The Learning School Project 2 - Kinsale Community School 2010/2011

The Learning School Project 2 - Kinsale Community School 2010/2011

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Section 1: Context of the School Kinsale Community School officially opened on August 1st 1996, following the amalgamation of Our Lady of the Rosary Secondary School and Kinsale Vocational School. The school is a rural co educational post primary community school offering both established Leaving Certificate and Junior Certificate programmes as well as Leaving Certificate Applied and the Leaving Certificate Vocational Programme. The school also offers FETAC certification courses and a variety of evening courses. The school accepts pupils of all academic abilities from all backgrounds.

Since its foundation Kinsale Community School has continued to grow and currently has a pupil population of 754 and approximately 72 staff members. For the academic year 2010/2011 Kinsale Community School has taken on 16 student teachers that are participating in Postgraduate Diploma in Education courses, in a variety of third level institutions nationwide. The school hosts student teachers of a variety of subjects from the Post Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) at NUI Cork and the Bachelor of Education (B.Ed) in Sports Studies and Physical Education also at NUI Cork, as well as students from the Higher Diploma in Arts for Art and Design Teachers at the CIT Crawford College of Art and Design, Cork.

Student teachers participating in the Bachelor of Sciences (B.Sc) in Physical Education and Sports Sciences at the University of Limerick and student teachers studying for the B.A in Education at St. Patrick’s College, Thurles are also training at Kinsale Community School. These student teachers engage in block release and do not do their teaching practice on a year long basis.

Student teachers are introduced to their parallel teacher at the start of the school year. Each student teacher is allocated a small portion of the teaching hours of their parallel teacher, with whom they are required to liaise. The parallel teacher is encouraged to keep in contact with the student teacher throughout the school year and to give advice where appropriate. The parallel teacher is asked to notify the Deputy Principal of any issue that concerns the performance of the student teacher. Kinsale Community School has 21 parallel teachers working with PGDE students this year. Page 1 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Section 2: Rationale The Kinsale Community School Learning School Project has committed itself to mentoring and monitoring its PGDE students and assisting with their integration in the school. In recent years the number of PGDE students in Kinsale Community School has increased. It was felt that a more structured induction of PGDE students would enhance the learning experience of pupils and ensure that the prescribed work would be taught well and within the given time frame. This need was identified by staff and management.

This provided an impetus for participation in the Learning School Project 2.

In order to ensure consistency in learning among pupils and to minimise disruption caused by new and inexperienced teachers, methods of communication between parallel teachers and PGDE students needed to be addressed and enhanced. At the same time the school was mindful of the needs of PGDE students, and strove to allow them to benefit from a positive experience of teaching which in turn would improve the quality of learning in the classroom and maintain high standards of teaching and learning. In partaking in the Learning School Project 2, Kinsale Community School’s aim is to develop an effective induction programme for PGDE students and to define within this programme the role of the parallel teacher and the student teacher.

The creation of links between PGDE students, their parallel teacher and the whole staff body of the school is of ongoing paramount importance to the project.

In order for the project to succeed the input and commitment of the PGDE students, parallel teachers and whole staff body was required. Initially the project focused on selecting a team comprising five parallel teachers and their respective student teachers. The team was selected with the aim of ensuring that a cross section of subjects, experiences and third level institutions were represented. Objectives of project team This work was undertaken by Jean Gaffney (Teacher and School Planning Co-ordinator) and Joanne Scobie (Teacher) who were approached by Mr. Seán Ó’Broin, Principal, and took responsibility for the initiation, implementation and evaluation of the project.

The project was extended to a school based team made up of parallel teachers that had shown a particular interest in this project and their PGDE students.

The role of team members was to implement the project by attending meetings, liaising with PGDE students, completing questionnaires and sharing experiences and clarifying roles. The role of management was to facilitate the implementation of the project and to support the team. Results of this project will be used by management to create a template for prospective student teachers and parallel teachers in the future. Page 2 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Methodology Between September 2010 and May 2011, an LSP2 meeting was held every Friday morning to discuss issues and monitor progress.

The team leaders also attended six LSP2 meetings at the West Cork Education Centre1 , Dunmanway, and three additional meetings were held at Kinsale Community School with LSP2 regional facilitators. The team’s initial action was to identify the concerns and expectations that PGDE students and parallel teachers had by virtue of their position. In consultation with management two surveys were designed, completed and collated. The results of this research formed the basis of the rest of the project (Appendices A and B) This was followed by a series of meetings with the PGDE students and parallel teachers, in order to air concerns, put forward suggestions and give feed back on surveys.

