OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COMMANDER CIVIL AIR PATROL UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AUXILIARY MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, ALABAMA 36112-5937

OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COMMANDER CIVIL AIR PATROL UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AUXILIARY MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, ALABAMA 36112-5937

OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COMMANDER CIVIL AIR PATROL UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AUXILIARY MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, ALABAMA 36112-5937

OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COMMANDER CIVIL AIR PATROL UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AUXILIARY MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, ALABAMA 36112-5937 ICL 19-03 1 MARCH 2019 MEMORANDUM FOR ALL CAP MEMBERS FROM: CAP/CC SUBJECT: Interim Change Letter – CAPR 20-1, Organization of Civil Air Patrol 1. CAPR 20-1, 2 January 2013, is currently undergoing revision as a part of the publications reengineering project. This interim change letter will remain in effect until such time as the new CAPR 20-1 is complete and published. 2. Organizational charts in Part II are updated to include the National Diversity Officer and Diversity Officer positions at the Wing and Region level as shown in attachment 1.

3. Part III, Senior Member Position descriptions are updated to include the position descriptions shown in attachment 2.

4. If you have any questions or comments, contact Ms. Susan Parker, CAP/DP at (334) 953-7748, extension 212 or email sparker@capnhq.gov. MARK E. SMITH Major General, CAP National Commander 2 Atch 1. Changes to Organization Charts in Part II 2. Additions to Senior Member Position Descriptions in Part III

2 ICL 19-03 R20-1 1 MARCH 2019 Part II CAP Organizational Charts Vice Commander Command Chief Commander National Diversity Officer National Region/Wing Vice Commander Command NCO Commander Diversity Officer

ICL 19-03 R20-1 1 MARCH 2019 3 National Diversity Officer The National Diversity Officer serves as the subject matter expert for diversity and inclusion excellence to improve access and membership retention of qualified, historically underrepresented members to the organization.

The National Diversity Officer advises the National Commander and staff on the impact of diversity on mission effectiveness and recruiting/retention, organizational progress, and actions to promote diversity. The National Diversity Officer will: Provide strategic planning and oversight for institutional diversity and inclusion in all areas, including but not limited to programs, personnel, and resources.

Develop and lead a sustainable process to implement, assess, and adapt the national goals related to diversity and inclusion excellence. Monitor diversity statistics and analyze the data for trends. Conduct studies to monitor organizational climate and advise the National Commander on ways to improve the climate. Assist in developing Region diversity programs. Collaborate with stakeholders to leverage effective practices to diversify membership, leadership, and staff teams. Serve as a resource to identify and implement best practices, programs, and processes. Work with other members of the National Staff to provide strategic communications and public outreach, and to guide recruiting and retention efforts to promote a diverse membership.

Assist with developing partnerships with organizations that share similar missions and attract membership from historically underrepresented populations. Participate in National Professional Development and Cadet Team development of Civil Air Patrol training activities and course curriculum for diversity and inclusion excellence. Support the National Staff on developing and updating publications (regulations, pamphlets, brochures, websites, etc.) to encourage diversity, reflect the diverse population, and remove barriers to participation.

Region Diversity Officer The Region Diversity Officer is the subject matter expert for diversity and inclusion excellence in their respective region. The Region Diversity Officer advises the Region Commander and staff on the impact of diversity on mission effectiveness and recruiting/retention, organizational progress, and actions to promote diversity. The Region Diversity Officer will: Provide strategic planning and oversight for institutional diversity and inclusion in all areas, including but not limited to programs, personnel, and resources.

Monitor diversity statistics and analyze the data for trends.

Advise the Region Commander on ways to improve the climate within their region. Assist in developing Wing diversity programs. Collaborate with stakeholders to leverage effective practices to diversify membership, leadership, and staff teams. Serve as a resource

4 ICL 19-02 22 FEBRUARY 2019 to identify and implement best practices, programs, and processes across the region. Work with other members of the Region Staff team to provide strategic communications and public outreach, and to guide recruiting and retention efforts to promote a diverse membership. Assist with developing partnerships within the region with organizations that share similar missions and attract membership from historically underrepresented populations. Support the Region Staff on developing and updating publications (supplements, operating instructions, pamphlets, brochures, websites, etc.) to encourage diversity, reflect the diverse population, and remove barriers to participation.

Wing Diversity Officer The Wing Diversity Officer is the subject matter expert for diversity and inclusion excellence in their respective wing. The Wing Diversity Officer advises the Wing Commander and staff on the impact of diversity on mission effectiveness and recruiting/retention, organizational progress, and actions to promote diversity. The Wing Diversity Officer will: Provide strategic planning and oversight for institutional diversity and inclusion in all areas, including but not limited to programs, personnel, and resources.

Monitor diversity statistics and analyze the data for trends.

Advise the Wing Commander on ways to improve the climate within their wing. Collaborate with stakeholders to leverage effective practices to diversify membership, leadership, and staff teams. Serve as a resource to identify and implement best practices, programs, and processes across the wing. Work with other members of the Wing Staff to provide strategic communications and public outreach, and to guide recruiting and retention efforts to promote a diverse membership. Assist with developing local partnerships and activities with organizations that share similar missions and attract membership from historically underrepresented populations.

