Edible Landscape Design & Gardening This class is for individuals who are interested in learning and expanding their knowledge of edible landscaping techniques, design, and maintenance. This course is appropriate for growers with some gardening experience. Students will create a four-season planting plan for an existing farm site and will present their planting design as a final project. Certificate course Maureen Maitland, The Organic Gardener Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago Saturdays, March 9 – May 18, 1 – 4 p.m.

Aquaponics Intensives Aquaponics Intensives This course is for individuals seriously consid- ering or already in the process of aquaponic food production on a commercial scale. This three-day course is a comprehensive look at the design and build-out of a system, water quality, controlled environment growing, daily operations and growing techniques. Instruction will include hands-on work and lectures. Certificate course Andy McGhee, Windy City Harvest aquaponics specialist $950 | Farm on Ogden, 3555 Ogden Avenue, Chicago Friday – Sunday, May 17 – 19; September 13 – 15; November 8 – 10 WCH Spring v.5-SINGLE PAGES.indd 67 1/25/19 10:46 AM

Youth & Family Education Spring Youth & Family v.5 single pages.indd 68 1/25/19 11:07 AM

Youth & Family To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 69 Early Childhood & Family Programs Nature Preschool The Garden’s Nature Preschool will delight and engage your children in an adventure of discovery about the natural world and prepare them for a future of lifelong learning. Registra- tion for the 2019–20 school year is open. Visit chicagobotanic.org/naturepreschool or call (847) 835-8238 for more information. Seeds (3-year-olds) Age 3 by September 1, 2019 $2,520/$3,150 per child | Early Childhood Classroom, Learning Center (Tuition is due in quarterly installments.) Tuesdays and Thursdays, September 3, 2019 – May 21, 2020 9 – 11:30 a.m.

Seedlings (4-year-olds) Age 4 by September 1, 2019 $4,275/$5,344 per child | Early Childhood Classroom, Learning Center (Tuition is due in quarterly installments.) Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, September 4, 2019 – May 22, 2020 9 a.m. – noon Stems (3 – 5-year-olds) Age 3 by September 1, 2019 $2,850/$3,563 per child | Early Childhood Classroom, Learning Center (Tuition is due in quarterly installments.) Tuesdays and Thursdays, September 3, 2019 – May 21, 2020 12:30 – 3:30 p.m. Stems (3 – 5-year-olds) Age 3 by September 1, 2019 $5,600/$7,125 per child | Early Childhood Classroom, Learning Campus (Tuition is due in quarterly installments.) Monday through Thursday, September 3, 2019 – May 21, 2020 12:45 – 3:45 p.m.

Little Diggers It’s going to be a sensational sensory-filled summer as your “little diggers” touch, taste, and smell their way through the Garden. This four-class series for children ages 2 to 4 with caregivers meets Saturday mornings once a month May through August. Each program includes hands-on seasonal activities, planting, outdoor time, and free-play.

$68.80/$86 per child | Learning Center Saturdays: 5/18, 6/15, 7/20, 8/10 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. or 11 a.m. - noon Visit chicagobotanic.org/littlediggers to register or call (847) 835-6801 for more information. New! Books & Cooks Does your child love to help out in the kitchen? Bring your little chef to the Garden for stories, songs, and games followed by a cooking activ- ity. This one-hour caregiver-and-child program is designed for children ages 4 – 5. It is the perfect way to encourage children to eat their fruits and veggies and have fun, too. Simple, delicious recipes are easy to replicate at home.

Families with dietary restrictions are encour- aged to contact the program coordinator at (847) 835-6826.

$19.20/$24 per child | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center Tuesday, April 16: Veggies & Dip 10 – 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 23: Banana “Nice Cream” 10 – 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 30: Fruit Salad 1 – 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 7: Rainbow Soup 1 – 2 p.m. Weekend Family Classes Together, adults and children ages 4 to 10 can learn cool things about how plants connect to science, food, history, and culture. Each Sat- urday or Sunday 90-minute program includes a variety of hands-on activities and kitchen exploration (tasting, too!), as well as opportu- nities to bring the Garden home.

$19.20/$24 per child | ITW Kitchen, Learning Center 9:30 – 11 a.m.

or 1 – 2:30 p.m. Make Your Own Butter and Pancakes Your next homemade breakfast won’t be the same after you learn how fun and easy it is to make your own butter. What could be better than enjoying your butter spread on delicious buttermilk pancakes? Participants will learn about the plants used to make breakfast and take home recipes to replicate this delectable feast at home. Sunday, March 3, or Saturday, March 9 Pizza Party Pizza has lots of ingredients from the garden: tomatoes, wheat, herbs, and all vegetables. Learn about how these plants grow and how they are used to make pizza. Participants will plant their own herb garden to take home.

Saturday, March 16, or Sunday, March 24 New! Homemade Granola Participants will make personalized oven-baked granola and a no-bake granola treat. Create a yogurt parfait to sample the tasty creation in class. This class is nut-free.

