Prince William County Planning Office Scope of Work

Prince William County Planning Office Scope of Work

Prince William County Planning Office Scope of Work Issued To: Period of Performance: Project: Impacts of BRAC on the Potomac Communities Project Manager: Pat Thomas, Potomac Communities Planner (703)792-7058; pthomas1@pwcgov.org Project Staff: Purpose: Prince William County is seeking proposals from fully qualified firms to provide recommendations for alleviating the impacts that the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) will have on the County (specifically the Potomac Communities) through researching existing conditions and future plans; reviewing the potential for land use and zoning changes; identifying the future travel demand of the Potomac Communities; defining improvements and alternatives for multi-modal transportation facilities; drafting a final plan for development; and recommending marketing strategies to obtain buy-in from the general public and other stakeholders on the recommended improvements in the area.

The firm awarded the contract will meet regularly with the County, interested participants and stakeholders, and state and federal funding sources as well as provide interim status briefings, prepare formal reports, attend and present at public hearings for the Prince William County Planning Commission and deliver several briefings to the County.

The selected contractor will need to discuss the impacts that BRAC (specifically at the Fort Belvoir and Quantico military posts) will have on Prince William County, specifically Potomac Communities, and how these changes will impact the existing plans. The contractor will also need to discuss what land use and transportation alternatives or improvements they would recommend to address the changes that will result from BRAC. They will need to provide explanations and use proven evaluation methods for determining whether the alternatives or improvements will be effective and successful, as well as provide cost estimates.

Finally, the contractor will need to illustrate how the improvements will benefit the citizens, businesses, and communities within Prince William County (specifically the Potomac Communities).

Overview of Scope Requirements: The scope of work includes (a) a technical process to quantify the impact of BRAC on traffic and travel conditions in the study area by refining and applying the County’s travel demand model; (b) applying the model to quantify the relief attained by implementing roadway and transit improvements; (c) applying the model to quantify the traffic congestion relief attained by making land use changes; (d) assessing multi- modal options to help ameliorate the traffic congestion; (e) reviewing the County land use plan’s capability to absorb the BRAC growth; and (f) facilitating input from the stakeholders in the study area.

The County envisions that the analysis of the BRAC impacts will fall into the following major categories: 1

(1) Review Existing Plans (2) Review Existing Conditions (2005) (3) Baseline Scenario 1 Development (2015 and 2030 without BRAC) (4) Scenario 2 Development (2015 and 2030 with BRAC) (5) Scenario 3 Development (2015 and 2030 with BRAC and recommended transportation and land use changes) The scenario development process can be visually seen in the following diagram: Existing Conditions (2005) Scenario 1: Future Conditions (2015 & 2030) • No BRAC • Programmed Transportation Improvements Only (2015 & 2020) • Existing/Planned Land Use and Zoning ™ One Iteration of Travel Demand Model for each study year Scenario 2: Future Conditions (2015 & 2030) • With BRAC • Programmed Transportation Improvements Only (2015& 2030) • Existing/Planned Land Use and Zoning ™ One Iteration of Travel Demand Model for each study year Scenario 3: Future Conditions (2015 & 2030) • With BRAC • Additional Transportation Improvements (2015 & 2030) • Revised zoning and land use activity levels ™ Up to Three Iterations of Travel Demand Model for each study year 2

Scope of Work: (1) Review Existing Community, County and Regional Plans (A) Research Existing Community and County Plans For each plan, the contractor will review a number of factors, as applicable, including: the population and employment projections that were used to make the plans; projected usage and ridership of the transportation system; planned service levels; new capital improvements; implementation timeframes. These factors should be assessed based on the how BRAC might modify the results of these plans. The contractor need not amend the plans but rather point out qualitatively how the factors listed above will be (or will not be) impacted by BRAC.

The following plans should be reviewed and key conclusions and factors summarized. Information regarding the availability of the plans is summarized in Table 2 at the end of this Scope of Work. Reports available electronically will be made available on a CD, upon request.

