Rainbow Dreams Early Learning Academy School-Based Emergency Operations Plan 2020-2021 - Rainbow Dreams ...

 
Rainbow Dreams Early Learning Academy School-Based Emergency Operations Plan 2020-2021 - Rainbow Dreams ...
Rainbow Dreams Early Learning
      Academy School-Based
    Emergency Operations Plan
           2020-2021
       School Name: Rainbow Dreams Early Learning
                      Academy
             Region: Las Vegas, NV
           Principal: Janice D.Henry

CONFIDENTIAL: THIS PLAN IS NOT A PUBLIC DOCUMENT. DISCLOSURE OF THIS PLAN TO ANY
UNAUTHORIZED PERSON OR ENTITY IS A VIOLATION OF NEVADA LAW. NRS. 239.010(1); NRS 388.259.
UNAUTHORIZED DISSEMINATION OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY RESULT IN IMPOSITION OF DISCIPLINE
AND/OR REFERRAL TO APPROPRIATE LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES FOR POSSIBLE PROSECUTION.

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COPYRIGHT @ Clark County School District
                                 All rights reserved.

THIS DOCUMENT IS PROTECTED UNDER THE COPYRIGHT LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
THE RAINBOW DREAMS ACADEMY EXPRESSLY RESERVES ALL RIGHTS TO THE PUBLICATION,
REPRODUCTION AND DISSEMINATION OF THIS DOCUMENT. THE PUBLICATION, REPRODUCTION OR
DISSEMINATION OF THIS PLAN OR ANY PORTION THEREOF BY ANY MEANS TO UNAUTHORIZED
RECIPIENTS WITHOUT THE EXPRESS AND UNEQUIVOCAL, WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE RAINBOW
DREAMS ACADEMY IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

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Table of Contents
I.          Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1
       A.      Purpose of the Plan ...................................................................................................................... 1
       B.      Scope of the Plan .......................................................................................................................... 1
       C.      Disclaimer ..................................................................................................................................... 2
       D.      Open Meeting Law Inapplicable ................................................................................................... 3
       E.      Situation Overview ....................................................................................................................... 3
       F.      Planning Assumptions and Limitations......................................................................................... 7
II.         Concept of Operations ..................................................................................................................... 7
       A.      National Incident Management System (NIMS) ........................................................................... 8
       B.      Implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS) ............................................................. 8
       C.      Initial Response............................................................................................................................. 9
III.        Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities............................................................................ 9
       A.      Principal ........................................................................................................................................ 9
       B.      Incident Commander .................................................................................................................... 9
       C.      Teachers...................................................................................................................................... 10
       D.      Instructional Assistants............................................................................................................... 10
       E.      Counselors, Social Workers, and Psychologists .......................................................................... 10
       F.      School Nurses/FASA/Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) ...................................................... 11
       G.      Custodians/Maintenance Personnel .......................................................................................... 11
       H.      School Secretary/Office Staff...................................................................................................... 12
       I.      Food Service/Cafeteria Workers................................................................................................. 12
       J.      Other Staff (e.g., Itinerant Staff, Substitute Teachers) ............................................................... 12
       K.      Students (age-appropriate) ........................................................................................................ 12
IV.         Direction, Control, and Coordination............................................................................................. 12
       A.      School Incident Command System (ICS) ..................................................................................... 12
       B.      Coordination with Policy/Coordination Group ........................................................................... 16
       C.      School District Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) ..................................................................... 17
       D.      Coordination with Responders ................................................................................................... 17
       E.      Source and Use of Resources ..................................................................................................... 17
V.          Information Collection, Analysis, and Dissemination .................................................................... 17
       A.      Types of Information .................................................................................................................. 17

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B.     Information Documentation....................................................................................................... 17
VI.          Training and Exercises.................................................................................................................... 18
        A.     Training ....................................................................................................................................... 18
        B.     Drill/Exercises ............................................................................................................................. 19
VII.         Administration, Finance, and Logistics .......................................................................................... 19
        A.     Agreements and Contracts ......................................................................................................... 19
        B.     Recordkeeping ............................................................................................................................ 19
        C.     Incident Costs ............................................................................................................................. 20
        D.     Preservation of Records.............................................................................................................. 20
VIII.        Plan Development and Maintenance ............................................................................................ 20
        A.     Approval and Dissemination of the Plan .................................................................................... 21
        B.     Plan Review and Updates ........................................................................................................... 21
IX.          Authorities and References ........................................................................................................... 21
Functional Annexes ..................................................................................................................................... 24
        Communications Procedure ............................................................................................................... 25
        Emergency First Aid/Triage Procedure ............................................................................................... 29
        Evacuation Procedure ......................................................................................................................... 31
        Family Reunification Procedure .......................................................................................................... 31
        Hard Lockdown ................................................................................................................................... 35
        Independent Evacuation Procedure ................................................................................................... 37
        Psychological Healing Procedures....................................................................................................... 38
        Recovery Procedure ............................................................................................................................ 40
        Reverse Evacuation Procedure ........................................................................................................... 42
        Shelter-in-Place Procedure ................................................................................................................. 43
        Soft Lockdown Procedure ................................................................................................................... 45
        Staff and Student Accounting Procedure............................................................................................ 47
Threat- and Hazard-Specific Annexes ......................................................................................................... 48
        Active Assailant ................................................................................................................................... 49
        Aircraft Accident ................................................................................................................................. 51
        Bees/Animal on Campus ..................................................................................................................... 55
        Biological/Chemical Threat (suspicious package or letter) ................................................................. 57
        Bomb Threat/Suspicious Package ....................................................................................................... 60