Saturday, April 6 Family Campouts Experience the Regenstein Learning Campus the way few families can—by sleeping over. Enjoy a low-stress camping experience with flushing toilets and running water. Families can choose between sleeping outside (bringing your own camping gear, the Garden has no gear to lend) or sleeping inside the building. Please plan to spend the night as the Garden is unable to accommodate evening-only par- ticipants. Activities are suitable for participants ages 5 and up. $55/person | Learning Center July 27 or August 10 5 p.m. Saturday – 8 a.m. Sunday Call the program coordinator directly at (847) 835-8239 with questions or to register online for the campout.

Nature Nights Bring a picnic dinner and enjoy some quality family time at the Garden. Children ages 4 – 10 and their families will explore different areas of the Garden and enjoy a variety of outdoor, discovery-based activities. Each Nature Nights includes a tram ride, a planting project, and s’mores around the campfire. Participants provide their own picnic dinner. $24/$30 per child | Learning Center 5 – 7:30 p.m. New! Chocolate Chasers Saturday, June 1 or 8 Journey to Japan July 13 or 20 New! Powerful Pollinators August 3 or 17 Prairie Prowl September 7 or 14 Visit chicagobotanic.org/naturenights or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Birthday Parties Celebrate your child’s birthday with a garden-themed party held at our inspiring Re- genstein Learning Campus. All parties include free parking for you and your guests and allow use of a reserved indoor space in the Learning Center for 90 minutes. Project Parties and Pizza Parties, for children turning 4 and up, also include educational, hands-on activities led by Garden staff. Parties can be scheduled year-round on Saturday or Sunday mornings or afternoons. Garden Plus membership required. Visit chicagobotanic.org/birthdays or call (847) 835-8275 for more information Spring Youth & Family v.5 single pages.indd 69 1/25/19 11:07 AM

Regenstein School | Youth & Family 70 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Free Programs Story Time Stop by the Lenhardt Library on Monday mornings, January through March, for na- ture-themed stories and hands-on activities. Registration is not required. Ages 2 – 5 with an adult Free | Lenhardt Library, Regenstein Center Mondays, January 14 – March 25 10 – 11 a.m. Malott Japanese Garden Spring Festival Celebrate spring during this special weekend of activities. Make a traditional Japanese cherry blossom hanging scroll, design a kimono paper doll, and try your hand at marbled paper (suminagashi) painting.

Enjoy a tea ceremony and musical performances, and take a walk in the Malott Japanese Garden.

Free | Nichols Hall, Regenstein Center Saturday, April 27, and Sunday, April 28 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. New! Summer Reading Kickoff Join us in the Lenhardt Library for na- ture-themed stories, songs, and activities to celebrate the Library’s summer reading program. Ages 2 – 5 with an adult Free | Lenhardt Library, Regenstein Center Wednesday, June 5 10 – 11 a.m. Youth Programs Spring Break Camp Children in grades K – 5 will participate in high-quality learning activities with experienced teachers who use inquiry-based, hands-on activities. Programming connects nature to a range of themes including art, cuisine, and conservation.

This spring, children will dissect and plant seeds, explore fragrant herbs and flowers, search for birds and early spring plants on nature hikes, take a trolley ride around the Garden, create take-home science-themed projects, and much more.

$63.20/$79 each day | Classroom 8, Learning Center March 25 – 29 March 25: A Visit to the Woods March 26: Greenhouses & Gardens March 27: Let’s Go Camping March 28: Grossology March 29: Seeds 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Summer Break Camp Join our new camp as we kick off summer. We’ll get a jump on some of our most favorite camp activities, plant a bed in the Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden, investigate the Dixon Prairie, discover what lives in the Mc- Donald Woods, visit the Kleinman Family Cove, and compare the three Greenhouses. Each day, campers will make their own healthy afternoon snack and play in our Nature Play Garden.

Sign up for one day or the whole week. Grades 1 – 4 $68/$85 per child per day | Learning Campus June 10 – 14, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. New! Middle School Summer Break Camp Join our new camp as we kick off summer. Middle school-aged students will dig deeper as they investigate different areas of the Garden including the Dixon Prairie, Kleinman Family Cove, and Greenhouses. Each day, campers will prepare their own healthy snack, dabble in art, and conduct a science experiment. Sign up for one day or the whole week.

Grades 5 – 8 $68/$85 per child per day | Learning Campus June 10 – 14, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Scouts Scout Badge Programs Scouts will complete badge requirements with challenging activities. Our wide range of scout programs take children throughout the Garden, and can be scheduled after school on Mondays through Fridays and on select Satur- days between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 90-minute programs (grades K – 3): Deposit of $125 covers 10 Scouts; plus $10 per additional Scout, due on the day of the program.

2-hour programs (grades 4 – 5): Deposit of $180 covers 10 Scouts; plus $15 per additional Scout, due on the day of the program.

