Program of Studies 2020-21 High School - Anchorage ...

 
Program of Studies 2020-21 High School - Anchorage ...
2020-21 High School
Program of Studies
Program of Studies 2020-21 High School - Anchorage ...
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS____________________________
Students must complete 22.5 credits to receive a high school diploma.
   1. English Language Arts (ELA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 credits
          Four years of ELA are required: English I and II, and English III and IV or their equivalents
   2. Social Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 credits
          World History, U.S. History, one semester of Alaska Studies, one semester of Economics, one semester of United
          States Government, one semester of a Social Studies elective. Students may waive the .5 credit social studies
          requirement by completion of Level III of a world language (ASL, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin,
          Russian, or Spanish);immersion students may waive the .5 social studies requirement by completion of any one
          high school immersion course in the required immersion continuum.
   3. Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 credits
          Six semesters of Mathematics electives. In order to satisfy the algebra requirements, students must complete one
          of the following options: Algebra I, semester 1 and 2; or Survey of Algebra 1 and 2; or Credit-by-Choice Challenge
          by Examination.
   4. Sciences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 credits
          Three years (six semesters) of science credit are required. Two semesters must be life science. Two semesters must
          be physical science.
   5. Physical Education/Health Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 credits
          Three semesters of physical/health education are required. A wide variety of courses are offered at each school.
          Elective credit must be earned to replace a Physical Education/Health Education requirement that is waived.
         A) Students may obtain a waiver of .25 of the physical education graduation requirement for each full season of
            ASAA-sanctioned sports participation within the Anchorage School District.
         B) Students may also waive comparable physical education requirements through Credit By Choice,
            correspondence, or college coursework in Physical Education/Health.
         C) A maximum of 1.0 waiver of the physical education requirement is available upon successful completion of 2
            years (four semesters) of JROTC.
   6. Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 credits
          Fourteen semester courses have not been specified so as to provide students an opportunity to pursue individ-
          ual educational goals. Electives may include additional courses in Language Arts, Social Studies, Mathematics,
          Science, Technology, Fine Arts, World Languages, Physical Education and Career Technology.

                                                                                                                                                  Total 22.5 credits

a. A student may be considered for graduation when he or she has acquired a minimum of 22.5 credits after grade 8 in required and elective subjects.
b. Seniors entering the ASD for the first time may graduate by meeting requirements of their previous school when the ASD requirements create
   hardship.
Anchorage School District
                                      High School
                                   Program of Studies

                                           This listing contains all courses approved by the Anchorage
                                          School Board as of the date below. Not all courses are simul­ta­
                                                       neously offered at every high school.

                                                              Revised July 2020

                                                       ASD Statement of Nondiscrimination
The Board is committed to an environment of nondiscrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, national
origin, ancestry, age, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy, parenthood, physical or mental disability, Vietnam era veteran status, genetic
information, good faith reporting to the board on a matter of public concern, or any other unlawful consideration. No person shall, based solely on
protected class, be excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, any academic or extracurricular program or educational opportunity or
service offered by the District. The District will comply with the applicable statutes, regulations, and executive orders adopted by Federal, State and
Municipal agencies. The District notes the concurrent applicability of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Title II of the Americans with
Disabilities Act and the relevant disability provisions of Alaska law.
Any student or employee who violates this policy will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action.
       Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to ASD’s Office of Equity and Compliance Senior Director, who also serves as the Title IX and ADA
 Coordinator, ASD Education Center, 5530 E. Northern Lights Blvd, Anchorage, AK 99504-3135 (907) 742-4132, Equity@asdk12.org., or to any of the
following external agencies: Alaska State Commission for Human Rights, Anchorage Equal Rights Commission, Equal Employment Opportunity
   Commission, or the Office for Civil Rights-U.S. Department of Education. REVISED: 8/2007, 8/2012, 5/2013, 7/2014, 3/2017, 9/2017, 1/2020
                                                             For information contact:
                                                     Anchorage School District Education Center
                                                               Secondary Education
                                                          5530 E. Northern Lights Blvd.
                                                          Anchorage, Alaska 99504-3135
                                                                (907) 742-4256
TABLE OF CONTENTS
   Graduation Requriements . . . . . . . . . . .  inside front cover                          Language Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  iv                      Language Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
      Anchorage High Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  iv                  Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
      High School Alternative Programs/Schools . . . . . . . .  iv                            Physical Education/Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
      Non-resident tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ix              Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
      About scheduling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ix             Social Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
      Alaska Performance Scholarship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ix                     Social Studies Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
      Course withdrawal procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ix                        Geography/Area Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
      Grading procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ix                  History/Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
      High school credit for middle school students. . . . . . . x                            World Languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
      Credit By Choice program (CBC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x                         General Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
      Independent study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  xiii           King Tech Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
      Student foreign exchange programs. . . . . . . . . . . . .  xiii                           Agriculture and Food and Natural Resources. . . . . . . 15
      Alaska School Activities Association (ASAA)                                                Architecture and Construction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
      eligibility for sports and activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  xiii                   Arts, A/V Technology & Communications . . . . . . . . 16
      National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)                                            Business Management & Administration. . . . . . . . . . 17
      eligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv         Career Readiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
      Tech Prep: college credits/trade organizations. . . . . . . xiv                            Education and Training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
      Alternative credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv              Engineering Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1                         Health Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
   Career & Technical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2                      Hospitality and Tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
      Architecture and Construction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2                       Human Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
      Arts, A/V Technology & Communications . . . . . . . . . 3                                  Information Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
      Education & Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3                   Law and Public Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
      Engineering Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4                    Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
      Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5          Transportation, Distribution & Logistics. . . . . . . . . . 21
      Health Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6        ASD Virtual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
      Hospitality and Tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7                   Language Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
      Information Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8                    Math. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
      Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8               Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
      CTE Internship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8                Social Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
   English Language Learners (ELL). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23                         Social Studies Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
   Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23          World Languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
   International Baccalaureate (West High School). . . . . . . 28                                General Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
   JROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31         Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Anchorage High Schools                                                             gram. ASD Virtual provides high school students with opportu­
Alaska Middle College, 2650 E. Northern Lights. . . . 742-2744                     nities to earn credit online. Through ASD Virtual’s online classes,
AVAIL, 425 C Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-4930   students have access to courses that may not be available at their
Bartlett High, 1101 N. Muldoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-1800            school, that allow students to overcome scheduling challeng­
Benson Secondary, 4515 Campbell Airstrip Road. . . 742-2050                        es, and that meet student needs. Online courses may be taken
Chugiak High,                                                                      as original course attempt, to replace a grade, or for academic