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Disruptive/Unruly Person ................................................................................................................... 63
Earthquake .......................................................................................................................................... 65
Outbreak of Disease ............................................................................................................................ 82
Fire/Smoke .......................................................................................................................................... 68
Hazardous Materials ........................................................................................................................... 72
Intruder/Suspicious Person................................................................................................................. 76
Mass Casualty Incident ....................................................................................................................... 78
Natural Gas Leak ................................................................................................................................. 80
Suicide/Death...................................................................................................................................... 82

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SIGNATORY PAGE
A review of this school’s written School-Based Emergency Operations Plan has been conducted and
modified as needed by the planning/review committee charged with the specific elements in the
development and ongoing review of this plan. This School-Based Emergency Operations Plan conforms
to the mandated requirements set forth in the School Based Emergency Operations Plan Template. The
written School-Based Emergency Operations Plan is at Rainbow Dreams Academy School and available
for review by authorized personnel. Based on this review, written modifications have been made to
account for and meet the emergency needs of students and employees at this school site in the School-
Based Emergency Operations Plan. The School-Based Emergency Operations Plan is ready for
implementation if required. Due to implemented COV-19 procedures, committee meetings were held
through teleconferencing.

                    Principal                                      Licensed Employee
                  Janice Henry                                        Traneika Ross

                Board Member                                     Non-Licensed Employee
                 Diane Pollard                                        Leslie Graves

                 Police Officer                                     Parent/Guardian
                                                                     Ralexsia Wilson

          Mental Health Professional                            USC Intern Social Worker
         License Clinical Social Worker                               Yvette Lopez
                Telisha Morgan

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School-Based Emergency Operations Plan

I. INTRODUCTION

A. Purpose of the Plan

The purpose of the Rainbow Dreams Academy School-Based Emergency Operations Plan (School EOP) is
to identify and respond to incidents by outlining the responsibilities and duties of the School, its
employees, and students. Developing, maintaining, training, and exercising the plan empowers everyone
involved in an incident to act quickly and knowledgably. In addition, the plan educates staff, students,
and other key stakeholders on their roles and responsibilities before, during, and after an incident. This
plan provides assurances that Rainbow Dreams Academy has established guidelines and procedures to
respond to threats and hazards in an effective way.

The developed guidelines and procedures for dealing with existing and potential student and school
incidents are defined in the plan below. The basic plan and the functional and threat/hazard-specific
annexes outline an organized, systematic method to address threats, hazards, and vulnerabilities before,
during, and after an incident. Annual training must be provided to faculty and staff to assess the
seriousness of incidents and respond according to these established procedures and guidelines. This
school must conduct monthly Emergency Operations drills throughout the school year. The principal of
the school could face misdemeanor charges if drills are not conducted per NRS 392.450.

Lastly, developing, maintaining, and exercising the School-Based EOP increases each school’s legal
protection. Schools without established incident management procedures have been found liable for
their absence. While no set of policies rules out the potential for legal problems, establishing
procedures and guidelines on best professional practices provides a margin of protection against
liability.

B. Scope of the Plan

The School-Based EOP outlines the expectations of staff; roles and responsibilities; direction and control
systems; internal and external communications plans; training and sustainability plans; authority and
references as defined by local, tribal, State, and Federal government mandates; common and specialized
procedures; and specific threat/hazard vulnerabilities and responses/recovery.

  1. Definitions
  Annex: Explains how the school will carry out a broad function in response to a threat or hazard. The
  Annex is broken down into two parts a Functional Annex and a Threat and Hazard Specific Annex.

  Appendix: Supplementary documents needed for emergency operations planning and
  implementation of the crisis plan during a drill or real-life incident.

  Crisis: NRS 388.231 defines a crisis as a “traumatic or sudden event or emergency condition…. that
  involves violence; profoundly and negatively affects or will affect pupils and employees of a school, or
  both; occurs on property of a public school, at an activity sponsored by a public school or on a school
  bus while the bus is engaged in its official duties for a public school; and may involve serious injury or
  death.”

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  These incidents can be a large-scale event impacting the schools in the area, the total district, or they
  can happen on a smaller scale and impact one school site. In all situations, however, a crisis incident
  has a harmful effect on those who directly and indirectly experience it.

  Emergency: NRS 388.233 defines an emergency as “an occurrence or threatened occurrence for which
  action is necessary to save lives, protect property or to protect the health and safety of persons, or to
  avert the threat of damage to property or injury to persons, on the property of a public school, at an
  activity sponsored by a public school or on a school bus while the bus is engaged in its official duties
  for a public school.”

  Hazard: Something that is potentially dangerous or harmful, often the root cause of an unwanted
  outcome.

  Incident: An occurrence, caused by either human action or natural phenomena, which may bring
  about harm and may require action. Incidents can include major disasters, emergencies, terrorist
  attacks, terrorist threats, fires, floods, hazardous materials accidents, earthquakes, hurricanes,
  tornadoes, tropical storms, public health and medical emergencies, and other occurrences requiring
  an emergency response. The principal/building administrator shall have the authority to determine
  when an incident has occurred and to implement the procedures within this Emergency Operations
  Plan.