Scout Seasonal Workshop: Earth Day Celebrate Earth Day with hands-on activities. Scouts will create a project to help animals prepare for a busy spring, enjoy a tram ride (weather dependent), and save resources by re- using items to make art inspired by the beauti- ful gardens. This program is open to both Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts in grades K through 5; single Scouts and groups welcome. Adults should plan to stay with their Scouts for the duration of the program. If you are a leader registering a group, at least one adult chaper- one for every five Scouts is required. Parking is included in workshop fee.

$15 per child | Learning Center Saturday, April 27 12:45 – 3 p.m. Visit chicagobotanic.org/scout/seasonal or call (847) 835-6801. Scout & Youth Group Campouts Experience the Regenstein Learning Campus the way few visitors can—by sleeping over. Enjoy a low-stress camping experience with flushing toilets and running water. Groups can choose to sleep outside (bringing your own camping gear, weather dependent) or inside the building. Please plan to spend the night as the Garden is unable to accommodate evening-only participants. Activities are suited for participants ages 6 and up. Cub Scouts and Girl Scout groups or any other youth groups with kids in grades K through 5 are welcome to register.

Scout and youth groups require at least one adult for every five Scouts and each tent must have at least one adult. All Scout and Youth Group Campouts include s’mores and hands-on projects. $55/person | Learning Center 6 p.m. Friday – 8 a.m. Saturday June 7 – 8 September 6 – 7 September 13 – 14 Call the Program Coordinator at (847) 835-8239 with questions or to register online for a campout. $ Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount, listed in each class description before the full nonmember price. Spring Youth & Family v.5 single pages.indd 70 1/25/19 11:07 AM

Camp CBG Where Science, Nature & Fun Meet! June 17 – August 16 Camp CBG provides exciting and enriching learning experiences for your child, with programs for children ages 6 months to 15 years. The Garden offers weeklong camps each summer with morning, afternoon, and all-day options from June to August. Camp programming includes Stroller Walks for adults and little ones, two- or three- day camps for caregivers and preschoolers, half- or full-day drop-off camps, and exciting two-week full-day camps. Our camps invite you and your child to explore the Garden and experience something new.

All camps include nature exploration, inquiry-based activities, games, hands-on projects, or plantings.

Visit chicagobotanic.org/camp for details including camp descriptions, fees, and special attention services. Other Camp Programs Leaders in Training Grades 8 – 10 Ages 13 – 15 Over the course of two weeks, Leader in Train- ing (LIT) participants will immerse themselves in camps every morning, then work with the LIT coordinator every afternoon on a new topic fo- cusing on life skills that will help them in future job searches, taking leadership roles at school, and even college preparation. Upon review of applications, interviews will be scheduled, and placement will be confirmed within two weeks of the interview.

Please note: A mandatory training session takes place in June. For an application and more information about the LIT program, please contact the camp manager at (847) 835-8361.

$420 | Learning Campus Lunch Bunch Camp CBG offers a supervised lunch period for Green Sprouts, Green Thumbs, and Explorers campers attending morning and afternoon camps. Camp staff supervises the lunch and escorts campers to their afternoon sessions. Pack a nut-free lunch that does not require refrigeration. $10 per child per week | Learning Campus Noon – 12:30 p.m. Before- and After-Camp Care Grades preK to 7 (ages 4 – 13) Supervised before- and after-camp care is avail- able. Activities include games, art projects, and gardening. More information is available on the Camp CBG webpage.

June 17 – August 16 Morning Care: 7:30 – 9:30 a.m.

$53 per week per camper | Learning Campus Afternoon Care: 3 – 5:30 p.m. $66 per week per camper | Learning Campus No member discount for Lunch Bunch or Before- or After-Camp Care. Camp CBG Cancellation Policy Cancellations made by May 31 will be refunded at 75 percent of the total fee. Transfers will be granted until May 31 at no cost. Registration fees are nontransferable after that date. Cancellations made on June 1 or later will not be refunded. Registrations made after June 1 are included in this policy. To cancel or change your registration, please call (847) 835-6801.

If your child is unable to attend camp due to medical reasons, you may receive a refund (less a 25 percent administration fee) at any time prior to the start of camp by providing a doc- tor's note. We are unable to refund for missed days of camp. The Garden reserves the right to cancel a camp due to low enrollment or Garden closure. Camps canceled by the Garden because of low enrollment or Garden closure will be fully refunded. Spring Youth & Family v.5 single pages.indd 71 1/25/19 11:07 AM

72 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801.