  16525 Birchwood Loop Rd., Chugiak. . . . . . . . . . . 742-3050                  advancement.
Dimond High, 2909 W. 88th. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-7000
                                                                                   AVAIL
Eagle River High, 8701 Yosemite Drive . . . . . . . . . . . 742-2700
East High, 4025 E. Northern Lights Blvd.. . . . . . . . . . 742-2100                  The Anchorage Vocational Academic Institute of Learning is
Family Partnership Charter School,                                                 an alternative high school program developed for students who
  401 E. Fireweed Lane, Ste. 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-3700          have dropped out of traditional schools. The school’s purpose is
Frontier Charter School,                                                           well matched with the definition of the word “avail,” which means
  400 W. Northern Lights Blvd, Ste 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-1180             “to be of use or help.” AVAIL is designed to help students return
                                                                                   to the educational system and obtain skills for employment with
Highland Academy, 5530 E. Northern Lights. . . . . . 742-1700
                                                                                   an emphasis on earning a high school diploma.
PAIDEIA Cooperative School,1405 E St. . . . . . . . . . 742-4164
Polaris K–12 School, 6200 Ashwood St.. . . . . . . . . . . 742-8700                Bartlett High, Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC)
King Tech High, 2650 E. Northern Lights . . . . . . . . . 742-8900                    Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) provides a spectrum of
SAVE, 410 E. 56th Ave.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-1250     core content academic classes at Bartlett High School for Alaska
SEARCH, 4515 Campbell Airstrip Road. . . . . . . . . . . 742-2050                  Native and American Indian students. CITC teachers emphasize
Service High, 5577 Abbott Road. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-8100           high expectations for academic excellence while providing stu­
South Anchorage High, 13400 Elmore Rd. . . . . . . . . 742-6200                    dents with an encouraging environment in which youth can fulfill
Steller Secondary School, 2508 Blueberry . . . . . . . . . 742-4950                their potential through education. CITC promotes the develop­
West High, 1700 Hillcrest Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-2500          ment of self-confidence, creativity, leadership, and traditional
High School Alternative Programs/                                                  values by integrating hands-on, culturally responsive content and
                                                                                   innovative practices into their academic classes and after-school
Schools                                                                            activities.
   The district has a number of special purpose programs for stu­
dents with special interests and needs and where individualization                 Bartlett Medical Academy
is emphasized. Students earn credits and meet district require­                       The Medical Academy at Bartlett will prepare students to
ments in a variety of ways and these programs are characterized by                 enter the work force or college with preparation in various facets
curricular innovation along with basic skills development. A brief                 of the medical field. Classes in Anatomy, Physiology, Forensics,
description is included here. If you have any questions, check                     Medical Terminology, Health Occupations, and Sports Injury
with your counselor.                                                               Management will be available to students through the academy.
                                                                                   Students do internships and shadow professionals at the Veterans
Alaska Middle College
                                                                                   Hospital next to the Bartlett campus for real life experience.
   Alaska Middle College School (AMCS) is Alaska’s first dual-en­
rollment high school in which students are concurrently enrolled                   Bartlett, Integrated Honors High School (IHHS)
in both high school and college courses. AMCS students have the                        The Integrated Honors Program is a college-preparatory
opportunity to complete their high school graduation require­                      program designed to emphasize academic writing and analysis
ments while accruing college credits toward a wide array of degree                 of classic literature. Beginning in 9th grade, students will take
programs. Some students may be able to earn their Associates                       their Honors Language Arts course and Honors History course
Degree by the time they graduate high school depending on                          with a designated “Honor Team” comprised of one Honors
course load. College courses are taught by UAA faculty, and                        Language Arts teacher and one Honors/AP History teacher for
ASD teachers provide individualized academic support to ensure                     each grade level. Experience with the Seminar Method will begin
students are successful in their college courses as they undergo                   in 9th grade and continue through the program. Students will
an early transition to college. College courses become a part of a                 be introduced the Honors Team in 9th grade and continue with
student’s college transcript as well as their ASD transcript.                      the honors teams through graduation. “Cross connections are so
   Alaska Middle College is located on UAA’s main campus where                     important to the student’s learning experience, and these connec­
students have access to college professors, high school teachers,                  tions can be found throughout the curriculum.” In an effort to
and support staff. Additionally, the Alaska Native Science and                     enhance student learning, the study of literature and history in
Engineering Program (ANSEP) is located on main campus and                          all honors designated courses will be integrated and team-taught.