• Prince William County Comprehensive Plan The Comprehensive Plan includes many aspects of County growth, but this work should focus on the parts applicable to transportation and land use. The current County Comprehensive Plan was adopted in June 2003, and an update has begun but is not expected to be complete until March 2009. However, as parts are completed concurrently with this study, they should be incorporated. The updated Comprehensive Plan will include a Mass Transit Plan, which is not a part of the existing Comprehensive Plan. The contractor is expected to review long-range land use projections in the study area and the Transportation Plan.

They should also review the Community Design Plan, Economic Development Plan, Gateway and Corridor Design Plan and summarize the key aspects which will need to be applied to the proposed improvements.

o Potomac Communities Plan The Potomac Communities Plan was developed in November 2003, before BRAC changes were announced. It is a subset of the County Comprehensive Plan and its update is the focus of this study effort. The contractor should review the parts of the Potomac Communities Plan that will need to be updated as part of this effort, including the long-range land use plan, the transportation plan and the study areas of North Woodbridge, Neabsco Mills and Triangle. o Cherry Hill Sector Plan This sector plan addresses a parcel of land that is majority (78%) owned by one corporation.

The contractor should review the transportation and land use sections Cherry Hill Sector Plan. • Prince William County Capital Improvement Program (CIP) The most current Prince William County CIP covers the timeframe from FY2008 – FY2013 and includes all capital improvements within the County. The main aspects of the CIP that are applicable to this study are the transportation section as well as the section on unfunded needs. The contractor should review the applicable sections of the County’s CIP to review planned improvements and unfunded needs. • Route 1 Location Study This is a study conducted by VDOT and consists of proposed roadway improvements, typical sections, cross sections and a trail map for US Route 1 from the Prince William/Stafford County line to the Occoquan.

The contractor will need to review these plans for use during Scenario development (Sections 3, 4, and 5 of this Scope of Work).

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• Light rail study along Route 1 This is a study conducted by WMATA in conjunction with Fairfax County that looked at alternatives for light rail service from Franconia/Springfield to Fort Belvoir, specifically to accommodate post employees. The study was completed before the BRAC impacts were finalized. The contractor should review the demographics behind the ridership analysis and review the alternatives analyzed as well as the preferred alternative and the reasons behind its selection. (B) Review Existing Transportation Plans • Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) The TIP consists of the first six years of the CLRP and requires funding commitments to be in place.

The current TIP, for FY2007-FY2012, was adopted in October 2006 but is constantly being amended as new funding sources become available. There are a number of projects in the TIP that affect the study area. The contractor is expected to review the applicable projects in the TIP, including proposed timing and expected impacts of the projects.

• VDOT 6-Year Plan The VDOT 6-Year Improvement Program provides an overview of all of the development and construction projects in VDOT’s long-term plans. The most recent plan is for fiscal years 2008 – 2013 and contains 58 projects in Prince William County totaling over $1 billion. The contractor is expected to review the list of projects for those specific to the study area and compile the expected capacity/level of service improvements expected as a result of the improvements. • VRE Strategic Plan The VRE Strategic Plan was adopted in May 2004. VRE provides commuter rail service from the Northern Virginia suburbs to destination zones around four innermost stations in Alexandria and DC during weekday peak periods.

There are three existing (Woodbridge, Rippon and Quantico) and one future (Cherry Hill) VRE stations within the Potomac Communities, all along the Fredericksburg Line. There are currently more than 1,600 parking spaces at these stations and a total of approximately 1,500 boarding’s per day, although the parking facilities are not as full as those numbers suggest. Current daily ridership on the entire Fredericksburg Line is over 7,500 but VRE expects this to double over the next twenty years. Population and employment in the catchment areas of the three existing stations in the Potomac Communities is expected to grow significantly over the next twenty years, even without BRAC considerations.

The contractor is expected to review ridership projections for the line and obtain ridership projections by station within the study area, including access mode.

• PRTC Strategic Plan The PRTC Strategic Plan was adopted in October 2004. PRTC operates bus services in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, and the City of Manassas Park. The Strategic Plan recommended a number of bus service improvements, both local and commuter-oriented, based on population and employment growth anticipated at the time. Service recommendations were made for individual years through 2010 and for a beyond-2010 timeframe. Service improvements were recommended keeping in mind past and future population and employment growth, each of which, at the time of the Strategic Plan, were expected to grow at 4% per year.

