Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Disclaimer This document has been developed by Sunshine Coast Council’s Community Services Department (Active and Healthy Branch). Information contained in this document is based on available information at the time of writing. All figures and diagrams are indicative only and should be referred to as such. This is a strategic document which deals with technical matters in a summary way only. Council or its officers accept no responsibility for any loss occasioned to any person acting or refraining from acting in reliance upon any material contained in this document.

© Sunshine Coast Regional Council 2011. www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au mail@sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au T 07 5475 7272 F 07 5475 7277 Locked Bag 72 Sunshine Coast Mail Centre Qld 4560 Acknowledgements The Sport and Active Recreation project team is grateful for the contribution of the many sport and recreation club or community group representatives who completed surveys and/or attended community forums. We also thank the residents of the Sunshine Coast who responded to surveys or provided other input into the study. The guidance and feedback provided throughout this project by the internal and external members of the project team was much appreciated.

The Sport and Active Recreation project team is also grateful for the support and guidance provided by Strategic Leisure Group, council officers, Councillors, representatives of government agencies, educational institutions and non-government agencies who gave freely of their time to provide input into the study. The project team would like to acknowledge the Queensland Government who provided funding through the Department of Communities – Sport and Recreation Services to Sunshine Coast Council to develop the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011- 2026 to get more Queenslanders active through sport and recreation.

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Contents Foreword . . 5 Message from the Mayor and Corporate Planning and Performance Portfolio Councillor . . 5 About this document. . . 6 Supporting Resources Volume 1 (Locality of Interest Summaries . 6 Supporting Resources Volume 2 (Background Research . 6 Executive summary. . . 7 Importance of sport and active recreation . 7 Purpose of project . . 7 Study scope. . . 7 Localities of Interest . . 8 Study approach . . 8 Key findings . . 8 Vision and guiding principles . . 9 Provision of land for sport. . . 9 Better outcomes for sport . . 9 Facility provision and management . . 10 1 Vision and guiding principles .

12 1.1 Vision for sport and active recreation . 13 1.2 Guiding principles.

. 13 2 Recommendations . 16 2.1 Summary of recommendations . 17 2.2 Timing. . 17 2.3 Policy development . 18 2.4 Provision and development of land for sport . 19 2.5 Management/development of major facilities . 21 2.6 Council support and communication with sport. . 22 2.7 School partnerships . 24 2.8 Non-powered water sports . . 25 2.9 Indoor sport . 27 2.10 Sport development – other . . 30 2.11 Economic development . . 32 2.12 External and internal impacts on existing facilities . 33 2.13 Internal communication . . 34 2.14 Implementation and administration . 35 2.15 Locality recommendations .

. 36 3 Study framework . 46 3.1 Purpose . 47 3.2 Scope . 47 3.3 Excluded activities. . 47 3.4 Eligible activities . 47 3.5 Plan alignment . 48 3.6 Methodology.

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Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

4 Population profile. . 52 4.1 Population and growth . . 53 4.2 Age profile . 53 5 Participation trends . . 54 5.1 Sunshine Coast sport and recreation clubs . 54 5.2 State Sporting Association membership . 55 5.3 ERASS surveys. . 59 6 Consultation outcomes . . 60 6.1 Community forums . 61 6.2 Focus group meetings. . . 62 6.3 Survey of sport and recreation clubs. . 64 6.4 Schools surveys . 69 6.5 Community survey . 69 7 Sports land and indoor facilities . 72 7.1 Sports reserve land . 73 7.2 Facility design – field/outdoor sports .

77 7.3 Indoor facilities . 80 7.4 Sharing of court sports . . 82 8 Economic benefits of sport . . 84 9 Maps . 88 Appendix 1: Prioritisation criteria for capital recommendations . 100 Cr Tim Dwyer Deputy Mayor Corporate Planning and Performance Portfolio Cr Bob Abbot Mayor

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

The provision of adequate facilities and services for sport and active recreation on the Sunshine Coast is not without its challenges. Based on 2006 population levels, the Sunshine Coast had a shortage of land for sport of over 100 hectares. With the region's population continuing to grow this deficit will continue to swell unless additional land is secured. Accommodating the rapid population growth places competing pressure on our finite land resources and so the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 will ensure that land for sport and active recreation is prioritised in the future planning for our region.

The Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 recognises that council has an important role in facilitating improved opportunities and outcomes for sport and active recreation. This Plan contains recommendations on the type, scale, provision, funding and timing of new infrastructure, as well as recommendations which call on council to play a facilitation or advocacy role. We commend the Sunshine Coast community for the valued input into the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 and look forward to a dynamic sporting and active recreation future for the Sunshine Coast.

The Sunshine Coast Council recognises the importance that sport and active recreation play in our region. For this reason, council has produced the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 to assist in the development of the current and future provision of facilities and services. Sport and active recreation is an important part of the Sunshine Coast community and are seen as key components of our vibrant lifestyle. Whether it is kids playing sport at the local community club or having a weekly hit at the tennis courts, sport and active recreation contribute towards defining who we are.

Sport and active recreation also have significant health, social and economic benefits. The current trend for both adults and children (increasing obesity levels, and for adults of escalating medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes type 2, various cancers and depression) is most concerning – sport and active recreation have an important part to play in reducing the likelihood of these conditions. Being part of a team or club also allows a sense of ‘belonging’, and can be essential for individual and social cohesion, integration and development, especially given the transitory nature of the Sunshine Coast population.

In addition, the economic benefits of sport and active recreation to the Sunshine Coast cannot be underrated. It is estimated that expenditure related to organised sport and aquatic facilities on the Sunshine Coast was $5.27 million in 2010, and the value of volunteer contributions to sport in 2006 was estimated at approximately $56.5 million.

Foreword Message from the Mayor and Corporate Planning and Performance Portfolio Councillor Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 5

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Supporting Resources Volume 2 (Background Research) An extensive review of background documentation was undertaken to inform the study. In addition to the information contained in Supporting Resources Volume 1 (Locality of Interest Summaries), a review of reports and studies is outlined in Supporting Resources Volume 2 (Background Research). Note: Currency of Sports Reserve Data Data used in this report to calculate the current and projected shortfall/surplus of sports reserve land in individual Localities of Interest was supplied by Sunshine Coast Council and was current as at August 2010.

This data is being updated by council at the time of producing this report. About this document This report provides a synopsis of the research and consultation undertaken for this project. More detailed information is contained in the two supporting resource documents. Supporting Resources Volume 1 (Locality of Interest Summaries) Sunshine Coast Council has identified 44 Localities of Interest, each of which is geographically defined, to guide its future planning. The boundaries of these localities are illustrated in Map 1: Sunshine Coast wide, districts and Localities of Interest. As per council’s brief, study recommendations for each individual Locality of Interest were required.

Supporting Resources Volume 1 (Locality of Interest Summaries) provides the background context for framing these recommendations. For each Locality of Interest it contains: 1 snapshot of the locality 2 current and projected population 3 key demographic characteristics 4 current sport and active recreation facilities and services 5 club membership trends 6 facility needs expressed by sport and active recreation clubs 7 existing council plans or other management documents relevant to the locality 8 land area observations for each locality from council’s open space planning work 9 summary of key demands from the consultation process 10 specific actions for the locality.

6 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Study scope The study examined sport and active recreation activities only, defined as those which have formal rules, scoring, event organisation and administration structures. It excluded non-competitive, passive activities; activities already addressed in council’s Difficult-to- Locate Sports Study 2009–2028; activities covered in other recent council strategies; and wholly private sector funded activities. A full description of eligible and excluded activities is shown in Section 3.3: Excluded Activities and Section 3.4: Eligible Activities. Study integration The Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 is an important contributor to the Health and Wellbeing theme of council’s Corporate Plan 2009-2014.

It is one of a number of closely related recent or emerging strategic plans that will assist in ensuring council adequately responds to the broader social, leisure, sport, recreation and physical activity needs of the region. These documents include the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028, Open Space Strategy, Social Infrastructure Strategy, Active Transport Strategy, Aquatic Plan, Skate and BMX Plan, Affordable Living Strategy and Draft Recreation Trail Plan.

The Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 closely aligns with council’s Sunshine Coast Open Space Strategy 2011 which articulates council’s commitment, role and intent in the provision and embellishment of recreation parks and sports reserves across the region. It provides guidance to the open space framework on the provision, development and management of land and infrastructure for sport. The Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011- 2026 was undertaken concurrently with the Sunshine Coast Aquatic Plan 2011-2026 and integrates the recommendations of the Difficult- to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028.

Executive summary Importance of sport and active recreation Participation in sport and physical activity has important health, social and economic benefits. There is proven scientific evidence that active adults have lower rates of disabling medical conditions including coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, type 2 diabetes, colon cancer, breast cancer and depression.1 Physical inactivity accounts for 17 per cent of the total health cost of treating these conditions in Australian adults and is the fourth greatest contributor to the burden of disease in Australia.2 Only about half of Queensland adults (55.9 per cent) are sufficiently active to derive a health benefit.3 There is a positive association between participation in sport and social integration, cohesion and community development.

The value of the volunteer contribution to sport on the Sunshine Coast has been estimated at approximately $56.5 million.4 Purpose of project The main purpose of this study was to develop a robust Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 to guide the current and future provision of facilities and services to meet the needs of the Sunshine Coast’s diverse communities over the next 15 years.

1 US Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report. Washington, DC, June 2008 2 Econtech. The Cost of Physical Inactivity. Medibank Private. 2007 3 Pollard G, et al. 2009 Self-Reported Health Status: Queensland 2009. Queensland Health, Brisbane. 2010 4 See Section 8: Economic Benefits of Sport. Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 7

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

► ► Field sports are struggling with the cost of maintaining facilities (at the same time peak bodies are imposing minimum safety standards for the condition of playing areas).

► ► There is inequity of council support (e.g. maintenance) to clubs, stemming from the different policies that applied under the pre-amalgamated councils.5 Maintenance assistance provided to clubs by council is not based on any hierarchy ranking of the facility (e.g. district/regional/state). ► ► The perception exists among some clubs that those sports based at venues owned and (directly or indirectly) maintained by council (e.g. Maroochydore Multi Sports Complex, Quad Park) get a ‘better deal’. ► ► Peak bodies in some sports (e.g. tennis/AFL) are seeking to upgrade existing facilities to regional or state standard to accommodate higher levels of competitions.