students attending that program have access to courses at AMCS
in order to fulfill their requirements.                                            Benny Benson
                                                                                      The SAVE II Program provides specialized high school pro­
ASD Virtual                                                                        grams for students who are in 11th and 12th grade and are behind
     ASD Virtual is the Anchorage School District’s online pro­                    in credit or have already dropped out of high school. Students
iv
must have a referral from a counselor or administrator. Final rec­        Crossroads
ommendation for acceptance into these programs is determined                  Crossroads located at Benny Benson, is the Anchorage School
after a student and parent interview is conducted. These programs         District’s school for pregnant and parenting teens. Crossroads
combine teacher-directed instruction, class assignments, and              provides a supportive instructional environment which allows
individualized contracts for the students’ academic development.          students to continue their education while pregnant and/or
Students are evaluated on a monthly system where a minimum                parenting. A complete program of instruction is provided with
of academic progress is expected. Students are required to hold a         an emphasis on core academics. The program utilizes online
part time job for a minimum of 20 hours per week and/or attend            instruction in conjunction with traditional coursework to meet
a class at King Tech High to fulfill their vocational expectation.        the academic needs of students. Specialized curriculum related to
Work experience and vocational training are counted as elective           being a pregnant and/or parenting teen is offered and community
credit and serve as half of the student’s educational day. Students       support contacts are available for students. The staff at Crossroads
in these programs must meet the same requirements for state               is committed to providing quality instruction in an environment
and district standards as the students attending traditional high         that fosters regular school attendance and student responsibility
schools in the Anchorage School district.                                 for learning.
Charter Schools                                                           Dimond High School Japanese Immersion Program
   Charter school students, with principal approval, may take                The district’s K-12 Japanese, Russian and Spanish language
courses at comprehensive high schools or King Tech High.                  immersion programs have designated feeder middle and high
Chugiak High School Spanish Immersion Program                             schools to ensure that students continue their immersion expe­
                                                                          rience in a seamless, articulated sequence of higher level cours­
   The district’s K-12 Japanese, Russian and Spanish language
                                                                          es. Dimond High School is the continuation of the Japanese
immersion programs have designated feeder middle and high
                                                                          immersion program from Sand Lake Elementary and Mears
schools to ensure that students continue their immersion expe­
                                                                          Middle schools. The Japanese for Fluent Speakers course sequence
rience in a seamless, articulated sequence of higher level courses.
                                                                          includes an “Honors” course in which students are partnered
Chugiak High School is the continuation of the Spanish immer­
                                                                          with members of the local Japanese community in an “adopt-
sion program from Chugiak Elementary and Mirror Lake Middle
                                                                          a-student” program. Advanced Placement Japanese Language
schools. In the high school program there is a four-year sequence
                                                                          and Culture is part of the course offerings in the High School
of upper-level courses designed to increase students’ language
                                                                          Japanese Immersion sequence. High school immersion courses
skills while learning through content. Spanish courses include
                                                                          are designed to be rigorous and challenging for students while
Vistas Juveniles del Mundo Hispano, Perspectivas Literarias, Estudios
                                                                          preparing them for upper division university coursework.
Latinoamericanos, and Advanced Placement Spanish Language.
High school immersion courses are designed to be rigorous and             Dimond High School Engineering Academy
challenging for students while preparing them for upper division             The DHS Engineering Academy is designed to prepare stu­
university coursework.                                                    dents for a two-year or a four-year engineering degree program.
                                                                          Five engineering courses follow the Project Lead the Way (PLTW)
Chugiak, World Discovery Seminar Program (WDS)
                                                                          curriculum that may qualify for articulated agreements with
    The World Discovery Seminar Program is an alternative,                universities in Alaska and across the U. S. Engineering Academy
smaller learning community and official ASD school-within-a-              courses are project-based. Students are connected with engineer­
school that serves students at Chugiak High School. Rather than           ing professors at UAA and with engineers in businesses that serve
relying on textbooks, the program employs the Paideia method­             on the Engineering Academy Advisory Council.
ology, a Socratic–based learning technique focusing on in-depth              Students may enter the Engineering Academy as freshmen
understanding of primary texts. With the teacher facilitating the         and continue the four-year sequence or they may take individual
discovery learning process, students explore, through writing and         courses when space is available.
discussion, real life questions about literary and historical texts. In
the Paideia seminar process, verbal and written discussion of the         East High, Elitnaurvik (EWE)
texts is emphasized over answering “end of chapter” questions.               Elitnaurvik-Within-East is designed specifically for Alaska
    Emphasis is placed on deeper learning, rather than general            Native and American Indian students. Elitnaurvik in Yupik
content. The basic concept is to assist young people to become            means “a place to learn.”
avid, self-motivated learners. Interesting projects and hands-on             EWE incorporates Native values and issues, and successfully
activities are also fundamental to the class work. Self-expression        addresses different learning styles in its activities, course offerings,
is highlighted through the many varied activities comprising the          and work components. EWE enjoys widespread support in the
World Discovery Seminar approach. Class dialogue allows the               community. The primary emphasis is on building leadership
sharing of various opinions and experiences, which encourages             through group participation, volunteerism, and empowering
students to draw their own conclusions. This helps all students           students to embrace their cultural heritage. Elitnaurvik provides
develop a greater, more profound understanding of literature,             culturally-based education, counseling, tutoring, and after-school
history, science, mathematics and philosophy.                             activities.
                                                                                                                                                v
East High, School-Within-A-School (SWS)                                jumping into a career or preparing for college We have a strong
   School within a school is a cohesive learning community             advisory program that supports academic, social, and emotional
within East Anchorage High School which provides a unique,             growth and students regularly present a reflection of their learning
enhanced learning experience for self-directed students with an        experiences throughout their time at Highland Academy.
emphasis on independent thinking, integrated learning, and             King Tech High School (KTHS)
community development. SWS accomplishes this through a part­              The Martin Luther King Jr. Tech High School offers career,
nership of skilled, innovative teachers and staff, a small cohesive    vocational and technical training in more than 25 occupations
student population, and parental support. SWS offers a wide            for students primarily in grades 11–12. KTHS courses provide
range of core and elective classes, including advanced placement
                                                                       academic and elective credit, and some courses offer concurrent
and self-directed study classes. Students take world language,
                                                                       college credit through Tech Prep or credit toward post-secondary
physical education, and vocational and fine arts offerings from the
                                                                       training programs such as apprenticeships. All KTHS courses are
wide array offered in East High School. SWS students participate
                                                                       guided by an Advisory Council made up of experts from industry
in East High activities that include sports, clubs, drama, dance,
                                                                       and post-secondary education, including apprenticeships and
music, and student government. SWS program has 240 students,
                                                                       trade organizations. Courses at KTHS are delivered through
in addition to the world exchange students and fills through the
                                                                       hands-on learning with the latest technology and equipment. At
district lottery system. Siblings in SWS and students in the East
                                                                       KTHS students learn skills that will help them in post-secondary
High attendance zone will have preference.
