Pre-Course Handbook BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery with Placement - London Geller College of ...

 
Pre-Course Handbook
BA (Hons) Food and
Professional Cookery
BA (Hons) Food and
Professional Cookery
with Placement

London Geller College of Hospitality & Tourism

                                1
BA (Hons) Food and
Professional Cookery
BA (Hons) Food and
Professional Cookery with
Placement

Course Handbook

2016-2017

                  2
BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery
BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery with
Placement

 Course Handbook

Contents

                                                        Page No.

 Section 1   Key Information
 1.1         Welcome to the Course                         4
 1.2         Overview of the Course                        5
 1.3         Sources of Help and Support                   6
 1.4         Facts and Figures                             8
 1.5         Your Responsibilities                         9

 Section 2   Structure and Content
 2.1         Introduction                                 13
 2.2         Award Title, Exit Points and Progression     14
 2.3         Course Philosophy, Aims and Objectives       14
 2.4         Course Outline                               15
 2.5         Course Summary                               15

 Section 3   Learning, Teaching and Assessment
 3.1         Learning and Teaching Approaches             25
 3.2         Assessment                                   25
 3.3         UWL Graduate Attributes                      27

 Section 4   Quality Management and Enhancement
 4.1         Course Management                            28
 4.2         Student Evaluation                           29
 4.3         Course Committee/Board                       29

                                     3
Section

   1
Key Information

 1.1 Welcome to Course

Dear Student,
Welcome to The London Geller College of Hospitality and Tourism, a centre of
vocational excellence in culinary arts education provision. We hope you will
enjoy and embrace the academic and social life of the College and University
alike.
You are embarking on a new learning experience, which we are sure will be
both exciting and stimulating. This course presents you with the opportunity to
develop a range of skills enabling you to operate effectively in the hospitality
industry and progress rapidly to a senior level especially in a food production
environment.
The BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery and the BA (Hons) Food and
Professional Cookery with Placement build the knowledge and skills you will
need, enabling you to focus on both the practical aspects of the industry, whilst
encouraging you to develop a broad knowledge of business, intellectual critical
thinking and problem solving, essential to your career development.
You are joining a course that welcomes students from a wide variety of cultures,
international backgrounds and academic achievement.
We hope you will find this a lively and stimulating environment in which to learn.
We wish you every success with your studies.

The Academic and Administrative Teams of the London Geller College of
Hospitality & Tourism

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1.2 Overview of the Course

This handbook contains information based on a Course Specification formally
approved by the University. The relevant sections of the specification – for
example, the course’s aims, module content, learning outcomes, teaching and
learning methods, assessment requirements – are incorporated into the
handbook. The full Course Specification is available from the Course Leader.
For information regarding University Regulations, Policies and Procedures,
please see the current Student Handbook, relevant supplement and the UWL
website. The regulations applying to a student will be those in place for the
academic year of their enrolment.
The BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery and the BA (Hons) Food and
Professional Cookery with Placement prepares the student for a career in
professional cookery and food related occupations. Students will be able to
enter the industry in traditional sectors such as hotels and restaurants, while
others may wish to become food consultants, chef managers in contract
catering or work for supermarkets as food buyers. The course has a high
content of practical work underpinned by intellectual skills, critical thinking and
problem solving. It especially focuses on diet and nutrition, the cultural aspects
of food choice, healthy eating and responsible food marketing. There is also a
module on Hospitality Business Management which is an important aspect of
the hospitality industry and which helps students to understand the various
aspects of managing people and resources in commercial environments.
The BA (Hons) also develops academic abilities in related cognate areas.
These areas include, for example, nutrition, microbiology and food hygiene.
Thus, professional cookery encompasses the practice and development of
culinary and psychomotor skills combined with the relevant management
disciplines, drawing on a blend of the art and, sciences of the culinary
practitioner.
The length of the academic year for the BA (Hons) Food and Professional
Cookery course has been designed to suit the target market. London has a
transient working population in the catering/culinary arts sector. This curriculum
model is well established within the subject area, having been used for a number

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of years on the Advanced Diploma in Food and Professional cookery and the
previous foundation degrees. The course is delivered on a full-time basis
two/three days per week and can be completed in three years.