Grades Grades Age Age 1-2 PreK-K 2 My First Camp 3 My First Camp Adventurers Grades 5 – 7 Age 6 mos to 2 yrs My First Camp 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. 9:30 a.m. – noon 12:30 – 3 p.m. 9:30 a.m. – noon 9:30 a.m. – noon 9:30 a.m. – noon 12:30 – 3 p.m. 10 – 11 a.m. 9:45 – 11:15 a.m. June 17 - 21 June 24 - 28 July 1 - 5 July 8 - 12 July 15 - 19 July 22 - 26 July 29 - August 2 August 5 - 9 August 12 - 16 Stroller Walks Habitat Hunters Nature Art NO CAMP Fun with Physics Hidden Treasures Mad Scientists Nature Art Hidden Treasures Super Seedlings Mad Scientists Garden Expedition NO CAMP Super Seedlings Sprouting Wizards Bug Brigade Garden Expedition Habitat Hunters Salad Science Bug Brigade Hidden Treasures NO CAMP Salad Science Nature Art Habitat Hunters Sprouting Wizards Fun with Physics Mad Scientist Grossology Wildlife Wanderers Kinetic Kids NO CAMP Grossology Art in the Garden Explore Your World Plant People Art in the Garden Plant People NO CAMP Insect Investigation NO CAMP Ecology Chemistry Chemistry Ecology Botany Art Botany NO CAMP Kinetic Kids Art in the Garden Expert Wizardry Wildlife Wanderers NO CAMP Art Incredible Edibles Stroller Walks Stroller Walks Stroller Walks Stroller Walks Stroller Walks Stroller Walks Stroller Walks 10 – 11 a.m.

NO CAMP Rainbow Fish Rainbow Fish The Very Hungry Caterpillar Goodnight Moon Planting a Rainbow The Very Hungry Caterpillar ITW Kitchen Cooking A – Z 9:30 a.m. – noon. Cuisine 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. NO CAMP Cuisine 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Cuisine 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Botany in the Kitchen 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. NO CAMP Rainbow Fish Rainbow Fish The Very Hungry Caterpillar Goodnight Moon Planting a Rainbow Goodnight Moon Planting a Rainbow Cooking A – Z 9:30 a.m. – noon Grades 2-4 Rovers NO CAMP FULL-DAY TWO-WEEK 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Create & Grow Science Explorer Science Explorer Create & Grow Grades 3-4 12:30 – 3 p.m.

9:30 a.m. – noon NO CAMP NO CAMP Garden Spa Garden Caching Making Art Supplies Konnichiwa Japan Forensic Files Surviving Outdoors Engineering Investigations Making Art Supplies Engineering Investigations Surviving Outdoors Forensic Files Explorers Garden Spa Konnichiwa Japan Garden Photography Treasure Hunt Expert Wizardry Incredible Edibles Treasure Hunt Explore Your World Insect Investigation Garden Adventure Camp Grades 1 – 4 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Garden Photography Garden Caching Goodnight Moon Planting a Rainbow The Very Hungry Caterpillar Botany in the Kitchen 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Botany in the Kitchen 9:30 a.m.

– 3 p.m. Camp CBG Schedule Spring Youth & Family v.5 single pages.indd 72 1/28/19 2:51 PM

2018-19 SEASON MASTERWORKS SERIES APRIL 13 & 14, 2019 EETHO EN ERLIO MAY 18 & 19, 2019 T HAIKO SKY S H ERT RA HMANINO (847) 295-2135 | WWW.LAKEFORESTSYMPHONY.ORG | 400 EAST ILLINOIS ROAD

Teacher & Student Education Teacher Student-Spring SINGLE PAGES.indd 74 1/25/19 1:23 PM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 75 Teacher & Student Teacher Professional Development The Chicago Botanic Garden’s teacher professional development programs feature best practices in STEM education (science, technology, engineering, and math) and support Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) for grades preK – 12.

Many courses incorporate reading, math, art, social studies, and engineering into the science lessons. CPDUs and graduate credits are available for most workshops. Visit chicagobotanic.org/ teacherprograms for more details. One-Day Workshops STEM Forensics, Earth and Life Science Solving mysteries using forensic science gets students excited about using NGSS practices and core ideas in earth and life sciences to figure out “whodunit.” Walk through two lab activities where you will analyze soil char- acteristics and botanical materials to solve the case. Leave with directions to replicate these labs at your school, and ideas for addi- tional forensic investigations.

CPDUs: 6 Grade level: 3 – 12 $72/$90 | Learning Center Saturday, March 16 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Teaching with Pollinator Gardens Promote conservation and make NGSS con- nections by planting a pollinator container garden and receive additional native plants and seeds for your school garden. Meet a horticulturist and a scientist to learn about native plant care, companion planting, and the ecology of native pollinators. Gain ideas for using phenomena found in a pollinator garden in your science curriculum. CPDUs: 6, Gateways: 6 Grade level: preK – 12 $72/$90 | Learning Center Saturday, April 27 9 a.m.

– 3:30 p.m. STEAM: Connecting Art and Science Dabble in the artsy side of science and dis- cover how to integrate these two disciplines. Investigate how the processes of science and art are complementary and how NGSS cross-cutting concepts such as patterns, scale, and cause and effect can be supported through artwork. Create a pop-up book, experiment with mixing liquids and colors, make models, and more. While focused on preK through grade 5, science content con- nections can be scaled up for older grades. CPDUs: 6, Gateways: 6 Grade level: preK – 5 $72/$90 | Learning Center Saturday, May 18 9 a.m.