(Appendix C) Concerns that required action were addressed in the following ways. Drafting of a letter template (Appendix V) for use by PGDE students for the purpose of micro –teaching2 . This was to ensure continuity in communication with parents. This made PGDE students aware of and ensured the compliance with child protection policies. The possibility of class teachers distributing letters on behalf of the PGDE student was raised in order to avoid discrepancies.

Practical advice was provided in relation to locating and using data projectors and a school camcorder and other school equipment. A two hour behaviour management3 workshop was organised and attended by all full time PGDE students and a questionnaire completed (Appendix D). To assist in the identification of staff and PGDE students and enhance relations the idea of using reference photographs was mooted by the team and approved by management. The limitations of space in an overcrowded building required the provision for immediate booking of office space for unannounced inspection visits from PGDE course tutors.

A room booking template was designed and a procedure for booking a room was put in place.

Following this a meeting was held between the Team Leaders and the parallel teachers. Ways to improve communication between parallel teachers and PGDE students were explored. A PGDE student/ Parallel Teacher Liaison Form was designed and distributed accordingly 1 The West Cork Education Centre is part of a national network of teacher education support centres. whose aim is a to promote the continuing professional development of teachers 2 Micro teaching involves video recording of actual lessons in order to give feedback to the student teacher about effective strategies in the classroom.

3 The workshop was organised by The Provisional Development Services for Teachers, a state funded body set up to provide support to education programmes.

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The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 (Appendix E) This method of communication was piloted and feedback was acquired via survey, and then revised accordingly (Appendix F). It was unanimously agreed that such a procedure should be implemented in future to ensure formalised documentation of such communications. A number of meetings with the team were held to explore the roles of the PGDE student and the parallel teachers. Results of surveys, the induction policy at Kinsale Community School and teacher and management input were considered. These would be seen as a crucial element of the new induction policy for PGDE students.

The suggested roles were provisional and not exhaustive and would therefore be reviewed and revised as appropriate throughout the course of the rest of the project.

In order to gain an insight into the development of PGDE students over the year a final survey was issued to PGDE students (Appendix H). The questions asked were to ascertain if their perspectives had changed or altered based on experiences in Kinsale Community School throughout the year. A comparative study was made between this survey and the survey issued in October 2010 which had posed similar questions (Appendix S). Concrete roles were defined and the induction policy for PGDE students was reviewed (Appendix W) and amended in light of the Learning School Project. A series of guidelines to accompany these roles were drawn up (Appendix T & U).

A detailed action plan for the project can be found in Appendix H. A podcast outlining a brief introduction to the project is available. Resources A number of resources were key to the implementation of the project, first and foremost the participation of the PGDE students and their parallel teachers. This ensured that the project was relevant to the particular school and its own staff and pupils. Management was a vital resource in providing support and allocating time to see the project through. The West Cork Education Centre in Dunmanway facilitated six LSP2 meetings for participants of the Learning School Project.

At these meetings, LSP2 team leaders from a number of other West Cork Schools were given the opportunity to share their experiences of their respective projects. These meetings were useful to allow the team to reflect on current activities and to seek advice and feedback on how to move forward. The Learning School hubs also provided the team with the necessary framework on which to structure the project, as well as providing practical advice.

The Provisional Development Services for Teachers facilitated a behaviour management workshop for the PGDE students at Kinsale Community School. This workshop was organised to address concerns of PGDE students about how to manage pupil behaviour. The workshop lasted for two hours and offered practical advice on common problems encountered by student teachers in the classroom. The evaluation of the efficacy of the workshop (Appendix L) reaffirmed the need for a structured induction programme for PGDE students and informed the next stages of the project.

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The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 The project has been informed by literature on mentoring programmes in other countries such as the UK and in particular the system of induction followed in German schools.

Publications by the Department of Education and Skills were also consulted, in particular the Department of Education and Skills Child Protection Policy and Procedures, and the Learning to Teach Study Executive Summary by the School of Education, University College Cork.

Policy documents specific to Kinsale Community School such as the Induction Policy for PGDE students and the Staff Handbook were also referred to. Data Collection Data was collected through the design, issue and collation of a number of surveys that were specific to each stage of the project. In order to provide meaningful and current data the surveys were designed to be relevant and as concise as possible. Each survey was handed out to participants individually and its purpose explained to participants. Four of the surveys were designed and issued by the team, while an evaluation survey was collated following the behaviour management workshop facilitated by Provisional Development Services for Teachers (Appendix L).