 1.3 Sources of Help and Support

  Dean, London Geller          James Edmunds
  College of Hospitality and
  Tourism
  Email                        James.Edmunds@uwl.ac.uk
  Phone                        0208 231 2927
  Location                     WK.02.002
  Deputy Dean, London Geller Janet Rowson
  College of Hospitality and
  Tourism
  Email                        Janet.Rowson@uwl.ac.uk
  Phone                        0208 231 2286
  Location                     WK.02.002
  BA (Hons) Food and           Nathan Vasanthan
  Professional Cookery
  Course Leader
  Email                        Nathan.Vasanthan@uwl.ac.uk
  Phone                        0208 231 2985
  Location                     WK.GF.002
  Senior Lecturer              Peter Pelham
  Email                        Peter.Pelham@uwl.ac.uk
  Phone                        0208 231 2941
  Location                     WK.GF.002
  Associate Professor          Amalia Tsiami
  Email                        Amalia.Tsiami@uwl.ac.uk
  Phone                        0208 209 4422
  Location                     WK.01.003
  Senior Lecturer              Jo Tucker
  Email                        Joanne.Tucker@uwl.ac.uk
  Phone                        0208 231 2632
  Location                     WK.03.005
  Senior Lecturer              Steve James

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Email                      Steven.James@uwl.ac.uk
    Phone                      0208 231 2300
    Location                   WK.GF.002
    Lecturer                   Peter Cross
    Email                      Peter.Cross@uwl.ac.uk
    Phone                      0208 231 2941
    Location                   WK.GF.002
    Lecturer                   Thomas Kyritsis
    Email                      Thomas.Kyritsis@uwl.ac.uk
    Phone                      0208 231 2302
    Location                   WK.03.005
    Lecturer                   Ben Christopherson
    Email                      Ben.Christopherson@uwl.ac.uk
    Phone                      0208 231 2300
    Location                   WK.GF.002
    Administration officer     Luigi Pisanelli
    Email                      Luigi.Pisanelli@uwl.ac.uk
    Phone                      0208 231 2302
    Location                   HAT.GF.004
    Subject Librarian          James Concannon
    Email                      James.concannon@uwl.ac.uk
    Phone                      020 8231 2251
    Location                   UWL library
    Placement Coordinator      Rebecca Jones
    Email                      Rebecca.Jones@uwl.ac.uk
    Phone                      020 8231 2453
    Location                   BY.GF.008

Throughout your course of study, you will have access to a wide variety of
sources of support depending on your individual circumstances and needs.
Apart from the University-wide support framework, which encompasses the
Course Leader, Modules Leaders, the Subject Librarian, the Internship/Careers
Team and your Course Administrator you will also have at your disposal the
following:
•   Careers and Employment Services

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•     Student Advice Team
•     Disability Team
•     Information and Funding Team
•     Accommodation Team
•     Chaplaincy
•     Counselling
•     Medical Centre
•     The International Office (Non-EU students only)

Further details are outlined in Section 4 of this document.

    1.4 Facts and Figures

    Teaching and Learning Data
    Percentage of participants’ study time:    Level 4        Level 5    Level 6
    Scheduled teaching & learning time          27%            28%        28%
         Guided independent study time          62%            61%        72%
                      Time on Placement         11%            11%         0%

    Assessment
    Percentage of final marks assessed         Level 4        Level 5    Level 6
    by:
                                     Exam        8%            19%         8%
                              Coursework        47%            42%        63%
                                 Practical      45%            39%        28%

    1.5 Your Responsibilities

For a full description of your entitlements and responsibilities please consult the
Student Handbook: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/Current_students.jsp
The course team and other University departments will always contact you via
your University email address. So please ensure that you check your University
email account regularly.
Students should follow the university, course and module inductions, which are
specifically intended to inform students how to access services and pass your
modules successfully. Failure to attend these important module induction
sessions may disadvantage you as a learner.

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The student will study a range of skills, both academic and practical, which
underpin the competences necessary to become an advanced practitioner in
the sector. Full attendance is strongly advised particularly where successful
teamwork relies upon the participation of all stakeholders.
Material resources, food items, large and small equipment have group
ownership, It is imperative all learners share resources. Staff make every effort
to use resources wisely giving due consideration to both the learner and the cost
implications, where a student attends a practical late those food resources may
have been returned to food stores.
Students will study concepts and models appropriate and applicable to the
business of hospitality whilst developing a critical thinking approach through
research and self- directed study.
The student will have the opportunity, where time allows, undertaking a stage or
participating in industry events commensurate with the scope of their ability. UWL
patrons and placement providers are aware of the need to gain industry exposure,
and provide excellent opportunities for students at leading establishments in London
and surrounding areas.
Students are more likely to be invited to interview where they can list industry
experience on their Curriculum Vitae. Students who forego industry exposure risk
disadvantaging themselves in any job market.
In addition to the taught course, curriculum related learning may take place off-
site and should be attended smartly presented in business style attire
commensurate with the task or venue. The hospitality industry is a disciplined
profession often reflected in smart personal presentation.
Guest speakers and practitioners from leading sector providers attend the college
throughout the academic year offering valuable insight and knowledge to the
learner. You are strongly advised to attend as many of these events as possible,
where feasible, tutors may make alter session times to allow students to attend.
Food Hygiene and Food Safety
Please refer to the publication “Food Safety in Practical Areas” (Paskins, 2016)
Attendance and punctuality in practical areas
It is expected students will attend all classes punctually particularly where
teamwork and commercial pressures are additional pressures upon learners.