Support the Wing Staff on developing and updating publications (supplements, operating instructions, pamphlets, brochures, websites, etc.) to encourage diversity, reflect the diverse population, and remove barriers to participation.

Supersedes: CAPR 20-1, 29 May 2000. OPR: DP Distribution: National CAP website. Pages: 50 Notice: CAP publications and forms are available digitally on the National CAP website at: http://www.capmembers.com/forms_publications__regulations/ NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS CIVIL AIR PATROL CAP REGULATION 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 Corrected Copy Includes ICL 17 NOVEMBER 15 and 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 18 Organization and Mission ORGANIZATION OF CIVIL AIR PATROL This regulation establishes the organization structure of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) and position descriptions at all levels.

It applies to all CAP units.

SUMMARY OF CHANGES: This revision is a general update to include the new governance changes. All references to the National Board, National Executive Committee and Executive Director have been removed. Terms limits for Region, Wing and Unit Commanders have been included as well as the National Inspector General. The job descriptions have also been updated. Note: Shaded areas identify new or revised material. TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE PART I−ORGANIZATION OF CIVIL AIR PATROL 3 Section A−General . . 3 Section B−Corporate Organization at National Level . . 3 Section C−Relationship with the Air Force .

4 Section E− Field Organization . . 6 Section F−Organization and Manning of CAP Units . . 6 Figure 1−Civil Air Patrol Organizational Chart . . 8 Figure 2−Headquarters CAP-USAF Organizational Chart . . 9 Figure 3−CAP Chain of Command . . 10 Figure 4−CAP Regions and Wings . . 11 PART II−ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS FOR ALL LEVELS OF CAP HEADQUARTERS 12 Figure 5−Region Headquarters Organizational Chart . . 12 Figure 6−Region Level . . 13 Figure 7−Wing Headquarters Organizational Chart . . 14 Figure 8−Wing Level . . 15 Figure 9−Group Headquarters Organizational Chart . . 16 Figure 10−Group Headquarters Organizational Chart .

16 Figure 11−Group Level . . 18 Figure 12−Senior Squadron Organizational Chart (Strength Over 50 Senior Members . . 19 Figure 13−Squadron Level (Strength Over 50 Senior Members . . 20 Figure 14−Senior Squadron Organizational Chart (Strength Less Than 50 Senior Members . . 21 Figure 15−Squadron Level (Composite Squadron w/less than 50 Senior Members . . 22 Figure 16−Composite Squadron Organizational Chart (Senior Member Positions . . 23 Figure 17−Cadet Squadron Organizational Chart (Senior Member Positions . . 24 Figure 18−Cadet/Composite Squadron Organizational Chart (Cadet Positions . .

25 PART III−SENIOR MEMBER POSITION DESCRIPTIONS 26 Region Commander . . 26 Wing Commander . . 27 Group Commander . . 28 Squadron Commander . . 28 Operations Officer . . 29

2 CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 Emergency Services (ES) Officer . . 30 Emergency Services Training Officer . . 31 Search and Rescue (SAR) Officer . . 31 Disaster Relief Officer . . 32 Counterdrug (CD) Officer (Applicable to Wing/Region Only . . 32 Communications Officer . . 33 Drug Demand Reduction Officer . . 33 Internal Aerospace Education Officer . . 34 (Applicable to Regions, Wings, Groups and Squadrons . . 34 External Aerospace Education Officer . . 35 (Applicable to Regions, Wings, Groups and Squadrons . . 35 Professional Development Officer . . 35 Director of Cadet Programs (Applicable to Wings .

37 Cadet Programs Development Officer (Applicable to Regions, Wings, Groups . . 37 Cadet Special Activities Officer (Applicable to Regions, Wings, Groups . . 37 Leadership Education Officer (Applicable to Cadet and Composite Squadrons Only . . 38 Activities Officer (Applicable to Cadet and Composite Squadrons Only . . 38 Testing Officer (Applicable to Squadrons Only . . 38 Deputy Commander For Cadets (Applicable to Composite Squadrons Only . . 39 Logistics Officer (Applicable to Squadrons Only . . 39 Supply Officer . . 39 Transportation Officer . . 40 Maintenance Officer . . 40 Administrative Officer .

41 Personnel Officer . . 41 Recruiting Officer . . 41 Plans and Programs Officer . . 42 Public Affairs Officer . . 42 Director of Finance . . 42 (Applicable to Regions and Wings . . 42 Finance Officer . . 43 (Applicable to Units Below Wing-Level . . 43 Chaplain . . 43 Character Development Instructor . . 44 Legal Officer . . 44 Health Services Officer . . 45 Inspector General . . 45 (Applicable to Regions, Wings . . 45 Safety Officer . . 46 Historian . . 46 Government Relations Advisor (Wing Level Only . . 47 National Command Chief . . 47 Region Command NCO . . 48 Region NCO Advisor . . 48 Wing NCO Advisor .