– 3:30 p.m. Plant Therapy for Early Childhood Horticultural therapy provides opportunities to use plants and nature to help very young children build developmental skills, including visual, language, motor, and social/emotional skills. Experience the therapeutic benefits of nature play, sample a variety of nature-based activities, and learn about green corners and safe plants for young learners. This work- shop is for early intervention providers and anyone working with infants and toddlers, and is adaptable for preschool. CPDUs: 6, Gateways: 6, EI Credits: 6 Grade level: Birth – preK $72/$90 | Learning Center Saturday, June 15 9 a.m.

– 4 p.m. Gardening Courses Windy City Harvest holds a variety of garden- ing workshops at the Arturo Velasquez Insti- tute in Chicago. These classes cover growing plants indoors and outside using sustainable techniques, and can improve your home and school gardening skills. See p.? for garden- ing classes.

Visit chicagobotanic.org/education/windy_ city_harvest for a complete list of topics and other information. Conference Inspiring Nature Play: Mindful Connections Our sixth annual conference will highlight developmentally appropriate nature play ex- periences for early childhood (birth through age 8) and practical ideas for incorporat- ing nature play into your early childhood program. Keynote speakers Marilyn Brink, M.Ed., manager of professional development and early childhood at Brookfield Zoo, and Jennifer Rosinia, Ph.D., OTR/L, president of Kid Links Unlimited, Inc., will address con- nections between nature play and brain de- velopment.

Parking and lunch are included. CPDUs: 6, Gateways: 6 Grade level: Birth – Grade 3 $59 | Regenstein Center Wednesday, May 1 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Inspiring Nature Play is possible because of the collaborative effort among the Chica- go Botanic Garden, the Alliance for Early Childhood, BackYard Nature Center, Greeley Elementary School, the Forest Preserves of Cook County, Lincoln Park Zoo, Natural Start Alliance (a project of the North American Association for Environmental Education), and Northfield Community Nursery School. _ _ $ Educator members receive a 20 percent discount on most classes, listed in each class description before the full nonmember price.

Financial aid may be available for teachers serving low-income populations; contact Rebecca Ammann at rammann@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-8235 for details. Teacher Student-Spring SINGLE PAGES.indd 75 1/25/19 1:23 PM

76 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Coming This Summer NGSS Phenomena in the Schoolyard CPDUs: 18, Graduate credit: 2 (optional; additional fee) Grade level: K – 12 Tuesday – Thursday, June 25 – 27 Citizen Science Data in the Classroom Online course CPDUs: 30, Graduate credit: 2 (optional; additional fee) Grade level: 6-12 Online: Friday, June 28, through Monday, July 29 Native Americans and Plant Science CPDUs: 18, Graduate credit: 2 (optional; additional fee) Grade level: K – 12 Tuesday – Thursday, July 9 – 11 Talking and Thinking Floorbook Approach® A Claire Warden Workshop for Early Childhood Educators CPDUs: 18, Gateways: 18 Grade level: preK – 2 Tuesday – Thursday, July 23 – 25 STEAM and Plants for Diverse Learners CPDUs: 13, Gateways: 13, Graduate credit: 1 (optional; additional fee) Grade level: preK – 12 Monday – Tuesday, August 5 – 6 Custom Teacher Workshops Garden educators can customize workshops for your needs.

Workshops are perfect for teacher institute days, curriculum meetings, or other professional events. Activities are aligned with Next Generation Science Stan- dards (NGSS) and your curriculum, and will increase understanding of plants and nature, build a repertoire of teaching techniques, and enliven the classroom. Workshops may be held at your school or at the Garden. Choose from the following topics or suggest one of your own.

Exploring Nature with Young Children Classroom Gardening Plant Basics Schoolyard Ecology Science and Literature Midwest Ecosystems Growing Plants in Martian Soil Custom workshops are a minimum of two hours long and cost $200/hour for each group of up to 20 teachers. Please call Teacher Programs at (847) 835- 8253 for more information. The Garden is a CPS Preferred Provider of teacher professional development. Student Field Trips Guided Field Trips Guided field trips at the Chicago Botanic Garden teach students in grades preK – 12 about plants, nature, and life science core ideas. Field trips are STEM-focused and aligned with NGSS.

Payment is required at the time of registra- tion. Groups have the option to pay in full or pay a $50 deposit per program. The balance is due two weeks before the field trip. $140 per program in fall, early winter, and spring; $100 per program January 7 – March 8 Seasonal, Monday through Friday 10 or 11:30 a.m. 60 minutes Custom Field Trip Experiences If you would like a guided field trip topic or tour that is not offered in our listings, we can work with you to make that happen. Requests are subject to space and resource availability, may involve extra fees, and cannot be scheduled in May or October.

Call (847) 835-8313 for more information. Homeschool Groups Please review our program descriptions online and select a program that best matches your group’s grade level, interest, and knowledge. Programs that suit your youngest students are ideal, as each program’s content can be expanded for older ages.