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Section

 2
A suggested start time for the commercial outlets is 15 minutes prior to the
session start time, allowing for class & ingredient set up time. It is not possible
to make up learning time where a class has been missed. Marks will be lost
where portfolio evidence is experiential and is submitted for marking.
Where food handling work is concerned respiratory infection, colds, coughs and
sore throats are not conducive to hygienic food preparation, where you have an
illness please inform your tutor via you student e-mail, copy in your course
leader to avoid an absent recording on your attendance.
Uniform and Equipment
Uniform and equipment requirements reflect both industry norms and safety
requirements. Most of the equipment you will need will be provided by the
University; however you are required to provide full, clean uniform for yourself.
All students embarking on the BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery
course must have the required uniform and equipment for the start of session.
This means that all chefs must come to each practical lesson following these
criteria:
1.          Clean chef hat (preferably white)
2.          Clean white chef jacket
3.          Blue or black and white chef trousers
4.          Clean white chef apron
5.          Kitchen safety shoes on (no trainers or open toe sandals)
6.          Each student should bring paper and pencil
7.          Knives and utensils suitable for the practical session
8.          No wearing of bracelets, loose earrings or nail varnish
9.          Please put mobile phones on silent and any other electronic devices
10.         Be well-groomed, clean and tidy

Please note it is your responsibility to ensure you have the required equipment
and/or uniform - failure to do so might impede your ability to take part in the
practical elements of the course.

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Structure and Content

2.1   Introduction

Using your handbook
This handbook is for students undertaking BA (Hons) Food and Professional
Cookery Course. The handbook is an essential document for you and we have
tried to make it as accurate and informative as possible.
However, it is important to note that as a student at UWL you will also receive
other sources of essential and invaluable information regarding your academic
and social life at the University this will include other handbooks and
documentation, which will include:
•     UWL Student Handbook
•     Module Study Guides
•     Learning Skills Development Workbooks
This handbook provides a general introduction to the course and its various
components and you should read it carefully when you enrol - at whatever stage
or year this takes place. It is also a good idea to re-read it and refresh your
understanding at the start of each semester.
The handbook contains essential information about the Course. Details about
University regulations which affect you, such as pass criteria and progression
regulations, as well as procedures for extensions to assignment hand-in dates,
mitigation, appeals and so on, are provided in your UWL student Handbook.
Please take the time to ensure that you not only read them but fully
understand them! Your Course Leader or Learning Skills Tutor will be
happy to explain anything you do not fully understand.
This handbook is for you, so please feel free to make helpful comments on the
style of presentation and contents.

2.2   Award title, Exit Points and Progression

After 1 year successful study at Level 4 and subject to your achieving 120 credit
points, having submitted and passed all the required modules, you have a stop

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off option award Certificate in Higher Education.
After 2 years successful study and subject to your achieving a total of 240 credit
points having submitted and passed all the required modules, you have a stop
off option award Diploma in Higher Education.
This course has the full award of BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery, to
achieve this you will have successfully passed 18 modules gaining a total of 360
credits. A Post Graduate Masters route provides seamless progression to MA
in Food Business Management or MA in Luxury Hospitality Management.
Students who successfully complete all modules at level 4 and level 5 and have
registered to this course are awarded the Food and Professional Cookery or the
Food and Professional Cookery with placement if they have registered to the
course with a placement.