49 Group NCO Advisor . . 49 Squadron NCO Advisor . . 49 PART IV−CADET POSITION DESCRIPTIONS 50 Cadet Commander . . 50 Cadet Deputy Commander . . 50 Cadet Executive Officer . . 50 Cadet Aerospace Education Officer . . 51 Cadet Operations Officer . . 51 Cadet Communications Officer . . 51 Cadet Flight Commander . . 52 Cadet First Sergeant . . 52 Cadet Flight Sergeant . . 52 Cadet Element Leader . . 53

CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 3 PART I−ORGANIZATION OF CIVIL AIR PATROL Section A−General 1. Civil Air Patrol, A Corporation. Civil Air Patrol (CAP) was established 1 December 1941 and is a private, nonprofit organization of a benevolent character, and incorporated by the United States Congress on 1 July 1946 (36 USC 40301- 40307) and its status and governing body are defined by 10 USC Chapter 909. Civil Air Patrol functions in accordance with its Constitution and Bylaws, regulations, and other directives approved by the Board of Governors, and issued by the Chief Operating Officer.

2. Objects and Purposes.

The objects and purposes of CAP, as contained in 36 U.S.C. 40302, are to: a. Provide an organization to encourage and aid citizens of the United States in contributing their efforts, services, and resources in developing aviation and in maintaining air supremacy. b.Encourage and develop by example the voluntary contribution of private citizens to the public welfare. c. Provide aviation and aerospace education and training especially to its senior and cadet members. d.Encourage and foster civil aviation in local communities.

e. Provide an organization of private citizens with adequate facilities to assist in meeting local and national emergencies. f. Assist the Department of the Air Force in fulfilling its noncombat programs and missions. 3. Organizational Structure. Civil Air Patrol’s organizational structure at all levels follows the basic organizational concepts in this regulation. However, there may be situations where wings/units need to realign organizational elements to fit unique mission requirements. In these cases region commanders may approve deviations to improve efficiency. a. Position descriptions at all echelons (national, region, wing, group, and squadron) are so similar that the same position description applies to all levels, unless otherwise indicated.

Short, brief sentences in the position descriptions give a broad picture of the duties of each position. The tasks listed are described in detail in other CAP directives. All phases of each functional area have been covered in each position description even though some units may not have a need for every task. Local units are authorized and encouraged to develop more detailed position descriptions to fit individual unit situations. b. Each unit commander should develop and post an organizational chart at headquarters, depicting the name and grade of the incumbent of each position and the specific duties of each so unit personnel know their responsibilities and their chain of command.

In smaller units, it may be necessary that more than one position be filled by the same member; however, someone should be responsible for each task outlined in the position description so the entire unit is aware of who is responsible for which duties.

4. CAP, as an Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. In 1943 CAP began as an auxiliary of the Army Air Corps and later continued with the Army Air Force. The Congress codified that status declaring CAP as the official Auxiliary of the newly created United States Air Force on 26 May 1948 by a law frequently referred to as the CAP Supply Bill (10 USC 9441). In 2000, Congress codified CAP’s status as an auxiliary of the Air Force when it is performing a mission for a “department or agency in any branch of the Federal government”. The CAP and its members are deemed to be instrumentalities of the United States with respect to any act or mission of the CAP in carrying out a mission assigned by the Air Force (see 10 U.S.C.

9442). Section B−Corporate Organization at National Level 5. National Organization. This section describes the corporate organization of CAP at the National level. The overall organization of CAP, the CAP National Headquarters as well as the Civil Air Patrol-United States Air Force (CAP-USAF) structure is depicted in figure 1.

6. The Board of Governors. The Board of Governors is the governing body of CAP and as such shall govern, direct and manage the affairs of the Corporation. It is comprised of 11 members: four members appointed by the Secretary of the Air Force, who may be active or retired employees of the United States, or private citizens; four members of Civil Air Patrol; and three members appointed jointly by the Secretary of the Air Force and the National Commander of Civil Air Patrol, from personnel of any Federal Government agencies, public corporations, nonprofit associations, or other organizations that have an interest and expertise in civil aviation and the Civil Air Patrol mission.

7. The CAP Senior Advisory Group. The CAP Senior Advisory Group (CSAG) is an advisory group to the National Commander and shall conduct such business as determined by the Board of Governors, National Commander, or delineated by CAP regulations. The CSAG consists of the: a. National Commander b. National Vice Commander c. National Chief of Staff d. Region Commanders e. Chief Operating Officer* f. Commander, CAP-USAF* *Ex-officio, nonvoting members

4 CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 8. The CAP Command Council.The CAP Command Council is the advisory body to the National Commander on operational issues.

The Command Council consists of: a. National Commander b. National Vice Commander c. National Chief of Staff d. Region Commanders e. Wing Commanders f. Chief Operating Officer* g. Commander, CAP-USAF* *Ex-officio, nonvoting advisors 9. The National Headquarters. a. The National Headquarters consists of the National Commander who also serves as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), the Chief Operating Officer (CO) the National Staff, and NHQ-chartered units activated as directed by the National Commander.

b. The National Commander is the Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation and is primarily responsible for the operational missions of the Corporation. The National Commander serves as a permanent advisor to the Board of Governors, c. The Chief Operating Officer is contracted by the Board of Governors to administer the day-to-day activities of Civil Air Patrol and to issue rules, regulations, and other directives in accordance with the resolutions of the Board of Governors. He/she is also responsible for all employment and management decisions associated with the paid staff employed to assist him/her in executing the purposes of the Corporation.