► ► There are growing demands for the use of existing regional sporting facilities such as Quad Park and Nambour Showgrounds for non-sport uses (e.g. markets, exhibitions). ► ► Water access and on-land facilities are major concerns for a number of non-powered water sports. Issues include limited land availability, existing areas being at capacity, lack of support facilities (e.g. storage, toilets, shade), conflicts with other uses, or cost of accessing on-water facilities. Sports affected include sailing, rowing, canoeing, dragon boating, kayaking and outrigger canoeing. ► ► Existing multi-court indoor sporting facilities are already at capacity during peak afternoon/evening usage times (3.30 pm- 10.00 pm).

► ► The study has identified 21 indoor sporting facilities being developed in schools (mostly with Federal Government education sector stimulus funding) but their suitability for community sport is unknown. School facilities frequently have design limitations and are not fully functional for conducting competitions in court sports. 5 A cross-council team is currently reviewing council’s support for not-for-profit groups, including maintenance of playing areas or buildings, remissions of water/sewerage or general rates, tenure arrangements, or community partnership grants. Localities of Interest Sunshine Coast Council has identified 44 Localities of Interest which are intended to guide future planning.

This study has examined future needs for the region as a whole as well as for each individual Locality of Interest. Individual recommendations for each Locality of Interest, in addition to broader strategic recommendations, are contained in this report. Study approach The study methodology illustrated in Figure 2: Study methodology includes a wide ranging review of previous reports and plans, profile of each of council’s 44 Localities of interest, analysis of current and projected population, review of participation trends, inspection of key facilities, consultation with internal and external stakeholders, sporting clubs and a comprehensive community engagement process.

Key findings Key findings from the research and consultation process were as follows: ► ► Stakeholders feel positively about proactive planning for sport by council, the responsiveness of council staff and council funding programs. ► ► Most sports have increased membership significantly over the last three years. Some clubs have declined (e.g. bowls, golf, softball and squash). ► ► The most common trends in participation have been demands for more social, casual and non-competitive forms of participation, increasing demand for junior sport and more demand for evening participation. ► ► Lighting of playing fields, amenities and car parking is considered inadequate by many field and outdoor sports.

► ► Lack of available land and/or poor functionality of land for field sports (usually due to inadequate drainage, flooding, environmental constraints, and poor field condition often from overuse) was a common theme raised by clubs and reinforced by a number of State sporting organisations. ► ► Inadequate access to facilities for people with disabilities was also frequently raised in consultations. 8 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

It will be critically important to secure additional, suitable quality land, in population growth areas throughout the Sunshine Coast over the next 15 years.

This can be achieved via a Plan for Trunk Infrastructure (Parks and Land for Community Purposes) as part of council’s overall Priority Infrastructure Plan, Infrastructure Agreements, other acquisitions, or utilisation of education sector or privately owned sector land. Provision of land and embellishments can be funded by these mechanisms. The acceptance of poor quality land or insufficient land puts pressure on the sustainability of existing resources, and ultimately affects participation. Larger parcels of land (e.g. more than 20 hectares) should be secured where possible to create ‘hubs’ which can provide for several sports, service multiple localities and allow for the growth of individual clubs over time.

In high density, mature urban areas, where land is unavailable or prohibitively expensive, it will be necessary to access land in neighbouring localities. In smaller communities, accessing school ovals may be the most cost effective means of provision.

Better outcomes for sport Council has an important role in facilitating better outcomes for sport. This may take the form of: ► ► supporting clubs to gain better access to school facilities ► ► promoting better planning and governance arrangements within sporting clubs ► ► working with regional and state bodies and facility managers to resolve access constraints which impede participation and growth of sports ► ► facilitating improved communication and coordination among different sports ► ► negotiating with other agencies to minimise adverse impacts on existing facilities and ensuring adequate replacement and compensation of facilities resulting from transport corridor expansions ► ► guiding and supporting clubs through the development application process ► ► enabling greater economic benefit for the region to be generated through sport.

This Plan sets out a number of recommendations which call on council to play a facilitation or advocacy role in achieving better outcomes for sport.

► ► Some clubs are experiencing difficulties accessing school facilities. Major users of schools are cricket, soccer, and to a lesser extent AFL, netball and futsal. The main issues identified are uncertainty of access, maintenance standards, red tape in formalising access arrangements, and difficulty in establishing amenities, lights and storage areas. ► ► Gymnastics facilities on the Sunshine Coast are already at capacity and there is high demand. ► ► There is an opportunity to consolidate the management of current and future regional sporting facilities under a Major Venues Unit of council.

► ► Sport and leisure is identified in the Sunshine Coast Economic Development Strategy as one of eleven industry sectors for which an economic development strategy should be prepared to broaden the region’s economic base. ► ► Household expenditure on organised sport on the Sunshine Coast is estimated at $5.27 million in 2010. The value of the volunteer contribution to sport on the Sunshine Coast is estimated at $56.5 million (see Section 8: Economic benefits of sport). ► ► There is likely to be some medium to long term impact on sporting facilities from future road/rail corridor developments.

Vision and guiding principles Sport and active recreation are key elements of the lifestyle of Sunshine Coast residents. The adoption of a ‘vision’ and ‘guiding principles’ for sport and active recreation that is consistent with council plans and strategies will provide a framework for council’s role and will guide the future planning and management of facilities and opportunities. The Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 sets out a vision and guiding principles that respond to current council planning and research findings. Provision of land for sport At 2006 population levels, the Sunshine Coast had an overall shortfall of land for sport of more than 100 hectares, based on the Desired Standards of Service for sports reserve land contained in council’s Open Space Strategy.

This deficit will clearly increase unless additional land is provided to meet the needs of this rapidly growing region.

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 9

Facility provision and management Over the 15 year life of this Plan, council has a significant role in terms of providing, partnering, supporting or facilitating new or upgraded infrastructure for sport and active recreation and maximising the use and sustainability of these assets. This could comprise new policies which deal with: ► ► the level of support provided to not-for-profit clubs ► ► ensuring support to clubs is equitable and directed toward key priorities ► ► undertaking feasibility studies for new infrastructure to meet existing or future community needs ► ► funding and/or seeking external funding for major infrastructure ► ► seeking partnership opportunities in facility provision ► ► improving the effectiveness of council- managed facilities ► ► supporting key improvements to club managed sporting facilities, especially drainage, lighting, amenities and disability access ► ► advocating for retention of, or improved access to, sport and active recreation facilities owned by other agencies.

This Plan contains recommendations on the type, scale, provision, funding and timing of new infrastructure for sport and active recreation. 10 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 11

1 Vision and guiding principles

1.2 Guiding principles The guiding principles shown in Table 1: Guiding principles for council involvement in sport and active recreation are intended to give effect to council’s ‘vision’ for sport and active recreation and guide the future planning and management of facilities and opportunities. They are consistent with other planning within council and should be used as a reference point for future development. The guiding principles comprise: ► ► economic and environment sustainability ► ► infrastructure provision and club sustainability ► ► accessibility and mobility ► ► urban character and amenity ► ► social equity ► ► community involvement and inclusion.

1.1 Vision for sport and active recreation Sport and active recreation are key elements of the lifestyle of Sunshine Coast residents. A ‘vision’ for sport and active recreation that is consistent with broader strategies of council will provide a framework for council’s role in this area. The following vision is proposed: ‘Through its role in sport and active recreation, Sunshine Coast Council will contribute to the health and well being, social cohesion, and broadening of the economy of the Sunshine Coast.’ It will do this by: ► ► providing or facilitating equitable access to facilities and services ► ► providing pathways ► ► providing or facilitating infrastructure in response to existing needs and/or population growth that is sustainable and consistent with identified local and regional needs ► ► facilitating partnerships with community, government and education sectors ► ► encouraging clubs to be self sufficient ► ► encouraging and/or supporting regional and higher level events, especially those which build on the natural and competitive advantages of the region ► ► ensuring that sport and recreation assets are effectively managed and protected.

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 13

Table 1: Guiding principles for council involvement in sport and active recreation Principle Description Economic and environmental sustainability Maximise the investment in sport and active recreation facilities and services by endeavouring to ensure that they are economically and environmentally sustainable. It will do this by: ► ► adopting policies or guidelines that set out the responsibilities of council and the users of council land ► ► ensuring that the use of existing infrastructure is maximised before developing new facilities ► ► contributing to the development and/or maintenance of sport and active recreation infrastructure on council owned/managed land ► ► avoiding duplication of facilities and ensuring that facilities are provided on the basis of demonstrated need ► ► ensuring that land purchased or acquired for sport represents best value for money (e.g.

expansion of existing areas vs establishing new development) ► ► ensuring that land in new developments that is accepted from developer contributions for sporting purposes is of sufficient scale and functionality to provide community benefit and be efficiently managed, and complies with the Desired Standards of Service set out in council’s Open Space Strategy ► ► pursuing partnerships in the development and operation of sport and recreation facilities (e.g. schools, university, private sector) ► ► encouraging environmentally sustainable design principles such as water harvesting and use of recycled water and treated effluent water for irrigation of sportsfields, under car park storage wells, cogeneration of power, solar capture and power storage, and the use of ‘green’ building technologies, design practices and operations ► ► supporting clubs and organisations via funding programs that are approved by council from time to time, and requiring organisations that it funds to meet specified accountability requirements ► ► supporting clubs and organisations to access external (non-council) funding.

Infrastructure provision and club sustainability Support the provision and sustainability of sport and active recreation facilities/ services by: ► ► ensuring they are based on demonstrated community need (e.g. strategic plans, feasibility studies, master plans) and an assessment of existing supply ► ► paying particular attention to ensuring that high growth areas have adequate land and facilities ► ► ensuring that existing facilities are optimally used in order to maximise its investment in sport and active recreation infrastructure ► ► encouraging multi-use except where it is deemed inappropriate for safety, good management or specific purposes related to individual activities ► ► adopting or amending policies from time to time to most efficiently manage its facilities, playing fields and other active recreation assets ► ► granting such tenure arrangements as it deems appropriate for the efficient use of land provided for sporting purposes ► ► supporting clubs to be sustainable and well managed, and enabling them to focus on the delivery of sporting opportunities.

The safety and security of users will be implicit in the planning, design, development and maintenance of sport and active recreation facilities and open space. Council recognises the principles of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) and will employ them to the extent that competing demands for resources allows. Council will endeavour to support organisations to address risk management plans. 14 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Principle Description Accessibility and mobility Endeavour to maximise the accessibility of sport and active recreation facilities and services throughout the region.

