The Learning School Project 2 - Kinsale Community School 2010/2011

The Learning School Project 2 - Kinsale Community School 2010/2011

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Section 1: Context of the School Kinsale Community School officially opened on August 1st 1996, following the amalgamation of Our Lady of the Rosary Secondary School and Kinsale Vocational School. The school is a rural co educational post primary community school offering both established Leaving Certificate and Junior Certificate programmes as well as Leaving Certificate Applied and the Leaving Certificate Vocational Programme. The school also offers FETAC certification courses and a variety of evening courses. The school accepts pupils of all academic abilities from all backgrounds.

Since its foundation Kinsale Community School has continued to grow and currently has a pupil population of 754 and approximately 72 staff members. For the academic year 2010/2011 Kinsale Community School has taken on 16 student teachers that are participating in Postgraduate Diploma in Education courses, in a variety of third level institutions nationwide. The school hosts student teachers of a variety of subjects from the Post Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) at NUI Cork and the Bachelor of Education (B.Ed) in Sports Studies and Physical Education also at NUI Cork, as well as students from the Higher Diploma in Arts for Art and Design Teachers at the CIT Crawford College of Art and Design, Cork. Student teachers participating in the Bachelor of Sciences (B.Sc) in Physical Education and Sports Sciences at the University of Limerick and student teachers studying for the B.A in Education at St. Patrick’s College, Thurles are also training at Kinsale Community School. These student teachers engage in block release and do not do their teaching practice on a year long basis.

Student teachers are introduced to their parallel teacher at the start of the school year. Each student teacher is allocated a small portion of the teaching hours of their parallel teacher, with whom they are required to liaise. The parallel teacher is encouraged to keep in contact with the student teacher throughout the school year and to give advice where appropriate. The parallel teacher is asked to notify the Deputy Principal of any issue that concerns the performance of the student teacher. Kinsale Community School has 21 parallel teachers working with PGDE students this year. Page 1 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Section 2: Rationale The Kinsale Community School Learning School Project has committed itself to mentoring and monitoring its PGDE students and assisting with their integration in the school. In recent years the number of PGDE students in Kinsale Community School has increased. It was felt that a more structured induction of PGDE students would enhance the learning experience of pupils and ensure that the prescribed work would be taught well and within the given time frame. This need was identified by staff and management. This provided an impetus for participation in the Learning School Project 2.

In order to ensure consistency in learning among pupils and to minimise disruption caused by new and inexperienced teachers, methods of communication between parallel teachers and PGDE students needed to be addressed and enhanced. At the same time the school was mindful of the needs of PGDE students, and strove to allow them to benefit from a positive experience of teaching which in turn would improve the quality of learning in the classroom and maintain high standards of teaching and learning. In partaking in the Learning School Project 2, Kinsale Community School’s aim is to develop an effective induction programme for PGDE students and to define within this programme the role of the parallel teacher and the student teacher. The creation of links between PGDE students, their parallel teacher and the whole staff body of the school is of ongoing paramount importance to the project.

In order for the project to succeed the input and commitment of the PGDE students, parallel teachers and whole staff body was required. Initially the project focused on selecting a team comprising five parallel teachers and their respective student teachers. The team was selected with the aim of ensuring that a cross section of subjects, experiences and third level institutions were represented. Objectives of project team This work was undertaken by Jean Gaffney (Teacher and School Planning Co-ordinator) and Joanne Scobie (Teacher) who were approached by Mr. Seán Ó’Broin, Principal, and took responsibility for the initiation, implementation and evaluation of the project. The project was extended to a school based team made up of parallel teachers that had shown a particular interest in this project and their PGDE students.

The role of team members was to implement the project by attending meetings, liaising with PGDE students, completing questionnaires and sharing experiences and clarifying roles. The role of management was to facilitate the implementation of the project and to support the team. Results of this project will be used by management to create a template for prospective student teachers and parallel teachers in the future. Page 2 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Methodology Between September 2010 and May 2011, an LSP2 meeting was held every Friday morning to discuss issues and monitor progress. The team leaders also attended six LSP2 meetings at the West Cork Education Centre1 , Dunmanway, and three additional meetings were held at Kinsale Community School with LSP2 regional facilitators. The team’s initial action was to identify the concerns and expectations that PGDE students and parallel teachers had by virtue of their position. In consultation with management two surveys were designed, completed and collated. The results of this research formed the basis of the rest of the project (Appendices A and B) This was followed by a series of meetings with the PGDE students and parallel teachers, in order to air concerns, put forward suggestions and give feed back on surveys. (Appendix C) Concerns that required action were addressed in the following ways. Drafting of a letter template (Appendix V) for use by PGDE students for the purpose of micro –teaching2 . This was to ensure continuity in communication with parents. This made PGDE students aware of and ensured the compliance with child protection policies. The possibility of class teachers distributing letters on behalf of the PGDE student was raised in order to avoid discrepancies.

Practical advice was provided in relation to locating and using data projectors and a school camcorder and other school equipment. A two hour behaviour management3 workshop was organised and attended by all full time PGDE students and a questionnaire completed (Appendix D). To assist in the identification of staff and PGDE students and enhance relations the idea of using reference photographs was mooted by the team and approved by management. The limitations of space in an overcrowded building required the provision for immediate booking of office space for unannounced inspection visits from PGDE course tutors. A room booking template was designed and a procedure for booking a room was put in place.

Following this a meeting was held between the Team Leaders and the parallel teachers. Ways to improve communication between parallel teachers and PGDE students were explored. A PGDE student/ Parallel Teacher Liaison Form was designed and distributed accordingly 1 The West Cork Education Centre is part of a national network of teacher education support centres. whose aim is a to promote the continuing professional development of teachers 2 Micro teaching involves video recording of actual lessons in order to give feedback to the student teacher about effective strategies in the classroom.

3 The workshop was organised by The Provisional Development Services for Teachers, a state funded body set up to provide support to education programmes. Page 3 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 (Appendix E) This method of communication was piloted and feedback was acquired via survey, and then revised accordingly (Appendix F). It was unanimously agreed that such a procedure should be implemented in future to ensure formalised documentation of such communications. A number of meetings with the team were held to explore the roles of the PGDE student and the parallel teachers. Results of surveys, the induction policy at Kinsale Community School and teacher and management input were considered. These would be seen as a crucial element of the new induction policy for PGDE students. The suggested roles were provisional and not exhaustive and would therefore be reviewed and revised as appropriate throughout the course of the rest of the project.

In order to gain an insight into the development of PGDE students over the year a final survey was issued to PGDE students (Appendix H). The questions asked were to ascertain if their perspectives had changed or altered based on experiences in Kinsale Community School throughout the year. A comparative study was made between this survey and the survey issued in October 2010 which had posed similar questions (Appendix S). Concrete roles were defined and the induction policy for PGDE students was reviewed (Appendix W) and amended in light of the Learning School Project. A series of guidelines to accompany these roles were drawn up (Appendix T & U).

A detailed action plan for the project can be found in Appendix H. A podcast outlining a brief introduction to the project is available. Resources A number of resources were key to the implementation of the project, first and foremost the participation of the PGDE students and their parallel teachers. This ensured that the project was relevant to the particular school and its own staff and pupils. Management was a vital resource in providing support and allocating time to see the project through. The West Cork Education Centre in Dunmanway facilitated six LSP2 meetings for participants of the Learning School Project. At these meetings, LSP2 team leaders from a number of other West Cork Schools were given the opportunity to share their experiences of their respective projects. These meetings were useful to allow the team to reflect on current activities and to seek advice and feedback on how to move forward. The Learning School hubs also provided the team with the necessary framework on which to structure the project, as well as providing practical advice.

The Provisional Development Services for Teachers facilitated a behaviour management workshop for the PGDE students at Kinsale Community School. This workshop was organised to address concerns of PGDE students about how to manage pupil behaviour. The workshop lasted for two hours and offered practical advice on common problems encountered by student teachers in the classroom. The evaluation of the efficacy of the workshop (Appendix L) reaffirmed the need for a structured induction programme for PGDE students and informed the next stages of the project.

Page 4 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 The project has been informed by literature on mentoring programmes in other countries such as the UK and in particular the system of induction followed in German schools. Publications by the Department of Education and Skills were also consulted, in particular the Department of Education and Skills Child Protection Policy and Procedures, and the Learning to Teach Study Executive Summary by the School of Education, University College Cork.

Policy documents specific to Kinsale Community School such as the Induction Policy for PGDE students and the Staff Handbook were also referred to. Data Collection Data was collected through the design, issue and collation of a number of surveys that were specific to each stage of the project. In order to provide meaningful and current data the surveys were designed to be relevant and as concise as possible. Each survey was handed out to participants individually and its purpose explained to participants. Four of the surveys were designed and issued by the team, while an evaluation survey was collated following the behaviour management workshop facilitated by Provisional Development Services for Teachers (Appendix L).

Two of the four surveys contained qualitative data only and these were instrumental in shaping the project (Appendices J & M). Participants gave responses that were very much based on their own personal experiences and provided an invaluable insight into the roles and responsibilities of both student teachers and parallel teachers at Kinsale Community School. The remaining two surveys provided a mixture of qualitative and quantitative data. While the qualitative data provided a context within which PDGE students and their parallel teachers were working, the quantitative data acted as indicators which would steer the project (Appendices K & M).