Field Trip Financial Aid The Garden provides aid for qualified schools serving low-income populations. Contact dwehrle@chicagobotanic.org for more infor- mation on eligibility and online applications to subsidize the cost of transportation and guided field trips. Visit chicagobotanic.org/fieldtrips for more information. Teacher Student-Spring SINGLE PAGES.indd 76 1/25/19 1:23 PM

To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. 77 Teacher & Student _ _ For all classes indicates most of the class will be taught outside; please dress for the weather.

indicates that class will be an indoor lab experience. _ _ Student Field Trips at a Glance Grades Grades Grades Grades 6-8 1-2 preK-K 9-12 Grades 3-5 Discovering Plants Weather Watchers Winter January 7 – March 8, 2019 Early Spring March 11 – April 19, 2019 Spring April 22 – June 7, 2019 Nature’s Needs Insect Investigation Discovering Plants Insect Investigation Surprising Seeds The Wonders of Worms and Soil DIY Hydroponics Photosynthesis Lab Flower Lab Tree Detectives Ecology Research Lab Human Impacts and Sustainability Photosynthesis Lab Human Impacts and Sustainability Butterflies and Bumblebees Water Bugs Partners in Pollination Mighty Macros Water Quality Field Study Biodiversity Field Study Nature’s Needs Insect Investigation DIY Hydroponics Tree Detectives Lake Investigations Pondering the Prairie DIY Hydroponics Human Impacts and Sustainability PreK – K Preschool and kindergarten classes observe living things using investigative skills and look for patterns in nature while on a guided field trip at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Discovering Plants Weather Watchers Insect Investigation Nature’s Needs Grades 1 – 2 Students in grades 1 and 2 observe the structure and function of living things during their guided field trip at the Garden. They recognize patterns and formulate answers to questions about life cycles, growth and devel- opment, and interdependent relationships in the natural world.

Surprising Seeds The Wonders of Worms and Soil Insect Investigation Nature’s Needs Butterflies and Bumblebees Water Bugs Grades 3 – 5 On a guided field trip class for grades 3 – 5, students ask questions and carry out investigations to understand the structure and function of plants, adaptations, and the dynamics between plants and other living things within ecosystems. Flower Lab DIY Hydroponics Tree Detectives Partners in Pollination Mighty Macros Grades 6 – 8 Middle-school students use scientific tools and guided inquiry to expand their under- standing of the structures and processes of living things.

Explore the biological interac- tions of plants in their ecosystems during a guided field trip at the Garden. Pondering the Prairie Lake Investigations Human Impacts and Sustainability DIY Hydroponics Photosynthesis Lab Grades 9 – 12 While on a guided field trip at the Garden, high-school students use scientific tools and current practices to explain and discuss phe- nomena of the natural world. Take biological and chemical samples to determine greater ecological conclusions.

Water Quality Field Study Biodiversity Field Study Human Impacts and Sustainability DIY Hydroponics Ecology Research Lab Teacher Student-Spring SINGLE PAGES.indd 77 1/25/19 1:24 PM

Regenstein School | Teacher & Student 78 To register, visit chicagobotanic.org/education or call (847) 835-6801. Guided Programs for Children with Special Needs Bring your students to the Garden for a customized therapeutic program in the Buehler Enabling Garden outdoor classroom. These one-hour programs provide a guided, structured experiences with nature, designed for youth in grades K–12 with special needs.

Proper ratio of adults to student is required. $140 for a maximum of 15 students Monday through Friday, between 10 a.m. and noon Call (847) 835-6801 to learn more about horticultural therapy field trips and in-school programs.

Self-Guided Field Trips Explore the Chicago Botanic Garden at your own pace. Education staff can recommend garden areas suited for specific curricular top- ics prior to your field trip. Register in advance to receive a $15 discount on the regular bus parking rate. Self-guided groups are also eligible for discounted tram tours and special exhibition tickets. $50 per bus ($65 for unregistered buses) Year-round, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Additional Field Trip Experiences Chicago Botanic Garden tours and special exhibitions are available seasonally at a school group rate. Tram tours and Garden walks must be scheduled in advance; exhibition tickets may be purchased in advance or on-site at the school group rate if space is available.

$3 per person The Orchid Show February 9 to March 24 School Tram Tours April 22 through October 27 Model Railroad Garden May 11 to October 13 Butterflies & Blooms May 25 to September 2 Wonderland Express November 29, 2019, to January 5, 2020 Visit chicagobotanic.org/orchid, chicagobo- tanic.org/railroad, chicagobotanic.org/butter- flies, and chicagobotanic.org/wonderland for more information. New! Guided Walking Tour Walk through a garden with a staff mem- ber who can tell you about the plants and answer your questions. Choose the Malott Japanese Garden, Regenstein Fruit & Vegeta- ble Garden, or the Greenhouses.