  OODA Loop: The OODA Loop stands for Observe, Orient, Decide and Act. The use of the OODA Loop in
  conjunction with the School-Based Emergency Operations Plan, training, and drills can greatly
  enhance the response to various crisis and emergency situations.

  Policy Group: The Policy Group is made up of the Governing Board or designee, the Principal or
  designee, and various other designees. The Policy Group is the executive level oversight and strategic
  decision-making body for the school during a crisis or emergency. The Policy Group has the authority
  to make strategic, financial, operational, and policy decisions in response to a crisis or emergency.

  Threat: A natural or man-made occurrence, individual, entity, or action that has or indicates the
  potential to harm life, body, information, operations, the environment, and/or property.

  Suicide: NRS 388.2359 defines suicide as “the suicide of a pupil, teacher, or other member of the
  community of a public school.”

  Vulnerability: Characteristic of the school that could make it more susceptible to the identified threats
  and hazards.

C. Disclaimer

There is no such thing as a perfect incident management system. While no set policies rule out the
potential for disaster, establishing procedures based upon best professional practices increases the
probability that a crisis will be managed efficiently and effectively in order to mitigate the impact upon
the school, its students and employees. Adopting this plan is one means by which the Rainbow Dreams
Academy endeavors to ensure that every reasonable effort is expended to manage crisis situations with
the information and resources available at the time.

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D. Open Meeting Law Inapplicable

NRS 388.261 states that Nevada’s Open Meeting Law, NRS Chapter 241, does not apply to meetings of a
Development Committee established pursuant to NRS 388.241; a School Committee established
pursuant to NRS 388.247; or the State Board of Education (if the meeting concerns a regulation adopted
pursuant to NRS 388.255 or the plan developed pursuant to NRS 388.253.

E. Situation Overview

  1. School Population
   ▪   _____ Administrators

   ▪   _____ Teachers, specialists, and licensed staff

   ▪   _____ Students

   ▪   _____ Office/support staff

   ▪   _____ Instructional Assistants

   ▪   _____ Cafeteria staff

   ▪   _____ Maintenance and custodial staff

   ▪   _____ Volunteers

 A master schedule of where classes, grade levels, and staff are located is available in the main office
 and is accessible in Infinite Campus.

  2. Students with Disabilities or Access and Functional Needs

 This school is committed to the safe evacuation, transportation and communication with staff,
 students, and parents with the following disabilities (including but not limited to):
   ▪ Limited English proficiency,
   ▪ Blindness or visual disabilities,
   ▪ Cognitive or emotional disabilities,
   ▪ Deafness or hearing loss,
   ▪ Mobility/physical disabilities (permanent and temporary), and
   ▪ Medically fragile health (including asthma and severe allergies).

 Significant planning must occur by the planning/review committee for students who may require
 accommodations due to medical conditions, whether chronic or temporary. The Emergency Response
 Plan for Medically Fragile Students (Health Services form, HS-140) is a required section of the School-
 Based Emergency Operations Plan. This plan must capture what additional support is needed for
 classrooms with multiple students who are medically fragile and /or students who are compromised
 short-term (broken legs, ankles, etc.).

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 Clark County, Nevada, is subject to a variety of natural and technological disasters. Currently, the
 Clark County Hazard Mitigation Plan specifies the following threats to the region (in alphabetical
 order): Climate Change, Dam Failure, Drought, Earthquake, Flood, Hazard Material Events, Infectious
 Disease, Infestation, Subsidence and Fissures, Terrorism and Wildfire.

 It is the responsibility of each staff member to monitor and notify the Health Office of any additional
 needs so that additional assignments to classrooms/areas can be made. School nurses will collaborate
 with site administrators to facilitate completion of the HS-140, and the Healthmaster (HMS) electronic
 student health record attachments for the HS-140 will be maintained in the Health Office Disability
 Notebook. Please contact the Health Services Department (702-799-7443), Office of Emergency
 Management (702-799-HELP), or site school nurse with any questions.

 The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as well as school policy ensure that accommodations must
 be afforded to children with disabilities or access and functional needs. The site administrator must
 account and plan for those students who need assistance when a crisis event occurs and communicate
 with students and parents with limited proficiency.

 The HS-140 and any supporting documents are in the Appendix.

 3. Employees with Disabilities or Access and Functional Needs
 Significant planning must occur by the planning/review committee in planning for employees who
 may require accommodations due to medical conditions, whether chronic or temporary. The
 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as well as school policy ensure that accommodations must be
 afforded to those in the workplace. For confidentiality purposes, this should be handled at the school
 administration level only.

 The Employees with Disabilities or Access and Functional Needs Worksheet is in the Appendix.

 4. Threat/Hazard Assessments Summary
 Schools are exposed to many threats, hazards, and vulnerabilities. All of these have the potential for
 disrupting the school community, causing casualties, and damaging or destroying public or private
 property.

 At 2:00pm, on June 23, 2020, the planning/review committee completed a thorough site assessment
 to identify any circumstances in the school or near the campus that may present unique problems or
 potential risk to people or property. The interior and exterior portions of all school buildings and
 school grounds have been assessed for potential threats/hazards that may impact the site, the staff,
 and the students. Identified threats/hazards have been assessed by risk and likelihood and ranked
 accordingly.

 The school will take into consideration the amount of time it will take for police and fire department
 resources to respond to their school in an emergency.