All data collected confirmed and reaffirmed the importance and necessity of the project. Results All surveys were analysed by the team leaders and this analysis informed the next stages of the project. The first survey, designed to determine PGDE students concerns and expectations as student teachers revealed a myriad of qualitative data, which on analysis, revealed the PGDE students to be a group of motivated individuals with a heavy work load and a strong desire to teach well (Appendix O). While many needs of PGDE students were met at the school there was an overriding concern about behaviour management. In order to meet this need a date for a behaviour management workshop was organised. Analysis of feed back from this workshop demonstrated the need for such a workshop to become an integral part of the PGDE induction programme at Kinsale Community School (Appendix Q) Page 5 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Following the initial survey of PGDE students, it was decided that it would be valuable to conduct a similar survey at the end of the school year, to assess any of the actions initiated by the Learning School Project 2. Analysis of data collected from a survey designed to assess the needs and concerns of parallel teachers produced both qualitative and quantitative data (Appendix O & P). One interesting outcome was the fact that only 54% of parallel teachers saw their role as being clearly defined and there were differing conceptions as to what this role entailed (Appendix P). This led to the conclusion that roles needed to be clarified and more information be disseminated to parallel teachers, in particular what exactly is required in the role of mentor. A major concern was that fact that currently, meetings between parallel teachers and PGDE students are often sporadic. They depend on availability of time, the needs of the PGDE student and the willingness of the parallel teacher to make themselves available. Based on this analysis we recommend that a new system be implemented in this area to ensure regular structured contact is made.

This survey also revealed data that reflects the willingness of the parallel teacher to develop professionally. Many parallel teachers saw the PGDE students as an asset to the school and commented on the many positive experiences that they bring to the school that enhance learning, from which parallel teachers can learn. However, parallel teachers raised concerns about the inexperience of PGDE students and stressed the need for them to be monitored and guided. There was some concern about the additional workload that this would involve. In order to address the aforementioned needs, a structured approach to monitoring was identified by the parallel teachers and suggestions for addressing this issue were piloted. A parallel teacher/PGDE student liaison form was tested (Appendix D) and the response from all parties was positive (Appendix R). 100% of participants agreed that this was beneficial and on analysis it appears that this approach would ultimately ensure consistency in pupils’ learning. It was felt that completing it weekly may put undue pressure on PGDE students and completing it monthly may result in some material being omitted. After long discussion it was agreed that fortnightly /bi monthly would be the best option. Provisional dates for meetings between PGDE students and their parallel teachers will be scheduled at the beginning of the school year.

On analysis of the final survey given to PGDE students following almost a whole school year at Kinsale Community School (Appendix S) it was clear that while PGDE students had become confident and had developed their own teaching strategies, there was still a lack of clarity and definition as to what their roles and that of the parallel teacher were. Communication remained sporadic and informal. Due to the initiatives introduced by LSP2 concrete roles of PGDE students and parallel teachers have been suggested and drawn up for modification and approval by management (Appendix T). It is hoped that these roles will give clarity to PGDE students about what is expected of them, as well as emphasising the importance of the active participation of the parallel teacher in mentoring the PGDE student. Accompanying these roles is a series of Page 6 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 guidelines for mentoring programmes (Appendix U). These guidelines provide practical suggestions as to how to fulfil the role of PGDE student and parallel teacher. As a result of this a comprehensive induction programme has been suggested that is informed by concrete experiences. Both the qualitative and quantitative data produced by the surveys have been instrumental in its creation. This project has made the staff more aware of the importance of developing a reciprocal relationship with PGDE students. The project has affirmed the long term and short term benefits of mentoring PGDE students effectively.

Section 3 The project has impacted on the school management, the immediate team members, parallel teachers and the PGDE students and has initiated the development of a more comprehensive induction programme and mentoring system for PGDE students, which will enhance learning in the classroom. The immediate team members, who are also parallel teachers, reflected on their responsibility as a parallel teacher, and some team members stated that it also made them reflect on their own approaches to teaching. Their willingness to partake and their continuous involvement throughout the year is testament to the fact that they saw its benefits. Contributions from parallel teachers and PGDE students have provided a concrete foundation from which management can develop its policies and programmes. The PGDE students embraced the project with enthusiasm and provided honest and thought provoking answers. Management identified the need for the project and were supportive throughout. It was also noted by the Department of Education and Skills officials who came to inspect the school as part of a Management, Leadership and Learning inspection.

As team members, leading the project has been a learning experience, having gained valuable insights into the concerns and needs of student teachers and their mentors. Staff members and management were supportive of the project, however it was often difficult to find time for the whole team to meet, due to busy schedules. Despite this, much has been achieved and it is hoped the outcomes of the project will be sustainable. The results of the project will be shared with staff at a staff meeting and will be presented to the Board of Management. It is also envisaged that third level institutions which provide student teacher education be informed of this project.

Because of the introduction of the project, all staff members have become more sensitive to the needs of not only PGDE students, but also new staff members that join the school. It is also foreseen that it will assist with the integration of substitute teachers and teaching assistants from abroad. It is hoped that in reading this project other schools will gain an insight into both the challenges and benefits of a mentoring system and will be in a position to review their own practices in light of this.

Appendices Project Methodology Page 7 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix A – Initial survey of PGDE students (template) Appendix B – Initial survey of parallel teachers (template) Appendix C – Sample of Minutes of Meetings Appendix D – Survey of Behaviour Management Workshop (template) Appendix E - PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (Pilot) (template) Appendix F – PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (revised) (template) Appendix G – Questionnaire feed back on PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (template) Appendix H – End of year questionnaire for PGDE students (template) Data Collection Appendix I - LSP2 Action Plan 2010/2011 Appendix J - Initial survey of PGDE students - responses Appendix K - Initial survey of parallel teachers - responses Appendix L - Survey of Behaviour Management Workshop -responses Appendix M - Questionnaire feed back on PGDE student & parallel teacher liaison form (responses) Appendix N - End of year questionnaire for PGDE students (responses) Results Appendix O - Initial survey of PGDE teachers –responses with analysis by LSP 2 team Appendix P - Initial survey of parallel teachers – responses with analysis by LSP 2 team Appendix Q- Survey of Behaviour Management Workshop –responses with analysis. Appendix R- Questionnaire - feed back on PGDE student and parallel teacher liaison form (analysis) Appendix S- End of year questionnaire for PGDE students (responses with analysis) Appendix T- Suggested roles for PGDE students and parallel teachers Appendix U- Elements to Consider when Developing Teaching Practice Competences. Appendix V- Micro teaching letter template Appendix W – Amended induction policy for Student teachers Appendix A – Initial survey of PGDE students. 01.10.2010.

1. Why do you want to be a teacher? 2. From your experience as a pupil what is (a) a good teacher; (b) a poor teacher? Page 8 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 3. Why did you pick K.C.S.? Any particular reason(s)? 4. How did you feel when you visited the school last May? 5. What were your feelings immediately prior to opening and especially on your first morning in school? 6. How did you feel going in/coming out the door of your first class? 7. Has your experiences in KCS since Sept altered these feelings (questions 4, 5 and 6) if so please explain? 8. How realistic are induction courses organised by your university? 9. What difficulties are you facing in the classroom? 10. What difficulties do you think are coming down the track? Do you have any one particular nightmare?

11. What do you want from induction in K.C.S.? 12. What contribution do you see yourself making to KCS? 13. How can your parallel teacher fulfil his/her role? 14. How important is class preparation? 15. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? 16. Have you put any thought into your style of questioning? 17. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? 18. How would define effective teaching? 19.How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach? 20. How do you know when a lesson has been successful? 21. What do you hope to gain from your year as a PGDE student? 22. What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date?

Any other comments you wish to make at this time Appendix B – Initial survey of parallel teachers The Learning School Project 2 8th November 2010 Page 9 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 1. Have you ever been a parallel teacher for a PGDE student before?( please tick) Yes No not specified 2. How often do you meet with your PGDE student? (please tick) once a week once a month as the need arises other (please specify) Do you feel that your role as a parallel teacher is clearly defined? (please tick) Yes No not specified 3.How do you see your role as a parallel teacher? 4. What are the main challenges for you as a parallel teacher? 5. What are your main concerns as a parallel teacher? 6. What in your opinion are the benefits of being a parallel teacher? Page 10 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 7. What impact does having a PGDE student have on the pupils at school? 8. How can we improve the quality of PGDE student participation in order to promote enhanced learning in the classroom? 9. Would you be prepared to be involved in a mentoring/ buddying system with a PGDE student? Yes No Not Specified Why/why not? Thank you for your participation Page 11 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Page 12 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix C – Sample of Minutes from meetings. Learning School Project Minutes of Meeting Date 19th November 2010 Time 9.35am In attendance Jean Gaffney, Joanne Scobie, Tony Cierens, Elaine Bennett, Cathal O’Donovan Points discussed Jean briefed other members of the team on the developments of the project so far. She reiterated the aims of the project and explained the actions taken as the result of the survey of PGDE students i.e. creation of draft letter for micro teaching, location of video camera, organisation of behaviour management workshop (still pending).