2.3    Course Philosophy, Aims and Outcomes

The course is intended for the professional who wishes to work in the hospitality
industry, both from the local area and from overseas, where hospitality and
tourism are major economic drivers. It allows you, the student, to gain a higher-
level qualification based on your craft skills allowing you to further develop and
enhance them. The course provides a vehicle for personal and professional
development crucial to success in the hospitality industry, where the ability to
communicate your vision effectively with colleagues and customers alike is vital.
The hospitality industry is diverse, comprising major sectors such as hotels,
public sector catering, contract catering, restaurants, gastro-pub, food retailing
sectors and event caterers. The demand for skilled practitioners and managers
with operational ability is paramount. The hospitality industry is a major provider
of employment and a source of economic stability worldwide. This course
provides a broad base on which a career specialism can be built. Career advice
and guidance is encouraged very early in the course. A comprehensive CV is
paramount to successful career development.          Students should use every
opportunity to network, stage and placement at appropriate establishments and
via College patrons at all stages of the course.

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2.4    Course Outline

Included in each module, listed in the Module Study Guide (MSG) are learning
aims and learning outcomes which are critical areas of skills acquisition,
essential underpinning knowledge and academic understanding of the
discipline.
All practical marks based on modules delivered in the commercial operations
are attendance dependent, where absence occurs a mark cannot be given for
work subsequently submitted in absence, marks may be lost pro-rate in these
instances.
Learning aims and outcomes have been developed based on employability and
professional development with eventual mastery of the subject being desirable.
The curriculum meets these outcomes through its relevance to the modern
industry and, in particular, the development needs of the employee.
On successful module completion, students will have the practical skills
demanded by employers together with the intellectual underpinning knowledge
required for fast track career development.

2.5    Module Summary

Included in each module, learning aims and outcomes are critical to the areas
of both practical skills acquisition and essential underpinning knowledge vital to
understanding and applying the subject knowledge.
The learning outcomes have been developed based on employability and
professional development with eventual mastery of the subject being desirable.
The curriculum meets these outcomes through its relevance to the modern
hospitality industry and, in particular, the development needs of the industry and
the knowledge identified by employers and in consultation with People First.
On successful module completion, students will have the practical skills
demanded by employers together with the intellectual underpinning knowledge
required for fast track career development with the business acumen to become
an active practitioner and model citizen.
 Level 4: Year 1

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•   Academic Development and Employability (20 Credits)
    •   Kitchen Operations (20 Credits)
    •   Food Microbiology and Hygiene (20 Credits)
    •   Introduction to Accounting and Finance (20 Credits)
    •   Modern Patisserie Techniques (20 Credits)
    •   Applied Food Sciences (20 Credits)
 Level 5: Year 2
    •   Product Development for Dietary trends (20 Credits)
    •   Diet and Nutrition (20 Credits)
    •   Managing Human Resources (20 Credits)
    •   Research Methods for Managers (20 Credits)
    •   Global Food Network (20 Credits)
    •   Contemporary Culinary Influences (20 Credits)
 Level 6: Year 3
    •   International Gastronomy (20 Credits)
    •   Applied Nutrition (20 Credits)
    •   Culinary Design Concepts (20 credits)
    •   Strategic Food and Beverage Management (20 Credits)
    •   Food Policy (20 Credits)
    •   Service Industry Dissertation (20 Credits) or Business Project (20
        Credits)
Level 4 Modules

Academic Development and Employability
The aim of this module is to help the student’s research academic sources and
develop a critical approach to apply the correct academic writing skills. In
addition, the module aims at helping students develop knowledge and
understanding of employment in the sector as well as to enhance their
employability.
Kitchen Operations
This module requires the student to work in a team environment using industry
best practice in food preparation, cooking and presentation skills. Students must
appreciate and apply an understanding of larger scale food production using

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forward planning and effective communication throughout the module.
Students are required to produce their proposed menu dishes with the
assistance of their peer group as a food production team, to be offered in Pillars
and Feast restaurants as a part of the broader food offer.
Working in an environment where good teamwork is an essential element to
successful outcomes, the student is individually planning, preparing, cooking
and presenting dishes of high quality in all instances of food offer.
Food Microbiology and Hygiene
This module assumes little or no prior knowledge of microbiology. The basic
principles of microbial growth will be introduced and related to their importance
for food safety and stability. The role of processing techniques in the inhibition
and destruction of microorganisms e.g. heating, chilling, freezing, will be
examined.    The importance of hygiene and cleanliness for premises and
personnel will be explored in detail. The module will also include food-handling
codes of practice and legislation. The essential elements of the Hazard Analysis
Critical Control Point (HACCP) system will be introduced. A number of case
studies will be undertaken to ensure familiarity with HACCP and the role of risk
assessment in determining the nature of appropriate control.
The aim of this module is to introduce food microbiology and hygiene and their
importance in food safety and quality. Key principles relating to the presence
and control of disease-causing and spoilage organisms in foods will be
presented. Ways in which pro-active microbial control in food preparation can
be achieved will be explored. The module includes a substantial component of
practical, laboratory work to underpin the principles presented in the theoretical
sessions. The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system is also considered
as well as compliance with legal and commercial requirements for the
preparation of safe food.
Theory sessions are supported by full attendance of all practical laboratory,
missing sessions may affect your overall results & progression.
Introduction to Accounting and Finance
This module provides a foundation programme of studies in accounting and
statistics in an appropriate industrial context. The role of accounting and
statistics in the decision making process is stressed. The module includes

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essential conceptual underpinning as well as practical applications and
encourages an appropriately critical approach. The module also lays the
foundations for level five studies in Financial Management for the Hospitality
Industry.