                                                                       education, in a trade organization training program or going
Family Partnership Charter School                                      directly to work. Our students tell us that they are better prepared
   Family Partnership Charter School is a K-12 homeschool/             for life after high school because of the skills and knowledge
correspondence program that focuses on personalized learning           gained through their KTHS classes.
options, including flexible curriculum, online/distance ed., AP,          Students spend the equivalent of three periods at KTHS and
university/college, and small group enrichment courses, in a           earn 1.5 credits for each semester class. Bus transportation is pro­
partnership with with parents, vendors, and tutors. Our students       vided from students’ home schools or they may drive. Students
also have the ability flex their school year, week, and school day     who meet requirements in their second semester may earn credit
to accommodate activities like sports training and travel, fine arts   by doing on-the-job training with mentors throughout the city.
events, and work.                                                      Students may also earn credit toward graduation for working a
                                                                       part-time job that relates directly to their KTHS course. Please
Frontier Charter School                                                note that KTHS courses, at this time, do not meet NCAA
    Frontier Charter School is a K-12 correspondence study pro­        Division I or Division II entry guidelines.
gram that serves a multitude of students with diverse interests and
needs. Individuals interested in a traditional homeschool educa­       McLaughlin
tion, pursuing advanced studies, behind in high school credits,           McLaughlin Youth Center provides short-term and long-
or those with special needs as well as student-athletes that seek      term residential care for institutionalized delinquent adoles­
a flexible schedule, those with an interest in educational travel,     cents throughout the State of Alaska. The Anchorage School
and individuals that want to take online/correspondence courses        District administers a comprehensive educational program for
all find valued resources and support. Frontier’s program allows       McLaughlin residents. Students receive instruction in the core
families to use public education funds to give students assess         academic areas, as well as physical education, technology, and
to a tremendous learning environment. Frontier students have           vocational studies.
the ability to take classes at UAA and receive dual credit, attend
classes in other ASD schools, and take online courses from a wide      P.A.I.D.E.I.A. Cooperative School
variety of colleges and universities. Frontier students benefit from      P.A.I.D.E.I.A. Cooperative School is a K-12 culture of aca­
a customized daily schedule, the flexibility of a 12 month school      demic innovation and adaptation, offering a personalized, cus­
year, and the personalized support of their own academic advisor.      tomizable and blended learning plan for passion driven students
                                                                       and families. Students may take up to three classes at local ASD
Highland Academy                                                       schools, attend small on-site core courses at P.A.I.D.E.I.A. and
   Highland Academy is a rigorous 6th-12th grade competen­             register for local university courses Staff assists students in coor­
cy-based learning environment that promotes mastery learning           dinating business partnerships, internships and mentorships.
across the curriculum. Students are placed at ability level in         Teachers work collaboratively with parents and colleagues to
Language Arts and Math in order to meet specific needs. Teachers       design custom programs utilizing hundreds of online class
plan integrated projects in combination with traditional direct        options and several pre-approved, pre-arranged credit options
instruction approaches, using a variety of resources. Skills learned   for family-developed plans and life experiences. The program is
in one content area can often lead to standards met in another.        enhanced with exploratories, field trips and customized cooper­
We emphasize social-emotional learning, community-based                ative groups.
and competencey-based learning, and growth mindset through
our blended learning program. When students graduate from              Polaris K–12 School
Highland, they are prepared for the next step, whether that’s             Polaris K-12 School is Anchorage’s only brick and mortar
vi
school to have all grade levels from kindergarten to the senior year   make good decisions, behave ethically and responsibly, develop
of high school. As an ASD alternative program, we differ in edu­       positive relationships and avoid negative behavior.
cational philosophy, grade level organization, student evaluation,
curriculum, instructional methods, and student involvement.            Service High, Biomedical Career Academy (BCA)
Our program is characterized by curricular innovation along with          The Biomedical Career Academy at Service aims to prepare
basic skills development and allows for an integrated curriculum       students for a successful career in the healthcare industry. Classes
and multi-age group learning based on student interests, needs,        within the BCA focus heavily on rigorous academics within a tra­
and developmental levels. Students are participants in creating        ditional curriculum, integrating healthcare and medically based
a rigorous curriculum that exposes them to 21st century skills,        activities within the classroom and community. Students have the
learning traditional academic standards, developing civic respon­      option of preparing themselves for a position directly after high
sibilities and policies, while also meeting their personal educa­      school within a healthcare setting and/or to focus on preparation
tional interests. Our program is for students, parents/guardians       for a traditional college degree.
and teachers who want an emphasis on self-directed learning and           All students are required to be members of HOSA (Health
active participation in community.                                     Occupation Students of America–a nationally recognized student
                                                                       healthcare organization) and will also be obtaining current first-
SAVE                                                                   aid/CPR certification. Students are also required to take Project
   SAVE provides specialized high school programs for students         Lead The Way Principals of Biomedical Science and Human
who are in 11th and 12th grade and are behind in credit or             Body Systems in the appropriate progression. Seniors, upon the
have already dropped out of high school. SAVE accepts student          successful completion of prerequisites, will take a capstone class
enrollments year-round. Applications may be picked up at your          which focuses on individual research and hands-on learning.