Jean thanked parallel teachers for their participation in a survey and mentioned main concerns arising out of survey. i.e. that while there are many positive experiences of PGDE students in the school, there is great concern about PGDE students being left to their own devices and the impact that this can have on pupil’s learning and on uptake of certain subjects. Concerns arose in particular about the selection of PGDE students (in particular those coming from UCC) and whether they are being mentored effectively to ensure that they can deliver the curriculum to the pupils. We questioned whether the role of the University is passed onto the parallel teacher and whether parallel teachers should have to face this challenge alone. Should PGDE students come in to school before school starts and meet their parallel teacher before students return, when parallel teachers are not too busy.

The perception of what it means to be a parallel teacher was discussed. It is often perceived as a role which frees up time for the parallel teacher, when in fact it can place more demands on a parallel teacher. The possibility of parallel teachers playing a more active role with PGDE students was mooted. Appendix D Provisional Development Service for Teachers PARTICIPANTS’ EVALUATION FORM Schools: Kinsale Community School Date: 28th January 2011 Page 13 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Topic: Positive Behaviour Management Please rate how you found today’s programme: Very Helpful Helpful Not very helpful No of Participants: What did you find most helpful? Have you any recommendations or suggestions for future in service? Is there anything you wish to add? Summary prepared by E. O’Keeffe PDST Regional Advisor Appendix E PGDE STUDENT AND PARALLEL TEACHER LIASON FORM (Pilot) To _ ( parallel teacher) Date _ _ Page 14 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Subject _ Class _ _ Section 1 Topic (s) covered in last week Section 2 Homework given/ Tests given Section 3 Issues that arose? Section 4 Intentions for up coming week Section 5 Resources needed? Section 6 Other questions/comments From _ ( PGDE) Appendix F PGDE STUDENT AND PARALLEL TEACHER LIASON FORM (revised) To _ ( parallel teacher) Date _ _ From _ ( PGDE) Time frame _ _ Page 15 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Subject _ Class _ _ Section 1 Topic (s) covered in this time frame Section 2 Homework given/ Tests given Section 3 Issues that arose? Section 4 Intentions for up coming week Section 5 Resources needed? Section 6 Did an inspector visit your class? If yes provide details Section 7 Did you observe a lesson? If yes provide details Section 8 Other questions/comments Appendix G Questionnaire- Monitoring form for PGDE students and Parallel Teachers 1. Do you think that completing this form is beneficial? (please tick) Yes No Why?

2. How often do you think this form should be completed?(please tick) Page 16 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Weekly Fortnightly Monthly Other _ _ 3. On average how much time did it take you to complete/ process this form? _ _ 4. Is there any section of the form that you would omit? _ _ Why? _ _ 5. Would you recommend adding something to this form? yes no If yes please explain: _ _ 6. Could you suggest an alternative way to document progress between the PGDE student and the parallel teacher? Yes No If yes please explain or add any additional comments Appendix H End of Year PGDE Questionnaire March 2011 1. Do you still wish to pursue a career in teaching – Please explain? 2. From your experience of teaching this year what is (a) a good teacher? (b) a poor teacher?

3. How do you feel going in/coming out the door of your classes in general? 4. How have your experiences in KCS since Sept influenced these feelings? 5. How have your experiences in University since September influenced these feelings? Page 17 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 6. What strategies have you found helpful in overcoming difficulties in the classroom? 7. As a newly qualified teacher what difficulties do you think are coming down the track? 8. What have you gained from induction in K.C.S.? 9. How have you contributed to KCS? 10. Do you feel your parallel teacher fulfilled his/her role? Could this be improved – explain? 11. Do you feel that school management fulfilled their role? Could this be improved explain?

12. Did you find the behaviour management workshop useful? Could you recommend other workshops that would be of benefit PGDE students? 13. How important is class preparation? 14. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? 15. Has your style of questioning evolved? Do you incorporate differentiated questioning? 16. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? 17. How would define effective teaching? 18. How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach? 19. How do you know when a lesson has been successful?

20. What have you gained from your year as a PGDE student? 21. What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date? 22. How would you define the role of the PGDE student? 23. How would you define the role of the parallel teacher? 24. How would you define management’s role in relation to PGDE students? Page 18 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix I LSP2 Action Plan School Year 2010/2011 Mentoring and Monitoring PGDE students (Jean Gaffney, Joanne Scobie) September October November December January February March April May West Cork Ed. Centre meetings 13 Sept 18 Oct In-school meeting To be decided (22nd at 11 am) 6 Dec Meeting cancelled due to weather 12 Jan In lieu of Dec meeting 24 Jan In-school meeting To be decided 7 March 11 March 4April 11 April In house meeting 13th May Actions to be taken Decide LSP2 team to travel to West Cork meetings Decide topic for project Design, issue and collate questionnaire for PGDE students to identify issues for consideration in project Design, issue and collate questionnaire for Parallel teachers to identify issues for consideration in project Finalise full school based team for LSP2 project Hold meeting with PGDE students to discuss the results of questionnaire Hold meeting with full team to introduce topic and discuss questionnaires Behaviour management workshops for PGDE students One inhouse with Kathleen O’Brien One outhouse with Liz O’Keeffe(LSP2) Cancelled due to weather conditions rescheduled for January Behaviour management workshops Meeting with full team to discuss/design a monitoring form –this will be completed weekly by PGDE students.

It should inform the parallel teacher of work covered during the lessons/homework set/ behavioural issues along with any issues that the PGDE student wishes to discuss with the parallel teacher. Design questionnaire to get feedback from PGDE students re behaviour management workshops Issue and collate questionnaire to PGDE students re Behaviour management workshops Evaluation sheet used by Liz O ‘Keefe following workshop – used in lieu of questionnaire. Pilot monitoring form Pilot monitoring form Design, issue, collate questionnaire re monitoring form 11th March team meeting. Write up and submit report for West Cork Ed Centre re project Monday 11 April pm – Management to attend. Discuss progress of project. Finalise Induction for PGDE student 2011/2012 Meet PGDE 2011/2012 students if possible 13th May Final date for submission of report. 21st September 2011 Show case of all projects, Charleville venue. Page 19 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix J Initial P.G.D.E. survey responses 07.10.2010. 1. Why do you want to be a teacher? I always found the dynamics and issues/responsibilities surrounding a school setting very interesting with relation to development I enjoy working in the classroom. I love teaching English and enjoy thinking of different ways to engage and educate students Communicate knowledge with others. I love my subjects and want to share them with others It seemed to be a natural progression after the arts degree and then masters.

Loved school and learning and want them to enjoy it too, follow in mum’s footsteps, love of subjects. I loved school and always wanted to teach. I love working with students and want to help them achieve their best. I love the subjects I teach. I want to be a teacher because I love learning and having the opportunity to work in an environment where everyday is different, challenging and rewarding. I’ve always respected and admired a good teacher. I’m very passionate about art and having the opportunity to share what I know to others. 2. From your experience as a pupil what is (a) a good teacher; (b) a poor teacher?

Good teacher: Understanding, creative, prepared Organised, strict but fair, approachable, enthusiastic Interested in his/her subject, enthusiastic, get students involved Someone who motivates learning effortlessly, who inspires students to want to learn Someone who conveys information with enthusiasm – someone who repeats information a lot Variety of resources, good classroom management, clarity Uses different methods of teaching, good management of class, gives homework and checks One who was engaging. Use of different activities Enthusiastic, engaging, clear and concise, good listener, passionate about their subject, good motivator, prepared.

Poor teacher: Poor management, poorly prepared Unorganised, too lenient in class, easily led by students, unmotivated in teaching their subjects Just reads from books Someone who inspires learning only through fear and discipline Hostile – being too fearful is not conducive to learning. Going at too quick a pace. Not recapping enough Reads from textbook/ write notes on white board constantly, no variation Uses only verbal explanation, can’t manage the class, doesn’t check homework, doesn’t care One who read chapter by chapter from the book.

Unprepared, poor social skills, Unclear, poor motivator Page 20 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 3. Why did you pick K.C.S.? Any particular reason(s)? Was placed here by PE dept in UCC - happy A lot of my friends went to school here, they gave me great reports of the school Reputation of being a good school Spanish was available as a subject to teach I live in the area Number of reasons – great atmosphere in the school, staffroom lively chatty, posters and pictures up in reception, Sean very welcoming, I met a current PGDE student who had very positive reports: seemed very helpful to PGDE students We were given our placements by the college. Reputation / accessibility None 4. How did you feel when you visited the school last May? Nervous at first but warmly welcomed. Put at ease immediately by all staff members When I visited the school over the summer I was made feel very welcome. I felt like I was part of the staff and not just a dip student Very welcome I thought the school had a positive atmosphere and I was impressed by the principal’s views on education.

Excited to be meeting the other h-dips and getting to hear what it was like from the present h-dips at school. As above I felt very welcome. All staff very welcoming. Confident. It was a great opportunity to familiarise myself with the school, the staff, the layout of the school, the ethos of the school, school rules and the literature of the school. Also provided great support – discussion with pgde students gave insight to year ahead. none 5. What were your feelings immediately prior to opening? and especially on your first morning in school? Slightly anxious Even with teaching experience, I was very nervous! I was very unsure of myself and dreading my first lesson.

