HISTORIC PIRATES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

HISTORIC PIRATES FROM AROUND THE WORLD
  • 1. Eustace the Monk 2. Baba Aruj and Kheir-ed-Din: “the Barbarossa Brothers” 3. Sir John Hawkins 4. Sir Francis Drake 5. François l’Ollonais 6. Sir Henry Morgan 7. William "Captain" Kidd 8. Thomas Tew 9. Henry Avery 10. Alexander Selkirk 11. Edward Teach: “Blackbeard” 12. Bartholomew “Black Bart” Roberts 13. Anne Bonny and Mary Read 14. Jean Lafitte 15. Ching Shih 1. Eustace the Monk (c. 1170 – 1217) was a medieval French pirate who terrorized the high-seas at the beginning of the 13th Century. He was also a mercenary – a professional soldier hired by a foreign army – who served both France and England. While leading a French fleet against England in 1217, he was caught by the English and beheaded.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. HISTORIC PIRATES FROM AROUND THE WORLD 2. Baba Aruj (c. 1474 – 1518) and Kheir-ed-Din (c. 1478 – 1546) were 16th Century pirates who plundered along the Barbary Coast in the Mediterranean Sea. Known as “the Barbarossa Brothers” because of their red beards, Aruj was killed by the Spanish in 1518, while Kheir-ed-Din lived to command the Ottoman navy until retirement in 1545.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candle wick Press, 2001.
  • http://www.nationalgeographic.com/pirates/adventure.html 3. Sir John Hawkins (1532 – 1595) was an English privateer during the Elizabethan era, and like Sir Francis Drake (below), he raided Spanish ships carrying gold and riches from the Spanish Main (the mainland coast of the Spanish Empire around the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico). John Hawkins was also the first privateer to realize the wealth that could be attained as a slave trader. He captured slaves in West Africa and brought them to the Caribbean to be sold on the island of Hispaniola.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. 4. Sir Francis Drake (1540 – 1596) was an English sea captain, privateer, and navigator of the Elizabethan era. He turned pirate after the Spanish raided his merchant ship in the Caribbean. A three-year raiding voyage around the world brought him fame and fortune, and, in 1581, Queen Elizabeth I awarded Drake a knighthood. He was second-in-command of the English fleet against the Spanish Armada in 1588.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candle wick Press, 2001.
HISTORIC PIRATES FROM AROUND THE WORLD
  • 5. François l’Ollonais (c. 1635 – 1668) was a French pirate active in the Caribbean during the 1660s. He became a pirate to avenge the deaths of his friends, who were killed by a group of Spaniards. He was one of the most savage of the Caribbean buccaneers, torturing his Spanish captives before killing them.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candle wick Press, 2001.
  • 6. Sir Henry Morgan (c. 1635 – 1688) was a Welsh privateer who worked in the Caribbean. He was one of the most notorious and successful privateers from Wales, and one of the most dangerous pirates who worked in the Spanish Main (“Spanish Main” here refers to the seaways surrounding the Spanish possessions in the Caribbean).
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candlewick Press, 2001.
  • http://www.nationalgeographic.com/pirates/adventure.html 7. William "Captain" Kidd (c. 1645 – 1701) was a privateer who sailed on behalf of England to capture pirates in the Indian Ocean. He failed in his mission and some say that he turned pirate himself. He was tried and hanged for piracy after returning from his voyage. According to legend, his treasure ship lies buried in the Caribbean Sea.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candle wick Press, 2001.
  • http://www.nationalgeographic.com/pirates/adventure.html 8. Thomas Tew (?-1695), also known as the Rhode Island Pirate, was an English privateerturned-pirate who pioneered the route around the southern tip of Africa which became known as the “Pirate Round.” He was celebrated in America for his exploits and even became friends with the governor of the colony of New York. Tew was killed during an expedition in the Red Sea with fellow pirate Henry Avery.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. 9. Henry Avery (c. 1653 – disappeared from record 1696) was a pirate whose aliases included John Avery, Long Ben, and Benjamin Bridgeman. In 1695, while leading a small pirate fleet in the Red Sea, he battled and defeated the Indian treasure ship Gang-ISawai and took away an incredible fortune. Despite a large reward, Henry Avery was never caught.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candlewick Press, 2001. 10. Alexander Selkirk (1676 – 1721) was a Scottish privateer who spent four years as a castaway when he was marooned on an uninhabited island. Apparently, Selkirk had actually asked to be marooned because he thought the ship his crew sailed was not a seaworthy vessel. He immediately regretted this decision. All he brought with him was a musket, gunpowder, carpenter's tools, a knife, a Bible, and some clothing. His life provided inspiration for Daniel Defoe's novel Robinson Crusoe, in which Crusoe lives as a castaway on a desert island for more than a quarter of a century.

Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.

HISTORIC PIRATES FROM AROUND THE WORLD
  • 11. Edward Teach (c. 1680 – 1718) – otherwise known as “Blackbeard” - was an English pirate who plundered in the Caribbean Sea and western Atlantic during the early 18th century. He sailed aboard the Queen Anne’s Revenge, and it was reported that, during battle, he wore lit matches in his enormous black beard to intimidate his enemies.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candlewick Press, 2001.
  • http://www.nationalgeographic.com/pirates/adventure.html 12. Bartholomew Roberts (1682 – 1722), or “Black Bart”, was a Welsh pirate who raided ships off the coasts of the Americas and West Africa between 1719 and 1722. He was the most successful pirate during the Golden Age of Piracy, capturing far more ships than some of the best-known pirates, including Blackbeard and Captain Kidd.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • http://www.nationalgeographic.com/pirates/adventure.html 13. Anne Bonny (possibly 1700 – 1782) and Mary Read (unknown – 1721) were British pirates who practiced their trade in the Caribbean at the height of the Golden Age of Piracy in the early 18th Century. Anne and Mary met abroad the ship of “Calico” Jack Rackham, and when the ship was captured, both women escaped execution by announcing they were pregnant.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candlewick Press, 2001.
  • Yolen, Jane. Pirates in Petticoats. New York: David McKay Co., 1963.
  • Yolen, Jane. Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World. Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge, 2008.
  • http://www.nationalgeographic.com/pirates/adventure.html 14. Jean Lafitte (c. 1776 – c. 1823) was an American pirate and privateer in the Gulf of Mexico in the early 1800s. During the war of 1812, Lafitte’s pirate fleet plundered British, Spanish, and American ships while the U.S. government was distracted by the war. At one point, Lafitte helped the U.S. defend New Orleans against the British. When the president offered to pardon Lafitte for his help during the war, Lafitte declined and continued to live as a pirate for the remainder of his days.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Platt, Richard. Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter. Cambridge: Candle wick Press, 2001.
  • 15. Ching Shih (c. 1785 – 1844) was a female pirate during the Qing Dynasty in China. During the early part of the 19th century, she led a massive pirate fleet that plundered its way through coastal towns, markets, and villages in the China Seas. She ended her pirate career in 1810, but she still managed to hang on to her fortune.
  • Platt, Richard. Eyewitness Books: Pirates. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
  • Yolen, Jane. Pirates in Petticoats. New York: David McKay Co., 1963.
  • Yolen, Jane. Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World. Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge, 2008.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/pirates/adventure.html

HISTORIC PIRATES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Example Journey Map

Stede Bonnet (Stede Bonnet, c. 1688 – December 10, 1718, was an early 18th-century pirate. He was born into a wealthy English family on the island of Barbados in the Caribbean, but he turned to a life of piracy when his marriage began to sour. In 1717, Bonnet was a companion of the infamous Blackbeard, and for a few months together they plundered merchant ships along the Atlantic coast of North America.) Monologue: Blast! The life of a pirate is not what I thought it would be.

One day you're the captain of a ship - my majestic vessel, The Revenge! - and the next day your crew turns mutinous and joins that infernal Blackbeard. What a scoundrel! I suppose I wasn't always the best captain. I don't have much experience in this line of work, and I do love taking long naps in my cabin while the crew slaves away on deck. But what captain actually wants to do work? That blasted Blackbeard! He's always outmaneuvering merchant ships and frightening sailors into submission with his ratty, flaming hair. I simply couldn't light my hair on fire. It would ruin my freshly powdered wig!