Two of the four surveys contained qualitative data only and these were instrumental in shaping the project (Appendices J & M). Participants gave responses that were very much based on their own personal experiences and provided an invaluable insight into the roles and responsibilities of both student teachers and parallel teachers at Kinsale Community School. The remaining two surveys provided a mixture of qualitative and quantitative data. While the qualitative data provided a context within which PDGE students and their parallel teachers were working, the quantitative data acted as indicators which would steer the project (Appendices K & M).

All data collected confirmed and reaffirmed the importance and necessity of the project. Results All surveys were analysed by the team leaders and this analysis informed the next stages of the project. The first survey, designed to determine PGDE students concerns and expectations as student teachers revealed a myriad of qualitative data, which on analysis, revealed the PGDE students to be a group of motivated individuals with a heavy work load and a strong desire to teach well (Appendix O). While many needs of PGDE students were met at the school there was an overriding concern about behaviour management.

In order to meet this need a date for a behaviour management workshop was organised. Analysis of feed back from this workshop demonstrated the need for such a workshop to become an integral part of the PGDE induction programme at Kinsale Community School (Appendix Q) Page 5 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Following the initial survey of PGDE students, it was decided that it would be valuable to conduct a similar survey at the end of the school year, to assess any of the actions initiated by the Learning School Project 2. Analysis of data collected from a survey designed to assess the needs and concerns of parallel teachers produced both qualitative and quantitative data (Appendix O & P). One interesting outcome was the fact that only 54% of parallel teachers saw their role as being clearly defined and there were differing conceptions as to what this role entailed (Appendix P).

This led to the conclusion that roles needed to be clarified and more information be disseminated to parallel teachers, in particular what exactly is required in the role of mentor. A major concern was that fact that currently, meetings between parallel teachers and PGDE students are often sporadic. They depend on availability of time, the needs of the PGDE student and the willingness of the parallel teacher to make themselves available. Based on this analysis we recommend that a new system be implemented in this area to ensure regular structured contact is made.

This survey also revealed data that reflects the willingness of the parallel teacher to develop professionally. Many parallel teachers saw the PGDE students as an asset to the school and commented on the many positive experiences that they bring to the school that enhance learning, from which parallel teachers can learn. However, parallel teachers raised concerns about the inexperience of PGDE students and stressed the need for them to be monitored and guided. There was some concern about the additional workload that this would involve. In order to address the aforementioned needs, a structured approach to monitoring was identified by the parallel teachers and suggestions for addressing this issue were piloted.

A parallel teacher/PGDE student liaison form was tested (Appendix D) and the response from all parties was positive (Appendix R). 100% of participants agreed that this was beneficial and on analysis it appears that this approach would ultimately ensure consistency in pupils’ learning. It was felt that completing it weekly may put undue pressure on PGDE students and completing it monthly may result in some material being omitted. After long discussion it was agreed that fortnightly /bi monthly would be the best option. Provisional dates for meetings between PGDE students and their parallel teachers will be scheduled at the beginning of the school year.

On analysis of the final survey given to PGDE students following almost a whole school year at Kinsale Community School (Appendix S) it was clear that while PGDE students had become confident and had developed their own teaching strategies, there was still a lack of clarity and definition as to what their roles and that of the parallel teacher were. Communication remained sporadic and informal. Due to the initiatives introduced by LSP2 concrete roles of PGDE students and parallel teachers have been suggested and drawn up for modification and approval by management (Appendix T). It is hoped that these roles will give clarity to PGDE students about what is expected of them, as well as emphasising the importance of the active participation of the parallel teacher in mentoring the PGDE student.

Accompanying these roles is a series of Page 6 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 guidelines for mentoring programmes (Appendix U). These guidelines provide practical suggestions as to how to fulfil the role of PGDE student and parallel teacher. As a result of this a comprehensive induction programme has been suggested that is informed by concrete experiences. Both the qualitative and quantitative data produced by the surveys have been instrumental in its creation. This project has made the staff more aware of the importance of developing a reciprocal relationship with PGDE students. The project has affirmed the long term and short term benefits of mentoring PGDE students effectively.

Section 3 The project has impacted on the school management, the immediate team members, parallel teachers and the PGDE students and has initiated the development of a more comprehensive induction programme and mentoring system for PGDE students, which will enhance learning in the classroom. The immediate team members, who are also parallel teachers, reflected on their responsibility as a parallel teacher, and some team members stated that it also made them reflect on their own approaches to teaching. Their willingness to partake and their continuous involvement throughout the year is testament to the fact that they saw its benefits.

Contributions from parallel teachers and PGDE students have provided a concrete foundation from which management can develop its policies and programmes. The PGDE students embraced the project with enthusiasm and provided honest and thought provoking answers. Management identified the need for the project and were supportive throughout. It was also noted by the Department of Education and Skills officials who came to inspect the school as part of a Management, Leadership and Learning inspection.