Little nervous about the unknown Extremely nervous but excited I felt sick with nerves and excited at the same time. Very nervous! Not sure were there classes, relief when there were meetings. Nerves again on Monday! Very excited to get started too. It was on my mind throughout the summer. Was very nervous coming up to opening in the month of August? Mixed, Nervous, excited, anxious, enthusiastic, confident, and optimistic. On my first morning I was nervous meeting the other PGDE students and the rest of the staff.

Page 21 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 6. How did you feel going in/coming out the door of your first class? Relieved as I knew more about what to expect I was satisfied with my first class I was very nervous going in but after the initial introductions I settled in and I feel the class was a success Little nervous going in but once I was started it was fine. I was a little relieved when my first class was finished. Nervous going in, relieved coming out Before going into my first class I stood outside the door for a minute and asked myself if I could really do this, then I took a deep breath and went in. The lesson went well and I left feeling elated.

Going in- nerves excited Coming out- happy and positive as it went very well I felt nervous on entry. I found it very daunting. I was very relieved when first class was over. My nervousness had diminished/ anxiety had gone. I felt satisfied that my first class had gone well. Going into my first class I was nervous but excited to meet the group of new first years. Coming out I felt a little overwhelmed at being responsible for 22 pupils’ first introduction to are and design but again motivated to excite and inspire young artists in the making.

7. Has your experiences in KCS since Sept altered these feelings (questions 4, 5 and 6) if so please explain? Yes I feel more settled in now I am a lot more confident going into class now. The Staff is very friendly and always wiling to help. I still feel very welcome- not nervous going into class now. I feel less nervous than at the start of school I don’t feel that the old H-Dips gave an accurate description of what it was like. They said it was really easy and think 6 to 8 classes was an unrealistic view of teaching. I think 8 classes as well as driving to Cork 4 days a week is very demanding.

No still feel very welcome, great help from all. Not as nervous Yes now I feel more comfortable going into class, although I always feel that bit nervous. I feel good when I know the students learned something and I taught a good well managed class. None All the staff and h – dips are very friendly and helpful. I had no reason to be nervous. 8. How realistic are induction courses organised by your university? They are organised quite well by UCC PE dept, have had experience in second and third college with mentors of both subjects Not very! We were introduced to a lot of information in a very short time. It was a lot to process and did not benefit me in my initial weeks of training Well organised and planned Not very, too much information squeezed into too short a time Two days really is not adequate. I would prefer more training in lesson planning. Also I would have liked more information on Junior Certificate Page 22 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 English prior to starting to teach third years. Tutorials are helpful to help with first class content but for someone who had never taught before I don’t believe the induction would be very helpful may have made them more nervous! Well I had 2 weeks maths teaching last year and 2 weeks PE teaching the year before, so I had some induction. I feel if I had more experience I would be more comfortable this year. Ok – many discussed classroom management which is important from the beginning as well as what is expected for the year.

The induction week in Crawford was great, realistically they can only cover so much in such a short time, but it was a good eye opener in terms of classroom management and professional/ ethical behaviour. 9. What difficulties are you facing in the classroom? Management. Silence throughout the lesson when explaining something. Improving day to day. I have no classroom management difficulties; the students are very well behaved. However I am finding it difficult to gauge the level of material for the class, whether it is too easy or too challenging. No major difficulties some students are a little talkative at times. Sometimes classroom management/discipline is an issue, sometimes I feel I’m not doing a good enough job in engaging the students Sometimes there are discipline issues, small ones people chatting not concentrating on work. Maybe I need to be more severe imposing but I am really not sure how to achieve this.

Homework not being completed – maths my clarity needs to improve. Knowledge of content- not having taught the content before – what way to go about teaching this content. Resources – finding other methods of teaching is difficult. I don’t think of them as difficulties but more as challenges – inclusion/ differentiation – accommodating everyone. 1st years – trying to motivate them intrinsically. 4th Years – some behavioural issues. I feel pupils see art as a waste of time and it is difficult to get them to finish work. 10. What difficulties do you think are coming down the track? Do you have any one particular nightmare?

Progressing at appropriate rate with class Schemes of work – I find it difficult to plan 7 or 8 weeks in advance. Get the course covered with first year. I find the transition year Spanish class hard because I’ve had so little time with them. I’m worried they won’t really have learned anything! Typical nightmare of inspector walking in at really bad moment. The next inspection, although the first one went well there is always the worry that something won’t flow on the day. Also having to film a class as it just seems so invasive.

Classroom management as first years come out of their shell. In future years classroom management of TYs Difficulties teaching/supervising classes of behaviour problems. Would love some tips on behaviour management. No nightmares! I think there will always be challenges as a teacher. Page 23 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 That the 4th years wont have learnt anything by Christmas. That it will become a battle to get work done. 11. What do you want from induction in K.C.S.? Yes I found the whole experience to be very welcoming and understanding I want to get a well rounded experience of teaching. I would like to experience dealing with older classes and not just first years. Good experience as a teacher. Experience and ideas To gain an insight into the life of a professional teacher and to hopefully become one myself.

Perfect the teaching of my subjects with more closer help from parallel teachers Want to have a good experience with all type of classes. Hope to learn from observations, watching other teacher’s management components etc. I felt that the induction we had had in May worked well. I wan to experience the full role of being a teacher, dealing with the various year groups, break supervisions and class supervisions. 12. What contribution do you see yourself making to KCS? I’ve already been involved in extra curricular activities and enjoy contributing in any way possible I aim to meet the professional requirements of the school. I am available if needed for extra curricular activities.

Helping students through their studies. Hopefully I will fulfil all my professional duties in a meaningful way. I will do my best to teach students and to convey to them information in a clear/ concise fashion. I am involved in s+s everyday; I hope to get involved in extra curricular activities. I would like to think that I will make a valuable contribution. I hope to contribute to TY’s mini company with demonstrations of what they will make and any other projects that will be going on. 13. How can your parallel teacher fulfil his/her role? Parallel teachers have been great so far this term. Really, really helpful. I feel very lucky in comparison to college classmates in different schools My parallel teachers have been very helpful and supportive so far. I have been given handouts and extra notes which have been very helpful. Keep me on track with regard to curriculum Both parallel teachers have been excellent for advice and support By offering me much needed guidance in the role of discipline and context and method Advice on classroom activities, how to make material interesting, particularly maths.

Well my parallel teachers are excellent. I am benefiting from their advice and feedback after every class, I find this excellent – give great tips on management etc. Share key teaching skills that they found valuable I think she is fulfilling it perfectly. I feel that I can approach her with any difficulties or problems. Page 24 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 14. How important is class preparation? Crucial for beginning of the year it can give you a confidence that might be faltering Vital. Lesson planning is very important in order to determine what material you want to use and what you want students to know. Very important – must know what you’re going to cover. extremely very, I spend hours preparing my third year English it helps me feel more confident and I come across better/clearer.

Imperative – don’t feel confident if I don’t know the material inside out. Lack of confidence means lack of clarity. Extremely important I feel the more prepared you are the more one can talk and teach in class especially in PE – have to be prepared. Essential – ‘fail to prepare – prepare to fail’ Within art it is vital. Visual aids of other artist’s work as well as examples of the task are necessary. I also think you need to be prepared for the unexpected e.g. if a student is very strong and needs to be challenged to get more from the class.

15. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? Yes but they were prearranged before I had the opportunity At the moment the seating plan is working for me. There are no disruptions in class as of yet. Yes I have made out seating arrangements for students as students can be very talkative next to their best friend. Yes: changes transition year students around. I have not moved any students yet. I have asked my third year English not to sit right at the back of class as it is a small group of 15. Yes I have changed this a couple of times as I get to know the students. Very important for motivation and focus in the classroom as well as classroom management.

Not yet. My maths class were seated by their class teacher. This plan was ok. On the first period with each group, I asked them to line up at the top of the classroom. Firstly, I asked if anyone needed to be near the board. Then I assigned them seats – boy girl and made a seating plan. In cases where teachers had already made a seating plan I took a copy. I made a seating plan for each class using photographs. Yes. I let the class sit where they wanted on the first day and I told them that is where they would sit from there on in. I since found it difficult to keep them quiet and gave seating places in a few weeks. The level of work became higher and the level of noise reduced. 16. Have you put any thought into your style of questioning? Yes its an area I’ve learned about in college and continue to do so I have looked into the different forms of questions, literal, inferential, evaluative. I try to incorporate a few of each in lessons. I try to distribute the questions evenly.

Ask questions to the entire class and then name someone so all students are alert. Yes: I try to use questioning in such a way that every student eventually Page 25 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 gets the answer right, making it positive. Yes I try to ask questions that will illicit the proper response, something that tells me the students have understood the theme. I will – it will be a portfolio entry I try to get information from students by asking them questions. Haven’t put thought into style. Questioning needs to be varied. This I discovered after my first week. ‘Hands up’ gives the other students a chance to opt out. Use of both low level and high level cognitive questions.

Yes. The questions I ask are purposeful to generate a discussion within the group. It is important to get the groups talking about the art they see before them. Questions are put in a way as to try to encourage every pupil to answer. By not looking for a particular right or wrong answer the pupil has more of a chance to express their opinion. 17. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? Yes, reflection is heavily emphasised as part of the experience Self analysis has a huge role to play in my teaching. We are required to reflect on all lessons and assess the issues and successes. One should be aware of their own way of learning in order to become aware of students.