As far as possible, sport and active recreation facilities will: ► ► be provided in areas of need ► ► be located in proximity to residential areas ► ► be able to be accessed by a range of transport modes (e.g. private cars, public transport, cycle/walkways) ► ► ensure that internal mobility within areas/facilities is addressed ► ► take into account the needs of target populations identified by council from time to time ► ► meet the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and Building Certification Authority standards.

Opportunities to expand existing land areas/facilities, where they result in more cost effective provision without unduly compromising access, will be considered. Council will encourage sport and active recreation providers to address the diverse nature of access requirements. Urban character and amenity Sport and active recreation facilities and services are an important contributor to the lifestyle of Sunshine Coast residents and visitors. ► ► Sport and active recreation facility developments will be cognisant of urban character and amenity. Within available budgets, high quality design which is both functional and attractive will be applied to infrastructure development for sport and recreation.

► ► Council will ensure that the location of sport and active recreation facility developments or improvements (e.g. lights, car parks, playing field extensions) do not impact on residential amenity. ► ► Council will ensure that the location or upgrading of sport and active recreation infrastructure avoids, or adequately mitigates, residential amenity impacts and endeavours to preserve intrinsic environmental or scenic values. Social equity In planning and managing sport and active recreation facilities and services: ► ► endeavour to provide opportunities for all residents regardless of age, gender, income, culture or physical ability ► ► encourage sport and active recreation providers throughout the region to adopt policies, practices and programs that encourage and facilitate equity ► ► where the primary use of land is for sport, seek to protect such land from development or its loss to other purposes ► ► where appropriate, endeavour to accommodate other active recreational uses of open space set aside for sporting purposes ► ► where appropriate, take into account the needs of different cultural groups and traditions in land use planning and service delivery.

Community involvement and inclusion Ensure that the principles of community engagement outlined in council policy are adhered to with respect to the planning and delivery of sport and active recreation facilities and services. Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 15

2 Recommendations

The cost of implementing all recommendations in this Plan would be beyond the capacity of council to fund in its own right. To this end, external funding and/or partnerships with other agencies or the private sector should be sought wherever possible.

Recommended actions should be reviewed biannually with a major review every five years. It is to be noted that all recommendations are subject to budget. 2.1 Summary of recommendations Recommendations have been classified into the following categories: ► ► policy development ► ► provision and development of land for sport ► ► management/development of major facilities ► ► council support and communication with sport ► ► school partnerships ► ► non-powered water sports ► ► indoor sport ► ► sport development – other ► ► economic development ► ► external and internal impacts on existing facilities ► ► communication ► ► administration ► ► locality recommendations.

A brief comment summarises the rationale for each recommendation category.

2.2 Timing This study has a 15 year planning horizon. The following time frames have been compiled to guide priorities: Short term Within next 4 years (2011-2015) Medium term Next 5-9 years (2016-2020) Long term Next 10-15 years (2021-2026) Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 17

2.3 Policy development 2.3.1 Vision for sport and active recreation Priority Recommendation 1 Adopt the following ‘vision’ to provide a framework for council’s role in sport and active recreation. ‘Through its role in sport and active recreation, Sunshine Coast Council will contribute to the health and well being, social cohesion, and broadening of the regional economy of the Sunshine Coast.' It will do this by: ► ► providing or facilitating equitable access to facilities and services ► ► providing pathways ► ► providing or facilitating infrastructure in response to existing needs and/or population growth that is sustainable and consistent with identified local and regional needs ► ► facilitating partnerships with community, government and education sectors ► ► encouraging clubs to be self sufficient ► ► encouraging and/or supporting regional and higher level events, especially those which build on the natural and competitive advantages of the region ► ► ensuring that sport and recreation assets are effectively managed and protected.

Short 2.3.2 Guiding principles Priority Recommendation 1 Adopt the guiding principles set out in Section 1.2: Guiding Principles of this Plan to guide the future planning and management of facilities and opportunities and act as a reference point for future development. key elements of the guiding principles are: ► ► economic and environmental sustainability ► ► infrastructure provision and club sustainability ► ► accessibility and mobility ► ► urban character and amenity ► ► social equity ► ► community involvement and inclusion. Short Comment The adoption of a ‘vision’ and guiding principles for future planning and management of land and facilities for sport and active recreation will provide a strategic framework for decision making.

They will assist in aligning planning for sport and active recreation with strategic policy. They will also assist in the development of a future Community Plan by articulating the principles governing council’s involvement in sport and active recreation.

2.3.3 Security of land and assets Priority Recommendation 1 As part of council’s tenure policy, develop guidelines for the security of improvements on council owned and/or managed land. Key elements should include circumstances when caretaker residences are warranted (e.g. whether or not the site is isolated), clear guidelines as to caretaker responsibilities, skills required (e.g. communication), clear articulation of caretaker authority/responsibility, quality, planning provision and aesthetics of on-site housing infrastructure.

Medium Comment Guidelines on caretaker residences will enable council to deal with increasing demand for approval of these facilities on council land.

At present there is no policy governing quality and management of these facilities. 18 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

2.4 Provision and development of land for sport 2.4.1 Secure land to meet population growth Priority Recommendation 1 Integrate the recommendations of this Plan and Open Space Strategy with Structure Plans and the Plan for Trunk Infrastructure (Parks and Land for Community Purposes) as part of council’s overall Priority Infrastructure Plan. Short and ongoing 2 Incorporate all elements that can be recouped from developer contributions in the Plan for Trunk Infrastructure as permited by legislation (refer Open Space Strategy), for example: ► ► land component up to 4.8 hectares per 1000 person (includes recreation land) ► ► development of parks and playing fields ► ► planning and design costs.

Short and ongoing 3 Preparing the Plan for Trunk Infrastructure will need to consider what components will be funded by alternative means (i.e. items limited by legislation such as land above the 4.8 hectares per 1000 person limit or ineligible items) and not included in the calculation of the Infrastructure Charge to be levied on developers, in accordance with council’s Desired Standards of Service for open space.

Short and ongoing 4 Where possible, acquire larger parcels of land (e.g. more than 20 ha) for sports reserves. Ongoing 5 These larger parcels provide operational savings in being able to ‘hub’ facilities, service multiple sports, and provide for club growth over time. (An indicative layout for a sports reserve of more than 20 ha is illustrated in Map 4: Notional layout of 20+ ha sports reserve and description of indicative land areas and chargable components in Table 12: Indicative elements, chargeable components and spatial requirements). Short and ongoing 6 In new residential sub-divisions and structure plans, endeavour to co-locate sports reserves with school ovals where possible in order to maximise available playing areas.

Ensure that co-location of council playing fields with schools does not result in schools opting out of providing playing fields.

Short and ongoing 7 In smaller, isolated population settlements or mature, high density communities where the provision of land may be unwarranted or prohibitively expensive, facilitate access to school land or land in adjoining localities. Short and ongoing 8 Prepare a master plan for all new sporting precinct developments. Short Comment Lack of available land and/or poor functionality of land were frequent themes raised throughout the consultation process for this study, and reinforced by State Sporting Organisations. At 2006 population levels, the Sunshine Coast had an overall shortfall of land for sport of more than 100 ha, based on the Desired Standards of Service for sports reserve land contained in council’s Open Space Strategy.

This deficit will clearly increase unless additional land is provided to meet the needs of this rapidly growing region. It is evident that substantial land parcels will need to be secured via council’s Plan for Trunk Infrastructure (Parks and Land for Community Purposes), or by other means such as Infrastructure Agreements associated with structure plan areas, to service the needs of the current and projected population. A notional projection of the number of new playing fields/facilities potentially required throughout the Sunshine Coast is summarised in Table 9: Notional number of playing areas/facilities and land area required to service additional residents by 2026.

Evidence from numerous studies undertaken for local governments has indicated that the most efficient model of land provision for sport is to develop ‘precincts’ where larger parcels of land (more than 20 ha) can provide for several sports, longer term growth of individual clubs and reduce maintenance. An indicative layout for a sports reserve of more than 20 ha is illustrated in Map 4: Notional layout of 20+ ha sports reserve. In smaller communities, or mature coastal communities where the cost of securing land for sport may be prohibitive, it may be necessary to access school land and/or larger land areas in neighbouring localities.

In new residential areas, co-location of sports reserve land with public or private school ovals will maximise potential usage and increase the functionality of available land. Council may need to support sports clubs in negotiating agreements for the use of school land.

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 19

2.4.2 Adopt adequate standards of service for land Priority Recommendation 1 Adopt the provision standard of 2 hectares per 1000 residents for sports reserve land and other performance criteria for sports reserve land contained in council’s Open Space Strategy (e.g. size, shape, slope, road frontage, flood immunity, freedom from hazards, and proximity to residents). Short 2 Endeavour to ensure that any land acquired by council or obtained via a Plan for Trunk Infrastructure (Parks and Land for Community Purposes) or Infrastructure Agreements complies with the Desired Standards of Service outlined in council’s Open Space Strategy.

Short Comment Suitable quality land for sport will need to be secured in accordance with the Desired Standards of Service developed as part of council’s Open Space Strategy. Council’s proposed supply standard of 2 hectares per 1000 residents for sports reserve land is strongly supported. It reflects an accepted standard across many councils in Queensland, continuation of previous standards of provision which operated in Caloundra and Noosa councils, and is consistent with modelling undertaken.

The total cost of developing and managing inferior land that is cheaper to acquire may exceed the lifecycle cost of more expensive acquisition options (i.e.

due to periodic remediation after flood events). Moreover, the acceptance of poor quality land or securing insufficient land puts pressure on the sustainability of existing resources, and ultimately affects participation in sport. Securing adequate land will be influenced by the availability and cost of land in growth areas (especially in high density, mature urban environments). In these cases it may be necessary to access land in adjoining localities and/or schools where suitable land is unavailable or prohibitively expensive. 2.4.3 Priorities for land Priority Recommendation 1 Secure land for sport in localities as identified in the Open Space Strategy.

Ongoing 2 For land secured or acquired for sport in the future: ► ► utilise sports participation data for the Sunshine Coast to guide preliminary plans for the use and layout of the land (see Section 2.14.2: Gather relevant research data recommendations) ► ► prepare a master plan for each site ► ► invite Expressions of Interest for the use of the land ► ► determine management and tenure arrangements consistent with council policy (currently under review, see Section 2.6.1: Forms of support and protocols). Ongoing 3 If any existing large land areas become underutilised, identify opportunities for rationalisation of clubs in order to generate greater use of the land.