As team members, leading the project has been a learning experience, having gained valuable insights into the concerns and needs of student teachers and their mentors. Staff members and management were supportive of the project, however it was often difficult to find time for the whole team to meet, due to busy schedules. Despite this, much has been achieved and it is hoped the outcomes of the project will be sustainable. The results of the project will be shared with staff at a staff meeting and will be presented to the Board of Management. It is also envisaged that third level institutions which provide student teacher education be informed of this project.

Because of the introduction of the project, all staff members have become more sensitive to the needs of not only PGDE students, but also new staff members that join the school. It is also foreseen that it will assist with the integration of substitute teachers and teaching assistants from abroad. It is hoped that in reading this project other schools will gain an insight into both the challenges and benefits of a mentoring system and will be in a position to review their own practices in light of this.

Appendices Project Methodology Page 7 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix A – Initial survey of PGDE students (template) Appendix B – Initial survey of parallel teachers (template) Appendix C – Sample of Minutes of Meetings Appendix D – Survey of Behaviour Management Workshop (template) Appendix E - PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (Pilot) (template) Appendix F – PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (revised) (template) Appendix G – Questionnaire feed back on PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (template) Appendix H – End of year questionnaire for PGDE students (template) Data Collection Appendix I - LSP2 Action Plan 2010/2011 Appendix J - Initial survey of PGDE students - responses Appendix K - Initial survey of parallel teachers - responses Appendix L - Survey of Behaviour Management Workshop -responses Appendix M - Questionnaire feed back on PGDE student & parallel teacher liaison form (responses) Appendix N - End of year questionnaire for PGDE students (responses) Results Appendix O - Initial survey of PGDE teachers –responses with analysis by LSP 2 team Appendix P - Initial survey of parallel teachers – responses with analysis by LSP 2 team Appendix QSurvey of Behaviour Management Workshop –responses with analysis.

Appendix RQuestionnaire - feed back on PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (analysis) Appendix SEnd of year questionnaire for PGDE students (responses with analysis) Appendix TSuggested roles for PGDE students and parallel teachers Appendix UElements to Consider when Developing Teaching Practice Competences. Appendix VMicro teaching letter template Appendix W – Amended induction policy for Student teachers Appendix A – Initial survey of PGDE students. 01.10.2010.

1. Why do you want to be a teacher? 2. From your experience as a pupil what is (a) a good teacher; (b) a poor teacher? Page 8 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 3. Why did you pick K.C.S.? Any particular reason(s)? 4. How did you feel when you visited the school last May? 5. What were your feelings immediately prior to opening and especially on your first morning in school? 6. How did you feel going in/coming out the door of your first class? 7. Has your experiences in KCS since Sept altered these feelings (questions 4, 5 and 6) if so please explain? 8.

How realistic are induction courses organised by your university? 9. What difficulties are you facing in the classroom? 10. What difficulties do you think are coming down the track? Do you have any one particular nightmare?

11. What do you want from induction in K.C.S.? 12. What contribution do you see yourself making to KCS? 13. How can your parallel teacher fulfil his/her role? 14. How important is class preparation? 15. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? 16. Have you put any thought into your style of questioning? 17. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? 18. How would define effective teaching? 19.How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach? 20. How do you know when a lesson has been successful? 21. What do you hope to gain from your year as a PGDE student? 22.

What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date?

Any other comments you wish to make at this time Appendix B – Initial survey of parallel teachers The Learning School Project 2 8th November 2010 Page 9 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 1. Have you ever been a parallel teacher for a PGDE student before?( please tick) Yes No not specified 2. How often do you meet with your PGDE student? (please tick) once a week once a month as the need arises other (please specify) Do you feel that your role as a parallel teacher is clearly defined? (please tick) Yes No not specified 3.How do you see your role as a parallel teacher? 4.

What are the main challenges for you as a parallel teacher? 5. What are your main concerns as a parallel teacher? 6. What in your opinion are the benefits of being a parallel teacher? Page 10 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 7. What impact does having a PGDE student have on the pupils at school? 8. How can we improve the quality of PGDE student participation in order to promote enhanced learning in the classroom? 9. Would you be prepared to be involved in a mentoring/ buddying system with a PGDE student? Yes No Not Specified Why/why not? Thank you for your participation Page 11 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Page 12 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix C – Sample of Minutes from meetings.