The contractor is expected to review improvements specific to the study area as well as projected ridership growth on existing service in the area. • PRTC Long Range Bus Plan The PRTC Long Range Bus Plan is in its final stages of development and is expected to be adopted by the PRTC Board in October 2007. The plan will fill a need for long range planning in addition to the existing short-range transit plans and the Prince William County Comprehensive 4

Plan. The plan, which has a planning horizon of 2030, will serve as a policy guide for bus service expansion and will estimate costs and funding options. • Northern VA Regional Bikeway and Trail Network Study The Northern Virginia bikeway plan was adopted in November 2003 and shows VDOT’s long range plans for new bikeway facilities. There are a number of proposed new facilities in the study area, including regional bicycle corridors along US 1, Potomac Parkway and the Potomac Heritage Trail. The contactor is expected to review the details of the proposed projects in the study area including the proposed timing and expected impact of the project.

• TransAction 2030 Plan TransAction 2030 is a strategic transportation plan for all of Northern Virginia, including Prince William County. It was adopted by the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA) in April 2006. The plan shows predicted levels of service on both transit and highway and also outlines key improvements that the region and jurisdictions foresee over the next 25 years. Major improvements in the Potomac Communities area of Prince William County that are included in the plan include: widening portions of I- 95; construction of HOV lanes along I-95; reconstruction of interchanges along I-95; upgrade traffic management system along I-95; construction of access road to future Cherry Hill VRE station; priority bus service along US 1; and transit service improvements along I-95.

The contractor is expected to review the projected levels of service for highway and transit facilities as well as proposed improvements in the study area.

• Constrained Long Range Plan (CLRP) The CLRP contains all transportation improvements planned by 2030. It includes input from VDOT, Prince William County, PRTC and VRE, as well as all other implementing agencies in the region. The current CLRP, adopted in October 2006, includes numerous highway and transit improvements, including widen VA 123; widen VA 234, including intersection with US 1; US 1 intersection with Russell Road; I- 95 HOV lanes; and the Cherry Hill VRE station. It also includes studies for Metrorail from Springfield to Potomac Mills; a People Mover from Fort Belvoir to Franconia/Springfield; US 1 transit improvements (bus and light rail); and the I-95/I-395 HOT Lane Study.

The contractor is expected to review the details of the improvements and studies, including proposed timing and expected impacts of the projects. (C) Review Final Environmental Impact Statements According to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), when the United States Federal Government takes a major Federal action which may significantly affect the quality of the human environment, it must first consider the environmental impact in a document called an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). An EIS is intended to evaluate the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the proposed action that may significantly impact the quality of the human environment.

Increasing the number of people at both Fort Belvoir and Quantico military posts as a result of BRAC is considered a major Federal action and will have a significant impact on the Potomac Communities and remainder of Prince William County, although it is not clear whether the EISs fully reflect this impact. The contractor is expected to review and summarize the most recent 2007 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the BRAC impacts of both Quantico and Fort Belvoir. The Final EISs for both military posts are expected to be published in July 2007.

• Final Environmental Impact Statement – Development of the Westside of Marine Corps Base Quantico, Including the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Action: Alternatives and Transportation Analysis (July 2007) This EIS evaluated the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with the development of Quantico, including the 2005 BRAC action. The proposed actions included the relocation 5

and co-location of Military Department Investigation Agencies (MDIA) and the Department of Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency to the Quantico Base.

This is expected to add approximately 3,000 personnel at MCBQ by 2011. The contractor should review the EIS for its conclusions regarding the impacts of these additional workers on the Potomac Communities and Prince William County, both from a land use and transportation perspective, but should not regard the EIS as the ultimate authority regarding expected impacts.

• Environmental Impact Statement – Implementation of 2005 BRAC Recommendations and Related Army Actions at Fort Belvoir, Virginia (June 2007) This EIS evaluated the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of two proposed actions at Fort Belvoir. The proposed action that is relevant to the impacts that BRAC will have on the Potomac Communities is the part that updated the land use plan of the post’s real property master plan (RPMP). The current RPMP was established in 1993 and amended in 2002. The proposed land use plan includes designations for the post including airfields, community, industrial, professional/institutional, residential, training, and troop.