 The planning/review committee also referenced the culture and climate assessment to determine
 staff, student, and parents’ perceptions of safety and to identify problems needing to be addressed.

 The table on the following page briefly discusses this school’s high-priority threats/hazards.

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 All threats against the school by a pupil or pupils should be reported to School Police at 702-799-5411
 and the Department of Student Threat Assessment, Evaluation and Crisis Response at 702-799-7449.
 They have the assessment tools that will assist you with the threat to your school.

 Additional information on School Specific Threats can be found in Appendix V.

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                                     Table 1. High-Priority Hazards

Active         While active assailant incidents at schools are rare, they are highly impactful. The
Assailant      Police Department averages 227 calls per year for a weapon on campus which
               illustrates the need to be prepared.

Fire           Fire poses a risk to the staff, students, and the building of the Rainbow Dreams
               Academy. For the past five years, there have been no fires reported to the Police
               Department.

Earthquake     According to the Clark County website “The State of Nevada is located in “earthquake
               country.” It lies within the Basin and Range Province, one of the most seismically active
               regions in the United States. Along with California and Alaska, Nevada ranks in the top
               three states subject to the largest earthquakes over the last 150 years.”
               (http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/building/engineering/Pages/EarthquakeInformation.a
               spx)

               Although scientists say there is around a .5% chance of an earthquake with a
               magnitude of 6.0 striking in Clark County within 50 years, the effects would be
               devastating. In a 2009 interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal then state
               Geologist, Jon Price stated that a 7.0 earthquake would kill about 2,300 people,
               damage 60,000 buildings, and hospitalize 8,100 people.
               (https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/state-geologist-estimates-possible-
               earthquake-risk/)

               See the Resource Documents Folder for more information.

COV-19         A Covid-19 outbreak poses a risk to the entire campus community of learners,
Outbreak       teachers, administrators and staff, and our pupils and employee’s families. Strict
               precautions are in place if an outbreak should occur.

  5. Resources
  Resources are vital during many incidents. To request resources, contact the Office of Emergency
  Management (OEM) at 702-799-HELP (4357). OEM will work with the various site administrators
  and/or outside agencies in order to fill requests. During large incidents, resources may be limited, and
  fulfillment of requests will be prioritized based on needs.

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F. Planning Assumptions and Limitations

 1. Planning Assumptions
 Stating the planning assumptions allows schools to deviate from the plan if certain assumptions prove
 not to be true during operations. The School-Based EOP assumes:
   ▪ The school community will continue to be exposed and subject to threats/hazards and
       vulnerabilities described in the Threat/Hazard Assessments Summary, as well as lesser
       threats/hazards that may develop in the future.
   ▪ A major disaster could occur at any time, and at any place. In many cases, dissemination of
       warning to the public and implementation of increased readiness measures may be possible;
       however, some emergency situations occur with little or no warning.
   ▪ A single site incident (e.g., fire, gas main breakage) could occur at any time without warning and
       the employees of the school affected cannot, and should not, wait for direction from local
       response agencies. Action is required immediately to save lives and protect school property.
   ▪ Following a major or catastrophic incident, the school may have to rely on its own resources to
       be self-sustaining for up to 72 hours.
   ▪ There may be a number of injuries of varying degrees of seriousness to staff, and/or students.
       Rapid and appropriate response will reduce the number and severity of injuries.
   ▪ Outside assistance from local fire, law enforcement, and emergency managers will be available
       in most serious incidents. Because it takes time to request and dispatch external assistance, it is
       essential for the school to be prepared to carry out the initial incident response until responders
       arrive at the incident scene.
   ▪ Actions taken before an incident, such as creating a positive school environment and conducting
       fire inspections will stop or reduce incident-related losses.
   ▪ Maintaining the School-Based EOP and providing frequent opportunities for training and
       exercising the plan for stakeholders (staff, students, parents/guardians, emergency responders,
       etc.) can improve the school’s readiness to respond to incidents.
   ▪ A spirit of volunteerism among school employees, students, and families will result in their
       aiding assistance and support to incident management efforts.

 2. Limitations
 It is the policy of the school that no guarantee is implied by this plan of a perfect incident
 management system. Because personnel and resources may be overwhelmed, school administrators
 can only endeavor to make every reasonable effort to manage the situation, with the resources and
 information available at the time.

II. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS

This plan is based upon the concept that the incident management functions that must be performed by
the school generally parallel some of their routine day-to-day functions. To the extent possible, the
same personnel and material resources used for day-to-day activities will be employed during incidents.
Because personnel and equipment resources are limited, some routine functions that do not contribute
directly to the incident may be suspended. The personnel, equipment, and supplies that would typically
be required for those routine functions will be redirected to accomplish assigned incident management
tasks.

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A. National Incident Management System (NIMS)

The National Incident Management System (NIMS) is a set of principles that provides a systematic,
proactive approach guiding government agencies at all levels, nongovernmental organizations, and the
private sector to work seamlessly before, during, and after an incident, regardless of cause, size,
location, or complexity, in order to protect and mitigate the impact on life or property. This system
ensures that those involved in incident response/recovery understand what their roles are and have the
tools they need to be effective.

Rainbow Dreams Academy recognizes that staff and students will be first responders during an incident.
Adopting NIMS enables staff and students to respond more effectively to an incident and enhances
cooperation, coordination, and communication among school officials, responders, and emergency
managers.