counselor’s office or downloaded online. Walk-ins are welcome             The BCA students will be interacting with our business part­
to complete application packet and schedule an appointment for         ners in the community thus will be held to high standards of
interview. Final recommendation for acceptance into SAVE is            professional conduct and communication.
determined after completed application, student and parent inter­
view and all required documents (immunization record, tran­            Service High, German Immersion Program
script, etc.) are turned into the front office. SAVE High School          The district’s K-12 Japanese, Russian, and Spanish language
offers a personalized education path for each of our students.         immersion programs have designated feeder middle and high
Instead of the traditional one-size-fits-all classroom, we seek to     schools to ensure that students continue their immersion expe­
motivate and encourage students to be independent learners.            rience in a seamless, articulated sequence of higher level courses.
Our blended-learning model provides teacher-directed instruc­          Service High School offers the advanced German immersion
tion, small group learning opportunities and/or online academic        courses for students who have attended Rilke Schule’s K-8
assignments. Students are evaluated monthly and expected to            German immersion program. In the high school program
demonstrate academic and vocational progress. As a result, each        there is a four-year sequence of upper-level courses designed to
student receives individualized instruction and support from our       increase students’ language skills while learning through con­
teachers and staff. This personal attention and guidance are often     tent. German courses include: Contemporary German Youth and
the crucial ingredient to student success. Students are required       Culture; Perspectives on German Culture through Literature, Film,
to hold a part time job or volunteer for a minimum of 20 hours         and Media; Germany: Past and Present; and Advanced Placement
per week and/or attend a class at King Tech High to fulfill their      German Language. High School immersion courses are designed
vocational expectation. Work experience and vocational training        to be rigorous and challenging for students while preparing them
are counted as elective credit and serve as half of the student’s      for upper-level university coursework.
educational day. The requirements for graduation from SAVE
High School are the same as the requirements for all secondary         Service High, The Leadership Academy
high schools in the Anchorage School District. Upon completion            The Leadership Academy at Service High School is centered
students receive an ASD high school diploma                            around the Navy JROTC program and focuses on academic
                                                                       excellence, community service and academic/practical leadership
SEARCH at Benny Benson                                                 training. Each year of participation in the Leadership Academy
    The SEARCH program is for ninth and tenth grade students           counts for one elective credit. Additionally, for each of the first
who have been unsuccessful at their home school due to poor            two years of participation the student will have one-half credit
attendance, poor academics, social issues, or limited behavioral       of Physical Education credit waived. An in-house mentoring
situations. Students are admitted at the beginning of each quar­       and tutoring program is provided for all Leadership Academy.
ter and are required to stay until the end of the semester. In the     The Leadership Academy prides itself on leading technology
SEARCH program academic and socialization skills are incor­            integration at Service High, making use of the latest in classroom
porated into the curriculum. The academic focus is based on the        technologies.
district grade level expectations. Social and emotional learning
skills are embraced and woven into all aspects of the program. The     Service High, The Seminar School (TSS)
social emotional learning aspect of the curriculum is the process         The Seminar School serves approximately 250 students and is
through which students learn to recognize and manage emotions,         characterized by the use of the Socratic seminar method, a strong
                                                                                                                                        vii
sense of community and a learning environment that emphasizes         following courses: honors English and honors social studies,
independence, trust, personal responsibility and an open mind.        biology/chemistry, algebra/geometry or higher, a world language,
The TSS curriculum is built on the consideration of classic texts     and the arts.
that span the history and breadth of human experience. Students
of the Seminar School are diverse in character and ability and        West High, International Baccalaureate (IB)
work together in a multi-grade level setting (9–12) for a portion         The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program (DP)
of their classes. Students can fulfill all language arts and social   at West Anchorage High School encourages creative inquiry and
studies requirements along with some science and math require­        critical thinking while helping students develop a global perspec­
ments through TSS classes.                                            tive. IB is a challenging two-year (11th-12th) pre-college course
                                                                      of studies in the tradition of the liberal arts. Diploma candidates
Steller Secondary School                                              must complete studies in six subject areas: English, a world lan­
   Steller is a school that provides students with opportunities      guage, history, science, math, and the arts. Additionally, students
to be self-directed, independent and responsible learners. Steller    undertake an independent research project; participate in cre­
offers a personalized education for grades 7 through 12 where         ative, physical, and social service activities; and take a class called
students can define their own educational goals with the help of      Theory of Knowledge. The IB DP encourages students to develop
parents and staff. Steller Secondary School fosters an educational    independence of thought, creativity, inquiry skills, open-minded­
environment based on student responsibility and freedom.              ness, and an ability to think critically and reflectively. West High
   Steller classes focus on educational process and provide oppor­    is the only IB program in the Anchorage School District.
tunities for the development of leadership skills, problem solving
proficiency, self-assessment abilities, decision-making skills and
                                                                      West High, Process Technology-Engineering
goal setting. Self-directed learning is a vital part of the Steller      The West Anchorage High School, Process Technology-
program. Active involvement within both the Steller community         Engineering program is designed to prepare students for a two-
and the community of Anchorage is also important. Steller fol­        year or a four-year process technology or engineering degree pro­
lows the ASD guidelines for educational content and graduation        gram. Students are introduced to Alaska’s physical science based
requirements.                                                         industries through Geology and Process Technology (designed
                                                                      to prepare students for a technical apprenticeship or degree pro­
West High, Anchor Media Production (AMP)                              gram. The Introduction to Engineering Design course and the
   The Broadcast-Journalism Program at West Anchorage High            Introduction to Digital Electronics follow the Project Lead the
School prepares students to enter the Journalism and Production       Way (PLTW) curriculum exposing students to design processes.