Modern Patisserie Techniques
This module develops and enhances the range of preparation and serving skills
for the food offerings in hospitality operations. It introduces the students to a
variety of methods and ideas for creating and presenting food.
Students are required to investigate commercial aspects regarding realistic and
rational methods for manufacture and utilization of the ingredients and products
in accordance with quality and portion control.
This module builds student’s ability to express themselves accurately and
improve communicative competence when analysing and appraising others
work.
The teaching course is contained in a 12-week period and comprises four hours
of contact time per week. Typically the class time will comprise some formal
sessions enabling the presentation and demonstration of new, key topic
information and kitchen sessions where students can develop cooking skills and
finishing techniques. These sessions may be taught consecutively allowing for
some diversification of activity to include individual and teamwork.
Applied Food Sciences
This module develops and enhances the range of preparation and serving skills
for the food offerings in hospitality operations. It introduces the students to a
variety of methods and ideas for creating and presenting food. Students are
required to investigate commercial aspects regarding realistic and rational
methods for manufacture and utilization of the ingredients and products in
accordance with quality and portion control. This module builds student’s ability
to express themselves accurately and improve communicative competence
when analysing and appraising others work. The teaching course is contained
in a 12-week period and comprises four hours of contact time per week.
Typically the class time will comprise some formal sessions enabling the
presentation and demonstration of new, key topic information and kitchen
sessions where students can develop cooking skills and finishing techniques.

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These sessions may be taught consecutively allowing for some diversification
of activity to include individual and teamwork.
Level 5 Modules

Product development for Dietary Trends
The module reflects the need for a thorough understanding of the current dietary
considerations when preparing pastry and confectionary products to an
advanced level. It will cover a wide range of key topic areas including:

   •   Dietary guidelines and recommendations for the UK.
   •   The health benefits of fibre, fruits and vegetables.
   •   Identification of foods as being made from whole-grains or refined
       grains.
   •   How to reduce or replace sugar, fat and salt in pastry and confectionary
       products.
   •   Alternatives for customers with food allergies and intolerances and
       customers following specific ‘lifestyle’ and religious diets.
Diet and Nutrition
This module aims to develop your facts of nutrition and will specifically look at
the energy providers - proteins, fats and carbohydrates and the micronutrients
with macro powers, which are the essential vitamins and minerals. With this
knowledge and a specialist computer software package you can determine if
your diet is in accordance with recommended intakes and UK government
guidelines. You will then have the experience to select specific foods to achieve
optimum health and be able to design diets for both yourself and individual case
studies. We will also discuss the numerous fad diets on the market, understand
how our body uses energy and how much we need and explore the latest
buzzwords of antioxidants and phytochemicals. This module will question if we
really are what we eat.
Managing Human Resources
This module aims to enable participants to gain knowledge and understanding
of the activities involved in effective human resource management within the
hospitality / tourism / food / events / aviation industry. The module focuses on
practices and processes of how people are managed at work. In addition, it

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identifies the current trends in human resources management.
Research Methods for Managers
The module aims at providing students with broad knowledge and
understanding of the principles and practices in conducting research. It focuses
on the use of a range of different research methods in order to successfully
undertake a dissertation or any research project. The module encompasses the
understanding and application of appropriate research designs, research
statistics, the use of the computer for data analyses, and report writing and
presentation.
Global Food Network
This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the principles of
production operations management and assess the value chain from economic
/ social / environmental perspectives.
By applying the principles and practices of analysis offered in this module,
students will be able to develop strategies that optimise the food choices when
creating menu offerings, thus enhancing their contribution to the society that
they operate in.
Content to be covered:
   • Introduction to the global food network
   • Scale and scope of the global food network
   • Supply/value chain management/production operations management
     theory
  • Stakeholders, ethics and social responsibility (CSR) in the global food
     network
  • Food Production systems
  • Food Markets and Purchasing
  • Preparation and Consumption
  • Resource and Waste Recovery
  • Concepts of collaboration
  • The future possibilities of the global food network
Contemporary Culinary Influences
This module develops and enhances the range of preparation and serving skills
for the food offerings in hospitality operations. It introduces the students to a
variety of methods and ideas for creating and presenting food. Students are
required to investigate commercial aspects regarding realistic and rational
methods for manufacture and utilization of the ingredients and products in