The school works with local government agencies to remain NIMS compliant. NIMS compliance for
schools and school districts includes completing the following:
    ▪ Adopt the use of the Incident Command System (ICS). All staff that assumes roles described in
        this plan should receive IS-100.SCa training. IS-100.SCa: Introduction to Incident Command
        System for Schools is a Web-based course available free from the Federal Emergency
        Management Agency (FEMA) Emergency Management Institute.
    ▪ Complete NIMS awareness course IS-700 NIMS: An Introduction. IS-700 is a Web-based course
        available free from the Emergency Management Institute. All persons assuming roles described
        in the basic plan or annexes should take the IS-700 course.
    ▪ Understand how to create a multi-hazard emergency operation plan by completing course IS-
        362.A: Multi-Hazard Emergency Planning for Schools. IS-362.A is a Web-based course available
        free from the Emergency Management Institute. All persons assuming roles on the
        Planning/review committee should take the IS-362.A course.
    ▪ Train and exercise the plan. All staff and students are expected to participate in training and
        exercising the plan’s procedures and threat/hazard-specific incident plans. The school is charged
        with ensuring that the training and equipment necessary for an appropriate response/recovery
        operation are in place.

B. Implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS)

In a major emergency or disaster, this school may be damaged or need to be evacuated, people may be
injured, and/or other incident management activities may need to be initiated. These activities must be
organized and coordinated to ensure efficient incident management. The Incident Command System
(ICS) will be used to manage all incidents and major planned events. [Note: The ICS approach can be
used before, during, and after an incident.]

The Incident Commander should be the person who has the most experience with the emergency
operations plan and should not be dependent upon title. The Incident Commander at this school will be
delegated the authority to direct all incident activities within the school’s jurisdiction. The Incident
Commander will establish an incident command post (ICP) and provide an assessment of the situation to
the principal or other officials, identify incident management resources required, and direct the on-
scene incident management activities from the ICP. If no Incident Commander is present at the onset of
the incident, the most qualified individual will assume command until relieved by a qualified Incident
Commander.

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C. Initial Response

School personnel are usually first on the scene of an incident in a school setting. Staff are expected to
take charge and manage the incident until it is resolved, or command is transferred to someone more
qualified and/or to an emergency responder agency with legal authority to assume responsibility. Staff
will seek guidance and direction from the school and local officials and seek technical assistance from
the Office of Emergency Management and/or State and Federal agencies where appropriate. The
principal or designee is responsible for activating the School-Based EOP, including common and
specialized procedures as well as threat/hazard-specific procedures. The principal or designee will
assign an Incident Commander based on who is most qualified for the type of incident occurring.

III. ORGANIZATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES

This section establishes the operational organization that will be relied on to manage the incident and
includes:
    ▪ A list of the kinds of tasks to be performed by position and organization.
    ▪ An overview of who does what.

The principal, assistant principals, or designees are not able to manage all the aspects associated with an
incident without assistance; therefore, the school should rely on other key school personnel to perform
tasks that will ensure the safety of staff and students during a crisis or critical incident. The Incident
Command System (ICS), see Figure 1 on page 11, uses a team approach to manage incidents. It is
difficult to form a team while a crisis or critical incident is unfolding. Roles should be pre-assigned based
on training and qualifications. Each staff member and volunteer must be familiar with their role and
responsibilities before an incident occurs.

School staff may be required to remain at school to assist in an incident. In the event that this school’s
School-Based EOP is activated, staff will be assigned to serve within the Incident Command System
based on their expertise and training and the needs of the incident.

A. Principal

The principal may serve as the Incident Commander or delegate the authority to a qualified individual.
At all times, the principal still retains the ultimate responsibility for the overall safety of staff and
students. However, delegating the authority to manage the incident allows the principal to focus on
policy-level activities and interfacing with the District, other agencies, and parents/guardians. The
principal, when not the school’s Incident Commander, shall coordinate between the Superintendent’s
office and the Incident Commander.

B. Incident Commander

The Incident Commander responsibilities include:
    ▪ Assume overall direction of all incident management procedures based on actions and
        procedures outlined in the School-Based EOP.
    ▪ Be aware of authorities, policies, and external stakeholders as part of the incident size up.
    ▪ Take steps deemed necessary to ensure the safety of students, staff, and other individuals.
    ▪ Determine whether to implement incident management protocols (e.g., evacuation, shelter-in-
        place, hard lockdown, etc.), as described more fully in the functional annexes of this document.

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    ▪   Arrange for transfer of students, staff, and other individuals when safety is threatened by a
        disaster.
    ▪   Work with emergency services personnel both internal and external. Depending on the incident,
        community agencies such as law enforcement or the fire department may have jurisdiction for
        investigations, rescue procedures, etc.
    ▪   Keep the principal and other officials informed of the situation.

C. Teachers

Teachers shall be responsible for the supervision of students and shall remain with students until
directed otherwise.

Responsibilities include:
   ▪ Supervising students under their charge.
   ▪ Taking steps to ensure the safety of students, staff, and other individuals in the implementation
       of incident management protocols located in the Staff Handbook of the Emergency Operations
       Plan.
   ▪ Direct students in their charge to inside or outside assembly areas, in accordance with signals,
       warning, written notification, or intercom orders according to established incident management
       procedures.
   ▪ Give appropriate action command during an incident.
   ▪ Conduct Staff and Student Accounting when needed following the Staff and Student Accounting
       Procedure.
   ▪ Execute assignments as directed by the Incident Commander or designee.
   ▪ Render first aid, in accordance with PUB 648 First Aid and Emergency Guidelines for School Staff,
       or obtain first aid services for injured students from the school’s emergency first aid/triage
       team.