Learning School Project Minutes of Meeting Date 19th November 2010 Time 9.35am In attendance Jean Gaffney, Joanne Scobie, Tony Cierens, Elaine Bennett, Cathal O’Donovan Points discussed Jean briefed other members of the team on the developments of the project so far. She reiterated the aims of the project and explained the actions taken as the result of the survey of PGDE students i.e. creation of draft letter for micro teaching, location of video camera, organisation of behaviour management workshop (still pending).

Jean thanked parallel teachers for their participation in a survey and mentioned main concerns arising out of survey. i.e. that while there are many positive experiences of PGDE students in the school, there is great concern about PGDE students being left to their own devices and the impact that this can have on pupil’s learning and on uptake of certain subjects. Concerns arose in particular about the selection of PGDE students (in particular those coming from UCC) and whether they are being mentored effectively to ensure that they can deliver the curriculum to the pupils. We questioned whether the role of the University is passed onto the parallel teacher and whether parallel teachers should have to face this challenge alone.

Should PGDE students come in to school before school starts and meet their parallel teacher before students return, when parallel teachers are not too busy.

The perception of what it means to be a parallel teacher was discussed. It is often perceived as a role which frees up time for the parallel teacher, when in fact it can place more demands on a parallel teacher. The possibility of parallel teachers playing a more active role with PGDE students was mooted. Appendix D Provisional Development Service for Teachers PARTICIPANTS’ EVALUATION FORM Schools: Kinsale Community School Date: 28th January 2011 Page 13 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Topic: Positive Behaviour Management Please rate how you found today’s programme: Very Helpful Helpful Not very helpful No of Participants: What did you find most helpful? Have you any recommendations or suggestions for future in service? Is there anything you wish to add? Summary prepared by E.

O’Keeffe PDST Regional Advisor Appendix E PGDE STUDENT AND PARALLEL TEACHER LIASON FORM (Pilot) To _ ( parallel teacher) Date _ _ Page 14 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Subject _ Class _ _ Section 1 Topic (s) covered in last week Section 2 Homework given/ Tests given Section 3 Issues that arose? Section 4 Intentions for up coming week Section 5 Resources needed? Section 6 Other questions/comments From _ ( PGDE) Appendix F PGDE STUDENT AND PARALLEL TEACHER LIASON FORM (revised) To _ ( parallel teacher) Date _ _ From _ ( PGDE) Time frame _ _ Page 15 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Subject _ Class _ _ Section 1 Topic (s) covered in this time frame Section 2 Homework given/ Tests given Section 3 Issues that arose? Section 4 Intentions for up coming week Section 5 Resources needed? Section 6 Did an inspector visit your class? If yes provide details Section 7 Did you observe a lesson? If yes provide details Section 8 Other questions/comments Appendix G QuestionnaireMonitoring form for PGDE students and Parallel Teachers 1.

Do you think that completing this form is beneficial? (please tick) Yes No Why?

2. How often do you think this form should be completed?(please tick) Page 16 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Weekly Fortnightly Monthly Other _ _ 3. On average how much time did it take you to complete/ process this form? _ _ 4. Is there any section of the form that you would omit? _ _ Why? _ _ 5. Would you recommend adding something to this form? yes no If yes please explain: _ _ 6. Could you suggest an alternative way to document progress between the PGDE student and the parallel teacher? Yes No If yes please explain or add any additional comments Appendix H End of Year PGDE Questionnaire March 2011 1.

Do you still wish to pursue a career in teaching – Please explain? 2. From your experience of teaching this year what is (a) a good teacher? (b) a poor teacher?

3. How do you feel going in/coming out the door of your classes in general? 4. How have your experiences in KCS since Sept influenced these feelings? 5. How have your experiences in University since September influenced these feelings? Page 17 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 6. What strategies have you found helpful in overcoming difficulties in the classroom? 7. As a newly qualified teacher what difficulties do you think are coming down the track? 8. What have you gained from induction in K.C.S.? 9. How have you contributed to KCS? 10.

Do you feel your parallel teacher fulfilled his/her role? Could this be improved – explain? 11. Do you feel that school management fulfilled their role? Could this be improved explain?

12. Did you find the behaviour management workshop useful? Could you recommend other workshops that would be of benefit PGDE students? 13. How important is class preparation? 14. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? 15. Has your style of questioning evolved? Do you incorporate differentiated questioning? 16. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? 17. How would define effective teaching? 18. How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach? 19. How do you know when a lesson has been successful?