                                         18
accordance with quality, portion control and modern plating techniques.
This module builds student’s ability to express themselves accurately and
improve communicative competence when analysing and appraising others
work. The teaching course is contained in a 12-week period and comprises four
hours of contact time per week. Typically the class time will comprise some
formal sessions enabling the presentation and demonstration of new, key topic
information and kitchen sessions where students can develop preparation,
finishing and presentation techniques. These sessions may be taught
consecutively allowing for some diversification of activity to include individual
and teamwork.
Placement Route Work Placement Activity
If you have enrolled for the BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery with
Placement course you will be required to compile a piece of assessment which is
linked to your placement and other modules in your course. See you MSGs for
Service Industries Dissertation modules if you are BA (Hons) Food and Professional
Cookery with placement student.
BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery on the placement route students are
required to undertake a 1400 hours (40 weeks) placement. As part of the UKVI
guidance international BA (Hons) Food and Professional Cookery students must
complete 40 weeks FT to reach in total 1400 hours including leave.
Placements are found in coordination with the Placements Office at UWL. A
placement coordinator and placement tutors are available to assist you with
preparing for the placement as well as to monitor your placement, support you with
the assessment and support you during your placement.
Level 6 Modules

International Gastronomy
This module encourages you to develop an in-depth knowledge of International
Gastronomy realistic to the hospitality industry. It will develop your analytical
and evaluative skills, providing you with the opportunity to learn to understand
and appreciate consumer behaviour.
Food production managers require life-long learning and understanding of good
food and wine; this module encourages you to build on your previous knowledge
to develop an in-depth understanding of international gastronomy, enabling you

                                       19
to extend the boundaries of conventional disciplines in culinary practices whilst
creating a culture to fuel the desire to achieve the higher standards in your
profession.
By developing your desire to research and evaluate international gastronomy,
its culinary heritage, sociological, physiological and ethical boundaries and the
future development of this diverse and absorbing subject, this module aims to
provide you with the opportunity to critically analyse and evaluate the social and
economic factors which interact and influence consumers’ food choice and
cuisine preferences.
Applied Nutrition
This module will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the current
dietary considerations when preparing and finishing food products. The module
will investigate alternatives and modifications to classical and contemporary
products for consumers with specific dietary needs.          The module will also
develop an appreciation of the current healthy eating guidelines.
The module aims to:
   •   Consider the nutritional needs throughout the lifecycle.
   •   Investigate calorie and macronutrient content of foods using nutrition
       software.
   •   Demonstrate nutritional information using labelling, packaging and
       marketing.
   •   Appreciate and apply the principles of nutrition to food preparation.
   •   Recognise suitable alternatives for customers with food allergies,
       intolerances & sensitivities.
   •   Appreciate the principles behind specialist diets and consider the alternatives
       for specific consumer groups.

Culinary Design Concepts
This module helps you to develop and enhance the range of preparation and
serving skills for Centre Pieces and Petit Four design. It introduces the students
to a variety of methods and ideas for creating Centre Pieces and Petit Fours:
   •   Encourages students to investigate commercial aspects regarding
       realistic and rational methods for manufacture and utilization of the
       ingredients and products.
   •   Develops student’s ability to express themselves more accurately and
       improve communicative competence when analysing peers work

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•   Encourages the student to participate as a member of a team.
Strategic Food and Beverage Management
The key purpose of this module is to develop your business awareness covering
marketing, food and beverage systems and practical business principles in
relation to the operation of food and beverage outlets.
The module requires the student to develop a range of business techniques to
enable you to work more effectively as a manager. For example formulate a
food and beverage business plan, forecasting the probable outcomes involving
the critical analysis of data. Design and systematise a new food and beverage
management system, evaluate aims, policies and standards embedded in food
and beverage management systems and critically assess new systems.
Appraise the food and beverage consumer, consumer-product relationship and
appreciate the importance of marketing sales and promotion in relation to food
and beverage management.
Food Policy
This module considers the complex relationship between food producers,
traders, processors and consumers. It examines the power and control that
key actors and players exert on different parts of the global food environment
and the dynamics of the policy issues that make up the modern food system.
The module aims to examine the key forces and policies that influence the
decision-making processes of the modern food system and to investigate its
impact on global food availability.
*Option modules: students will select 1 option at the start of level 5

*Service Industries Dissertation
The dissertation is an opportunity for the student to study a topic that is of
personal interest, will develop both their knowledge and skills of that topic and
their research skills, and may be beneficial to their future career plans. The
student identifies their area of research and develops research questions to be
answered or hypotheses to be tested in the industry context relevant to their
course of study. The dissertation that results from this research will be a
professionally presented piece of work that demonstrates the student’s abilities
in critical thinking and writing and their skills in completing an independent self-
managed piece of research.