D. Instructional Assistants

Responsibilities include assisting teachers as directed.

E. Counselors, Social Workers, and Psychologists

Counselors, Social Workers, and Psychologists aid assistance with the overall direction of the incident
management procedures at the site.

Responsibilities include:
   ▪ Take steps to ensure the safety of students, staff, and other individuals in the implementation of
       incident management protocols.
   ▪ Direct students in their charge according to established incident management protocols.
   ▪ Render Psychological First Aid if necessary. Counselors, Psychologists, and Social Workers may
       be trained in Psychological First Aid.
   ▪ Assist in the transfer of students, staff, and other individuals when their safety is threatened by
       a disaster.
   ▪ Execute assignments as directed by the Incident Commander or designee.

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F. School Nurses/FASA/Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP)

Responsibilities include:
   ▪ Initiate triage.
   ▪ Provide life-saving interventions in concert with education, skills, and training.
   ▪ Administer first aid or emergency treatment as needed.
   ▪ Supervise administration of first aid by those trained to provide it.
   ▪ Organize first aid and medical supplies.
   ▪ Completes the Victim Situation Sheet, as needed.
   ▪ Facilitates transfer of care to EMS emergency responders upon their arrival.
   ▪ Works with the Operation Section Chief to notify parents/guardians of injured student’s status
       and the location the student was transported, as needed.
   ▪ Communicates with the Operations Section Chief when students are identified who require
       medication or specialized nursing procedures.

G. Custodians/Maintenance Personnel

Responsibilities include:
   ▪ Survey and report building damage to the Incident Commander or appropriate supervisor.
   ▪ Control main shutoff valves for gas, water, and electricity and ensure that no hazard results
       from broken or downed lines.
   ▪ Provide damage control as needed.
   ▪ Assist in the conservation, use, and disbursement of supplies and equipment.
   ▪ Keep Incident Commander or designee informed of condition of school.

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H. School Secretary/Office Staff

Responsibilities include:
   ▪ Assist in the school threat and hazard vulnerability site assessments.
   ▪ Answer phones and assist in receiving and providing consistent information to callers.
   ▪ Provide for the safety of essential school records and documents.
   ▪ Execute assignments as directed by the Incident Commander or designee.
   ▪ Provide assistance to the principal and Policy/Coordination Group.
   ▪ Monitor radio emergency broadcasts.
   ▪ Assist with health incidents as needed, acting as messengers, etc.

I.   Food Service/Cafeteria Workers

Responsibilities include:
   ▪ Use, prepare, and serve food and water on a rationed basis whenever the feeding of staff and
       students becomes necessary during an incident.
   ▪ Execute assignments as directed by the Incident Commander or designee.

J.   Other Staff (e.g., Itinerant Staff, Substitute Teachers)

Responsibilities include reporting to the Incident Commander or ICS supervisor if requested or activated.

K. Students (age-appropriate)

Responsibilities include:
   ▪ Cooperate during emergency drills and exercises, and during an incident.
   ▪ Learn to be responsible for themselves and others in an incident.
   ▪ Understand the importance of not being a bystander by reporting situations of concern.
   ▪ Develop an awareness of the high priority threats and hazards and how to take measures to
       protect against and mitigate those threats and hazards.

IV. DIRECTION, CONTROL, AND COORDINATION

A. School Incident Command System (ICS)

To provide for the effective direction, control, and coordination of an incident, either single site or multi-
incidents, the School Emergency Operations Plan will be activated including the implementation of the
Incident Command System (ICS).

The Incident Commander is delegated the authority to direct tactical on-scene operations until a
coordinated incident management framework can be established with local authorities. The Incident
Commander should be the person who has the most experience with the emergency operations plan
and should not be dependent upon title. The Policy Group is responsible for providing the Incident
Commander with strategic guidance, information analysis, and needed resources.

Due to the rapid on-set and unpredictable nature or emergencies it is important for schools to have an
incident management team who will implement the tactics and strategies to achieve the goals set by the
Incident Commander. The Incident Management Team’s organization as well as a description for each
section is discussed below.

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                          Figure 1. School-Based Incident Management Team

The ICS is organized into the following functional areas:

  1. Incident Command
  Directs the incident management activities using strategic guidance provided by the Policy Group.

  Responsibilities and duties may include:
    ▪ Sets initial incident objectives to account for life safety, incident stabilization, and property
       preservation.
    ▪ Establish and manage the Command Post, establish the incident organization, and determine
       strategies to implement protocols and adapt as needed.
    ▪ Monitor incident safety conditions and develop measures for ensuring the safety of building
       occupants (including students, staff, volunteers, and responders).
    ▪ Coordinate media relations and information dissemination with the principal.
    ▪ Develop working knowledge of local/regional agencies, serve as the primary on-scene contact
       for outside agencies assigned to an incident, and assist in accessing services when the need
       arises.
    ▪ Document all activities using the Activity Log.

  2. Operations Section
  Directs all tactical operations of an incident including implementation of response/recovery activities
  according to established incident management procedures and protocols, care of students, emergency
  first aid/triage, Psychological First Aid, light search and rescue, site security, damage assessment,
  evacuations, and the release of students to parents.