Yes: reflection is strongly encouraged by UCC and I find it very useful for learning where I go wrong and what I can do to improve. Yes I question myself everyday. Could I have done that better if so how? Yes, impossible to avoid with class and weekly evaluations and supervisions! More helpful than I anticipated – seeing what I have to change and improve upon written down in black and white makes it clearer. Well I believe that weekly reflections are good for self analysis. I feel reflections after every class can be repetitive and often time wasting. Self analysis plays a key part in my teaching. I focus on determining what the strengths of my lessons were and how I can incorporate this into future lessons as well as analysing my weaknesses so that I can develop as a teacher.

Yes. Each class is different and it is important to adapt to that class, so they can achieve better learning. By analysing my actions through evaluations of each lesson, I get to improve my role as a teacher. 18. How would define effective teaching? Good management, creative Effective teaching incorporates positive student engagement and student learning and comprehension of the material. Enthusiastic about subject, getting students involved – up to the board etc Effective teaching is when learning is achieved within a positive classroom environment.

Giving students accurate information delivered in a clear concise manner as possible. Insure that they have taken it in correctly and can give information back in their own words ( understanding information rather than just memorising) When students are motivated to ask questions on the topic and have an interest in subject outside the classroom. Page 26 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 TEACHER – good management, approachable, different methods of teaching, good explanations, good rapport with students. Maximising learning by identifying and addressing different student learning styles and matching these with our teaching styles and methods. That each pupil would leave the classroom having learnt something new. Effective teaching – the pupil will remember what they have learnt. 19. How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach?

Observation, questioning (triangulated) exam I will implement regular quizzes and mini-tests throughout the year, I am constantly using target questioning in class. Activities are also a big part of my lessons and help in assessing student’s engagement and understanding of a topic. Asking questions and assessment. Continuous assessment through questions in class, homework and worksheets. Exams of course cannot be ignored either. I wish to ask pointed questions that will enable them to give the information back to me. I will prepare exercises that will aid students to further comprehend information and which will let me know whether they have truly understood. In the case of languages – they are able to use it/write it, spell it.

In class assessment as well as tests. Questioning students, their facial expressions, checking homework. By questioning verbally – homework and checking it, tests – giving tests which challenge students. Questioning throughout the class. Homework, tests, discussion. It is evident from a pupil’s art work if they haven’t tried of if they haven’t understood. So at the end of each class we look at all the work as a group and point out certain aspects of the work. In particular what the lesson was about. Giving each pupil a reminder of what they have learnt. 20. How do you know when a lesson has been successful? Feedback from questioning pupils relevant When students are willing and able to answer target questions in the recap stage of the lesson. When students are still attentive and alert at the end of the lesson.

If students go away having learned something constructive then the lesson has been a success. When every student has a proven that they have learned and has enjoyed the process of learning. Students are more enthusiastic. I think they are happy when they have the feeling they have learnt something new, that they are having success in learning. They also give plenty of feedback. When in class assessment yields the right answer (questioning, exercises etc) When students ask sensible questions themselves, facial expressions. Students are able to practice questions; students can answer questions when recapping etc.

When anticipated learning outcomes of the lesson have been met. All pupils involved in the learning. Page 27 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Usually I know when a lesson has been successful by asking at the start of the next class ‘who can remember what we learnt last week?’ Judging by the response I know if I need to go over it again. 21. What do you hope to gain from your year as a PGDE student? Experience is the main this I hope to gain I hope to learn of and utilise effective teaching methods in the classroom. I hope to build my confidence in the classroom and work on being firm but approachable with students.

Experience in class room, teaching skills, knowledge of different abilities. Experience and ideas. Valuable teaching experiences – knowledge on discipline ( experienced teachers seem to have little problem with discipline) Perfect sub teaching, learn about curriculum,learn about motivation, classroom management, questions. Good overall experience of school life, to gain confidence when teaching, have experience in teaching content, be able to control the class. Develop and learn teaching skills. Identify strategies that work for different classes.

I hope to gain experience as a well rounded teacher, and that I will have the ability to instruct clear and purposeful tasks within the classroom. 22. What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date? Teachers input and experience The internet – I use the internet for all lesson plans, Data projector – this was very useful in lessons and students were more attentive. Textbook, internet. Creative approaches to lesson plans Other teachers who are more experienced than my experience in the classroom.

An Irish textbook called ‘is feidir liom’. Internet, resource CD given to us by Physical Education Dept in UCC (very good) Teachers At the moment the projector. A powerpoint is a great way to show visuals to first years. Any other comments you wish to make at this time Kinsale offers a great environment for PDGE students. I think it would have been good to be introduced to the class teachers as well as our parallel teachers at the start of term. Page 28 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix K Initial survey of parallel teachers - responses The Learning School Project 2 8th November 2010 1. Have you ever been a parallel teacher for a PGDE student before?( please tick) Yes No not specified 2. How often do you meet with your PGDE student? (please tick) once a week once a month as the need arises other (please specify) about every second week at the end of each chapter to discuss the next one Tried once a week but she was off and had supervision so – when we can 3. Do you feel that your role as a parallel teacher is clearly defined? (please tick) Yes No not specified 4. .How do you see your role as a parallel teacher? To mentor PGDE students. Advise them re course content to be covered and Re exams and resources available. To ensure the PGDE student covers the course while allowing him/her the freedom to teach the class on their own. Regular communication – monitor progress of course work\momentum , assistance in class preparation\methodology ideas Offer support and guidance – discuss curriculum with PGDE student and give advice as needed. To support the PGDE student with class content, class management etc and to liaise between the student teacher and the school system.

To mentor the PGDE student. To advise them about the subject and how to teach it. To act as a mentor. To give advice with regards to classroom management and teaching strategies. To mentor the PGDE student. To guide the student teacher in classroom planning, being prepared, having proper schemes of work for each class group. (Confidence also important) To mentor my student teachers. To appraise their lessons. To induct them to teaching. To support my PGDE student re course content, classroom management. To help the PGDE student at the start of the year. To give advice if needed. To allow them the space to develop as a teacher.

To facilitate the trainee teacher in learning how to prepare, plan and present a successful lesson. Provide encouragement and support /be available to discuss any matter that may arise/ outline the material which needs to be covered and indicate a time frame. Page 29 of 73 8 5 1 4 3 4 7 4 1 2

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 5. What are the main challenges for you as a parallel teacher? Time to meet. PGDE student is very slow to share ideas /class plans they are using. To ensure we meet often enough. To supply PGDE student with new ideas \suggestions. To monitor class progress from a distance. Time constraints can impede at times – would like to meet for a longer period of time. We have to try to fit our class content into the course expectations of the PGDE student. Finding time when we both have time for a meeting can also be a challenge.

Finding time to meet with the PDGE student, to have meaningful discussions. Each meeting is often rushed and inconclusive. To ensure that we meet up on a regular basis. Question not answered. Question not answered. Keeping continuous contact to ensure that we are covering the same aspects of the course. Taking the class over the following year. Being absent from classes meaning I have to spend another week readjusting to the class. Ensuring I make the time to be available to the PGDE student. 6. What are your main concerns as a parallel teacher? That the PDGE student feels he/she can approach me with their concerns. Aware that progress\pace not as good as if I had them myself. Worry that students may choose German if class is not adequately stimulating.

I would hope PGDE teachers would be informed of children with special needs and of children with health problems As an option subject if our students (especially first years) have a bad experience of the subject It affects the uptake in subsequent years. That the PDGE student is getting the support that she deserves from me. That the course content /syllabus is being covered. To ensure that effective teaching is being carried out and that the pupils learn effectively and efficiently. Student teachers need more experience before participating in 4th year TP. Too little pupil contact in previous years. Missing out on year group/class group > not familiar with my methods. Making sure that we meet regularly.

Discipline issues arising. Course being covered. That the trainee teacher may not cover the required content that they may not follow up on all the discipline procedures to ensure classroom management. That all relevant material is being covered in class. That there is no discipline issues in the classroom. PGDE student seems to be working through course work too quickly. When I suggest ideas to slow down it often involves me doing extra work e.g. photocopying source resources, do group activity. 7. What in your opinion are the benefits of being a parallel teacher? Mutual Learning I can see the problems a new teacher has. Gives me a chance to reflect on my own teaching. Free time to attend to other duties.

It gives me more time for preparation and corrections. I would hope my experience would reflect positively during meetings with PGDE. PGDE students bring in new and interesting approaches keeping our dept up to date. If I have a pupil who is struggling I can use the time to take them out of class and give them extra help. It is a great opportunity to share ideas and to learn new and up to date teaching strategies. Page 30 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 PGDE students bring lots of new ideas and teaching strategies into classroom. I can incorporate these strategies into my own teaching. - none- To gain new ideas \ fresh ideas. Makes you think more about your own classes. Getting a fresh insight into teaching methodology. Sharing of ideas and resources. Time off to work on duties relating to post. to be able to see and experience new ideas and learning methods coming out of college. That you have an active role in the training of a new teacher. May pick up new ideas. PGD E students could bring new ideas into the department. Frees me up to work on other things 8. What impact does having a PGDE student have on the pupils at school? I believe it has a positive impact as generally PGDE students only have two classes and they focus all of their attention on their classes.