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Section

 3
*Business Project
The business project is an opportunity for the student to develop a restaurant
concept and apply their research skills. The student identifies their area of
research and develops a business concept to be measured in the industry
context against existing hospitality businesses. The business project will be a
professionally presented piece of work that demonstrates the student’s abilities
in critical thinking and writing and their skills in completing an independent self-
managed project conceptualisation.

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

3.1    Learning and Teaching Approaches

The teaching and learning strategy is to encourage the active learner and to
promote a “can do” attitude in all things hospitality. Practical skills acquisition at
each level of the course is firmly linked to the underpinning knowledge required
to drive the practical product forward. Students are required to apply an
appropriate level of independent study and research to keep ahead of practical
applications and industry norms.
The acquisition of business, management and entrepreneurial skills are
reflected in the modules covered in the commercial outlets, Pillars and Feast.
The student is required to develop food outlets and large event products and
processes where food, equipment and kitchen design aspects are important
factors in the efficiency of any business model.
Recent developments by hospitality industry leaders reflect the growth in
ecologically sound and sustainable food production behaviours and practices,
these play an important role in the teaching and learning approaches of the
college.

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3.2       Assessment

You will be required to submit all of your text-based assignment work – e.g. essays,
case studies and reports – electronically. Such work will also be marked online, and
your grades and feedback made available to you electronically. Details of the
submission mechanism and assessment dates will be provided via Module Study
Guides.

Assessment Schedule for your course

Dates for all your assignments on the course are provided in the table below. In the
exceptional case where a date has to be changed, you will be notified in advance.
The university standard is for assignments to be handed back to you fifteen working
days after the hand-in. This gives time for your work to be marked, and checked
before returning.

 Level          Module              Assignment          Hand-in date       Feedback date
                                                         (WK No.)
      4        Academic            Group report             6           10 working days after
             Development        Group presentation          10            submission date
                  and                Portfolio              14
             Employability
      4         Kitchen             Portfolio               10          10 working days after
              Operations           Menu Design              12            submission date
      4          Food               Portfolio               8           10 working days after
           Microbiology and        Written Exam             14            submission date
                Hygiene
      4     Introduction to      Individual Report          6           10 working days after
           Accounting and          Group Report             13            submission date
                Finance
      4         Modern               Portfolio              10          10 working days after
               Patisserie         Practical Exam            12            submission date
              Techniques
      4      Applied Food            Portfolio              10          10 working days after
               Sciences           Practical skills          12            submission date
                                   assessment
      5         Product           Portfolio (blog)          8           10 working days after
           development for        Practical exam            12            submission date
            Dietary Trends
      5    Diet and Nutrition       Workbook              4,8,11        10 working days after
                                   Presentation             12            submission date
      5       Managing               Portfolio             5-6          10 working days after
               Human            Role Play - Portfolio     10-11           submission date
             Resources
      5       Research              Portfolio               6           10 working days after
             Methods for        Research Proposal           13            submission date
             Managers

                                         23
5         Research        Portfolio (Research           6         10 working days after
              Methods for       idea 20% + Work in                        submission date
                Managers           progress 20%)
               (placement        Research Proposal           13
                   route)
      5       Global Food       Group Presentation           7          10 working days after
                 Network              Essay                  12           submission date
      5      Contemporary           Portfolio                10         10 working days after
                 Culinary             Essay                  12           submission date
                Influences
      6       International          Review                   9         10 working days after
              Gastronomy              Poster                  7           submission date
                                   Written Exam              14
      6     Applied Nutrition        Portfolio               10         10 working days after
                                   Presentation              13           submission date
      6     Culinary Design         Practical               11-12       10 working days after
              Concepts               Portfolio               12           submission date
                                  Self-evaluation            12
      6      Strategic Food     Group Presentation           6-7        10 working days after
             and Beverage             Report                11-12         submission date
             Management
      6       Food Policy       Group Presentation           5          10 working days after
                                      Essay                  13           submission date
      6         Service             Proposal                 7          10 working days after
               Industries          Dissertation              10           submission date
             Dissertation /       Management of              14
            Business Project         process