As a result of BRAC, 22,000 additional employees will be relocated to Fort Belvoir between September 2007 and September 2011. The contractor should review the EIS for its conclusions regarding the impacts of these additional workers on the Potomac Communities and Prince William County, both from a land use and transportation perspective, but should not regard the EIS as the ultimate authority regarding expected impacts.

Deliverable: The contractor is expected to submit a technical memorandum summarizing existing reports with associated qualitative discussion of BRAC impacts. 6

(2) Existing Conditions (2005) (A) Review Existing Population and Employment Rates The contractor is expected to research existing population and employment levels in the Potomac Communities and the remainder of Prince William County. The contractor should use existing numbers reflected in the most recent Regional Cooperative Forecasts (Round 7.0a) to develop a finer level of detail. Products will include: • Current Population and Employment (by TAZ and mini-TAZ) (B) Review Existing Roadway Facilities The contractor should research existing roadway facilities to ensure that the following information is up to date: • Roadways (Collector, Arterial, Freeway, etc.) o Capacity o AM and PM Peak Hour Level of Service (LOS) • Intersections / Interchange o Capacity o AM and PM Peak Hour Level of Service (LOS) • Park and Rides o Capacity Prince William County currently has 28 park and ride lots geared toward carpools, vanpools and buses, all of which are operated by VDOT.

The lots have a total of 9,024 spaces which are 68% full on a given weekday, and most of the lots and spaces are along the I-95 corridor. Currently, 993 spaces are located within the Potomac Communities, and these are on average 54% full. The contractor should review and evaluate capacity and usage of the applicable Park and Rides.

(D) Review Existing Transit Facilities The contractor is expected to review existing transit facilities. The consultant should review the following transit facilities to obtain more detail and to ensure that the following information is up to date: • VRE VRE currently operates three trains per morning on the Fredericksburg Line bringing nearly 1,500 people from three stations in the Potomac Communities into the Washington DC central business district. A fourth station is planned and is scheduled to open in the next three to five years. • OmniRide OmniRide is the commuter bus service operated by PRTC.

It operates eleven routes from Prince William County to Washington DC, four of which provide service for residents within the Potomac Communities. There is no corresponding service from DC back to the Potomac Communities until the afternoon peak period. Besides Commuter Service, OmniRide provides MetroDirect service, which provides bus service directly to Metrorail stations. From the Potomac Communities area, there is MetroDirect service to the Franconia-Springfield station.

• OmniLink OmniLink is the Prince William County local bus service. It operates on fixed routes, but with advanced notice will go up to ¾ mile off route to more directly serve its passengers. The service in the Potomac Communities area offers three routes within the area and one route that serves cross-county trips to the western part of the County. OmniLink service operates Monday through Saturday. 7

• Metro (Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority – WMATA) Metrorail does not service Prince William County, nor does the WMATA Strategic Plan include any provisions for service to the County.

However, Prince William County has expressed a desire to extend Metrorail south from the Franconia-Springfield station to Potomac Mills and has placed this into the regionally adopted TransAction 2030 plan. • Light Rail There is currently no light rail service in Prince William County; however a study has been conducted of light rail in the Route 1 corridor to Fort Belvoir.

• Bus Rapid Transit There is currently no bus rapid transit service in Prince William County, however Priority Bus Service in the Route 1 corridor as well as unspecified transit improvements in the I-95 corridor are part of the regionally adopted TransAction 2030 plan. In addition, bus rapid transit will be an important consideration of the implementation of the I-95/I-395 HOT Lanes project. (E)Travel Demand Update the existing travel demand forecasts of the Potomac Communities in order to quantify the traffic volumes, traffic congestion, and transit ridership. Validate the County’s travel demand model to accurately describe local traffic and transit in the Potomac Communities study area for the existing conditions in 2005.

Existing (2005) – traffic volumes, level of service, transit mode share, transit route ridership • Average Daily Volumes • AM Peak Hour • PM Peak Hour Deliverable: The contractor is expected to submit a technical memorandum summarizing existing conditions, including maps and other appropriate visuals. Travel demand model results containing the performance measures listed above. 8

(3) Scenario 1: Baseline – Future Conditions without BRAC Impacts (Years 2015 and 2030) (A) Demographics The contractor should use existing numbers as well as projections made by the County through the Regional Cooperative Forecasts (Round 7.0a) and by the County at a finer grain of detail (mini-TAZ).