Probably an overall negative impact but they have to practice somewhere. PGDE students have huge enthusiasm for their subject and pass this on to our pupils. They often come from a different art background bringing a more diverse knowledge to our subject. Pupils are often inspired by young new teachers so the pupils often benefit. However, PDGE students often face discipline problems that may result in poor behaviour. It can be very positive addition to the school. PGDE students are enthusiastic and use very creative teaching strategies.

Good teaching can make the difference between success and failure for most pupils because it helps pupils achieve their potential. The student teacher must establish a positive and productive relationship with the pupils. the teacher must be energetic, enthusiastic, committed, dedicated and act responsibly at all times. Depending on the PGDE student, Students can gain a positive/negative experience of the subject. The PGDE student brings with them a huge amount of enthusiasm and creativity. Positive – new teaching methods.

Discipline and classroom management may slip and pupils may be confused due to the new teacher coming in. PGDE students are learning the newest teaching methodologies and implementing these in the classroom. Young and enthusiastic and the PGDE students can relate to the pupils and enhance their learning. They can influence whether a pupil will keep on the subject. The 1st year course may not be revised by the pupils before Junior Cert. Therefore their knowledge of topics covered has to be very good to maintain /achieve high grades.

9. How can we improve the quality of PGDE student participation in order to promote enhanced learning in the classroom? Question not answered. We recently had a French Department meeting where the sole item on the agenda was the PDGE student. They attended too. More formal meetings recommended. Ensure if possible there are lots of projectors, so that the PGDE teacher can use PowerPoint. Encourage them to talk about problems/successes with students. Imbue H.Dip teachers with confidence to share experiences. Have a weekly appointed time for meetings.

I think we do a very good job with PGDE student participation. Afford time for PDGE students to meet with parallel teachers. Mentoring system – especially in September with regards to discipline and classroom management. Every young teacher should aspire to become an excellent teacher. This requires knowledge of the best practises and the development of the skills to implement these in the most effective manner in accordance with the personality of the teacher and the needs of the pupils. The teacher must be prepared to work hard and take advice Page 31 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 on board. Question not answered. Question unclear. Get them to give a presentation to their subject departments at a meeting on one area/aspect that worked well for them, possibly focusing on modern teaching methodologies. Set out the parameters as to when the teacher should be in school, how much they have to get fully involved in school life. Ensure we provide clear, concise instructions/guidelines. Ensure that there are clear lines of communication so if there are any difficulties experienced by the PGDE student would be happy to discuss them with us and we could help them solve these problems.

Structure the system better. Set a time for them to meet with their parallel teacher- free from supervision. 10. Would you be prepared to be involved in a mentoring/ buddying system with a PGDE student? Yes No Not Specified Why/why not? Not specified. Not if it requires extra time. Not this year. School show will require my time. Otherwise there is no benefit in me being freed up. I have though met him on a number of pre arranged occasions to discuss work. Is this not mentoring? Yes. We all need support and guidance. Yes, as I am doing it already. Yes. In order to build a rapport with them and to share ideas on the subject and classroom management. Yes it would be beneficial for both parties.

Not specified. Yes. Already am through UCC. Mentor students every week. No. no reason given. Yes, would see it as being of mutual benefit. Yes, In order to ensure that both the pupils in the class and the trainee teacher benefit while learning and teaching with the help of the teacher. Yes. Important PGDE student has a positive experience in their training year. Its refreshing for a parallel teacher to work with PGDE students – transfer of ideas (both ways. Yes. I feel this is a two way process and both PGDE student and parallel teacher have to learn from each other. Page 32 of 73 9 2 2

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix L Provisional Development Service for Teachers PARTICIPANTS’ EVALUATION FORM Schools: Kinsale Community School Date: 28th January 2011 Topic: Positive Behaviour Management Please rate how you found today’s programme: Very Helpful Helpful Not very helpful No of Participants: 9 What did you find most helpful? Have you any recommendations or suggestions for future in service? Is there anything you wish to add? Summary prepared by E. O’Keeffe PDST Regional Advisor Page 33 of 73 9 • Fantastic practical examples of different strategies to implement in the classroom • Draws attention to many misconceptions about how to handle misbehaviour more effectively • Helpful advice &examples from experienced presenter on how to handle classroom management (4) • Specific tactics for all classroom behaviour supplied • Very practical, really enjoyed session ( 2) • Different strategies very helpful • Giving examples of different classroom environments & how to deal with them • The focus on being positive in the class and knowing it’s OK to smile before Christmas • More time ( 2) • More examples in a longer session • Very good • Very helpful • Perhaps use of case studies in a longer session • Very informative and most relevant • Very good and helpful • Very helpful, relevant & insightful

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix M – Feed back on PGDE/Parallel teacher liaison form Results of Questionnaire- Monitoring form for PGDE students and Parallel Teachers 1. Do you think that completing this form is beneficial? Yes The following responses were given by those who said yes to question 1. If you are sharing a class this is very good for collaborative planning and essential in my opinion. It takes the stress off the PGDE student and lets them know whether they are going in the right direction, concerning the right topic, whether they are spending too much/too little time on a particular topic. Helps get ideas for resources. It can also be hard to find time for meetings so the written recording saves time and ensures proper planning. Allows you to reflect, learn and move on incorporating what you have learned from a period of time. Beneficial if oral contact is limited. Also good to keep a written record of work done. Allows parallel teacher to keep track of the work being covered by the PGDE student. Helps parallel teacher to get an insight into what is being covered in class. It is good to see what the PGDE student has done in class. It was good to let the parallel teacher know exactly what I had been doing. It is very clear No The following responses were given by those who said no to question 1. 2. How often do you think this form should be completed? Weekly Fortnightly Monthly Other 3. On average how much time did it take you to complete/ process this form? Ten minutes 7 – 10 minutes 10 minutes 5 minutes 3 – 5 minutes Less than 10 minutes 5 minutes 2 minutes Page 34 of 73 8 3 1 4

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 4. Is there any section of the form that you would omit? Yes No Other Not specified 5. Would you recommend adding something to this form: Yes No Not specified If yes please explain: Perhaps separate it into days. Then there is clear planning when sharing a class between two teachers and one can also check if one is spending too much time on a topic. Whether class was inspected or not. 6. Could you suggest an alternative way to document progress between the PGDE student and the parallel teacher?

Yes No Not specified Additional Comments Reflection is a focal point of a learning teacher’s experience so they are constantly reflecting on each lesson, week, scheme, etc. This form is similar and allows the mentor teacher an insight as to how they feel about things, what they are happy with, what needs improving, which keeps the lines of communication open even in hectic busy periods, which in turn will allow for an effective learning experience for any PGDE student. It would be good to have a written copy of what is usually discussed informally. Page 35 of 73 6 2 2 4 5 2 3

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix N End of Year PGDE Questionnaire - responses March 2011 Please feel free to use additional paper if necessary 1. Do you still wish to pursue a career in teaching – Please explain? Yes, definitely. I think this year has made me realise I enjoy sharing knowledge and showing pupils to be creative. Watching first years grow in confidence is very rewarding as a teacher. Yes, I do wish to pursue a career in teaching as I love my subjects. Yes, it’s what I have always wanted to do, and have enjoyed the past three years teaching.

Yes, I really enjoy teaching and I love my subject. Yes Of course. I have invested time, energy, money so I am not about to give up. Yes, its s career that is very special taking into account the role and inspiration you can be to the development of a person’s life during their formative years! 2. From your experience of teaching this year what is (a) a good teacher? (b) a poor teacher? Good teacher: Relate to where a pupil is at, making sure the pupil can learn at every level. A good teacher should be inspirational, passionate about their subject and a good listener Uses a range of resources and methodologies, gets students actively involved.

Good knowledge of pedagogy and methodology, good relationship, good knowledge of resources, recognises students as individuals. Prepared, flexible, facilitates and supports good learning. Organised, patient, assertive Understanding, driven, challenging Poor teacher: A teacher who looks down on a pupil, doesn’t listen, isn’t clear Just relies on the book, does not get students involved in the learning process. Disorganised, unimaginative Disorganised, not assertive enough, does not enforce sanctions. Unprepared 3. How do you feel going in/coming out the door of your classes in general? Every class is different, that’s why I like it, going in I feel ok and hope things go to plan but in general I leave feeling content that pupils have done something new.

In general. I feel pleased coming out of my classes if I know the students have learned something. Positive, exhausted! Children are good so I know classes will go well. Confident, of course there are days when students don’t engage with what you thought would be a great lesson and that’s disappointing. Sometimes elated sometimes deflated. Happy, appreciative, grateful. 4. How have your experiences in KCS since Sept influenced these feelings? They have helped me deal with any incidents in the class. Break supervision has given me confidence in dealing with pupils I don’t know, dealing with your own pupils becomes easier. So I go into and out of the class room feeling confident. Yes my experience in KCS has been good as the majority of students are well Page 36 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 behaved and are interested in their learning. Not answered I’m a lot more confident now. They haven’t really – how I feel is dependent on how well I got on with students that day – how interested they were in the task and how they responded. Positively, a lot more relaxed and confident in conducting lessons. 5. How have your experiences in University since September influenced these feelings? College has shown me how to simplify techniques for a younger age group. It has also made me aware of motivation that even pupils who are excellent at a subject need to be motivated. That pupils misbehaving need to be steered in a different direction.