The CO administratively reports to the Board of Governors but shall be under the operational direction of the CEO (National Commander). In the absence of the National Commander, the CO will assume the CEO responsibilities regarding the operation and daily administration of the Corporation.

10. National Committees and National Staff. National committees and National staff may be appointed by the National Commander and function under the direction of the Chief of Staff. These positions are advisory in nature and have no command or directive authority. The National Chief of Staff exercises command authority over NHQ-chartered units as delegated by the National Commander. Section C−Relationship with the Air Force. 11. Authority. 10 U.S.C. 9442 – 9448 establishes the relationship between the Air Force and CAP. The Air Force may furnish to the CAP any equipment, supplies and other resources the Air Force determines necessary to enable the CAP to fulfill the missions assigned by the Air Force as an auxiliary of the Air Force.

The legal instrument used to transfer resources to the CAP is a Cooperative Agreement (CA) which the Air Force and CAP entered into effective 1 October 2000. The CA, along with the attached Statement of Work (SOW), establish what support the Air Force may provide to CAP.

12. Civil Air Patrol – United States Air Force (CAP-USAF): a. CAP-USAF is an Air Force organization responsible for ensuring that CAP is organized, trained, and equipped to fulfill the Air Force-assigned missions. CAP-USAF provides day-to-day support, advice and liaison to CAP, and provides oversight for CAP programs, with particular emphasis on safety and programmatic requirements. CAP-USAF personnel are the primary functional interface between other Federal agencies and the CAP. CAP-USAF is responsible for reviewing CAP’s annual budget and program submission and making recommendations through HC/FM, HC/XP, AU/FM or AU/XP to AETC.

CAP-USAF is the Air Force program office for the CA and SOW. b. Headquarters CAP-USAF (HQ CAP-USAF). At the National level, CAP-USAF maintains its headquarters at Maxwell AFB. The CAP NHQ is collocated with HQ CAP-USAF. The Commander, CAP-USAF, commands all civil service and active duty members of the U.S. Air Force who are assigned to CAP-USAF (including USAF personnel at the region liaison offices) to provide advice, liaison and oversight to Civil Air Patrol. The CAP-USAF Commander reports to the Commander, Jeanne M. Holm Center for Officer Accessions and Citizen Development; who is responsible to Headquarters, Air University.

c. CAP-USAF Liaison Regions. CAP-USAF operates eight regional offices to support and oversee CAP’s eight regions and 52 wings. The CAP-USAF Liaison Region (CAP-USAF LR) consists of a Commander, a Director of Operations and a Chief of Logistics, as well as other support staff and Air Force Reserve personnel. This office provides advice, assistance, and oversight of the CAP region commander as well as advice and assistance to the CAP wing commanders in the region.

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 5 Section D−Command Responsibilities 13. Chain of Command.

CAP commanders operate through the following chain of command in the order shown below and illustrated in figure 3. a. National Commander b. Region Commander c. Wing Commander d. Group Commander e. Squadron Commander f. Flight Commander 14. Commander Appointments and Command Authority. The Board of Governors selects the National Commander who serves as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Civil Air Patrol. The National Vice Commander is selected by the National Commander and confirmed by the Board of Governors. Remaining commanders (who may have delegated authority from a Corporate Officer) are appointed as outlined below.

a. Region commanders are appointed by the National Commander and have command authority over all CAP units and members within their respective regions. As members of the CSAG, they are the senior officers for their regions and exercise authority as such. Region commanders serve a four-year term and are not eligible to succeed themselves. Region commander terms may be extended by the National Commander for up to 90-days as necessary. b. Wing commanders are appointed by the region commanders and have command authority over all CAP units, and members within their respective wings. Wing commanders shall serve a four-year term of office.

The region commander may grant an additional one-year term with the concurrence of the National Commander. When it is necessary to appoint a new wing commander, the region commander will follow the procedures outlined in CAPR 35-9 before consulting with the National Commander and notifying National Headquarters/DP so the appointment can be announced in published personnel actions. The region commander is also responsible for notifying the wing commanders concerned (both the new commander and the commander being replaced).

c. The wing commander appoints group, squadron, and flight commanders. These commanders serve a four-year term of office. Upon completion of the initial term, the Commander may be appointed to subsequent four-year terms with the approval of the Wing and Region commander. d. Group commanders are appointed by the wing commanders and have command authority over all CAP units, and members within their respective groups. Group commanders will work collaboratively with their wing commanders for the appointment of squadron commanders and flight commanders.

e. Squadron commanders are appointed by the wing commanders and have command authority over their respective units.