All of these forecasts were conducted independent of BRAC, so this will be a baseline scenario. • Prince William’s Current Projections (by using the mini-TAZs) • Current Regional Cooperative Forecasts (by TAZ) (B) Travel Demand Update projected year 2015 and 2030 travel demand forecasts of the Potomac Communities’ roadway and transit system without BRAC impacts in order to get a baseline of projected travel demand (highway and transit).

Projected without BRAC Impacts: volumes, level of service, transit mode share • Weekday • AM Peak Hour • PM Peak Hour (C) Land Use and Zoning Within Prince William County’s 2003 Comprehensive Plan, the Potomac Communities Revitalization Plan envisions the need to provide a pattern of land use countywide that encourages fiscally sound development and achieves a high quality living environment in the Long Range Land Use Plan. The Long Range Land Use Plan describes what the County has planned for transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments. The contractor is expected to review and validate the existing Long Range Land Use Plan to determine what the predicted land use changes and zoning regulations are for 2015 and 2030.

The contractor is expected to determine whether any conflicts exist between the proposed land use changes and the proposed rezoning regulations for 2015 and 2030 for the Potomac Communities, the remainder of Prince William County, and any other areas expected to support BRAC growth. In addition, the contractor is expected to research what is planned for transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments for 2015 and 2030.

(D) Multi-Modal Transportation Facilities Update the proposed multi-modal transportation facilities for the following: Identify Planned Roadway Facilities • Roadways (Collector – Freeway) o Capacity o Level of Service (LOS) • Intersections o Capacity o Level of Service (LOS) • Park and Rides o Capacity o Usage • Streetscape Improvements (Context Sensitive Solutions) 9

Identify Planned Transit Improvements • VRE o Stations/Parking o Service Levels • OmniRide o Routes o Service Levels • OmniLink o Routes o Service Levels • Other o BRT o Light Rail o Metro Deliverable: The contractor is expected to submit a technical memorandum summarizing 2015 and 2030 traffic and transit conditions, including maps and other appropriate visuals.

In addition, the contractor should include the travel demand model results containing the performance measures listed above in Section B.

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(4) Scenario 2: Future Conditions with BRAC Impacts and No Transportation or Zoning Changes (2015 and 2030) (A) Demographics Create demographic projections including BRAC for years 2015 and 2030 conditions without transportation improvements beyond existing plans and without land use and zoning changes beyond existing plans. (B) Travel Demand The contractor is expected to review travel demand forecasts in BRAC EISs and conduct additional forecasts using the County’s model in order to quantify traffic volumes, traffic congestion, and transit ridership from BRAC impacts.

Projected volumes, level of service, transit mode share with BRAC Impacts: • Weekday • AM Peak Hour • PM Peak Hour (C) Land Use and Zoning Regulations With the actions of BRAC expected to increase the population of defense workers by approximately 25,000 on both Fort Belvoir and Quantico military posts, it is important to look at how BRAC relocations will impact projected land uses and zoning for transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments. The contractor can utilize the research conducted in Scenario 1 and compare and determine what the impacts of BRAC will have on future plans.

The contractor need not amend the plans but rather point out qualitatively and quantitatively how the proposed land use and rezoning plans will be (or will not be) impacted by BRAC. The following areas should be reviewed and key conclusions and factors summarized: • Potomac Communities The majority of the BRAC impacts in the County are likely to occur within the Potomac Communities, as this part of the County is located between the Quantico and Fort Belvoir posts. Impacts to the Potomac Communities will include increased population, land activity changes, and significant traffic and travel demand impacts.

The contractor is expected to compare the research conducted in Scenario 1 with the expected impacts of BRAC growth on the Potomac Communities. This should include comparing the planned transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments in the Long Range Land Use Plan under the Potomac Communities Revitalization Plan within the Prince William County 2003 Comprehensive Plan with the expected impacts of BRAC growth (described in the Fort Belvoir and Quantico EISs).