Ongoing 20 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

2.5 Management/development of major facilities 2.5.1 Management arrangements Priority Recommendation 1 Consider the establishment of a Major Venues Unit for higher level facilities (e.g. Nambour Showgrounds, Maroochydore Multi Sports Complex, Noosa Leisure Centre, Caloundra Indoor Stadium, Quad Park). Short 2 Bring any future multi-use indoor facilities recommended in the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 (subject to a feasibility study) under the umbrella of the Major Venues Unit.

Short 3 Consolidate all bookings, asset management and staffing arrangements within the Major Venues Unit.

Short 4 If demand for use of Nambour Showgrounds for major commercial/cultural events such as motor shows/home shows increases, and there are no alternative plans for indoor/ outdoor venues to cater for these activities, consider: ► ► preparing a master plan for the Nambour Showgrounds to maximise its use for show, commercial and cultural activities ► ► securing additional land in the Nambour area to re-establish and develop any displaced sports.

Medium 5 Investigate future management models/tenure arrangements in line with the not-for- profit review being undertaken by council. Medium Comment Major facilities are defined as those which service regional catchments, host high level events, and cater for training and competition for sport. Council directly manages and maintains a number of such facilities (e.g. Maroochydore Multi Sports Complex (MMSC), Nambour Showgrounds, Caloundra Indoor Stadium and Noosa Leisure Centre). Quad Park Precinct is managed by a company established by council. Venues such as Quad Park and Nambour Showgrounds are also frequently used for commercial events (e.g.

home expo, caravan shows, motor shows, circuses).

Development of a Major Venues Unit within council would remove duplication of management services, reduce operating costs, consolidate operational systems, bookings, marketing and asset management and maintenance arrangements. A cross-council team is currently reviewing (among other things) tenure arrangements for not-for-profit groups including sporting clubs (see Section 2.6: Council support and communication with sport). Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 21

2.6 Council support and communication with sport 2.6.1 Forms of support and protocols Priority Recommendation 1 Pending the outcome of council’s review of support to not-for-profit groups (e.g.

maintenance, financial assistance, tenure arrangements, fees and charges), consider a 3-5 year transition toward providing a minimum level of maintenance of playing fields in accordance with a ranking hierarchy in order to deliver equitable support to sporting clubs. The hierarchy ranking of the facility (i.e. state/regional/district) should determine the level of maintenance support provided (e.g. mowing, aerating, lighting, fertilising).

Short 2 Implementation of recommendation (1) above will have budget implications and level of service options will need to be costed. Funding could be addressed by a combination of fees charged to clubs, operational budget allocations, and possibly a special rate levy. Short 3 As an interim measure, council should implement the following support mechanisms via training sessions with a cluster of clubs in different localities or one-on-one meetings: ► ► an immediate and ongoing program of providing specialist advice to clubs on field maintenance in order to maximise the capacity of clubs to adequately maintain their assets ► ► specialist advice to sport and active recreation clubs on energy efficiency in order to decrease energy, water and waste usage ► ► provision of financial and business advice to foster financial autonomy (in association with programs run by the Department of Communities – Sport and Recreation Services).

Short Ongoing Ongoing 4 Support volunteers in the delivery of sport by working in conjunction with Department of Communities – Sport and Recreation Services to develop and promote templates and resources that provide improved guidance and structure for club planning, development, communication and administration functions. Short and ongoing 5 Consider how best to take advantage of recently announced State Government funding (under the Local Sport and Recreation Jobs Plan) which could fund the creation of a Local Sport and Recreation Coordinator to provide advice on governance, marketing, support with grant seeking, and development of collaborative approaches.

Short 6 Support opportunities for sports to exchange information, knowledge and develop shared solutions to emerging issues.

Short and ongoing 7 In order to improve the functionality of existing facilities, apply a higher weighting to requests for council assistance (whether under existing funding programs or other requests for support) to applications which align with council policy and/or address upgrading of drainage, lighting, sustainability initiatives or disability access. Short and ongoing 8 Develop weighting criteria for assessing requests for council support from sporting clubs that is consistent with the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 and ensures that available funds are maximised.

Short and ongoing 9 Develop a communication package for council to inform club office bearers of key council contacts, club responsibilities and council processes. Short 10 In tenure arrangements with sporting groups, seek to achieve a minimum period of separation (2-4 weeks) between summer and winter sporting seasons to enable adequate maintenance of playing fields. Support clubs in making alternative pre-season arrangements at educational or private sector facilities. Ongoing 11 Work with the Australian Sports Commission through the Active After-school Communities Program by providing closer links between clubs and schools and promoting pathways to sport and recreation in existing clubs and organisations.

Ongoing 22 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Comment Maintenance of sporting facilities is a major area of concern for many groups. Many clubs are struggling with the cost of maintaining facilities to an adequate standard, particularly in a climate of declining volunteers. This issue is being exacerbated by the inequity of council support for some clubs but not others, stemming from the different policies that applied under the pre-amalgamated councils. Similarly, different tenure arrangements exist over sporting facilities throughout the Sunshine Coast. Currently maintenance assistance provided by council is not based on any hierarchy ranking of the sports reserve (i.e.

state/regional/district).

Notwithstanding the fees paid by clubs based at council-owned and maintained facilities (e.g. Maroochydore Multi Sports Complex, Quad Park), there is a perception among some clubs that sports based at these venues are getting a ‘better deal’ than clubs that have to maintain their own facilities. Club concerns about maintenance are likely to be exacerbated by rising costs of utilities (water, power) in the future. A cross-council team is currently reviewing council’s support for not-for-profit groups, including maintenance of playing areas or buildings, remissions of water/sewerage or general rates, tenure arrangements, or community partnership grants.

Any changes to current forms of council support may have budget implications.

Insufficient land for community sport, poor quality of land (low lying, frequently inundated resulting in loss of playing time, poorly drained, poor field condition often from overuse) and inadequate access for people with disabilities were frequently raised during the consultation process in community forums, club surveys, community surveys, and focus group discussions. Other concerns were inadequate lighting (there is increasing demand for night time participation) and ancillary facilities such as amenities and car parking. Sports that are most affected by these issues are cricket, rugby league, netball, AFL, rugby union and soccer.

There is a need for the progressive upgrading of sporting facilities, in particular drainage, lighting and amenities to ensure facilities meet safety standards, maximise utilisation or encourage membership. Peak bodies in a number of sports already set minimum safety standards for the condition of playing areas, with volunteer club members having to ensure compliance. The consultation process for this Plan reinforced previous council research showing the problems sporting clubs have in attracting and retaining volunteers, particularly those with the necessary skills to undertake increasing administration requirements and maintain club viability.

While administrative duties assist clubs in planning, attracting funding, reporting to governing bodies, maintaining insurance and incorporation status, they can also draw volunteer time away from the actual delivery of sport. Improved access to resources and templates could support clubs with administrative functions. The suggestion was raised in stakeholder consultation that better coordination between sports could improve their effectiveness (e.g. shared use of maintenance or other equipment, shared solutions to common issues, and exchange of information/knowledge and better coordination of fixtures to avoid seasonal overlaps).

Mechanisms to support improved coordination between sports should be further investigated and any possible solutions need to ensure they do not place further unnecessary resource and reporting demands on clubs.

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 23

2.7 School partnerships 2.7.1 Improving outcomes for community use of schools Priority Recommendation 1 Engage with regional and head office representatives of the Department of Education and Training, private schools, Department of Communities – Sport and Recreation Services, and Parents and Citizens representatives in order to: ► ► discuss barriers to the use of school facilities for community sport ► ► clearly communicate school requirements in respect of community use of school facilities, including key policies and procedures ► ► develop/clarify a Memorandum of Understanding between council and education institutions for access to school ovals and multipurpose halls and vice versa (for use of council land).

Short 2 Liaise with public and private schools in new growth areas to determine sporting facilities that are proposed to be provided, and identify opportunities for community use that are consistent with the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011- 2026. Short 3 As per Section 2.4.1: Secure Land to Meet Population Growth recommendation (8), endeavour to co-locate sports reserves with school ovals where possible in new residential areas in order to maximise available playing spaces. Support the negotiation of club access and maintenance agreements with schools.

Short Comment Draft Action 3 of the recently released Queensland Government Draft Greenspace Strategy (Department of Infrastructure and Planning, March 2010) is to ‘remove arbitrary barriers that limit public access to state-owned land.’ The draft action states that ‘…the government will pilot a program to assess after hours access to playing fields by community organisations….

[and]…. evaluate different access models in a small number of schools.’ The Queensland Government’s ‘Smart Moves’ policy already requires schools to ‘improve access to resources for physical activity’ and ‘increase community access to [school] sport and recreation facilities to benefit the broader community’.

Many schools on the Sunshine Coast are regularly used for community sport. The major users are cricket, soccer, and to a lesser extent AFL, netball and futsal. For many clubs, the use of school facilities is working satisfactorily. However a number of clubs on the Sunshine Coast identified difficulties accessing school facilities – notwithstanding adopted and draft policies aimed at improving after hours access to schools for sport and recreation. These difficulties include: ► ► uncertainty of access especially with changing principals ► ► difficulty securing good working relationships in some cases ► ► maintenance standards (e.g.

cracked synthetic pitches, uneven surfaces) ► ► red tape in establishing Memoranda of Understanding ► ► difficulty in establishing permanent infrastructure (e.g. amenities, lights, storage areas). Council officers should liaise with regional representatives of the Department of Education and Training to resolve difficulties and advocate for improved access to schools generally. In some smaller communities or mature coastal communities, land for community sport may not be available and/or it may be more cost effective to utilise school land. From school survey responses, the majority of schools are satisfied with existing council sporting facilities.

Outdoor playing fields, athletics tracks, indoor sporting facilities and swimming pools were the public facility needs most frequently stated by schools as necessary improvements for the future. 24 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

2.8 Non-powered water sports 2.8.1 Water access and on-land storage Priority Recommendation 1 In consultation with stakeholder groups, prepare an approach to non-powered water sports to address access constraints, potential long term locations, and/or management solutions for improving and expanding on-water access. Consultation should include all stakeholder clubs, council officers, Councillors, Department of Transport and Main Roads (Maritime Safety), DEEDI (Boating and Fisheries), DERM (Marine Parks, Environmental Protection), Mooloolaba Marina, and State Sporting Organisations (Queensland Canoeing, Australian Outrigger Canoe Racing – SE Qld Zone, Rowing Queensland, Queensland Dragon Boat Federation and Queensland Yachting Association).