20. What have you gained from your year as a PGDE student? 21.

What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date? 22. How would you define the role of the PGDE student? 23. How would you define the role of the parallel teacher? 24. How would you define management’s role in relation to PGDE students? Page 18 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix I LSP2 Action Plan School Year 2010/2011 Mentoring and Monitoring PGDE students (Jean Gaffney, Joanne Scobie) September October November December January February March April May West Cork Ed. Centre meetings 13 Sept 18 Oct In-school meeting To be decided (22nd at 11 am) 6 Dec Meeting cancelled due to weather 12 Jan In lieu of Dec meeting 24 Jan In-school meeting To be decided 7 March 11 March 4April 11 April In house meeting 13th May Actions to be taken Decide LSP2 team to travel to West Cork meetings Decide topic for project Design, issue and collate questionnaire for PGDE students to identify issues for consideration in project Design, issue and collate questionnaire for Parallel teachers to identify issues for consideration in project Finalise full school based team for LSP2 project Hold meeting with PGDE students to discuss the results of questionnaire Hold meeting with full team to introduce topic and discuss questionnaires Behaviour management workshops for PGDE students One inhouse with Kathleen O’Brien One outhouse with Liz O’Keeffe(LSP2) Cancelled due to weather conditions rescheduled for January Behaviour management workshops Meeting with full team to discuss/design a monitoring form –this will be completed weekly by PGDE students.

It should inform the parallel teacher of work covered during the lessons/homework set/ behavioural issues along with any issues that the PGDE student wishes to discuss with the parallel teacher. Design questionnaire to get feedback from PGDE students re behaviour management workshops Issue and collate questionnaire to PGDE students re Behaviour management workshops Evaluation sheet used by Liz O ‘Keefe following workshop – used in lieu of questionnaire. Pilot monitoring form Pilot monitoring form Design, issue, collate questionnaire re monitoring form 11th March team meeting. Write up and submit report for West Cork Ed Centre re project Monday 11 April pm – Management to attend.

Discuss progress of project. Finalise Induction for PGDE student 2011/2012 Meet PGDE 2011/2012 students if possible 13th May Final date for submission of report. 21st September 2011 Show case of all projects, Charleville venue. Page 19 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix J Initial P.G.D.E. survey responses 07.10.2010. 1. Why do you want to be a teacher? I always found the dynamics and issues/responsibilities surrounding a school setting very interesting with relation to development I enjoy working in the classroom. I love teaching English and enjoy thinking of different ways to engage and educate students Communicate knowledge with others. I love my subjects and want to share them with others It seemed to be a natural progression after the arts degree and then masters.

Loved school and learning and want them to enjoy it too, follow in mum’s footsteps, love of subjects.

I loved school and always wanted to teach. I love working with students and want to help them achieve their best. I love the subjects I teach. I want to be a teacher because I love learning and having the opportunity to work in an environment where everyday is different, challenging and rewarding. I’ve always respected and admired a good teacher. I’m very passionate about art and having the opportunity to share what I know to others. 2. From your experience as a pupil what is (a) a good teacher; (b) a poor teacher?

Good teacher: Understanding, creative, prepared Organised, strict but fair, approachable, enthusiastic Interested in his/her subject, enthusiastic, get students involved Someone who motivates learning effortlessly, who inspires students to want to learn Someone who conveys information with enthusiasm – someone who repeats information a lot Variety of resources, good classroom management, clarity Uses different methods of teaching, good management of class, gives homework and checks One who was engaging. Use of different activities Enthusiastic, engaging, clear and concise, good listener, passionate about their subject, good motivator, prepared.

Poor teacher: Poor management, poorly prepared Unorganised, too lenient in class, easily led by students, unmotivated in teaching their subjects Just reads from books Someone who inspires learning only through fear and discipline Hostile – being too fearful is not conducive to learning. Going at too quick a pace. Not recapping enough Reads from textbook/ write notes on white board constantly, no variation Uses only verbal explanation, can’t manage the class, doesn’t check homework, doesn’t care One who read chapter by chapter from the book.

Unprepared, poor social skills, Unclear, poor motivator Page 20 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 3. Why did you pick K.C.S.? Any particular reason(s)? Was placed here by PE dept in UCC - happy A lot of my friends went to school here, they gave me great reports of the school Reputation of being a good school Spanish was available as a subject to teach I live in the area Number of reasons – great atmosphere in the school, staffroom lively chatty, posters and pictures up in reception, Sean very welcoming, I met a current PGDE student who had very positive reports: seemed very helpful to PGDE students We were given our placements by the college.

Reputation / accessibility None 4. How did you feel when you visited the school last May? Nervous at first but warmly welcomed. Put at ease immediately by all staff members When I visited the school over the summer I was made feel very welcome. I felt like I was part of the staff and not just a dip student Very welcome I thought the school had a positive atmosphere and I was impressed by the principal’s views on education.