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 Responsibilities and duties may include:
   ▪ Implement an incident action plan. To address life/safety issues, stabilize the incident, and to
      protect school property.
   ▪ Analyze incident needs to develop a Family Reunification Plan.
   ▪ Monitor site utilities (i.e., electric, gas, water, heat/ventilation/air conditioning) and shut off only if
      danger exists or directed by Incident Commander and assist in securing facility.
   ▪ Establish medical triage with staff trained in first aid and CPR, provide, and oversee care given to
      injured persons, distribute supplies, and request additional supplies from the Logistics Section.
   ▪ Provide and access Psychological First Aid services for those in need, and access local/regional
      providers for ongoing crisis counseling for students, staff, and parents.
   ▪ Coordinate the rationed distribution of food and water, establish secondary toilet facilities in
      the event of water or plumbing failure, and request needed supplies from the Office of
      Emergency Management 702-799-4537 or the Logistics Section.
   ▪ Document all activities using the Activity Log.

 As needed, the types of Strike Teams described in the following table may be established within the
 Operations Section.

                                      Table 2. Operations Section Teams

  Strike Team       Potential Responsibilities
  Light Search      Light Search & Rescue Teams are responsible for ensuring that all staff and
  & Rescue          students evacuate the building or, if it is unsafe to move the person(s), that
  Team              their locations are documented so that professional responders can locate
                    them easily and extricate them. Light Search & Rescue Teams are responsible
                    for ensuring all staff and students are inside the building during a Soft
                    Lockdown and Shelter-in-Place. Light Search & Rescue Teams may search the
                    entire school facility, after an incident, entering only after they have checked
                    the outside for signs of structural damage and determined that it is safe to
                    enter.
  Emergency         Emergency First Aid/Triage Teams provide triage, and treatment. Emergency
  First             First Aid/Triage Teams are responsible for:
  Aid/Triage        ▪ Setting up first aid area for students.
  Team              ▪ Assessing and treating injuries.
                    ▪ Completing Victim Situation Sheet, see HS-140.
                    Note: The Logistics Section provides care to responders (if needed). The
                    Operations Section Emergency First Aid/Triage Team is dedicated to staff and
                    students or other disaster victims.

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  Strike Team      Potential Responsibilities
  Evacuation/      Evacuation, shelter, and student care in an incident are among the most
  Shelter/Care     important tasks faced by schools. These tasks include student accounting,
  Team             protection from weather, providing for sanitation needs, and providing for
                   food and water. The Evacuation/Shelter/Care Team is responsible for:
                   ▪ Accounting for the whereabouts of all students, staff, and visitors.
                   ▪ Setting up a secure assembly area.
                   ▪ Managing sheltering and sanitation operations.
                   ▪ Managing student feeding and hydration.
                   ▪ Coordinating with Emergency Management or the Logistics Section to
                       secure the needed space and supplies.
  Facility &       The Facility & Security Response Team is responsible for:
  Security         ▪ Locating all utilities and turning them off, if necessary.
  Response         ▪ Securing and isolating fire/HazMat.
  Team             ▪ Assessing and notifying officials of fire/HazMat.
                   ▪ Conducting perimeter control.
                   ▪ Crime scene preservation.
  Mental           The Mental Health Intervention Team is responsible for:
  Health           ▪ Psychological First Aid
  Intervention     ▪ Assessing need for onsite mental health support.
  Team             ▪ Determining need for outside agency assistance.
                   ▪ Providing onsite intervention/counseling.
                   ▪ Monitoring well-being of school School-Based Incident Management Team,
                       staff, and students, and reporting all findings to the Operations Section
                       Chief.
  Reunification    Reunification refers to getting students reunited with their parents or
  Team             guardians in an efficient and orderly manner. Reunification can be an
                   enormous challenge and takes a lot of planning. Reunification of staff with their
                   loved ones is an important part of Reunification as well. The Reunification
                   Team is responsible for:
                   ▪ Setting up the Two-Gate Reunification process, see Appendix G.
                   ▪ Organizing students at the Student Holding area.
                   ▪ Checking student emergency cards for authorized releases.
                   ▪ Completing release logs.
                   ▪ Coordinating with the Public Information Officer on external messages.

 3. Planning Section
 Collects, evaluates, and disseminates information needed to measure the size, scope, and seriousness
 of an incident and to plan appropriate incident management activities.

 Responsibilities and duties may include:
   ▪ Assist Incident Commander in the collection and evaluation of information about an incident as it
      develops (including site map and area map of related events), assist with ongoing planning efforts,
      and maintain incident time log.

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   ▪   Document all activities using the Activity Log.

   This section may not be established onsite at the incident. Rather, the school office may assume
   responsibility for these functions.

 4. Logistics Section
 Supports incident management operations by securing and providing needed personnel, equipment,
 facilities, resources, and services required for incident resolution; coordinating personnel; assembling
 and deploying volunteer teams; and facilitating communication among incident responders. This
 function may involve a major role in an extended incident.

 Responsibilities and duties may include:
   ▪ Establish and oversee communications center and activities during an incident (two-way radio,
      battery-powered radio, written updates, etc.), and develop telephone tree for after-hours
      communication.
   ▪ Establish and maintain school and classroom emergency kits, coordinate access to and
      distribution of supplies during an incident, and monitor inventory of supplies and equipment.
   ▪ Document all activities using the Activity Log.