University classes are not always beneficial as some of the objectives are unrealistic. Lectures have been very insightful and feel positive going in. Though information given in the lectures can sometimes be impractical I have learnt a lot and I have managed to test various methods of teaching in the classroom. The H-dip is really a roller coaster ride and so much to do. University has not been part of the day I’ve looked forward to after teaching in the morning. Energy is usually sapped and concentration levels depleted. 6. What strategies have you found helpful in overcoming difficulties in the classroom? For introductions having a variety of power points and visual aids keeps pupils interested. Also doing demonstrations in different areas in the room keeps pupils listening.

I found using PowerPoint slides good to help me communicate topics to students. Going around checking homework is good as students then know they should have it done. Don’t shout, positive feed back, don’t ask or apologise – tell them to do something- no question and say thanks. Circulating the room, constantly scanning, never sitting down. Taking a deep breath! Having a sense of humour, realising that one mistake is not the end of the world. Waiting for silence (don’t talk over!) (PE), use energy of boisterous/hyper pupils productively.

7. As a newly qualified teacher what difficulties do you think are coming down the track? Being a new teacher pupils want to test their limits so I think having school rules and the run of the school will quickly let pupils know you know your stuff and they won’t get away with a lot. I feel discipline issues will also be a difficulty although I do feel I have controlled the class reasonably well. Gaining employment, project maths. I have had no real experience in teaching senior classes and I definitely think that this will be quite challenging.

Hard to find work (full time) although I would be very happy to start slowly with a few part time hours. Employment!! Unemployment, Deployment 8. What have you gained from induction in K.C.S.? KCS gave us talks which made me really consider my approach in dealing with behaviour and also positive teaching. I have given insights into classroom management. I have also become familiar with the syllabus to be covered. Good experience of first year students. Page 37 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 It was good to be immersed in the general school environment for the whole year as opposed to block placement. H-Dips (PGDE) students given the freedom to find their own way. (A little bit of guidance where class structure is involved would be helpful). A thoroughly supportive group of people 9. How have you contributed to KCS? Because of college being very demanding I feel I haven’t had the time to contribute as much as I know I can. I have portrayed a very positive attitude and I hope this has inspired pupils to be positive in the work that they do. I have contributed to KCS as I have taught my classes to the best of my ability. Unfortunately, have not had the time for any extra-curricular activities. I have taken on an extra English resource class. I would like to get involved more with sports teams but college and time constraints prevented this. I have done my best. I have made an effort to get along with everyone in the staff room. I have tried my best to get along with students, firm but fair. Involvement in extra curricular events such as Eacht awards night, matches (soccer, GAA etc.) supervision when asked (halls and classes) Added ideas and resources to PE Dept.

10. Do you feel your parallel teacher fulfilled his/her role? Could this be improved – explain? Yes, my parallel teacher fulfilled her role. She gave me excellent advice and never made me feel like I was in her way. She has encouraged me all the way and this has given me lot of confidence in my teaching. Yes, both my parallel teachers fulfilled their role. They gave me advice and directed me towards relevant resources for teaching. Perhaps not – more meetings, ideas for classes, advice about resources, more clarity on what their role is is needed.

My parallel teachers were always so helpful and available for a chat or much needed advice. I didn’t have a parallel teacher in English, but _ was especially helpful and I thank her for that. Yes particularly with PE. The whole PE Dept was amazing. Can’t give enough praise. 11. Do you feel that school management fulfilled their role? Could this be improved explain? Yes, the Staff is more than helpful and it is all managed very professionally. Yes the school management fulfilled their role. Yes, very supportive.

School management were always very approachable. Maybe more regular meetings with the PGDE students. Yes . Yes the lines of communication were always open. 12. Did you find the behaviour management workshop useful? Could you recommend other workshops that would be of benefit PGDE students? Yes, I did it was a well needed reminder that pupils misbehave in all classes and gave me confidence to handle these situations. Maybe a workshop on teaching transition years – what motivates them, how to keep them engaged.

Yes, behavioural management workshops were very useful, Perhaps a workshop on how to use an interactive board may be beneficial. It was excellent, highly recommended. For those not clear on IT- perhaps a workshop would be useful. Definitely, really learnt a lot during the workshop. – Workshops on special ed needs (how to better accommodate special ed needs students in the classroom), - ICT workshops. Page 38 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Yes, I thought it was very useful. Yes, good as a refresher halfway through the year. 13. How important is class preparation? Vital, If I don’t have certain materials with me it could mean I can’t move on in a certain discipline. If my visual aids aren’t interesting enough this could lead to no class discussion or creative thinking. Class preparation is very important and is essential for a good class. The students will learn the most from a well planned and prepared class.

Vital, if you feel prepared going in, you’re a lot more confident. Crucial – I would feel lost if I didn’t have work prepared. For the student teacher it is very important. You feel more confident going into the classroom when you are organised and ready. Very important particularly when starting off. 14. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? Yes, with first years I think it is important. With a subject they only have once a week it’s a good idea to have some routine, normality as the disciplines change nearly every two weeks. Yes, I rearrange my seating plans every few weeks as this improves the classroom setting. Yes, and seating plans are changes regularly.

Seating arrangement s are very important in the classroom. Need to be put in place at the beginning of the year. Moving them around throughout the year can also help re-awaken them! Yes, I have moved students when I feel where they are sitting is not working for them or me! Yes, had one in place at beginning of year which was good and set tone. 15. Has your style of questioning evolved? Do you incorporate differentiated questioning? Yes, what started as recall questions has now developed into questions that make the pupils question their environment and the world they live in today. Yes, now I feel I ask the same question in a number of different ways so I will get a range of different answers.

Yes, need some work on this (differentiated questioning). Yes, I try to use lower and higher order questions to accommodate all students. I ask more challenging questions to brighter students and more straight forward questions to weaker students so that they can experience success. Definitely, I’m engaging with pupils significantly more. 16. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? This has played a major role. I evaluate every lesson but my focus is on the how did I make learning possible, what could I improve on for next week. I think this has improved my teaching.

Yes, one must look at ones teaching in order to know how he/she could improve. Massively, thought of lesson/weekly reflections as a chore at first, but it forces me to evaluate lesson and I have developed hugely because of it. Self reflection has been a huge part of teaching throughout the year. Completely, you really have to ask yourself some honest questions, you have to be able to critique yourself, think about how you could improve how you handle something. Yes….every lesson = reflection Every week = reflection.

17. How would define effective teaching? If the pupil leaves the room and never does art again but has taken some new knowledge /experience with them I see that as effective teaching. If you can motivate a class to working (making art) for themselves I think this is effective teaching. Effective teaching is when the teacher communicates his/her ideas clearly and Page 39 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 where learning has taken place. Good varying assessment - good resources, - fulfilling learning outcomes. Effective teaching =effective learning. Preparation, confidence etc. are key but you must ensure learning is taking place. A majority of students learning, being able to use/demonstrate the information you have given them. Question was not answered. 18 How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach? It is evident in the pupils work. If they have made an attempt, what I have tried to teach will be there.

I ask them questions and I get them to explain what they have learned in their own words. I also give them regular tests. Numerous forms of assessment – observation, oral discussion, teacher questioning, written homework, written and oral feed back, oral and written tests. From constant questioning, class exams, students enthusiasm and willingness to get involved. They can apply it to something else. Variety of questioning techniques (PE) informed observation. 19. How do you know when a lesson has been successful? When a pupil’s facial expression is one of achievement and pride, I know the class has been a success. Also if a good discussion develops because of an image or pupils work, I also see this as a successful class.

I know when my lessons are successful when students are able to answer my questions correctly. Positive, hard working atmosphere, students asking questions, students prepared for tasks and successful. When students willingly put up their hands and are engaged in the material, rather than dragging the answers out of them. Generally I know when a class has been successful as you can see that pupils seem more alert/ animated – learning something is stimulating so yes I think students more alert/interested.

Learning outcomes met. 20. What have you gained from your year as a PGDE student? I have gained knowledge in my subject. I have learned how to project my voice. I have learned how to get the most from a class. I have learned how to keep my eye on everything that is going on in the room and to ask effective questions. As a PGDE student I have gained insights into the teaching profession and I have learned how to deal with students. Getting experience of school environment. I have experienced life as a teacher not just in the classroom but within the whole school environment.

Insight into the world of teaching. Experience, something that has no substitute. Page 40 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 21. What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date? My laptop – couldn’t do this year without it. Lesson plans, evaluations, and power points are what I need for every lesson. I particularly find PowerPoint slides shows that I have made out very valuable as students learn a lot from their visual presentations. Teachnet.ie Internet and data projector. Internet: Makes things relevant for students and great for lesson ideas. Data projector: really engages the students and caters for visual learners.

Tes connect – teacher’s website - experienced teachers. Mentor (PE) … Internet (French – (tes.co.uk). 21. How would you define the role of the PGDE student? The role of the PGDE student is to gain as much subject and school experience. By getting involved in the school and covering classes you become part of the staff, talking to experienced teachers is some of the best advice a PGDE student can get and watching your parallel teacher teach gives you an insight to how it is done.