Excited to be meeting the other h-dips and getting to hear what it was like from the present h-dips at school. As above I felt very welcome. All staff very welcoming. Confident. It was a great opportunity to familiarise myself with the school, the staff, the layout of the school, the ethos of the school, school rules and the literature of the school. Also provided great support – discussion with pgde students gave insight to year ahead. none 5. What were your feelings immediately prior to opening? and especially on your first morning in school? Slightly anxious Even with teaching experience, I was very nervous! I was very unsure of myself and dreading my first lesson.

Little nervous about the unknown Extremely nervous but excited I felt sick with nerves and excited at the same time. Very nervous! Not sure were there classes, relief when there were meetings. Nerves again on Monday! Very excited to get started too. It was on my mind throughout the summer. Was very nervous coming up to opening in the month of August? Mixed, Nervous, excited, anxious, enthusiastic, confident, and optimistic. On my first morning I was nervous meeting the other PGDE students and the rest of the staff.

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The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 6.

How did you feel going in/coming out the door of your first class? Relieved as I knew more about what to expect I was satisfied with my first class I was very nervous going in but after the initial introductions I settled in and I feel the class was a success Little nervous going in but once I was started it was fine. I was a little relieved when my first class was finished. Nervous going in, relieved coming out Before going into my first class I stood outside the door for a minute and asked myself if I could really do this, then I took a deep breath and went in. The lesson went well and I left feeling elated.

Going innerves excited Coming outhappy and positive as it went very well I felt nervous on entry. I found it very daunting. I was very relieved when first class was over. My nervousness had diminished/ anxiety had gone. I felt satisfied that my first class had gone well. Going into my first class I was nervous but excited to meet the group of new first years. Coming out I felt a little overwhelmed at being responsible for 22 pupils’ first introduction to are and design but again motivated to excite and inspire young artists in the making.

7. Has your experiences in KCS since Sept altered these feelings (questions 4, 5 and 6) if so please explain? Yes I feel more settled in now I am a lot more confident going into class now.

The Staff is very friendly and always wiling to help. I still feel very welcomenot nervous going into class now. I feel less nervous than at the start of school I don’t feel that the old H-Dips gave an accurate description of what it was like. They said it was really easy and think 6 to 8 classes was an unrealistic view of teaching. I think 8 classes as well as driving to Cork 4 days a week is very demanding.

No still feel very welcome, great help from all. Not as nervous Yes now I feel more comfortable going into class, although I always feel that bit nervous. I feel good when I know the students learned something and I taught a good well managed class. None All the staff and h – dips are very friendly and helpful. I had no reason to be nervous. 8. How realistic are induction courses organised by your university? They are organised quite well by UCC PE dept, have had experience in second and third college with mentors of both subjects Not very! We were introduced to a lot of information in a very short time.

It was a lot to process and did not benefit me in my initial weeks of training Well organised and planned Not very, too much information squeezed into too short a time Two days really is not adequate. I would prefer more training in lesson planning. Also I would have liked more information on Junior Certificate Page 22 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 English prior to starting to teach third years. Tutorials are helpful to help with first class content but for someone who had never taught before I don’t believe the induction would be very helpful may have made them more nervous! Well I had 2 weeks maths teaching last year and 2 weeks PE teaching the year before, so I had some induction. I feel if I had more experience I would be more comfortable this year. Ok – many discussed classroom management which is important from the beginning as well as what is expected for the year.

The induction week in Crawford was great, realistically they can only cover so much in such a short time, but it was a good eye opener in terms of classroom management and professional/ ethical behaviour. 9. What difficulties are you facing in the classroom? Management. Silence throughout the lesson when explaining something. Improving day to day. I have no classroom management difficulties; the students are very well behaved. However I am finding it difficult to gauge the level of material for the class, whether it is too easy or too challenging. No major difficulties some students are a little talkative at times.

Sometimes classroom management/discipline is an issue, sometimes I feel I’m not doing a good enough job in engaging the students Sometimes there are discipline issues, small ones people chatting not concentrating on work. Maybe I need to be more severe imposing but I am really not sure how to achieve this.

Homework not being completed – maths my clarity needs to improve. Knowledge of contentnot having taught the content before – what way to go about teaching this content. Resources – finding other methods of teaching is difficult. I don’t think of them as difficulties but more as challenges – inclusion/ differentiation – accommodating everyone. 1st years – trying to motivate them intrinsically. 4th Years – some behavioural issues. I feel pupils see art as a waste of time and it is difficult to get them to finish work. 10. What difficulties do you think are coming down the track? Do you have any one particular nightmare?