Prior to selection as a squadron commander, it is highly desired that candidates have completed the following requirements completed. (1) Officer Basic Course (2) Squadron Leadership School (SLS) (3) Unit Commander Course (UCC) Circumstances may dictate that an individual be appointed to the position of squadron commander without having these courses completed. In this case, the new squadron commander should complete CAP Pamphlet 40-2, Just in Time Workbook for New Unit Commanders, within 30 days of their change of command. The squadron commander should then complete the desired training courses as expeditiously as possible.

f. Chaplains are not eligible for appointment as commanders. 15. Discharge of Responsibilities: a. Unit commanders are responsible for compliance with all directives from higher headquarters. They are authorized a staff to assist in the accomplishment of the various assigned tasks and should delegate appropriate authority to staff members in discharging the unit’s mission. Commanders retain full responsibility for the actions of their staff. b. Commanders must ensure that all members of their staff understand the chain of command, that is, who they report to and who reports to them. Individuals should have only one supervisor.

c. A commander who is an attorney will not appoint himself as a legal officer in his command. 16. Command Authority during Temporary Absence of Commanders. During the temporary absence of a commander at the region, wing or unit level, the vice/deputy commander or the chief of staff, in that order, will act as temporary commander. 17. Other National level appointments. a. The National Chief of Staff, Chief of the Chaplain Corps, Chief of the Legal Officer Corps and National Controller serve at the pleasure of the National Commander.

b. The National Inspector General (IG) is appointed by the National Commander and confirmed by the Board of Governors.

Once appointed and confirmed, the IG, remains in this position until a new National Commander is selected. The National IG may serve sequential National Commanders, if appointed by the National Commander . The National Inspector General may only be removed from office by a majority vote of the Board of Governors. In the event of a vacancy the National Commander shall immediately appoint a replacement who will serve with full authority of the office until confirmed by the Board of Governors. Disapproval by the Board of Governors creates a vacancy and disqualifies

6 CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 the individual from service in this position. Section E− Field Organization 18. Regions. CAP is divided into eight separate regions, divided geographically within the United States. Their collective boundaries include all the CAP wings. These regions are not constituted as separate legal entities. Each region is known by the geographical locale of the United States it encompasses. The CAP regions and the wings that comprise them are depicted in 4. 19. Wings. There are 52 wings in CAP, one for each state, the District of Columbia (which encompasses the Washington, D.C.

area), and Puerto Rico. A wing is comprised of the wing headquarters and all units within its geographical boundary unless otherwise prescribed.

20. Groups. Wing commanders may form groups when the wing geographical area or the number of units in the wing is too large to permit the wing commander to exercise effective supervision directly over squadrons and flights. A group will not be formed unless a minimum of five squadrons is placed under its control or unless extenuating circumstances, such as long distances, prevail. The need for groups will be at the discretion of the wing commander. Wing commanders will deactivate or redesignate existing groups that do not meet the above criteria. Both National and region headquarters will be notified of any change in group structures.

21. Squadrons. The squadron is the community-level organization of CAP. Wing commanders may activate squadrons in accordance with CAPR 20-3. Whenever the membership drops below the minimums outlined in CAPR 20-3, the wing commander may deactivate the squadron or redesignate it as a flight. The designation of each squadron will indicate whether it is a: a. Senior Squadron. Comprised entirely of senior members. b. Cadet Squadron. Comprised primarily of cadets with a minimum of three senior members to meet supervisory, administrative, and training requirements in the conduct of cadet programs.

Composite Squadron. Comprised of both senior and cadet members, conducting both senior and cadet programs. 22. Flights. The flight is the smallest CAP membership unit authorized and must conform to minimum membership requirements set forth in CAPR 20-3. Flights should be organized only in sparsely populated areas where there are an insufficient number of individuals to constitute a squadron. a. A flight may be assigned either to a squadron, group, or wing at the discretion of the wing commander concerned. b. If the membership drops below the minimum membership required, the flight may be deactivated.

If the membership increases to the minimum required for a squadron, the wing commander will redesignate the flight as a squadron.

c. Flights will use organizational charts established for a squadron of less than 50 senior members as a guide in establishing the unit. Section F−Organization and Manning of CAP Units CAPR 20-3 sets forth the procedures for activating, deactivating, and redesignating CAP units. 23. Field Organization: a. Headquarters organizational structures for each level of command throughout CAP are depicted in part II. This basic organizational structure has been determined to be the most workable structure for all CAP units, and deviations are not authorized, except to expand particular staff elements as required to accomplish the unit’s mission.

b. Each unit commander should develop and post a unit organizational chart indicating the name and grade of the member filling each position. In smaller units, one person may fill more than one position; however, someone should be responsible for each task outlined in each position description so the entire unit is aware of who is responsible for which duties.

24. Commander Grade Allocations: Position Grade−Not to Exceed* Region Commander Colonel Region Vice Commander Colonel Wing Commander Colonel Group Commander Lt Col Squadron Commander Lt Col *Unless higher grade earned when holding previous position 25. NCO Duty Positions. NCOs are eligible to hold any position within CAP, including pilot, except those normally reserved for officers (e.g. Unit Commanders) and will be assigned to any CAP organization level: Squadron, Group, Wing, Region or National Headquarters. Where possible, assignments will be rank appropriate and consider the member’s professional development training, professional military skills and professional and personal goals.

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 7 Senior NCOs (MSgt, SMSgt and CMSgt) may be in charge of a unit designated as a flight (if there are no CAP officers assigned); however, NCOs will not be authorized to command a Squadron, Group, Wing or Region. Any NCO assigned as squadron commander on the date of publication of this Interim Change may complete his or her term, but no additional NCO Commander appointments are authorized. a. NCOs add value to CAP units in many different ways. Examples include: (1) NCOs both complete and promote Professional Development and professional enhancement courses to develop and cultivate leadership skills and professionalism.