Technologies pathways and the Visual Arts pathway: emphasis is
                                                                      West High, School-Business Partnership
on core skills needed to communicate a message for any type of
organization/endeavor (be it creative, commercial, or personal)          The School-Business Partnership Program at West Anchorage
utilizing multimedia approaches including YouTube, Adobe              High School prepares students to transition from school to work
Premier and Suite.                                                    or school to college. Students develop career, business, service
                                                                      learning and leadership skills while working with the school
West High, Highly Gifted Program (HG)                                 business partners (interacting with the community in planning
    The Highly Gifted Program at West High School is designed         and directing fund-raisers, service learning projects, and board
for the 9th–10th grade student whose educational needs cannot         meetings). Students have the option for on-the-job training
be met within the Honors Programs at the high school level. The       throughout the community. The School-Business Partnership
first two years of the program offers a smaller learning community    class supports West Anchorage High School Career and Technical
through clustered core classes. The emphasis on critical thinking     Education (CTE) programs transitioning students from school to
and writing skills encourages depth and breadth of knowledge in       active learning in the workplace.
all content areas.                                                    West High School Language Immersion Programs
West High, Medical Academy                                               The district’s K-12 Japanese, Russian and Spanish language
   The Medical Academy at West Anchorage High School pre­             immersion programs have designated feeder middle and high
pares students to enter healthcare professions or college through     schools to ensure that students continue their immersion expe­
preparation in science classes: Anatomy & Physiology; Biology;        rience in a seamless, articulated sequence of higher level courses.
and Chemistry as well as medical classes: Health Occupation           West High School is the continuation of the Spanish two-way
Essentials; Medical Terminology; Introduction to Pharmacy; First      immersion program from Government Hill Elementary and
Aid; Emergency Trauma Technician; and Essentials of Athletic          Romig Middle schools. The two-way immersion program is
Injury Management. Students successfully completing their             the only one of its kind in Alaska. Students in this program are
coursework and application, graduate with the West Anchorage          both English speakers and native Spanish-speakers who together
High School, Medical Cord.                                            become bilingual and biliterate in both Spanish and English.
                                                                      Native Spanish-speaking students and heritage Spanish speakers
West High, Pre-IB                                                     with literacy skills in Spanish are encouraged to enroll in this
   Students in 9th and 10th grade who wish to prepare them­           Spanish two-way immersion program. In the high school pro­
selves for the Diploma Program are encouraged to study the            gram there is a four-year sequence of upper-level courses designed
viii
to increase students’ language skills while learning through con­       for Alaska high school students to earn a scholarship to help cover
tent. Spanish courses include Vistas Juveniles del Mundo Hispano,       the cost of an Alaska postsecondary education. Alaska high school
Perspectivas Literarias, Estudios Latinoamericanos, and Advanced        students who take a more rigorous curriculum, get good grades,
Placement Spanish Language. High school immersion courses are           and score well on college placement or work ready exams, can
designed to be rigorous and challenging for students while prepar­      earn an Alaska Performance Scholarship to qualified Alaska col­
ing them for upper-division university coursework.                      leges, universities, or vocational/technical programs.
   West High School is also the continuation of the Russian
immersion program from Turnagain Elementary and Romig                   Course withdrawal procedures
Middle schools. In the high school program there is a four-                The following are the procedures regarding withdrawing or
year sequence of upper-level courses designed to increase stu­          changing a course:
dents’ language skills while learning through content. Courses             1. Once students have selected their courses, there will be no
include Sovremenaya Molodyoj’ i kul’tura (Contemporary Youth and              schedule changes, including withdrawals, after the begin­
Culture), Vzgla’d na Rossiju cherez literaturu i SMI (Perspectives on         ning of the grading period except as determined by the
Russia through Literature and Media), Rossia i Alyska: Istoricheskiye         principal or his/her designee.
svyazi (Russia and Alaska: Historical Connections), and Advanced           2. Any student whose absence is unauthorized for the first
Placement Russian Language. High school immersion courses are                 three days of a course may be withdrawn from the course
designed to be rigorous and challenging for students while prepar­            and will need to reschedule.
ing them for upper division university coursework                          3. No record shall be kept on a student who withdraws from
                                                                              a course with the principal’s permission prior to the end
Non-resident tuition                                                          of the 10th day of the course. Students who, after 10 days
   By state law, all non-resident students attending schools of               in a course, withdraw with the principal’s permission will
this district shall pay in advance the regular school tuition rate.           have WF (withdraw failing) recorded on their transcripts.
(AS 9.030) This law pertains to students whose parents are not                The WF counts in the calculation of the Grade Point
residents of the Municipality of Anchorage and who are not in the             Average (GPA).
custody of a district resident. (ASD Policy Section 431.21) For
more information about non-resident tuition, please contact the         Grading procedures
school principal.                                                          Reporting periods are nine weeks in length although courses
                                                                        are taken by semester. In high school, the first report or grade is
About scheduling                                                        a notice of a student’s progress up to the middle of the semester.
   Scheduling for the year starts in February with juniors and          The final semester grade is based on the total amount of contribu­
continues with sophomores, freshmen and current 8th graders.            tion a student has made to the course during the entire semester
   A school’s master schedule is developed by taking all student        and is the grade recorded on the transcript. In high school, if a
course requests (from a list of all approved ASD courses) and cre­      student fails one semester of a full-year course and successfully
ating sections to accommodate the maximum number of student             completes the other semester of the same course, credit is granted
requests.                                                               for the semester successfully completed. Physical education classes
   Some requested courses will not have sufficient demand to            are an exception because they are nine weeks in length and the
permit the class to be offered so students must be prepared with        quarter grade is recorded on the transcript.
alternate requests.