• Remainder of Prince William County Although a majority of BRAC impacts in the County are likely to occur within the Potomac Communities, there may also be impacts to other parts of the County. Impacts may include increased population, subsequent land activity changes, and traffic impacts. The contractor is expected to compare the research conducted in Scenario 1 with the expected impacts of BRAC growth on the remainder of Prince William County. This should include comparing the planned transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments in the Long Range Land Use Plan under the 2003 Comprehensive Plan and the expected impacts of BRAC growth (described in the Fort Belvoir and Quantico EISs).

• Other Areas Expected to Support BRAC Growth As the BRAC growth is likely to impact other areas other than Prince William County, it is likely that Stafford County, Fairfax County, and other areas outside Prince William County may be impacted by this 11

growth. As mentioned previously, impacts may include increased population, subsequent land activity changes, and traffic impacts. The contractor is expected to compare the research conducted in Scenario 1with Scenario 2. This should include comparing the planned transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments in the Long Range Land Use Plan under the 2003 Comprehensive Plan and the expected impacts of BRAC growth (described in the Fort Belvoir and Quantico EISs).

Deliverable: The contractor is expected to submit a technical memorandum summarizing year 2015 and 2030 traffic conditions, including maps and other appropriate visuals. In addition, the contractor should include the travel demand model results containing the performance measures listed above in Section B. 12

(5) Scenario 3: Future Conditions with BRAC Impacts and Recommended Transportation and Land Use Improvements (A) Demographics The contractor should create demographic projections for future conditions with transportation improvements beyond existing plans and with land use and zoning changes beyond existing plans. (B) Travel Demand The contractor is expected to forecast projected travel demand forecasts of the Potomac Communities based on the impacts that BRAC will have on the Potomac Communities in order to quantify the benefits of transportation improvements and zoning changes. In addition, apply the County model and zoning text for alternatives and/or improvements.

The contractor should model up to three (3) scenarios that include such changes to land use activity and or the transportation network.

Forecast travel demand with BRAC and recommended improvements for volumes, level of service, transit mode share • Weekday • AM Peak Hour • PM Peak Hour (C) Land Use and Zoning Regulations With the significant growth expected in Prince William County as a result of BRAC, recommendations in land use improvements will be necessary for the future. The contractor is expected to recommend potential land use and zoning changes based on the information and research conducted in Scenarios 1 and 2. The following areas should be reviewed and key conclusions and factors summarized: • Potomac Communities The majority of the BRAC impacts in the County are likely to occur within the Potomac Communities as Quantico and Fort Belvoir are both located within the Potomac Communities.

The contractor is expected to recommend improvements in land use based on the research and information gathered from Scenario 2 for the Potomac Communities. The conflicts and discrepancies identified in Section 4 will determine areas of improvements in land use for transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments.

• Remainder of Prince William County Although a majority of BRAC impacts in the County are likely to occur within the Potomac Communities, as this is the area between the two post’s, there may also be impacts to other parts of the County. Impacts may include increased population and subsequent land activity changes and traffic impacts. The contractor is expected to recommend improvements in land use based on the research and information gathered from Scenario 2 for the remainder of Prince William County. The conflicts and discrepancies identified in Scenario 2 will determine areas of improvements in land use for transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments.

• Other Areas Expected to Support BRAC Growth With the actions taken under BRAC, growth is likely to impact other areas other than Prince William County. Stafford County, Fairfax County, and other areas outside Prince William County may be impacted by this significant growth. As mentioned previously, impacts may include increased population, subsequent land activity changes, and traffic impacts. The contractor is expected to recommend improvements in land use based on the research and information gathered from Section 4, Scenario 2: Future Conditions with BRAC Impacts and No Transportation or Zoning Changes (2015 and 2030) for the remainder of Prince William County.