(2) NCOs help to ensure finances, facilities, and other resources are used in an effective and efficient manner and in the best interest of the Civil Air Patrol. (3) NCOs can plan resource utilization, replenishment, and budget allocation to ensure personnel are provided the equipment and resources needed to effectively accomplish the mission. (4) NCOs understand and can manage and explain manning requirements and capabilities. (5) NCOs promote a culture of innovation and continuous process improvement to identify and resolve deficiencies. NCOs should guide, train, instruct and develop peers so they are technically ready to accomplish the mission and ensure they are prepared to accept increased levels of authority and responsibility.

(6) NCOs bring professional military experience to Cadet Programs and Leadership training, and can be invaluable in guiding cadets as they learn drill and ceremonies, color guard, and other military and leadership functions. (7) Encampments (and other special activities) can also significantly benefit from NCO involvement. NCOs can provide guidance on large military formations, enhance leadership instruction for the cadre members in attendance, and provide information and advice to encampment leadership on the morale and welfare of the attendees. b. Typical NCO duty assignments by rank and position are described as follows: (1) CAP Staff Sergeant: Completed Level I of the Professional Development Program and progressing through Level II.

Working towards specific skill set within chosen Specialty Track. Should be given opportunities to further develop technical abilities and to demonstrate leadership skills. Responsible for the effective accomplishment of all assigned tasks.

(2) CAP Technical Sergeant: Completed Level II of the Professional Development Program and progressing through Level III. Should be given opportunities to further develop technical abilities and to demonstrate leadership skills. Assigned to a specific area/position within the unit. (3) CAP Master Sergeant: Experienced member of the unit. Completed Level III of the Professional Development Program and progressing through Level IV. Assigned to a specific area/position within the unit. Role models/mentors of cadets and newly assigned senior members. Participate in the decision making process, as appropriate, on technical, operational and organizational issues.

(4) CAP Senior Master Sergeant: Assigned to Squadron, Group, Wing or Region. Continue to develop leadership and management skills, complete Level IV of the Professional Development Program, and progress through (5) Level V. Role models/mentors, program, project or policy managers. Program/project oversight responsibilities; Directors of Summer Encampments, Cadet Special Activities; Group, Wing, Region or National Special Activities. Participates in the decision making process, as appropriate, on technical, operational, and organizational issues. (5) CAP Chief Master Sergeant: Assigned to Squadron, Group, Wing, Region or National Headquarters.

Completed Level V of the Professional Development Program. A role model/mentor, Senior NCO Advisor to the commander, Program/project oversight responsibilities. Directors of Summer Encampments, Cadet Special Activities; Group, Wing, Region or National Special Activities. Participates in the decision making process, as appropriate, on technical, operational and organizational issues. Chief Master Sergeants serve in the highest NCO rank and hold strategic leadership positions with tremendous influence at all levels of the Civil Air Patrol. They continue to develop personal leadership and management skills to prepare for ever increasing positions of responsibility.

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 8 Figure 1−Civil Air Patrol Organizational Chart UNITED STATES AIR FORCE CIVIL AIR PATROL HQ Air University USAF HQ Air Education and Training Command USAF HQ CAP-USAF Region Liaison Offices (8 Offices) Headquarters, USAF Jeanne M. Holms Center For Officer Accessions & Citizen Development USAF CAP Regions (8 Commands) CAP Wings (52 Commands) Groups (Optional) Squadron Flights Board of Governors Membership Action Review Panel National Commander/ Chief Executive Officer Chief Operating Officer National Staff CAP Volunteer Staff Paid Corporate Staff

9 CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 Figure 2−Headquarters CAP-USAF Organizational Chart Commander, CAP-USAF Vice Commander Inspector General Staff Judge Advocate Operations Financial Management Liaison Regions (8) Logistics Safety Information Management Chief Operating Officer National Commander/ Chief Executive Officer Command Chief

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 10 Figure 3−CAP Chain of Command National Commander National Vice Commander Command Chief Region Commander Wing Commander Group Commander (Optional) Squadron Commander Flight Commander Board of Governors

11 CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 Figure 4−CAP Regions and Wings

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 12 PART II−ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS FOR ALL LEVELS OF CAP HEADQUARTERS Figure 5−Region Headquarters Organizational Chart Health Services Officer Director of Personnel Director, Recruiting & Retention Director of Plans & Programs Director of Public Affairs Director of Finance Director, Information Technology Region Chaplain Region Historian *Two region Vice Commanders are authorized.

The above staff officers may find it desirable to delegate certain responsibilities to subordinate personnel. If any of these functions are expanded, the organizational charts on the following pages are recommended.

NOTE: The Operations and the Emergency Services functions may be separated at the option of the region commander. Government Relations Advisor Inspector General Wing Coordinator(s) Legal Officer *Vice Commander (Colonel) Command NCO NCO Advisor Region Commander (Colonel) Director of Safety CAP-USAF Liaison Region Commander Region Reserve Coordinator **DCS Operations **DCS Communications **DCS Cadet Programs **DCS Aerospace Education **DCS Logistics Director of Administration DCS Professional Development

12 CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 Figure 6−Region Level DCS Aerospace Education *Operations and Emergency Services may be organized as separate functions at the option of the region commander.