$30, maximum 30 students per walking tour Seasonal, Monday through Friday 30 minutes, 10, 10:45, or 11:30 a.m. Traveling Plant Science Teacher Chicago Botanic Garden educators can bring a life-science lesson to your classroom. One- hour programs support STEM and NGSS, in- corporate natural materials from the Garden, and include a planting activity. $140 per class Winter season, Monday through Friday Surprising Seeds (Grades K – 2) Garden Groceries (Grades preK – 2) Terrific Trees (Grades preK – 2) Insect Investigation (Grades preK – 2) Flower Lab (Grades 3 – 5) Visit chicagobotanic.org/fieldtrips/outreach for available programs and scheduling details.

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chicagobotanic.org 79 Science Career Continuum The Garden offers qualified Chicago Public School students opportunities to pursue their interests in science and nature while building skills for careers in STEM. Science First 1 (Grades 7 – 8) Science First 1 is a free, two-week summer program for students entering grades 7 – 8 in fall 2019. Through hands-on, nature-based science activities, students explore the appli- cation of science at the Garden, in their lives, and in potential careers. Science First 2 (Grades 9 – 10) Science First 2 is a four-week summer pro- gram for students entering grades 9 – 10 in the fall.

Students complete individual and group investigations to improve their under- standing of the environment and the scientific method. Applications for Science First 1 and 2 are due April 19.

chicagobotanic.org/sciencefirst College First (Grades 11 – 12) College First is a seven-week internship, field ecology course, and college and career guid- ance for students entering their junior or se- nior year. Students earn income and college credit while studying field ecology alongside scientists at the Garden. Applications for Col- lege First are due April 5. chicagobotanic.org/collegefirst The Science Career Continuum is made pos- sible by the generous support of the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, ITW, United States Environmental Protection Agency, an anonymous donor, Alvin H.

Baum Family Fund, Baxter International Inc., Discover Financial Services, HSBC, Mazza Foundation, Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation, Peoples Gas, the Trillium Founda- tion, Pauline M. Weinact Philanthropic Fund, a Donor-Advised Fund of Renaissance Charita- ble Foundation, William J. Clancy Foundation, and Bertha Lebus Charitable Trust. Research Experiences for Undergraduates The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program is a ten-week research intern- ship for college undergraduates. Students work with Garden scientists and graduate students from the Garden’s joint program in plant biology and conservation with North- western University.

cbgreu.org The Garden’s REU program is funded by the National Science Foundation. Windy City Harvest Windy City Harvest introduces Chicago youth and young adults to sustainable horticulture and urban agriculture. Through education, mentoring, and job training, this program has enabled thousands of young people to realize their potential. Windy City Harvest Youth Farm Youth Farm provides summer jobs and skills training for urban teens from some of the most challenged communities in Chicago and Lake County. Teens learn about sustainable gardening, healthy food systems, and healthy communities.

They also learn leadership and teamwork skills that prepare them for a suc- cessful future.

chicagobotanic.org/urbanagriculture/youth- farm Windy City Harvest Apprenticeship This certificate program in sustainable urban agriculture, offered in partnership with Daley College and held at Arturo Velasquez Institute satellite campus, prepares students for jobs in local horticulture and urban agriculture indus- tries. Students gain practical skills that enable them to change their careers and their lives for the better. chicagobotanic.org/urbanagriculture/appren- ticeship Windy City Harvest Corps The Windy City Harvest Corps provides train- ing and transitional employment to juveniles (ages 17 to 21) and adults who have been involved with the justice system.

Participants complete the Roots of Success job-readiness curriculum, which prepares them for other life-changing opportunities, including the Ap- prenticeship program.

chicagobotanic.org/urbanagriculture/corps Windy City Harvest programs are made possi- ble through partnerships and generous fund- ing from the following agencies, foundations, businesses, and individuals. Major support for the Chicago Botanic Gar- den’s Windy City Harvest programs is provided by anonymous donors, Astellas USA Founda- tion, the National Institute of Food and Ag- riculture’s Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive Grant Program, Chicago Department of Fami- ly and Support Services, Coleman Foundation, the Crown Family, Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation, the Searle Funds at the Chicago Community Trust, Harrison I.

and Lois M. Steans, and the Harry and Jea- nette Weinberg Foundation.

Other major support is provided by anony- mous donors, After School Matters, Albers/ Kuhn Family Foundation, the J.R. Albert Foun- dation, Allstate Insurance Company, Alvin H. Baum Family Fund, Baxter International Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois, Brinshore Development, Compeer Financial, Conagra Brands Foundation, Phyllis R. Cretors, Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, Hilton Chicago, HSBC, Walter S. Mander Foundation, the James and Madeleine McMullan Fami- ly Foundation, Midwest Foods, Leo & Peggy Pierce Family Foundation, Polk Bros. Foun- dation, Preservation Foundation of the Lake County Forest Preserves, Prince Charitable Trusts, SAVOR…Chicago at McCormick Place, the Siragusa Family Foundation, Brian B.

and Kathleen Kelly Spear, State Farm, Steans Fam- ily Foundation, Subaru of America Foundation Inc., Target Corporation, and US Bank. Also contributing are an anonymous donor, the Laurance Armour Memorial Trust at the Chicago Community Trust, Brown Family Fund at Schwab Charitable, Frank G. and Gertrude Dunlap Fund, Eileen Fisher Inc., Farm Aid, Sal- ly Mead Hands Foundation, Sharon Holihan, Kaplan Foundation Fund/Carol and Ed Kaplan, LoPrete Family Foundation, Madehere LLC, Madeleine P. Plonsker, SB Friedman Devel- opment Advisors, Linda F. Tomchuck, Woods Fund of Chicago, and Karen J. Zera.