   To assure success in scheduling, each student and parent can:
                                                                        Grading System
   1. Explore careers with a counselor and identify education             “A’’ This mark indicates the student has done work in quality
       needs.                                                                    and quantity far in excess of the standards set forth for a
   2. Plan a four-year program (grades 9–12) that is based on                    satisfactory grade in the course.
       tentative career choices.                                          “B’’ This mark indicates that the student is doing work in
   3. Select courses carefully with a counselor. Parents are                    quality and quantity above the standards set forth for a
       encouraged to consult a counselor before helping students                passing grade in the course.
       select courses.                                                    “C’’ This mark is a satisfactory passing grade. It indicates that
       a. Be fully aware of course content for each course being                the student is acquiring the necessary information to
           considered.                                                          proceed in the subject. He/she is meeting the standards
       b. Know the graduation requirements and make a check                     set for a passing grade in the course.
           list for meeting those requirements.                           “D” This mark indicates that the student is not effectively
       c. Be aware of the entrance requirements at potential                    mastering the work assigned but has sufficient under­
           post-secondary schools and NCAA requirements if                      standing of the subject to justify the opinion that more
           athletic participation is contemplated at a Division I               growth will result from advancement than from repeti­
           or II college.                                                       tion of the course.
       d. Have an alternative plan before coming to scheduling.           “F’’ Insufficient progress in the subject to merit granting of
                                                                                credit in the course.
Alaska Performance Scholarship                                            “WF” Student has been withdrawn from the course “failing.’’
   The Alaska Performance Scholarship provides an opportunity             “J’’ Audit— Principal approval is required. Indicates a stu­
                                                                                                                                         ix
dent is auditing a course for his/her benefit. This does     High school credit for middle school
        not count towards credit for graduation and must be          students
        approved prior to the 10th day of the course. Students are     See “Program No. 7”
        still required to complete course work.
                                                                     Credit By Choice program (CBC)
Weighted grades                                                         The Credit by Choice Program is designed to give students
   The Anchorage School Board has approved weighted grades           the opportunity to choose enriching learning experiences tai­
for Advanced Placement (AP) and higher level International           lored to their personal educational needs and to have them
Baccalaureate (IB) courses. While an “A” is normally worth four      recorded on their high school transcript. This program is open
points in calculating a student’s grade point average (GPA), a       to high school students currently enrolled in the Anchorage
weighted “A” is worth five points; a weighted “B” is worth four      School District.
points; a weighted “C” is worth three points; a weighted “D” is         An overview of each program option is given below. Details
worth two points and an “F” is worth no points. The Anchorage
                                                                     of requirements for each program are attached. While the
School District does not offer weighted grades for college course
                                                                     Curriculum Assistant Principal and Counselors can respond to
work.
                                                                     questions, it is the RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT
Transcripts                                                          TO WORK INDEPENDENTLY TO COMPLETE THE
   High school transcripts are legal documents and may not be        APPLICATION AND CARRY OUT A PROGRAM
amended except to correct errors and enter replacement grades        ACCORDING TO THE PRESCRIBED GUIDELINES.
for repeated courses once courses and grades have been posted to
                                                                     General Guidelines
the transcript. Prior to requesting inclusion of Credit by Choice
grades, including high school credit for courses taken during          1. Students proposing a Credit by Choice (CBC) Program
middle school, consider the effect these non-weighted grades will         must have prior written approval of their parents and the
have on class rank.                                                       Principal.
                                                                       2. A certificated staff person must sponsor and/or supervise
Honor roll                                                                the student’s program. In the case of the waiver, this will
   High school students earning a 3.5 grade average will be eli­          be the Principal.
gible for the honor roll. Any “F’’ or “D’’ grade will disqualify a     3. ASD is the accrediting institution and sets standards for
student for that grading period. A high school student must be            issuing credit/waivers. ASD is not the sponsoring agency
enrolled in a minimum of four subjects and grades in all courses          for off-campus programs and is not responsible for the
will be considered.                                                       student’s personal or financial liability. Program expense
                                                                          is the responsibility of the individual.
Anchorage School District academic letter
                                                                       4. CBC courses will be titled as such on the student’s
    To earn an ASD academic letter, any student who has fulfilled
                                                                          transcript. Programs 1 (Educational Travel) and 6
the criteria for Honor Roll in two consecutive semesters will be
                                                                          (Community Service/Field Study) may only be taken
awarded an Academic Letter. These semesters need not fall in
                                                                          for elective credit/waiver. Specific curriculum area
order of fall and spring semester, but may be considered consecu­
                                                                          credit will be recorded for Programs 2 (Correspondence
tive if the GPA is earned in the spring semester and the following
                                                                          Course), 3 (College Course Work), 4 (Early College
fall semester. Any semester the student meets the Honor Roll cri­
                                                                          Admissions Program), and 5 (Credit by Examination).
teria subsequent to the awarding of the Academic Letter and earns
a 3.5 to 4.0, a silver star is awarded. Any semester the student          Credit by Examination may not be done for Physical
meets the Honor Roll criteria subsequent to the awarding of the           Education credit.
Academic Letter and earns a 4.0 or higher, a gold star is awarded.     5. Since CBC registration is recorded only upon program
                                                                          completion, CBC is not a course that can be included for
Honors group                                                              calculating eligibility for full-time student status.
    To give recognition for high scholastic achievement, the           6. The grade received will be incorporated into the student’s
Anchorage School District has established standards for the               high school grade point average (GPA) and will be count­
selection of members of an Honors Group. A student who has a              ed to determine class rank and valedictorian. When com­
cumulative GPA of 3.5 by the semester prior to graduation will be         puting valedictorian status, the ratio of weighted advanced
eligible for membership in the Honors Group.                              placement to regular graded classes is significant.