NOTE: Counterdrug may be organized under either Operations or Emergency Services. Internal Aerospace Education Officer External Aerospace Education Officer DCS Cadet Programs Cadet Program Development Officer Cadet Activities Officer DCS Logistics Supply Officer Maintenance Officer DCS Communications Communications Engineering Officer Communications Licensing Officer *DCS Operations Standardization/ Evaluation Officer *Emergency Services Officer Transportation Officer Communications Training Officer Counterdrug Director Disaster Relief Officer Emerg Services Trng Officer Search and Rescue Counterdrug Director Homeland Security Officer DDR Coordinator

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 14 Figure 7−Wing Headquarters Organizational Chart Wing Commander (Colonel) Director of Safety Government Relations Advisor CAP-USAF Liaison Region USAFR Coordinator Inspector General **Director of Operations *Vice Commander Command NCO **Director of Communications **Director of Cadet Programs **Director of Aerospace Education **Director of Logistics Administrative Officer Director of Professional Development Recruitin g & Retention Plans & Programs Officer Public Affairs Officer Finance Officer Information Technology Officer Wing Chaplain Wing Historian Health Services Officer *Two vice commanders are authorized with the approval of the Region Commander.

The above staff officers may find it desirable to delegate certain responsibilities to subordinate personnel. If any of these functions are expanded the organizational charts on the following pages are recommended.

NOTE 1: The Operations and the Emergency Services functions may be separated at the option of the wing commander. Legal Officer Personnel Officer NCO Advisor

14 CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 Figure 8−Wing Level Director of Aerospace Education *Operations and Emergency Services may be organized as separate functions at the option of the wing commander. NOTE: Counterdrug may be organized under either Operations or Emergency Services. Internal Aerospace Education Officer External Aerospace Education Officer Director of Cadet Programs Cadet Programs Development Officer Cadet Activities Officer Director of Logistics Supply Officer *Maintenance Officer Director of Communications Communications Engineering Officer Communications Licensing Officer *Director of Operations Standardization/ Evaluation Officer *Emergency Services Officer Transportation Officer Communications Training Officer Counterdrug Officer Disaster Relief Officer Emergency Services Training Officer Search and Rescue Officer Counterdrug Officer *May be placed under the Director of Operations at the option of the wing.

Homeland Security Officer DDR Coordinator

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 16 Figure 9−Group Headquarters Organizational Chart Group Commander Safety Officer *Operations Officer Deputy Commander Personnel Officer *Communications Officer *Cadet Programs Officer Aerospace Education Officer *Logistics Officer Administrative Officer Professional Development Officer Recruiting & Retention Officer Plans & Programs Officer Public Affairs Officer Finance Officer Historian Chaplain Information Technology Officer Health Services Officer *The above staff officers may find it desirable to delegate certain responsibilities to subordinate personnel.

If any of these functions are expanded, the organizational charts on the following pages are recommended.

NOTE 1: The Operations and the Emergency Services functions may be separated at the option of the group commander. Legal Officer NCO Advisor

12 CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 Figure 10−Group Headquarters Organizational Chart Group Commander Safety Officer *Operations Officer Deputy Commander Personnel Officer *Communications Officer *Cadet Programs Officer Aerospace Education Officer *Logistics Officer Administrative Officer Professional Development Officer Recruiting & Retention Officer Plans & Programs Officer Public Affairs Officer Finance Officer Historian Chaplain Information Technology Officer Health Services Officer *The above staff officers may find it desirable to delegate certain responsibilities to subordinate personnel.

If any of these functions are expanded, the organizational charts on the following pages are recommended.

NOTE 1: The Operations and the Emergency Services functions may be separated at the option of the group commander. Legal Officer NCO Advisor

CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 18 Figure 11−Group Level Cadet Programs Officer *These functions may be separated at the option of the group commander. Cadet Programs Development Officer Cadet Activities Officer Logistic Officer Supply Officer *Maintenance Officer Communications Officer Communications Engineering Officer Communications Licensing Officer *Operations Officer Transportation Officer Communications Training Officer Standardization and Evaluation Officer *Emergency Services Officer Emergency Services Training Officer *May be placed under the Director of Operations at the option of the group commander.

Disaster PreparednessOfficer Search and Rescue Officer Homeland Security Officer DDR Officer

19 CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 Figure 12−Senior Squadron Organizational Chart (Strength Over 50 Senior Members) Legal Officer Chaplain NCO Advisor Deputy Commander Commander USAFR Assistant Safety Officer *Operations Officer Professional Development Officer Communications Officer *Logistics Officer Administrative Officer Aerospace Education Officer *The above staff officers may find it desirable to delegate certain responsibilities to subordinate personnel. If any of these functions are expanded, the organizational charts on the following pages are recommended.

NOTE 1: The Operations and the Emergency Services functions may be separated at the option of the group commander.