At least I'm still on Blackbeard's good side. Maybe he'll take me aboard his ship as a traveling companion again. Or at least as someone willing to write correspondence for him - the illiterate rascal! I never should have trusted a man who can't spell his own name. Blackbeard! His beard is hardly even black. I'd call it dark brown, if that. I just pray he’ll venture back towards the Chesapeake again. So many goldcarrying ships! Such little resistance! I could live a life of ease and luxury with a few more good hauls. And then I could build an estate on every island of the Caribbean! Expect on Barbados.

Don’t want to run into the wife, after all. Well, I’m beat. I guess I’ll turn in and wait to see what fate has in store for me tomorrow. Either Blackbeard will take me on as his mate, or he won’t. But whatever happens, I will command a crew of my own again someday! Stede Bonnet always gets his way!

Example Monologue

Example Wanted poster

WANTED Name: Also Known As: Physical Description: Other Information: Reward:

Pirate Dictionary Aft The rear of the ship. Ahoy! Hello! Arrrgh! Arrrgh! Black Spot To "place the Black Spot" on another pirate is to sentence him to death, to warn him he is marked for death, or to accuse him of a serious crime before the other pirates. Blimey! An exclamation of surprise. Booty Plunder, Loot. Bow The front of the ship. Brazen squid A cutting pirate insult for a shipmate who is insolent, audacious, and loud.

Brig A jail or prison on board a U.S. Navy or Coast Guard vessel. Not really pirate-speak, but it’s got a piratical ring to it!

Buccaneer A general term for the Caribbean pirates. Cap'n Short for "captain." Crow’s Nest A small platform, sometimes enclosed, near the top of a mast, where a lookout could have a better view when watching for sails or for land. Davy Jones' locker The bottom of the sea. Deadlights Eyes. "Use yer deadlights, matey!" Feed the fish What you do when you are thrown into the sea, dead or alive. Galley The ship’s kitchen. Godspeed! Goodbye, good luck! Grub Food. Hands The crew of a ship; sailors. Jolly Roger The pirates' skull-and-crossbones flag. It was an invitation to surrender, with the implication that those who surrendered would be treated well.

A red flag indicated "no quarter." Landlubber or just lubber A non-sailor. Lookout Someone posted to keep watch on the horizon for other ships or signs of land. Maroon A common punishment for violation of a pirate ship's articles, or offending her crew. The victim was left on a deserted coast (or, island) with few supplies. That way, no one could say that the unlucky pirate had actually been killed by his former brethren.

Me A piratical way to say "my." Me hearties Typical way for a pirate leader to address his crew. Matey A piratical way to address someone in a cheerful, if not necessarily friendly, fashion. Pillage To raid, rob, and sack a target ashore. Pirate A seagoing robber and murderer. Poop Deck The highest deck at the aft end of a large ship. Smaller ships don't have a poop; the highest part aft is the quarterdeck. Port The left side of the ship when you are facing toward her prow. Prow The "nose" of the ship.

Sail ho! "I see a ship!" The sail, of course, is the first part of a ship visible over the horizon.

Scallywagg A good-for-nothing rascal. Scurvy (1) A deficiency disease caused by lack of vitamin C, often afflicting sailors; (2) A derogatory adjective for an epithet, as in "Ye scurvy dogs!" Sea dog An experienced seaman. Shanty A sea song – also spelled "chantey." Shark bait (1) Your foes, who are about to feed the fish (q.v.). (2) A worthless or lazy sailor; a lubber who is no use aboard ship. Shiver me timbers!

An expression of surprise or strong emotion. Spyglass A telescope. Starboard The right side of the ship when you are facing toward her prow. Walk the plank A piratical execution. The victim, usually blindfolded or with bound hands or both, is forced to walk along a plank laid over the ship's side, to fall into the water below. Except this seems to be a total invention; it first appeared in 19th-century fiction, long after the great days of piracy. Ye A piratical way to say “you.” Yo-ho-ho A very piratical thing to say, whether it actually means anything or not. Pirate Dictionary continued...

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