    Honors graduates will be given recognition at graduation and
on their transcript in the following manner:                         Program No. 1 – Educational Travel
    1. Students with a GPA of 3.50 to less than 3.76 will be des­       Credit may be earned for a planned learning experience gained
        ignated as having graduated Cum Laude;                       through participation in a travel/study tour. The Curriculum
    2. Students with a GPA of 3.76 to 4.0 will be designated as         Assistant Principal must approve both the specific tour and
        having graduated Magna Cum Laude;                            teacher/sponsor before students may apply. Questions concerning
    3. Students with a GPA of greater than 4.0 will be designated    specific credit requirements during travel/study tours should be
        as having graduated Summa Cum Laude.                         directed to the teacher/sponsor.
x
• A three-week tour program is eligible for 0.5 unit of credit    college level coursework which will at the same time satisfy
      and a six-week program may earn 1.0 unit of credit.             high school graduation requirements. In consultation with the
    • Travel supervisors must submit a completed application          Director of the Early Honors Program and the local school coun­
      with supporting materials to the Curriculum Assistant           selor, the student will develop an Individual Learning Plan to
      Principal for approval by April 15. Proposals must outline      assure that district graduation requirements will be met. Students
      the type of educational travel, travel supervisor’s name,       will be concurrently enrolled in their home high schools. Because
      past experience with student travel, name of sponsoring         schools will continue to receive federal and state funding for
      company/affiliation, dates of departure and return, esti­       these students, students are not eligible for federal financial aid at
      mated number of student participants, goals and objec­          Alaska Pacific University, although they may be eligible for uni­
      tives, proposed itinerary, evaluation criteria, information     versity-granted financial aid, based on need.
      on liability/medical coverage for participants, parent infor­
      mation forms and copies of releases. Forward a copy of the
                                                                      Program No. 4 – Early College Admissions Program
      approved “Request for Out-Of-District Travel” (form J –            This program would allow outstanding students with a grade
      available from the Activities Office), taking care to specify   point average of 3.5 or above to leave high school for college work
      names of sponsors/chaperones.                                   prior to having the time and credits for graduation. The student
    • A student desiring credit for approved educational travel       would have the option of receiving his/her high school diploma
      must complete the Credit by Choice application and              after successfully completing the first year of college. ASD gradu­
      submit it to the Curriculum Assistant Principal in advance      ation requirements must be met in order to receive a high school
      of the trip. Upon completion of the travel, the supervisor      diploma. The program would serve the student who has made
      must provide the Curriculum Assistant Principal with            definite plans for master and doctoral work.
      grade reports and submit supporting grade book and leg­             • To be considered, a student must have maintained at least
      end to the Registrar.                                                   a 3.5 GPA during the first three years of high school and
                                                                              all required grade level courses must have been completed
Program No. 2 – Correspondence Course                                         prior to application for this Credit by Choice program.
   The purpose of the correspondence is to meet special needs of          • Tentative acceptance by a college or university must be
students as approved by the school administration. Due consider­              in evidence. It is the student’s responsibility to determine
ation will be given to the student’s record in completing indepen­            whether college coursework accepted by the Anchorage
dent studies. To be approved, correspondence programs must be                 School District will also be accepted for credit by the
accredited. Courses must be proctored by certificated staff.                  college.
    • As of August 2008, approved correspondence programs                 • Upon completion of 24 undergraduate semester hours of
       include: University of Nebraska, University of North                   credit at the college level, the student must furnish a tran­
       Dakota and Brigham Young University, and the Native                    script to the Curriculum Assistant Principal so that a high
       Heritage Center Advanced Academics. Others may be                      school diploma may be granted.
       considered upon request. Application for approval of other     Program No. 5 – Credit by Examination (Course
       programs may be done through the Curriculum Assistant
                                                                      Challenge)
       Principal.
    • Correspondence courses may be used for both makeup                 Credit by Examination (Course Challenge) (AS 14.03.073
       and acceleration.                                              Sections 2 and 3 of the Alaska Safe Children’s Act) is an oppor­
    • A copy of the correspondence school application must            tunity for students in grades 9-12 to receive credit through a
       accompany the Credit by Choice application and must be         testing process. Assessments determined by the Curriculum
       received by the Curriculum Assistant Principal prior to the    Coordinators will be used in most instances to challenge courses
       beginning of the course.                                       in mathematics, language arts, science, social studies, and world
                                                                      languages by demonstrating mastery of course material.
    • Upon completion, the student must submit proof of grade
                                                                          • The student can apply to challenge a course through exam­
       to the Curriculum Assistant Principal.
                                                                             ination in August or December or as individually sched­
Program No. 3 – College Course Work                                          uled. The course challenge request must be submitted
   Credits earned through accredited institutions of higher learn­           before the course has begins for the student.
ing can fulfill credits needed for graduation from ASD. A 1-2             • Upon receipt of an approved application for Credit by
credit hour university course equates to .5 ASD units; a 3-4 credit          Examination (Course Challenge), the Principal (or desig­
hour university course equates to 1.0 ASD units; and a 5-6 credit            nee) will appoint an examiner.
hour university course equates 1.5 ASD units. It is the student’s         • The examiner will pull the assessment off the ASD
responsibility to submit university transcripts to his or her home           Assessment Library whenever possible or request an assess­
school.                                                                      ment from the content Curriculum Coordinator.
                                                                          • The examiner is expected to proctor the test, notify the
APU                                                                          Principal (or designee) of the results, and submit the test
  The APU Early Honors Program will provide admitted and                     materials to the Registrar.
qualified students a two-semester program of study that includes          • A ninety-percent (90%) score is required to receive an A.
                                                                                                                                         xi
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