Recruiting & Retention Officer Historian Public Affairs Officer Information Technology Officer Finance Officer Personnel Officer Health Services Officer

CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 20 Figure 13−Squadron Level (Strength Over 50 Senior Members) *These functions may be separated at the option of the squadron commander. Logistic Officer Supply Officer *Maintenance Officer *Operations Officer Transportation Officer Standardization and Evaluation Officer *Emergency Services Officer Emergency Services Training Officer *May be placed under the Operations Officer at the option of the squadron commander. Disaster PreparednessOfficer Search and Rescue Officer Homeland Security Officer

21 CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 Figure 14−Senior Squadron Organizational Chart (Strength Less Than 50 Senior Members) Commander USAFR Assistant Safety Officer *Operations Officer Deputy Commander Professional Development Officer Communications Officer *Logistics Officer Administrative Officer Aerospace Education Officer Recruiting & Retention Officer Historian Public Affairs Officer Chaplain Information Technology Officer Finance Officer Personnel Officer Medical Officer *The above staff officers may find it desirable to delegate certain responsibilities to subordinate personnel.

If any of these functions are expanded, the organizational charts on the following pages are recommended.

NOTE 1: The Operations and the Emergency Services functions may be separated at the option of the squadron commander. Legal Officer NCO Advisor

CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 22 Figure 15−Squadron Level (Composite Squadron w/less than 50 Senior Members) *These functions may be separated at the option of the squadron commander. Logistic Officer Supply Officer *Maintenance Officer *Operations Officer Transportation Officer Standardization and Evaluation Officer *Emergency Services Officer Emergency Services Training Officer *May be placed under the Operations Officer at the option of the squadron commander.

Disaster PreparednessOfficer Search and Rescue Officer Homeland Security Officer

23 CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 Figure 16−Composite Squadron Organizational Chart (Senior Member Positions) Commander **The above staff officers may find it desirable to delegate certain responsibilities to subordinate personnel. If any of these functions are expanded, the organizational charts on page 20 are recommended. NOTE 1: The Operations and the Emergency Services functions may be separated at the option of the squadron commander. USAFR Assistant Safety Officer Aerospace Education Officer Activities Officer Leadership Officer Public Affairs Officer Administrative Officer Deputy Commander for Seniors Chaplain Character Development Instructor Deputy Commander for Cadets Aerospace Education Officer **Operations Officer **Communications Officer **Logistics Officer Professional Development Officer *Special Staff Officers 1.

Personnel 2. Recruiting & Retention 3. Information Technology 4. Finance 5. Medical 6. Testing 7. Historian 8. Homeland Security 9. Drug Demand Reduction Officer *Special Staff Officers Legal Officer NCO Advisor

CAPR 20-1 ICL 18-06 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 24 Figure 17−Cadet Squadron Organizational Chart (Senior Member Positions) Commander *Special Staff Officers 1. Personnel 2. Communications 3. Logistics 4. Professional Development 5. Recruiting & Retention 6. Finance 7. Health Services 8. Testing 9. Historian 10.Operations 11.Information Technology 12.Homeland Security 13.Drug Demand Reduction *Special Staff Officers as Required Deputy Commander Aerospace Education Officer Leadership Officer Administrative Officer Activities Officer Chaplain Character Development Instructor Public Affairs Officer Safety Officer USAFR Assistant Cadet Structure Legal Officer NCO Advisor

25 CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 Figure 18−Cadet/Composite Squadron Organizational Chart (Cadet Positions) Commander Operations Officer Deputy Commander Executive Officer Communications Officer Aerospace Education Officer Leadership Officer Public Affairs Officer Administrative Officer Supply Officer Recruiting Officer Flight Commander Flights Flights Flight Sergeant Squad Leader First Sergeant Special Advisors

CAPR 20-1 2 JANUARY 2013 26 PART III−SENIOR MEMBER POSITION DESCRIPTIONS Position descriptions at all echelons (region, wing, group, and squadron) are so similar that one broad position description applies to all levels, unless otherwise indicated.

Since CAP directives describe in detail the tasks to be performed in each position, each staff officer should become completely familiar with the CAP directives listed in his/her position description. Also, it should be noted that all phases of each position are covered even though some units do not have a particular need for every task. Local unit commanders are authorized and encouraged to develop more detailed position descriptions for their staff officers to fit the individual unit situation and talents of unit personnel.

Region Commander Region commanders are the senior officers within their region and are responsible to the National Commander for ensuring that corporation objectives, policies, and operational directives are effectively executed within their region. They shall: Represent the National Commander within their region and as such shall have full authority to command all CAP units and personnel in their region. Promote objectives and purposes of CAP by encouraging the achievement of established goals and programs by all units and by establishing new goals and programs within their region in support of the national organization’s objectives.

Ensure that all wings within their region accomplish the goals established.

Establish plans, policies, and procedures necessary to the proper conduct of region affairs that are not in conflict with National Headquarters policies and directives. Inform the National Commander of progress toward achievement of objectives, notable accomplishments, problem areas and other matters of interest. Ensure the safety of personnel and equipment through effective policy guidance regarding safety procedures on equipment utilization. Conduct a continuous search for talent to fill wing commander positions within their region and appoint new wing commanders as vacancies occur.

Remove from wing commander positions those members deemed unqualified or otherwise unsuitable to continue in their positions.

Appoint a competent region staff to assist them in fulfillment of their responsibilities. Assist subordinate units by furnishing guidance and resolving problems. Region commanders should be familiar with the Civil Air Patrol Constitution and Bylaws, all CAP governing directives and policy matters affecting their command. NOTE: Region commanders should develop detailed position descriptions for their vice commanders and chiefs of staff outlining the specific duties and responsibilities of each in support of the overall region mission.

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