The conflicts and discrepancies identified in Section 4 13

will determine areas of improvements in land use for transit oriented, residential, commercial, and mixed use developments. (D) Multi-Modal Transportation Facilities Provide recommendations for improvements to existing transportation facilities using the shortcomings of the existing plans relative to the changes expected as a result of BRAC. The contractor should include several packages of alternatives, including cost estimates, based on the impacts that BRAC will have on the surrounding area. Determine improvements and alternatives for the following: Identify new roadway facilities • Roadways (Collector, Arterial, Freeway, etc.) o Capacity o Level of Service (LOS) • Intersections o Capacity o Level of Service (LOS) • Park and Rides o Capacity o Usage • Streetscape Improvements (Context Sensitive Solutions) Identify Proposed Transit Improvements • VRE o Stations/Parking o Service Levels • OmniRide o Routes o Service Levels • OmniLink o Routes o Service Levels • Other o BRT o Light Rail o Metro Deliverables: The contractor is expected to submit model run results for 2015 and 2030; summarize in a technical memorandum the anticipated future conditions of transportation and land use facilities based on the proposed packages of improvements; forecast up to three (3) land use activity scenarios and up to three (3) transportation network scenarios for each model year, 2015 and 2030.

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(6) Review Initial Results with the Public Prince William County will be responsible for all of the logistics of the meeting, including reserving space, advertising, general coordination and leading the meeting(s) itself. The contractor is expected to present the results of the scenario analysis to the public at this meeting(s) and share the recommended transportation and land use improvements based on the impact that BRAC will have on the County. The contractor should provide graphics and visuals illustrating the proposed land use changes and transportation improvements and how those would ameliorate the impacts of BRAC.

Deliverable: The contractor is expected to present the recommended land use and transportation improvements with the appropriate graphics and visuals to illustrate the affects of BRAC. The contractor is also expected to be prepared to answer questions from the public regarding the recommended improvements.

(7) Research Funding Opportunities for Implementation The contractor is expected to conduct research of possible funding options that would be available for implementation of the recommended transportation and land use changes. The information provided should include: • Agency or grant source • Type of Assistance • Objective of funding program • Eligibility requirements • Documentation required • Application process • Due date • Amount of available funding per grant applicant • Match requirements Deliverable: The contractor should provide this information in a technical memorandum summarizing the above information.

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(8) Marketing / Outreach Plan (Potential Task) (A) Establish Marketing Strategies Establish and suggest strategies with which to reach out to and market the plan to the following stakeholders: • Potomac Communities The original Potomac Communities Plan was developed in 2002 as part of the County’s 2003 Comprehensive Plan Update and included significant public involvement to help identify the County and the public’s vision for the area. Given the acceptance of the original plan by the Communities, it is critical that this revised plan be shared and vetted with the Communities.

The contractor should develop and implement a plan for involving the public and community-based organizations in the development of the revised plans and to get their buy-in on potential changes, particularly upgrading, in zoning, land use and land activity levels.

• Other Prince William County Communities Although a majority of BRAC impacts in the County are likely to occur within the Potomac Communities, as this is the area between the two posts, there may also be impacts to other parts of the County. Impacts may include increased population and subsequent land activity changes and traffic impacts. The contractor should develop and implement a plan for involving the public and community- based organizations (and government, if applicable, i.e. City of Manassas) as necessary, based upon preliminary analysis of impacts.

• Local and State Governments and Agencies As the revised population, employment and land-use impacts will have implications beyond the County borders, it will be important to include appropriate government stakeholders, including departments of planning in neighboring jurisdictions, the planning department of MWCOG and others as identified.

In addition, as transportation improvements are discussed to match the revised demographics and land-use, implementing agencies including VRE, PRTC and WMATA will need to be included in the discussions. The contractor should develop and implement a plan for involving the necessary government and implementing agencies in the development of the plan.

• Department of Defense The DoD has already completed the Draft Environmental Impact Statements (DEIS) for the changes at both Fort Belvoir and Quantico. The DEISs do not highlight impacts beyond the immediate surrounding areas of the post’s, so this plan will serve that need and should be shared with the DoD planners in order to ensure that the plan takes into account the needs of the DoD and also to ensure that the DoD takes into account the needs of the County and understands the impacts that BRAC will have on the County. The contractor should develop and implement a plan for involving the DoD in the development of the plan.

Deliverables: The contractor is expected to submit a marketing plan to the County which includes strategies with which to reach out to and market the proposed plan to the Potomac Communities, Other Prince William County Communities, Local and State government agencies, and the Department of Defense.