Progressing at appropriate rate with class Schemes of work – I find it difficult to plan 7 or 8 weeks in advance. Get the course covered with first year. I find the transition year Spanish class hard because I’ve had so little time with them. I’m worried they won’t really have learned anything! Typical nightmare of inspector walking in at really bad moment. The next inspection, although the first one went well there is always the worry that something won’t flow on the day. Also having to film a class as it just seems so invasive.

Classroom management as first years come out of their shell.

In future years classroom management of TYs Difficulties teaching/supervising classes of behaviour problems. Would love some tips on behaviour management. No nightmares! I think there will always be challenges as a teacher. Page 23 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 That the 4th years wont have learnt anything by Christmas. That it will become a battle to get work done. 11. What do you want from induction in K.C.S.? Yes I found the whole experience to be very welcoming and understanding I want to get a well rounded experience of teaching. I would like to experience dealing with older classes and not just first years. Good experience as a teacher. Experience and ideas To gain an insight into the life of a professional teacher and to hopefully become one myself.

Perfect the teaching of my subjects with more closer help from parallel teachers Want to have a good experience with all type of classes.

Hope to learn from observations, watching other teacher’s management components etc. I felt that the induction we had had in May worked well. I wan to experience the full role of being a teacher, dealing with the various year groups, break supervisions and class supervisions. 12. What contribution do you see yourself making to KCS? I’ve already been involved in extra curricular activities and enjoy contributing in any way possible I aim to meet the professional requirements of the school. I am available if needed for extra curricular activities.

Helping students through their studies. Hopefully I will fulfil all my professional duties in a meaningful way. I will do my best to teach students and to convey to them information in a clear/ concise fashion. I am involved in s+s everyday; I hope to get involved in extra curricular activities. I would like to think that I will make a valuable contribution. I hope to contribute to TY’s mini company with demonstrations of what they will make and any other projects that will be going on. 13. How can your parallel teacher fulfil his/her role? Parallel teachers have been great so far this term.

Really, really helpful. I feel very lucky in comparison to college classmates in different schools My parallel teachers have been very helpful and supportive so far. I have been given handouts and extra notes which have been very helpful. Keep me on track with regard to curriculum Both parallel teachers have been excellent for advice and support By offering me much needed guidance in the role of discipline and context and method Advice on classroom activities, how to make material interesting, particularly maths.

Well my parallel teachers are excellent. I am benefiting from their advice and feedback after every class, I find this excellent – give great tips on management etc. Share key teaching skills that they found valuable I think she is fulfilling it perfectly. I feel that I can approach her with any difficulties or problems. Page 24 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 14. How important is class preparation? Crucial for beginning of the year it can give you a confidence that might be faltering Vital. Lesson planning is very important in order to determine what material you want to use and what you want students to know.

Very important – must know what you’re going to cover. extremely very, I spend hours preparing my third year English it helps me feel more confident and I come across better/clearer.

Imperative – don’t feel confident if I don’t know the material inside out. Lack of confidence means lack of clarity. Extremely important I feel the more prepared you are the more one can talk and teach in class especially in PE – have to be prepared. Essential – ‘fail to prepare – prepare to fail’ Within art it is vital. Visual aids of other artist’s work as well as examples of the task are necessary. I also think you need to be prepared for the unexpected e.g. if a student is very strong and needs to be challenged to get more from the class.

15. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? Yes but they were prearranged before I had the opportunity At the moment the seating plan is working for me.

There are no disruptions in class as of yet. Yes I have made out seating arrangements for students as students can be very talkative next to their best friend. Yes: changes transition year students around. I have not moved any students yet. I have asked my third year English not to sit right at the back of class as it is a small group of 15. Yes I have changed this a couple of times as I get to know the students. Very important for motivation and focus in the classroom as well as classroom management.

Not yet. My maths class were seated by their class teacher. This plan was ok. On the first period with each group, I asked them to line up at the top of the classroom. Firstly, I asked if anyone needed to be near the board. Then I assigned them seats – boy girl and made a seating plan. In cases where teachers had already made a seating plan I took a copy. I made a seating plan for each class using photographs. Yes. I let the class sit where they wanted on the first day and I told them that is where they would sit from there on in. I since found it difficult to keep them quiet and gave seating places in a few weeks.

The level of work became higher and the level of noise reduced. 16. Have you put any thought into your style of questioning? Yes its an area I’ve learned about in college and continue to do so I have looked into the different forms of questions, literal, inferential, evaluative. I try to incorporate a few of each in lessons. I try to distribute the questions evenly.

Ask questions to the entire class and then name someone so all students are alert. Yes: I try to use questioning in such a way that every student eventually Page 25 of 73

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