Short 2 As part of the development of the approach to non-powered water sports outlined in recommendation (1) above: ► ► engage with key stakeholders listed to discuss water access, on-land storage and facilities/amenities for non-powered water sports ► ► consider suitable long term locations for expanded on-land storage and on-water access for Sunshine Coast Rowing Club (currently based at Chambers Island) and Sunshine Coast Kayaking Club (currently based at Eudlo Creek). Co-location of these sports should be considered. Options could include: ● ● Lions Park, Eudlo Creek (while considered a good site for these uses, there are significant recreational values which may outweigh the case for developing significant additional infrastructure at this location) ● ● Muller Park, Bli Bli (master plan currently being prepared) ● ● Currimundi Lake ● ● Lake Kawana (not preferred by rowing due to insufficient training distance and prevailing wind conditions) ● ● Outrigger Park, Mooloolaba (poor road access) ● ● Lake Cootharaba ● ● Other suggestions that may be identified in the non-powered water sports approach.

► ► prepare a master plan for Chaplin Park which includes the feasibility of a storage shed and amenities for outrigger canoes (currently stored on the grassed area approx 150 m west of the existing club building at the end of Mill St) and possibly rowing. If not considered suitable, examine Weyba Creek and Lake MacDonald as possible alternatives. ► ► continue to pursue the former flood model shed land at Minyama for additional water sport land ► ► evaluate the impacts of expanded storage facilities on passive recreation outcomes as part of the master planning process ► ► include in a future master plan for Quad Park the following elements: ● ● toilets at northern end of Lake Kawana ● ● shade structures and landscaping, particularly toward the finish line at Lake Kawana ● ● boat shed on the eastern foreshore of Lake Kawana ● ● additional formal car park areas for major regattas at Lake Kawana ● ● storage areas.

Short Short Short Ongoing Ongoing Medium 3 Support Maroochy Sail Club in undertaking a condition audit of their building on Chambers Island and clarify whether or not expansion of the building footprint on the existing site (or elsewhere on the island) would be permitted. From perusal of the Planning Scheme – S21 Maroochy River Esp – and preliminary advice from council officers, this appears unlikely.

Medium 4 Subject to the outcome of recommendation (3) above, support Maroochy Sailing Club to source funding to redevelop and/or expand their building. Medium Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 25

2.8.1 Water access and on-land storage Priority Recommendation 5 Integrate actions arising out of the approach to non-powered water sports with River Management Plans for Noosa River, Maroochy River (being developed) and Pumicestone Passage (being developed). Short Comment Water access and on-land storage are major issues for a number of water sports including sailing (large and small craft), rowing, canoeing, dragon boating, kayaking and outrigger canoeing.

The Open Space Strategy recommends a Waterways Access Strategy which addresses demand for access and facilities for powered and non-powered water craft (both of which are placing demands on the open space network). Issues include existing areas being at capacity (Chambers Island, Chaplin Park), lack of support facilities such as storage, toilets, shade (Lake Kawana), conflicts with other uses (Eudlo Creek) and cost of access (Mooloolaba Marina). Given the importance of water based activities to the culture of the Sunshine Coast which was recognised in the Councillor ‘vision’ workshop for this study, long term resolution of this issue is important and will require more detailed planning.

Management solutions to some problems may exist, but suitable long term water access will require more detailed investigation. Groups affected include Sunshine Coast Rowing, Sunshine Coast Kayaking, Maroochy Sail Club, Mooloolaba Yacht Club, Mooloolaba Etchells, Noosa Yacht and Rowing Club, Noosa Outriggers, Lake Kawana Kayaking Club, AIS Kayaking.

Water sports frequently stage regional level events at Lake Kawana. These sports sought a number of improvements at Lake Kawana, most commonly toilets, shade, parking and enclosure of the finish tower. 26 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

2.9 Indoor sport 2.9.1 Future indoor court sport provision Priority Recommendation 1 Cater for the needs of indoor court sports as follows: ► ► Undertake a feasibility study to determine the need, viability, site location, facility mix, indicative capital cost, concept plans, financial projections, and management arrangements for the development of a 2-3 court indoor sporting facility to service Coolum – Noosa (including flexible programming space, health and fitness area, and potentially dedicated gymnastics training space outlined in recommendation 7).

This facility would also cater for adjoining localities and accommodate unmet demand at the Noosa Leisure Centre. Potential site location options are: ● ● Coolum Peregian Sports Complex (co-located with relocated netball courts to the south of the existing tennis courts, see Section 2.15: Locality recommendations, locality 7) ● ● Coolum Beach SHS (if so, consider negotiating transfer of land from the school to council ownership with guaranteed access to the school during school hours) ● ● potential new land in Coolum/Peregian (refer Open Space Strategy). Short (Feasibility Study) Medium (Development) 2 Undertake a feasibility study to determine the need for, and viability of, a 2 court indoor sport and recreation facility (including flexible programming space) to service the Beerwah/Glasshouse/Peachester/Mooloolah Valley localities at the Beerwah Sportsgrounds precinct (indoor courts are included in the 2009 Draft Master Plan).

Co-location with the Beerwah Pool in its current location will not be possible, however joint management/programming of pool and future indoor centre would be advantageous.

Medium (Feasibility Study) Long (Development) 3 Undertake a feasibility study to determine site location, facility mix, indicative capital cost, concept plans, financial projections, and management arrangements for the development of a 3 court indoor sporting facility (including flexible programming space, health and fitness area and possible squash facilities) in the Maroochydore/Buderim locality areas. Possible site option could be Maroochydore Multi Sports Complex as per Draft Master Plan. If relocation of the Maroochydore Eagles Basketball Stadium is required due to future DTMR requirement for widening of the Sunshine Coast Motorway, plan for the facility to accommodate that club’s needs and negotiate with the club and DTMR to direct relocation funding towards this facility rather than a stand alone, single court facility elsewhere.

Short (Feasibility Study) Medium to Long (Development) 4 Beyond the life of this study, additional indoor facilities will be required to service the locality 21 (Little Mountain) which incorporates the Caloundra South development (ultimate population understood to be in the order of 65,000). A feasibility study to determine facility requirements would be required. Long 5 Consider the impact of new indoor facility provision in schools funded under the Building Education Revolution in undertaking feasibility studies recommended in (1) to (4) above.

Ongoing Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 27

2.9.1 Future indoor court sport provision Priority 6 In other hinterland areas, seek to address indoor facility needs by facilitating access to existing or proposed new indoor facilities in schools and/or partnerships with schools (both private and public). Ongoing Recommendation 7 Cater for the needs of gymnastics as follows: ► ► facilitate the development of a dedicated gymnastics facility to service the Coolum to Noosa area by either: ● ● incorporating a dedicated gymnastics training space (scaled to service these catchments, i.e. not a regional scale facility) adjacent to the 2-3 court indoor sporting facility outlined in recommendation (1) above OR ● ● supporting Noosa Gymnastics to source and develop a new facility co-located with a private or public high school OR ● ● supporting Noosa Gymnastics to investigate the suitability of any land in the vicinity of Noosa Aquatic Centre.

► ► as part of the precinct planning process on council controlled land located south/ west of the Sunshine Motorway in Maroochydore (refer Open Space Strategy) consider the expansion of Maroochy Beach Gymnastics club as the regional facility for the Sunshine Coast. ● ● support the club to prepare a concept plan and capital cost estimate which addresses building extension, car park upgrade, car park security lighting, expanded office space, additional toilets/change rooms, and larger viewing area ● ● if de-gazettal of the road reserve adjacent to the club’s lease boundary is necessary to accommodate expansion of the building, advocate within council for speedy resolution of this issue on the club’s behalf ● ● support the club to source internal and external funding.

► ► undertake feasibility study to help facilitate the development of a dedicated gymnastics facility to service the needs of the southern end of Sunshine Coast. Potential options are: ● ● Meridan Fields ● ● Reserve 1000 ● ● public or private schools in the Little Mountain locality ● ● Central Park, Caloundra. Short Short Long 8 Support Sunshine Coast Table Tennis to secure a suitable location as a permanent home for the sport.

► ► preferred option is a school with suitable indoor area; or ► ► identify land for development of a dedicated facility by the sport. Options include: ● ● land adjacent to Maroochy Beach Gymnastics (north of creek corridor). Needs to be considered as part of Maroochy South/West precinct planning process (refer Open Space Strategy) ● ● recently closed Peregian Bowls Club ● ● archery club building at Ballinger Park Sporting complex (no longer functioning) or Caloundra South. Medium 9 Squash courts have historically been privately provided but ongoing provision is under threat due to closure of facilities.

Council should consider incorporating squash courts in the feasibility study for an indoor sporting facility at Maroochydore outlined in recommendation (3) or Caloundra South.

Long 28 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

2.9.1 Future indoor court sport provision Priority Comment There are 4 multi-court indoor sports facilities in Sunshine Coast Council local government area – Noosa Leisure Centre (2 courts), Matthew Flinders College (2 courts), University of the Sunshine Coast (3 courts) and Caloundra Indoor Stadium (4 courts) – all of which are at capacity during peak afternoon/evening usage times (3.30 pm-10 pm). Sixteen schools have indoor halls that are available for community sport. Some 21 schools indicated they were planning or constructing indoor sporting facilities of some kind, mostly with Federal Government education sector stimulus funding.

The extent to which these proposed facilities will be suitable for indoor community sport is not known. With the exception of Meridan State College (2 court facility) most of these will be single court halls. While suitable for some competitive activities and training purposes, single court facilities in schools frequently have design limitations; are not fully functional for conducting competitions in court sports (as only limited player numbers can be accommodated in an evening) which increases the burden on volunteers due to the need for competitions to be staged at multiple locations; or lack amenities for socialising.

The location of existing and proposed indoor court facilities, and the indicative catchments of multi-court facilities are illustrated in Map 5: Estimated indicative service catchment of existing indoor multi-court sports facilities as at 2006 and Map 6: Estimated indicative service catchment of existing indoor multi- court sports facilities as at 2026. Taking into account current and projected populations and the notional catchments of existing and proposed multi-court facilities as at 2026, the areas assessed as requiring feasibility studies for new multi-court indoor facilities in the 15 year time frame of this study are Coolum, Maroochydore and Beerwah.