   This section may not be established onsite at the incident. Rather, the school office may assume
   responsibility for these functions.

 5. Finance/Administration Section
 Oversees all financial activities including purchasing necessary materials, tracking incident costs,
 arranging contracts for services, timekeeping for emergency responders, submitting documentation
 for reimbursement, and recovering school records following an incident.

 Responsibilities and duties may include:
   ▪ Assume responsibility for overall documentation and recordkeeping activities; when possible,
      photograph or videotape damage to property.
   ▪ Develop a system to monitor and track expenses and financial losses in accordance with school
      policy, and secure all records.

 This section may not be established onsite at the incident. Rather, the school office may assume
 responsibility for these functions.

B. Coordination with Policy/Coordination Group

In complex incidents, a Policy/Coordination Group will be convened at the Emergency Operations
Center. The role of the Policy/Coordination Group is to:
    ▪ Support the on-scene Incident Commander.
    ▪ Provide policy and strategic guidance.
    ▪ Help ensure that adequate resources are available.
    ▪ Identify and resolve issues common to all organizations.
    ▪ Keep elected officials and other executives informed of the situation and decisions.
    ▪ Provide factual information, both internally and externally through the Joint Information Center.

The principal or Incident Commander will keep the Policy/Coordination Group informed.

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C. School Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)

Rainbow Dreams Academy maintains a School Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) to address
threats/hazards and incidents. The School-Based EOP has been developed to fit into the Clark County
School District larger EOP in the case of a large-scale incident.

D. Coordination with Responders

An important component of the School-Based EOP is the school’s set of interagency agreements with
various county agencies to aid timely communication. Agreements with these agencies and services
(including such county governmental agencies as mental health, law enforcement, and fire
departments) help coordinate services between the agencies and affected schools. The agreements
specify the type of communication and services provided by one agency to another. The agreements
also make school personnel available beyond the school setting in an incident or traumatic event taking
place in the community.

If a school incident is within the authorities of the responder community, command will be transferred
upon the arrival of qualified responders. A transfer of command briefing shall occur. The school’s
Incident Commander may be integrated into the Incident Command structure or assume a role within a
Unified Command structure.

E. Source and Use of Resources

This school will use its own resources and equipment to respond to incidents until exhausted or until
incident response personnel arrive.

V. INFORMATION COLLECTION, ANALYSIS, AND DISSEMINATION
An assigned administrative staff will collect, analyze, and disseminate information before, during, and
after an incident.

A. Types of Information

Before and during an incident, administrative staff should be assigned to monitor the weather, local law
enforcement alerts, and crime reports daily. This information will be analyzed and shared with the
principal, with any immediate actions required identified.

After an incident, assign staff to monitor websites and hotlines of mental health, emergency
management, and relief agencies, as well as the school information portal, to determine any
information pertinent or critical to the school’s recovery effort.

B. Information Documentation

The assigned staff member will document the information gathered using the Activity Log in the
Appendix section. Information to be documented includes:
    ▪ The source of the information.
    ▪ The staff member who collected and analyzed the information.
    ▪ The staff member to receive and use the information.
    ▪ The format for providing the information.

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    ▪   The date and time the information was collected and shared.

VI. TRAINING AND EXERCISES
The school understands the importance of training, drills, and exercises in maintaining and planning for
an incident. NRS 392.450 mandates principals conduct drills, at least once per month, to instruct pupils
in the appropriate procedures to be followed in the event of a lockdown, fire, or other emergency. Not
more than three of the drills may include instruction in the appropriate procedures to be followed in the
event of a chemical explosion, related emergencies and other natural disasters. At least one-half of the
drills provided must include instruction in appropriate procedures to be followed in the event of a
lockdown. In other words, there must be five drills for lockdown (at least three should be for a Hard
Lockdown), three drills for fire/evacuation, and one drill each for shelter-in-place and earthquake.
To ensure that school personnel and community responders are aware of their duties and
responsibilities under the school plan and the most current procedures, the following training, drill, and
exercise actions should occur. The Exercise Planning Team should coordinate training and exercising
efforts in accordance with the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program.

Training and exercises should be documented including date(s), type of training or exercise, and
participant roster.

A. Training

All school staff and students will receive training throughout the school year to better prepare them for
an incident.

  1. Staff Training
  At the beginning of the school year, before students start attending class, basic training and refresher
  training sessions should be conducted for all school personnel.

  Mandatory staff training should include:
   ▪ Threat/hazard and incident awareness training for all staff.
   ▪ Orientation to the School-Based EOP.
   ▪ Team training to address specific incident response or recovery activities, such as Family
      Reunification and relocation to the Reunification Site.
   ▪ Procedures for Staff and Student Accounting, Shelter-in-Place, Soft Lockdown, Hard Lockdown,
      Evacuation and Reverse Evacuation.
   ▪ Staff needs to know the exits, alternate routes, and what to bring with them.
   ▪ Location and placement of the classroom evacuation map and Teacher's Crisis Response Guide
      Poster should be consistent throughout the school. Staff should be intimately aware of both
      documents' contents.
   ▪ Teachers need to understand what is in their Classroom Kits.
   ▪ Teachers need to know the release procedures.
   ▪ Non-assigned personnel need to know where to receive their assignments.
   ▪ Alternative routes must be addressed (when they will be used, how staff will receive the
      communication, etc.)
   ▪ Student-Staff staging areas as well as Family Reunification Site locations should be discussed.

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