3.3       The University of West London Graduate Attributes

In 2011, the University defined the UWL Graduate Attributes as representing a
set of abilities acquired by students during their period of study at UWL that go
beyond simple acquaintance with a subject.            They reflect the University’s
approach to education which includes developing graduates who are well
prepared for employment, adopting a definition of ‘employability’ that includes
creative and enterprising attributes, lifelong learning attitudes, and an
awareness of the global context since educational and working experience are
necessarily anchored in the context of the wider world.
Graduate Attributes are embedded in the subject and involve preparedness and
the confidence to analyse; question; categorise; interpret; see relations; explain;
theorise; and reflect with reference to the broader context.

                                        24
Section

 4
Graduating at the University of West London means that you will be developing
the following Graduate Attributes and become:
   •   A creative and enterprising professional
   •   A reflective and critical lifelong learner
   •   A globally aware individual
Follow the link below for an interactive representation of these attributes:
http://hermes.uwl.ac.uk/grad_attributes/
How will you acquire and record these attributes?
A number of courses record the Graduate Attributes in an e-portfolio. You may
wish to discuss this with your tutors, and your Personal Tutor.

Quality Management and Enhancement
4.1    Course Management

The course has dedicated leadership who maintain quality through the
university wide system of monitored by College and faculty management. The
teaching team meet on a regular basis at course committee meetings, which
include student representatives from each cohort. An agreed agenda includes
any issues affecting student learning, quality issues and student progress.
Dates for committee meetings are posted in this guide, agenda and minutes are
recorded.
Regular culinary arts subject group meetings provide a forum for debate and
discussion, dissemination of information and comparisons with similar courses
elsewhere, agenda and minutes are held in the college office.
External Examiners’ (EE) regularly visit the course and may at times observe
sessions and talk to students on the course. Samples of marked and second
marked student work are submitted to the EE as a part of quality management
process.
Academic standards are also monitored through the EE, where twice yearly
reports are fed back to college and faculty management, course committees

                                        25
and subject group meeting agendas.
Twice yearly cluster reviews look at commonality across a range of courses and
similar discipline clusters. Course leaders give a short presentation on the
health of each course and share information on best practice and reflect on what
has gone well and not so well.
Courses are reviewed every 5 years as a minimum. These Course Reviews take
critical look at curriculum design, content and delivery of the course and are
chaired by senior management. All academic data, modules, external
examiners reports, module and course reports are required by the review panel
made up of internal and external experts in their fields. Student group
representatives are invited to take questions from the panel and give opinions
about tutors, the modules and the course content and delivery behaviour.

4.2    Student Evaluation

Towards the end of each module, you will be asked to complete an evaluation. This
is a very important activity as it helps your module and course leaders develop and
enhance your course. Time should be given in a taught session for you to complete
this quickly and easily. Please make sure you complete all the evaluations as
requested and take advantage of the opportunity to feedback constructively on your
experience of the modules. Specific issues that you would like to address during the
module should be addressed directly to your module or course leader as explained
in section 4.4 below.

4.3    Course Committee/Board

The agenda for these meetings will vary, but typically will include:
•      Admissions
•      Timetables and scheduling of assessments
•      Resources
•      Course leader reports
•      Module leader reports
•      Course mentor reports
•      Participant progress
•      Outcomes of assessments and assessment committees
•      Participant feedback

                                        26
Two representatives should represent the course and will sit on this committee
and give feedback on pertinent issues.
The Course Committee comprises of:
•      A Course Leader (Chair)
•      Module Leaders
•      Course mentors
•      Participant Representatives
•      Industry facilitators
•      An administrator (minute taker)
•      Others in attendance, as required
In the past the Course Committee has directly influenced topics such as the
structure of the course and individual modules therein, assessment and the
timing of submission of assessment and individual learning support and
guidance.
Course Committee/Board meetings will be held at least four times throughout
the duration of the course.
Course Committee/Board meetings will be held on:
Semester 1 (TBC)
Semester 2 (TBC)

4.4    If you have an issue

If you have an issue with your Course or a particular module, you should raise
this with the module or course leader in the first instance. You could also raise
it with your course representative.
If you are unable to resolve any issues informally with the course or module
leader you may wish to raise an informal complaint with the Head of College.
For information on the procedure you should go to:
http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/current-students/student-handbook

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