Beyond the study period, high population projections in Caloundra South will warrant further multi-court indoor facility provision in locality 21 (Little Mountain). Gymnastics has the third highest number of registered participants in Queensland for junior female sport. Facilities at Maroochydore and Noosa are at capacity and there is a high demand. Gymnastics Queensland has advised its priority areas for facilities are Noosa, Maroochydore and Caloundra. Sunshine Coast Table Tennis has been unable to obtain additional court hours at the University of the Sunshine Coast and is currently located at Meridan Community College.

The club is seeking a dedicated facility, a view endorsed by the sport’s peak body in Queensland. If trends in squash provision in other parts of the state are followed, there will be pressure on remaining privately owned squash centres to be developed for alternative uses and a likely reduction in remaining court numbers. Squash participation is declining and, in the absence of public provision, the sport may struggle to survive in the long term. Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 29

2.10 Sport development – other 2.10.1 Future sustainability/development of sports Priority Recommendation 1 Through the reseach and consultation process for this study, sustainability or development issues emerged in some sports which have not been dealt with in recommendations elsewhere in this report. These sports are as follows: Bowls ► ► work with regional bowls groups, Bowls Queensland and local bowls clubs in order to develop an amalgamation strategy to improve the long term viability and sustainabilty of clubs on the Sunshine Coast.

Medium 2 Tennis ► ► earmark Caloundra Tennis Association courts at Central Park as the venue for a future Sunshine Coast Regional Tennis Centre (as per Central Park Master Plan).

► ► liaise with Tennis Queensland and Caloundra Tennis Association to identify specific court requirements for those courts identified by Tennis Queensland as having unsuitable ‘fall’ ► ► ensure any remediation action taken on courts 5-8 (identified in the 2009 Sports Fields and Infrastructure Audit as being in unsatisfactory condition) is consistent with future surfacing requirements ► ► support Caloundra Tennis in seeking external funding for the development of a Regional Tennis Centre.

Medium 3 Equestrian ► ► liaise with equestrian clubs, peak bodies for equestrian sport and land agencies such as Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM) to undertake a review of equestrian activities and support the potential need for a long term ‘home’ for equestrian activities involving cross country disciplines on the Sunshine Coast. Long 4 Emerging Sports ► ► support the evolution of emerging or alternative sports which are consistent with the natural advantages of the Sunshine Coast (e.g. beach sports, mountain biking on public or private land).

Ongoing 5 Cycling ► ► ensure that council’s Active Transport Plan and Physical Activity Plan acknowledge the importance of walking/cycling in enabling residents to lead active lives.

Ensure that the planning of future walk/cycle paths incorporates the multiple needs/ motivations of potential users (i.e. transport, recreation, training, physical activity) in future planning. Ongoing 30 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Comment The Sunshine Coast District Men’s Bowls Association has advised that bowls club membership is in decline (3.8 per cent decline in last 3 years to 3372). A number of bowls clubs advised they have static or declining membership. The Sunshine Coast District Men’s Bowls Association has advised that amalgamation of clubs is a necessity to improve viability and facilities, however it is understood that clubs are reluctant. Amalgamation of clubs could ensure the long term sustainability of clubs and possibly free up some areas for other community recreation uses. The sale of freehold land by bowls clubs could be utilised to contribute to the upgrading of facilities at amalgamated clubs.

Of the 28 tennis clubs on the Sunshine Coast, 11 provided information on current and past membership. Overall there had been a 19 per cent increase in membership among these eleven clubs in the last three years to 1244. Eight clubs experienced increased membership in the last three years while three clubs had a decrease.

Tennis Queensland has prepared a Facilities Development Strategy as a blueprint for the development of key regional and sub-regional tennis centres throughout Queensland by 2020. Criteria for the development of a regional tennis centre have been developed by Tennis Queensland (including a minimum of 12 courts of the same playing surface, ideally acrylic, clubhouse/pro shop, car parking, professional management, proximity to major population area and transport routes). An assessment of potential sites by Tennis Queensland identified Mooloolaba Tennis Club as the preferred option for a regional tennis centre mainly due to its central location, proximity to population, accommodation, schools and main road transport routes.

Their assessment of Caloundra Tennis Club was unfavourable due to the need to demolish and rebuild some courts, possible reluctance of club members to change court surfaces, and its location at the southern end of the Sunshine Coast. This study acknowledges the central location of Mooloolaba Tennis Club, however it has no major road frontage access and could be impacted by the Sunshine Coast Motorway expansion. A master plan already developed for Central Park shows Caloundra Tennis courts being extended to 16 courts, a show court and clubhouse extension to two storeys, and car park upgrade.

Notwithstanding the need for replacement or remediation of court surfaces (as identified in the 2009 Sports Fields and Infrastructure Audit) this study recommends Caloundra Tennis Club as the preferred location for a future regional tennis facility. This is based on: ► ► potential transport corridor impact on Mooloolaba Tennis Club and absence of main road frontage ► ► consistency with the master plan for Central Park, Caloundra which accommodates 16 courts plus show court ► ► proximity to future growth corridor ► ► good road access. There is currently no home for equestrian cross country events on the Sunshine Coast.

Cross country events were previously staged by the Sunshine Coast Combined Equestrian Group Inc at the Sunshine Coast Recreational and Educational Park on land which is now leased to the ‘House with no Steps’. These events incorporated a number of jumps which extended into adjoining national parks land which has been seen as an incompatible use.

The importance of the natural advantages of the Sunshine Coast to its economy and lifestyle are acknowledged in council’s Corporate Plan 2009-2014. Sport and active recreation opportunities which are consistent with these natural advantages, including emerging or alternative sports, should be closely monitored. The most recent Exercise, Recreation and Sport Survey (2009) conducted under the auspices of the Australian Sports Commission (see Section 5.3: ERASS surveys) found that the top five activities in the North Coast Region were the same as those for Queensland as a whole, namely walking, aerobics, swimming, cycling and running.

The planning of paths for walking and cycling typically occurs as a separate body of work within local authorities. It is important to acknowledge the important contribution these activities make to residents’ capacity to be physically active and ensure that planning criteria for their development do not focus on transport considerations.

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 31

2.11 Economic development 2.11.1 Economic sport development planning Priority Recommendation 1 Prepare a Sport and Leisure Sector Development Plan which identifies the Sunshine Coast’s competitive advantage, maps associated businesses, leverages off existing events and identifies new event/industry development or research/technology opportunities. Short 2 Consider additional economic investigation and/or research projects on sport and active recreation which further inform council’s knowledge of: ► ► the economic benefits of participation in smaller scale sport and active recreation and community based events ► ► the value of commercial events (e.g.

home show, motor show) held on major sporting facilities (e.g. Quad Park, Nambour Showgrounds) and provide a tool for ongoing economic benefit assessment for future events ► ► the proximity benefits of major sporting events to a range of retail, hospitality and entertainment facilities to ‘unlock’ higher levels of visitor expenditure. Ongoing Comment Encouraging and facilitating increased physical activity through participation in sport and active recreation creates economic and social benefits, as well as reducing health costs and increasing productivity. There is a positive association between sport and social integration, cohesion and community development.

Research into the economic benefits of sport and recreation undertaken to support the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 indicated that: ► ► the value of volunteer contributions to sport on the Sunshine Coast in 2006 is estimated at $56.5 million (see Section 8: Economic benefits of sport) ► ► assuming a physical activity rate for the Sunshine Coast similar to the national average, a ten percent increase in the region’s physical activity rate could generate productivity benefits that would result in an increase in the Sunshine Coast Gross Regional Product of approximately $10.7 million – based on the region’s 2007 Gross Regional Product estimate (see Section 8: Economic benefits of sport) ► ► some research identified in a supporting report for this study has suggested that smaller scale community based events may have the potential to reap a greater rate of return than large scale events that require significant capital investment and involvement from outside organisers.

Sport and leisure is identified in the Sunshine Coast Council’s Economic Development Strategy as one of eleven key industry sectors for development to broaden the region’s economic base. In a similar vein, the 2005 SunROC Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Study recommended the development of a Sports Tourism Strategy.

Different private sector proposals have been put to the Sunshine Coast Council to enhance the marketing and economic development of sport. The Sports Business Task Force has a focus on economic development of the sports industry and is understood to be seeking to create greater leverage from existing events. A sports forum, facilitated by council’s Economic Development Branch, was recently held on the Sunshine Coast. The forum was aimed at collaborative development of the sports industry sector, reducing duplication of effort and making the best use of available resources. 32 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

2.12 External and internal impacts on existing facilities 2.12.1 Potential relocation of clubs Priority Recommendation 1 Where road/rail corridor developments outside council’s control are likely to impact on existing sporting facilities, ensure no net loss of capacity and, where relocation is required, provide good access and redevelopment to an equal or better standard. Ongoing 2 Develop internal protocols to ensure there is no non-essential alienation of sports land for environmental, engineering or transport purposes.

Ongoing 3 As a general principle, council should approve the relocation of sports from their existing playing areas if relocation: ► ► addresses safety or usage constraints ► ► is likely to result in an overall improvement in servicing the needs of sport ► ► will not reduce the capacity of new playing areas to cater for future residents ► ► results in greater efficiencies in the co-location of sports and/or social activities ► ► results in no net loss of playing areas for sport.

Ongoing 4 Where alienation of land is unavoidable, budget to ensure adequate compensation is made to offset the loss of functional land for sport.

Ongoing Comment Some existing sporting facilities could be significantly impacted by external factors under State Government control (e.g. Sunshine Motorway widening impact at Elizabeth Daniels Reserve; motorway alignment impact on Western Fields, Quad Park; railway corridor widening at Woombye, Landsborough and Mooloolah Valley). Most impacts would occur in the medium to long term but provision needs to be made if displacement of sports is likely to result. Council has plans to relocate some field sport clubs from their existing venues to other areas. In some cases it is understood that there are plans to convert existing facilities to other uses.

A number of clubs or peak bodies in field sports have expressed a desire to relocate their activities from their existing location due to either lack of security of tenure, desire for larger playing areas, difficulties with shared use of school facilities, poor facility condition, or to simply re-establish closer to new growth areas. Given the existing and projected shortfall in sports reserve land on the Sunshine Coast, the implications of club relocations are twofold: ► ► Land provided to accommodate community sport needs in growing population areas will quickly come under capacity pressures if it is merely catering for existing demands transferred from elsewhere.

► ► If existing land is converted to alternative non-sport uses after clubs are relocated, it will result in a loss of playing areas and further exacerbate the shortfall in available sports reserve land. Non-essential relocation of clubs diverts limited budgets from addressing demand in new areas or areas where facilities are already at capacity. Criteria for considering relocation of clubs will minimise adverse impacts on future provision for sport.

Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 33

2.13 Internal communication 2.13.1 Internal protocols Priority Recommendation 1 Establish internal comunication protocols to ensure that the actions of council branches/ departments are consistent with the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026. Ongoing 2 Decision making on issues such as the master planning of land, development and allocation of land, land tenure arrangements, traffic planning impacts on land used for sport, and maintenance of sports reserves should be addressed via this protocol.

Ongoing Comment A number of internal departments and branches are involved in providing services to sporting clubs. Their functions include land and facility planning, land procurement, facility development and management, property management, financial assistance, sports administration and maintenance. A cross-council team is currently reviewing council’s support for not-for-profit groups, including sporting clubs. Cross-council teams and other internal protocols will ensure that the actions of individual departments/ branches are consistent with the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026, maximise the use of land and facilities, and direct financial assistance and budget outlays where they are most needed.

34 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

2.14 Implementation and administration 2.14.1 Prioritisation criteria for capital works Priority Recommendation 1 Consider the criteria in Appendix 1: Prioritisation Criteria for Capital Recommendations to prioritise the ranking of recommendations in this Plan, in particular those with budget implications. Short 2 Consider the criteria in Appendix 1: Prioritisation Criteria for Capital Recommendations as the basis for prioritising future capital works requests that emerge outside of this Plan or which are driven by other studies.

Ongoing 2.14.2 Gather relevant research data Priority Recommendation 1 In order to accurately measure junior and senior participation rates in sport and active recreation on the Sunshine Coast, develop a statistically reliable survey instrument which can be used to monitor trends over time. Ongoing 2 Liaise with the Department of Communities – Sport and Recreation Services to enlist their support in undertaking the survey in recommendation (1) above. Ongoing 3 Undertake the survey every two years. Ongoing 2.14.3 Monitor the Plan Priority Recommendation 1 Review the recommendations of the Sunshine Coast Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 biannually.

Ongoing 2 Conduct a major review of the Plan, including public consultation, in years five and ten. Medium Comment To maximise the effectiveness of the Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026, it should be reviewed regularly to adapt to changing circumstances. Participation data, whether organised or informal, in sport and active recreation pursuits conducted on the Sunshine Coast is currently not available. An annual survey of participation in exercise, recreation and sport is conducted under the auspices of the Australian Sports Commission and State and Territory governments.

A survey sample size capable of providing accurate participation data for the Sunshine Coast for all sport and active recreation activities will support future planning. Accurate participation data for the Sunshine Coast will assist in informing the first level of planning for the layout of sports fields as new land is acquired for sport over the next 15 years. Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 35

2.15 Locality recommendations Specific recommendations for each of council’s 44 Localities of Interest, in addition to the recommendations outlined in Section 2.3: Policy Development to Section 2.14: Implementation and Administration, are described below. Locality 1 (Beerwah) Priority Recommendation 1 Review, adopt and progressively implement the Beerwah Sportsground Master Plan. Subject to the outcome of the Beerwah Aquatic Centre feasibility study, and the indoor sporting facility feasibility study outlined in Section 2.9.1: Future Indoor Court Sport Provision recommendation (2).

Medium 2 Consider a partnership with Beerwah State High School in implementing the master plan.

Medium Locality 2 (Belli Park – Cooloolabin – Gheerulla – Coolabine) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand and facilitate access to local schools for community sport. Ongoing 2 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► seek a commitment from DERM to retain the Gheerulla Trail Bike area over the long term and promote the venue to trail bike riders through trail bike retailers and clubs through the development of an education and awareness campaign ► ► protect the existing use of Cooloolabin Shooting Venue (Lot 15 RP224776) through the Sunshine Coast Planning Scheme 2011 ► ► recommend the State establish a second venue similar to the Gheerulla Trail Bike riding area within the Sunshine Coast.

Consider expanding opportunities for both licensed and unlicensed trail bike riders ► ► support the preparation of a club development/master plan which considers the future management and development of Cooloolabin Shooting Venue for pistol/small bore rifle disciplines.

Ongoing Locality 3 (Black Mountain – Ridgewood) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality. Ongoing Locality 4 (Bli Bli – Rosemount and district) Priority Recommendation 1 Invite Expressions of Interest to determine the best use for playing fields being developed at Parklakes Estate. Short 2 Ensure that, if any other club is relocated to Parklakes Estate, the land vacated by that club is retained for sporting purposes. Short 3 Investigate opportunities to build on McMartins Field to a district facility to address shortfall and demand from outside this locality.

Short 36 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Locality 5 (Buderim – Kuluin – Mons – Kunda Park) Priority Recommendation 1 As part of the precinct planning process on council controlled land located south/west of the Sunshine Motorway in Maroochydore (refer Open Space Strategy), consider the future of the Maroochydore Junior Rugby League Club premises at Wises Rd, Maroochydore. Short 2 Liaise with stakeholder clubs and undertake a master plan for Elizabeth Daniels Reserve, incorporating the following elements: ► ► development of an additional cricket oval ► ► upgrading of facilities on the main cricket oval (spectator seating, sightscreen) in keeping with the venue’s regional status ► ► upgrade signage from the Sunshine Motorway.

Short 3 Liaise with stakeholder clubs and prepare a master plan for Ballinger Park Sports Complex.

Short 4 Recognise Martins Creek Sports Complex as the regional headquarters for Federation Soccer on the Sunshine Coast. Extend playing fields to the west as demand warrants. Medium Locality 6 (Caloundra – Kings Beach – Moffat Beach – Shelly Beach) Priority Recommendation 1 Review the Central Park Master Plan and ensure ongoing use for sport and active recreation is preserved. Short 2 Investigate the potential of the former sewerage treatment plant land. Consider future mixed use and/or sporting use.

Medium Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 37

Locality 7 (Coolum Beach – Mount Coolum – Yaroomba – Point Arkwright) Priority Recommendation 1 Prepare a master plan for the Coolum Peregian Sports Complex which incorporates the following: ► ► relocation of netball to undeveloped land south of tennis courts and east of creek ► ► expansion of netball courts to 10 ► ► expansion of tennis courts into eastern end of former netball courts ► ► potential indoor sporting facility (see Section 2.9.1: Future indoor court sport provision recommendation (1) at this locality or surrounding locality) ► ► upgraded lighting of playing fields ► ► upgraded drainage to playing fields ► ► review adequacy of club house provision ► ► expanded car parking including conversion of western end of existing netball courts to car parking after club is relocated ► ► improved vehicular and pedestrian access with particular emphasis on safety ► ► active play space.

Short 2 Support Coolum Beach Junior AFC in negotiations with Coolum Beach State High School to develop club/change rooms and lights on the school oval and in seeking external funding.

Short 3 If unsuccessful, support the relocation of the club to potential new land (refer Open Space Strategy). Medium 4 If Coolum Touch is required to vacate its premises on DERM land, support the club to relocate to potential new land (refer Open Space Strategy). Medium 5 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations. Long 6 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► commence discussions with the Minister of DIP to secure long term tenure over the current Motocross Venue at Quanda Road, Coolum and seek the commitment to retain venue ► ► protect the existing use of Quanda Road Coolum Motocross Venue (Lot 110, SP 104283) through the Sunshine Coast Planning Scheme 2011 ► ► prepare master plan/business plan to ensure the most effective use and noise reduction measures are planned for and progressed for this site ► ► commence discussions with the Minister of DIP to secure long term tenure over the current lot for the Model Aero Club and resolve proximity to future buildings, infrastructure and current hydrology issues relating to adjacent development ► ► protect the existing use of Quanda Road Coolum Model Aero Venue (Lot 110, SP 104283) through the Sunshine Coast Planning Scheme 2011; refer to Difficult- to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028, Appendix H – Site Protection Advice for land planning objectives.

Ongoing Locality 8 (Cooran – Federal) Priority Recommendation 1 Support Cooroora Netball Club to resolve conflicts between the netball court and adjacent skate park. Short Locality 9 (Cooroibah – Ringtail Creek) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality. Medium 38 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Locality 10 (Cooroy) Priority Recommendation Based on the Desired Standards of Service in council’s Open Space Strategy there appears to be adequate sports reserve land in Cooroy and Pomona to service the localities of Cooroy, Black Mountain, Lake MacDonald and Pomona to 2026.

However, Cooroy Sporting Complex is already at capacity (especially for rugby league and soccer) as this complex also services residents in localities closer to the coast (e.g. Noosa) and the wider hinterland. A master plan has been prepared for the Cooroy Sporting Complex to increase the capacity of this facility, and while adjacent land has been acquired to cope with demands it is likely that capacity issues will continue to exist. Therefore consider the following: 1 Ensure the most effective utilisation of land at Cooroy Sporting Complex by considering a possible relocation of existing club(s) to alternative land identified elsewhere in this Plan (e.g.

Weyba Downs).

Short 2 Progressively implement other elements of the Cooroy District Sports Complex Master Plan. Short and ongoing 3 Give high priority to the development of playing fields and car parking for junior rugby league due to loss of future playing area to roadworks (see Section 2.12.1: Potential Relocation of Clubs recommendation 3). Short Locality 11 (Currimundi – Aroona – Battery Hill – Dicky Beach) Priority Recommendation 1 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations.

Ongoing Locality 12 (Doonan – Weyba Downs – Verrierdale) Priority Recommendation 1 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations.

Medium Locality 13 (Eumundi – Eewah Vale – North Arm – Bridges) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor utilisation of Eumundi Showgrounds and Eumundi State School. If demand warrants, secure additional land for active sport. Long 2 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► negotiate with the Davison Range Shooting Complex land owners (Including Lot 3 RP 221279, Lot 2 RP135437 and Lot 1 RP193778) about future protection and tenure arrangements which support the continuation of the Davison Range Shooting Complex long term ► ► protect the existing use of Davison Range Shooting Complex through the Sunshine Coast Planning Scheme 2011 ► ► support the club’s utilising this site to prepare a master plan/business plan to ensure the most effective use of the site.

Ongoing Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 39

Locality 14 (Glasshouse Mountains – Beerburrum – Coochin Creek – Bribie Island North) Priority Recommendation 1 Update the Glasshouse Sports Ground Master Plan including sports reserve land recently provided through developer contributions. Medium 2 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► commence discussions with the State Minister for Infrastructure and Planning to secure (150 ha) State land for a Driver and Rider Education and Training Precinct within Beerburrum East State Forest.