Horticultural Therapy Since 1977, the Garden’s Horticultural Thera- py Services Program has supported the estab- lishment of horticultural therapy programs at healthcare and human service agencies serv- ing schools, VA hospitals, people with disabil- ities, and older adults in the Chicago region. The program serves as a primary regional, national, and international resource for infor- mation, professional training, and consulting services in barrier-free garden design, sensory landscaping, and horticultural therapy pro- gram planning.

chicagobotanic.org/therapy Horticultural Therapy is supported by an en- dowment from the Buehler Family Founda- tion. Additional support is provided by the Abra Prentice Foundation, Albers/Kuhn Family Foundation, an anonymous donor, the Insti- tute of Museum and Library Services, and the Edmond and Alice Opler Foundation, as well as endowments established by the estate of Florence Rantz, the Kenilworth Garden Club, and the Julien H. Collins and Bertha M. Collins Fund. The Chicago Botanic Garden’s education and community programs are supported by an endowment from the Searle Funds at the Chicago Community Trust.

Additional support is generously provided by Astellas USA Foun- dation and the Brinson Foundation. Teacher Student-Spring SINGLE PAGES.indd 79 1/25/19 1:24 PM

80 chicagobotanic.org Baptisia ‘Lunar Eclipse’ a Chicagoland Grows® introduction This winter, the Chicago Botanic Garden celebrated the opening of the Robert F. Finke Green- houses at the Kris Jarantoski Campus, and in 2019, our focus shifts to planning the Campus’s shade evaluation garden. This new garden space continues the Garden’s tradition of ornamen- tal plant research and evaluation to help develop and define the best plants for Midwest gar- dens like yours and ours. We expect to start building Wirtz International’s dramatic garden in spring 2020 and complete it in fall 2021. This garden will be the first public garden in the United States from the much- acclaimed Belgian firm and principal Peter Wirtz.

In addition, landscape architect Heidi Na- tura of Chicago’s Living Habitats is designing the shoreline restoration adjacent to the new garden. This coordinated approach will result in a refined marriage of land and water along this important edge and underscore the Garden’s commitment to ecological restoration. The shade garden will nearly triple the space for our successful and long-standing plant evalu- ation program and provide a stunning context in which to conduct it. But our plant evaluation program began in 1985 and is the longest-running such program of its kind in the United States.

Richard Hawke, the Garden’s plant evaluation manager and associate scientist, has headed the program since its beginning, and the results of his years-long, comparative studies are detailed in more than 40 reports on our web- site. Confused by the myriad painted ferns? Richard’s report vividly explains the subtle differences. Want to know the most mildew-resistant garden phlox for our area? Richard looked at 80 different varieties for nine years to find out. His keen eye—and patience—yields science that is applicable to both the home gardener and green industry professional. Visit the Bernice E.

Lavin Plant Evaluation Garden to see all of our ongoing evaluations, and com- pare for yourself.

Also in the Lavin Evaluation Garden are the trials for our ornamental plant breeding work. Since 1995, James R. Ault, Ph.D., Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Director of Ornamental Research, has been focused on creating complex hybrids of native perennials that show enhanced vigor and durability to match their exquisite beauty. A side benefit of the multiple crosses and backcrosses that Jim makes to produce these plants is that many are also “mules” and do not produce fertile offspring that can accidentally overwhelm their garden neighbors or escape cultivation.

Jim produced the first orange coneflower (now common) and more recently, a plethora of false indigo (Baptisia) introductions.

The latter are amazingly tough, long-lived, and free-blooming plants with a broad range of flower colors. Jim Ault is a household name, if your household happens to include a plant breeder, and his work posi- tively impacts the nursery industry and provides tangible, useful (and lovely) results. His plants reach the con- sumer market through Chicagoland Grows®, in which we partner with the Morton Arboretum and the Ornamen- tal Growers Association of Northern Illinois. You should plant some today.

These two scientists embody just two of the discreet but influential ways in which the Chicago Botanic Garden fulfills our mission: We cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life. Fred Spicer, executive vice president and director This season in the Garden Here’s how we know which plants work best Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 38 1/28/19 3:21 PM

39 chicagobotanic.org Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 39 1/28/19 12:57 PM

chicagobotanic.org The Chicago Botanic Garden is one of the treasures of the Forest Preserves of Cook County.

THE ORCHID SHOW February 9 – March 24 Spring Keep Growing v.8 -single pages.indd 40 1/28/19 12:57 PM

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