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17 (9) Final Plan Development The contractor is expected to develop a final plan based on model runs and previously developed technical memoranda including appropriate maps and before and after visuals. Timeframe The contractor is expected to complete Tasks 1 – 8 within 12 months of Notice to Proceed. Table 1, below, illustrates the item required by the County and the schedule or approximate time frame at which the items will be delivered to the County. Table 1 – Deliverables and Schedule: ITEM DUE NOT LATER THAN Section 1: Review Existing Community and County Plans 1 month from NTP Section 2: Existing Conditions 2 months from NTP Section 3: Scenario 1: Baseline – Future Conditions without BRAC Impacts (2015 and 2030) 3 months from NTP Section 4: Scenario 2: Future Conditions with BRAC Impacts and No Transportation or Zoning Changes (2010 and 2030) 4.5 months from NTP Section 5: Scenario 3: Future Conditions with BRAC Impacts and Recommended Transportation and Land Use Improvements 6 months from NTP

Table 2 – Existing Studies List (can be located on the attached CD) Study Location CD Name on CD Potomac Communities Plan Cherry Hill Sector Plan http://www.pwcgov.org/docLibrary/PDF/001764.pdf http://www.pwcgov.org/docLibrary/PDF/001052.pdf √ PotomacCommunitiesPlan (folder) 2003 PWC Comprehensive Plan http://www.pwcgov.org/default.aspx?topic=040035000110000868 √ (applicable parts) Comp Plan 2003 (folder) North Woodbridge Urban Mixed Use Master Plan (if adopted) http://www.pwcgov.org/planning/documents/N_Woodbridge_Sum mary.pdf √ N_Woodbridge_Summary.pdf 2008 PWC Comp Plan Update Transportation and Land Use updates available early 2008 Prince William County CIP http://www.pwcgov.org/default.aspx?topic=040024000110003767 √ (applicable parts) CIP07-12 (folder) Route 1 Location Study http://www.pwcgov.org/default.aspx?topic=040035001140003560 √ Rte1Loc (folder) Light Rail Route 1 Study hard copy available n/a TransAction 2030 Plan http://www.transaction2030.com/ √ TransAction2030 (folder) VRE Strategic Plan http://www.vre.org/about/strategic/strategic_plan.htm √ VRE (folder) PRTC Strategic Plan http://www.prtctransit.org/docs/PRTCStrategicPlan.pdf √ PRTC/PRTCStrategicPlan.pdf PRTC Long Range Bus Plan http://www.pwcgov.org/docLibrary/PDF/006441.pdf Final version available October 2007 √ (Draft presentation of plan) PRTC/PRTC_LongRangeBusPl an.pdf VDOT 6-Year Plan http://syip.virginiadot.org/LineItems.asp?syp_scenario_id=123 √ (PW Projects Only) VDOT6Year_PWC.xls Northern VA Bikeway Study http://www.fhiplan.com/novabike/ √ NoVABikewayStudy (folder) CLRP http://www.mwcog.org/regionaltransportationplan/plan/current/hig hway.asp http://www.mwcog.org/regionaltransportationplan/plan/current/tra nsithov.asp √ CLRP_Brochure_Final.pdf (see links for maps) 18

19 http://www.mwcog.org/regionaltransportationplan/plan/current/stu dies.asp http://www.mwcog.org/regionaltransportationplan/plan/current/bik eped.asp TIP http://www.mwcog.org/regionaltransportationplan/documents/FY2 007-2012TIP.pdf √ FY2007-2012TIP.pdf Current Zoning Plan http://www.pwcgov.org/docLibrary/PDF/004277.pdf http://www.pwcgov.org/docLibrary/PDF/001849.pdf √ Zoning (folder) FEIS Fort Belvoir http://www.hqda.army.mil/acsim/brac/nepa_eis_docs.htm √ FtBelvoirEIS (folder) FEIS Quantico http://www.quantico.usmc.mil/activities/display.aspx?PID=1814& Section=NREA √ QuanticoEIS (folder)

Information to be provided by County: 1.

2003 Comprehensive Plan, including Potomac Communities Revitalization Plan 2. Route 1 Location Study 3. ULI Advisory Services Panel Report: Potomac Communities, Prince William County, Virginia 4. Digital base maps of project area 5. Zoning Ordinance summary 6. Relevant chapters of the Design and Construction Standards Manual 7. Current Population and Employment Projections by TAZ and mini-TAZ 8. County Travel Demand Model 20