Ongoing Locality 15 (Golden Beach) Priority Recommendation 1 Undertake a master plan to determine how best to accommodate an additional four outdoor netball courts adjacent to Caloundra Indoor Stadium. The aim of the master plan should be to accommodate expanded outdoor courts and resolve car parking issues without impacting on the functionality of the adjacent AFL playing field. Short Locality 16 (Ilkley – Eudlo and district) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality. Ongoing Locality 17 (Kin Kin – Cootharaba and district) Priority Recommendation 1 Continue to manage and maintain the sports reserve/open space at Kin Kin and Boreen Point, while no tenure is held over these areas.

Ongoing 2 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► implement protection mechanisms through the Noosa North Shore Landing Ground Reserve Management Plan to ensure current recreational uses (including Model Aero Flying) are identified and protected ► ► protect the existing use of Noosa North Shore Landing Ground Reserve (Lot 7 MCH4562) through the Sunshine Coast Planning Scheme 2011. Ongoing Locality 18 (Kureelpa – Kiamba) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality. Ongoing Locality 19 (Lake Macdonald – Tinbeerwah – Cooroy Mountain) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality.

Ongoing 2 Examine potential for Lake McDonald to cater for non-powered water sports (see Section 2.8.1: Water Access and On-Land Storage recommendations). Short 40 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Locality 20 (Landsborough – Mount Mellum) Priority Recommendation 1 Advocate for ongoing access to and upgrade of trails on SEQ Water land, Ewen Maddock Dam for mountain biking, horse riding and walking, as per Draft Recreation Trail Plan. Ongoing 2 Advocate for ongoing on-water activities at Ewen Maddock Dam (e.g. kayaking, canoeing). Ongoing 3 Progressively implement the Landsborough Sports Reserve Master Plan. Medium Locality 21 (Little Mountain – Caloundra West – Meridan Plains – Bells Creek) Priority Recommendation 1 Progressively implement the Meridan Fields Master Plan. If the recommended expansion of outdoor netball courts at Caloundra Indoor Stadium proceeds (see Section 2.15: Locality Recommendations, locality 15) amend the existing master plan for Meridan Fields to delete provision for netball courts.

Short 2 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations.

Ongoing 3 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► investigate, promote and positively influence the final configuration of extractive sites within the Meridan Extractive Resource area so that once they are discontinued they are left as freshwater lakes, transferred to council and made suitable for use as powered water sport activity areas. (This could also include other water sport opportunities.) ► ► that any water sport site deemed suitable, and is enabled as an active water sports venue, be protected by planning scheme instruments from any future conflicting encroachment or uses.

Ongoing Locality 22 (Maleny – Witta – North Maleny) Priority Recommendation 1 Develop two senior fields at the Maleny Sports Precinct to cater for the relocation of Maleny Football Club from the Showgrounds. It is understood playing field dimensions in the 2010 Community Precinct Master Plan – Sport and Recreation Sub Precinct have allowed for possible future shared use by other sports (e.g. touch). Medium 2 When demand warrants the relocation of Maleny Football Club to the Maleny Sports Precinct (see recommendation (1) above), master plan the Maleny Showgrounds to rationalise current usage.

Medium 3 In order to maximise council’s recent investment in improvements at Witta Recreation Reserve (drainage, lighting, undergrounding of power lines) monitor the capacity of this venue to cater for the future needs of touch and rugby union.

Ongoing 4 If future demands exceed the capacity of Witta Recreation Reserve, evaluate the cost effectiveness of acquiring adjoining land to expand this facility as opposed to further development of the Maleny Sports Precinct. Ongoing 5 Liaise with Maleny Netball Club and Maleny State High School to access the suitability and accessibility of the school’s existing hard courts and indoor facility for community use by netball/basketball participants.

Short Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 41

Locality 23 (Mapleton – Flaxton – Obi Obi) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality and neighbouring Kureelpa (locality 18). If existing Mapleton Sports Reserve and Mapleton State School oval are not meeting demand, acquire additional land for sport consistent with the Desired Standards of Service in council’s Open Space Strategy. Medium Locality 24 (Marcoola – Twin Waters – Pacific Paradise – Mudjimba) Priority Recommendation 1 Review options to increase the capacity of North Shore Multi Sports Complex.

Medium 2 Negotiate with Pacific Paradise State School for access to the school’s oval by North Shore Football Club (based at Nojoor Rd) for training purposes.

Short Locality 25 (Maroochydore) Priority Recommendation 1 Finalise and progressively implement the Maroochydore Multi Sports Precinct Master Plan. Short and ongoing 2 Prepare a master plan for Cotton Tree Park which addresses site integration and investigates opportunities for expanding support amenities for rugby union. Short Locality 26 (Mooloolaba – Alexandra Headland) Priority Recommendation 1 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations. Ongoing Locality 27 (Mooloolah Valley – Diamond Valley – Balmoral Ridge – Bald Knob) Priority Recommendation 1 Review tenure arrangements of the land located at Mooloolah Valley Country Club in accordance with the outcome of the review of support for not-for-profit clubs.

Short 2 Review the 2001 Master Plan and address: ► ► drainage (high priority) ► ► lighting (softball and soccer) ► ► amenity requirements ► ► possible shared use by cricket in summer ► ► potential for expansion of playing fields into adjoining land. Short 3 Implement the new Master Plan in recommendation (2) above. Long 4 Advocate to SEQ Water for the protection of access and usage of Ewen Maddock Dam and surrounding areas for active outdoor recreation pursuits (e.g. horse riding, cycling, walking, recreational and competitive canoeing and kayaking).

Ongoing Locality 28 (Mountain Creek) Priority Recommendation 1 Determine how best to utilise the proposed sports reserve land shortly to be provided from developer contributions. Seek opportunities to secure additional land in this locality over time. Short 42 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Locality 29 (Nambour – Burnside and district) Priority Recommendation 1 Encourage greater use of the sports field adjacent to Nambour PCYC, possibly for junior AFL, little athletics or cricket. Medium 2 Liaise with DERM to support efforts to involve stakeholders in upgrading and developing mountain bike trails in Parklands Conservation Park; and identify and develop safe linkages to Parklands State Forest from Nambour.

Ongoing Locality 30 (Noosa Heads) Priority Recommendation 1 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations.

Ongoing Locality 31 (Noosaville) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality. Ongoing Locality 32 (Palmwoods – Chevallum – Montville – Hunchy) Priority Recommendation 1 Make available the under-utilised ovals adjacent to Palmwoods Swimming Pool for junior AFL. Short Locality 33 (Peachester – Crohamhurst – Booroobin – Wootha) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality and review the Peachester Sports Ground Master Plan if and when demand warrants.

Long Locality 34 (Pelican Waters) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor demand in this locality. Ongoing Locality 35 (Peregian Beach) Priority Recommendation 1 Investigate the feasibility of purchasing or leasing the freehold land at Peregian Bowls Club (ceased operation) for the purpose of outdoor and indoor sport and active recreation activities (e.g.

table tennis, bridge, bowls) subject to cost effectiveness compared to other site options for these activities (see Section 2.9.1: Future Indoor Court Sport Provision recommendations).

Short Locality 36 (Peregian Springs) Priority Recommendation 1 Invite Expressions of Interest to determine the best use for playing fields being developed at Peregian Springs. Short 2 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations. Medium Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 43

Locality 37 (Pomona – Pinbarren) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor utilisation of Cooroy District Sports Complex and sports fields in Pomona. If at capacity, review the need to acquire additional land to meet needs of Pomona residents.

Long 2 Liaise with Noosa Show Society to access the need for a master plan at Noosa Showgrounds. Medium Locality 38 (Reesville – Conondale – Kenilworth) Priority Recommendation 1 Monitor sport and active recreation demands in this locality. Ongoing 2 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► protect the existing use of Green Park (Lots 264 M371054 and 243 MCH969) as a Motorcycle (off road) Precinct through the Sunshine Coast Planning Scheme 2011 ► ► prepare master plan/business plan for the future management and development of Green Park, Conondale as a state level facility for motocross, trail bike riding, trials and enduro disciplines.

Ongoing Locality 39 (Sippy Downs – Palmview) Priority Recommendation 1 Through the MOU with the University of the Sunshine Coast, advocate for the upgrade of its facilities and amenities to better provide for community sport and active recreation. Priorities are: ► ► upgrading and outfitting of canteen facility to ensure compliance with health standards ► ► provision of shade – over grandstand on athletics track, and around perimeter of track ► ► lighting of additional oval to increase the capacity of existing fields and reduce pressure on the main field.

Short 2 Endeavour to secure additional sports reserve land as per Open Space Strategy recommendations.

Ongoing 3 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► seek a commitment from the University of the Sunshine Coast to permit and retain the model boats over the long term. Ongoing Locality 40 (Sunrise Beach – Sunshine Beach – Marcus Beach – Castaways Beach) Priority Recommendation 1 Develop the playing fields for soccer, little athletics and a regional level criterion circuit at Girraween Sporting Complex.

Short 2 Support Noosa Rugby Union to access an additional field within reasonable proximity of its club to cater for future growth. Options are: ► ► local schools ► ► examine potential to create additional training area adjacent to Bicentennial Hall. Medium 44 Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026

Locality 41 (Tewantin) Priority Recommendation 1 Adopt and progressively implement the Noosa District Sports Complex Master Plan. Ongoing 2 Progressively implement the recommendations of the Difficult-to-Locate Sports Study 2009–2028 relevant to this locality: ► ► seek a commitment from DERM to permit, retain and possibly expand the Noosa Hill Climb over the long term.

Ongoing Locality 42 (Woombye) Priority Recommendation 1 Prepare a master plan for Victory Park which addresses possible loss of playing areas when the rail corridor expansion progresses and identify opportunities for other sports. Medium 2 Further investigate the possible displacement of the Pony and Soccer Clubs from the sports reserve near town when the rail corridor expansion progresses. If displacement is likely to occur seek suitable alternative land as compensation. Medium Locality 43 (Wurtulla – Buddina and district) Priority Recommendation 1 Undertake improvements at Quad Park as per Section 2.8.1: Water Access and On- Land Storage recommendation (2).

Medium 2 Continue to investigate opportunities to acquire additional land within this locality to compensate the loss of land from the MMTC and constraints on vegetation. Short Locality 44 (Yandina – Yandina Creek and district) Priority Recommendation 1 Prepare a master plan for Yandina Sports Complex. Medium Sunshine Coast Sport and Active Recreation Plan 2011-2026 45

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