Be prepared and plan well and try to get the best out of students. Teacher in training. Teacher in training. Accepts responsibility for the classes he/she is given and though in training, is accountable for their learning. As a student teacher you are required to behave professionally at all times, prepare adequately for classes and teach to the best of your ability. There to learn from staff of experienced knowledgeable teachers. 23. How would you define the role of the parallel teacher? Answer any questions the PGDE needed to know, act as someone to turn to for advice. Guide the PGDE student along and offer them support and advice. Direct the PGDE student to relevant resources.

Advisor on resources, lessons, curriculum, observe my classes, give us opportunity to observe them. A teacher there to support and mentor the PGDE student. Assist the student teacher by feed back on lesson plans, class work. A support to learning teacher with whatever issue they may need help with. 24. How would you define management’s role in relation to PGDE students? Somebody to go to for professional advice if something had happened in your classroom or school grounds. The management role is very efficient in helping PGDE students out. Relevant workshops were set up to help PGDE students to create positive classroom environment. Background support.

A supportive voice to whom the PGDE student can turn. Assistance with problems when they arise. Really helpful with settling into the school and its atmosphere. Allowing for as smooth a transition as possible. Page 41 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix 0– P.G.D.E. Students 2010 survey responses with analysis (in blue ink) 1. Why do you want to be a teacher? Always found the dynamics and issues/responsibilities surrounding a school setting very interesting with relation to development I enjoy working in the classroom. I love teaching English and enjoy thinking of different ways to engage and educate students Communicate knowledge with others. I love my subjects and want to share them with others It seemed to be a natural progression after the arts degree and then masters. Loved school and learning and want them to enjoy it too, follow in mum’s footsteps, love of subjects.

I loved school and always wanted to teach. I love working with students and want to help them achieve their best. I love the subjects I teach. I want to be a teacher because I love learning and having the opportunity to work in an environment where everyday is different, challenging and rewarding. I’ve always respected and admired a good teacher. I’m very passionate about art and having the opportunity to share what I know to others. PGDE students’ motivation behind wanting to teach is praiseworthy and informed by their own positive experiences of learning.

2. From your experience as a pupil what is (a) a good teacher; (b) a poor teacher? Good teacher: Understanding, creative, prepared Organised, strict but fair, approachable, enthusiastic Interested in his/her subject, enthusiastic, get students involved Someone who motivates learning effortlessly, who inspires students to want to learn Someone who conveys information with enthusiasm – someone who repeats information a lot Variety of resources, good classroom management, clarity Uses different methods of teaching, good management of class, gives homework and checks One who was engaging. Use of different activities Enthusiastic, engaging, clear and concise, good listener, passionate about their subject, good motivator, prepared. Poor teacher: Poor management, poorly prepared Unorganised, too lenient in class, easily led by students, unmotivated in teaching their subjects Just reads from books Someone who inspires learning only through fear and discipline Hostile – being too fearful is not conducive to learning. Going at too quick a pace. Not recapping enough Reads from textbook/ write notes on white board constantly, no variation Uses only verbal explanation, can’t manage the class, doesn’t check homework, doesn’t care One who read chapter by chapter from the book.

Unprepared, poor social skills, Unclear, poor motivator PGDE students’ responses show an awareness of the multifaceted range of skills needed to be a good teacher. Page 42 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 3. Why did you pick K.C.S.? Any particular reason(s)? Was placed here by PE dept in UCC - happy A lot of my friends went to school here, they gave me great reports of the school Reputation of being a good school Spanish was available as a subject to teach I live in the area Number of reasons – great atmosphere in the school, staffroom lively chatty, posters and pictures up t reception, Sean very welcoming, I met a current PGDE student who had very positive reports: seemed very helpful to PGDE students We were given our placements by the college. Reputation / accessibility None Many PGDE students chose to train in Kinsale for practical reasons, some had previous knowledge of the school.

4. How did you feel when you visited the school last May? Nervous at first but warmly welcomed. Put at ease immediately by all staff members When I visited the school over the summer I was made feel very welcome. I felt like I was part of the staff and not just a dip student Very welcome I thought the school had a positive atmosphere and I was impressed by the principal’s views on education. Excited to be meeting the other h-dips and getting to hear what it was like from the present h-dips at school.

As above I felt very welcome. All staff very welcoming. Confident. It was a great opportunity to familiarise myself with the school, the staff, the layout of the school, the ethos of the school, school rules and the literature of the school. Also provided great support – discussion with pgde students gave insight to year ahead. none Initial responses to the school appear to be positive. In particular staff at Kinsale Community School are perceived as welcoming. 5. What were your feelings immediately prior to opening? and especially on your first morning in school? Slightly anxious Even with teaching experience, I was very nervous! I was very unsure of myself and dreading my first lesson.

Little nervous about the unknown Extremely nervous but excited I felt sick with nerves and excited at the same time. Very nervous! Not sure were there classes, relief when there were meetings. Nerves again on Monday! Very excited to get started too. It was on my mind throughout the summer. Was very nervous coming up to opening in the month of August? Mixed, Nervous, excited, anxious, enthusiastic, confident, and optimistic. On my first morning I was nervous meeting the other PDGEs and the rest of the staff. Clearly, PGDE students feel nervous and anxious before commencing their teaching practice. The feelings expressed above serve to legitimise the necessity of one of the goals of the LSP2 project, i.e. to support PGDE students.

Page 43 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 6. How did you feel going in/coming out the door of your first class? Relieved as I knew more about what to expect I was satisfied with my first class I was very nervous going in but after the initial introductions I settled in and I feel the class was a success Little nervous going in but once I was started it was fine. I was a little relieved when my first class was finished. Nervous going in, relieved coming out Before going into my first class I stood outside the door for a minute and asked myself if I could really do this, then I took a deep breath and went in. The lesson went well and I left feeling elated.

Going in- nerves excited Coming out- happy and positive as it went very well I felt nervous on entry. I found it very daunting. I was very relieved when first class was over. My nervousness had diminished/ anxiety had gone. I felt satisfied that my first class had gone well. Going into my first class I was nervous but excited to meet the group of new first years. Coming out I felt a little overwhelmed at being responsible for 22 pupils’ first introduction to are and design but again motivated to excite and inspire young artists in the making. These responses demonstrate the serious attitude that PDGE students have towards their chosen career.

One of the goals of the LSP2 project is to ensure a positive experience for PGDE students at Kinsale Community School, to give them the best possible start in their career. 7. Has your experiences in KCS since Sept altered these feelings (questions 4, 5 and 6) if so please explain? Yes I feel more settled in now I am a lot more confident going into class now. The Staff is very friendly and always willing to help. I still feel very welcome- not nervous going into class now. I feel less nervous than at the start of school I don’t feel that the old H-Dips gave an accurate description of what it was like. They said it was really easy and think 6 to 8 classes was an unrealistic view of teaching. I think 8 classes as well as driving to Cork 4 days a week is very demanding. No still feel very welcome, great help from all. Not as nervous Yes now I feel more comfortable going into class, although I always feel that bit nervous. I feel good when I know the students learned something and I taught a good well managed class.

None All the staff and h – dips are very friendly and helpful. I had no reason to be nervous. Responses show overall positive responses to initial start at Kinsale Community School. 8. How realistic are induction courses organised by your university? They are organised quite well by UCC PE dept, have had experience in second and third college with mentors of both subjects Not very! We were introduced to a lot of information in a very short time. It was a lot to process and did not benefit me in my initial weeks of training Well organised and planned Not very, too much information squeezed into too short a time Two days really is not adequate. I would prefer more training in lesson planning. Also I would have liked more information on Junior Certificate English prior to starting to teach third years.

Tutorials are helpful to help with first class content but for someone who had never taught before I don’t believe the induction would be very helpful may have made them more nervous! Well I had 2 weeks maths teaching last year and 2 weeks PE teaching the year before, so I had some induction. I feel if I had more experience I would be more comfortable this year. Page 44 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Ok – many discussed classroom management which is important from the beginning as well as what is expected for the year. The induction week in Crawford was great, realistically they can only cover so much in such a short time, but it was a good eye opener in terms of classroom management and professional/ ethical behaviour. Mixed responses to induction programmes offered by third level institutions. The team are aware of the divergence in approaches to teacher training through out the providing institutions and see the input of third level institutions to teacher training as vital in enhancing the quality of newly qualified teachers.

9. What difficulties are you facing in the classroom? Management. Silence throughout the lesson when explaining something. Improving day to day I have no classroom management difficulties; the students are very well behaved. However I am finding it difficult to gauge the level of material for the class, whether it is too easy or too challenging. No major difficulties some students are a little talkative at times. Sometimes classroom management/discipline is an issue, sometimes I feel I’m not doing a good enough job in engaging the students Sometimes there are discipline issues, small ones people chatting not concentrating on work. Maybe I need to be more severe imposing but I am really not sure how to achieve this.

Homework not being completed – maths my clarity needs to improve. Knowledge of content- not having taught the content before – what way to go about teaching this content. Resources – finding other methods of teaching is difficult. I don’t think of them as difficulties but more as challenges – inclusion/ differentiation – accommodating everyone. 1st years – trying to motivate them intrinsically. 4th Years – some behavioural issues. I feel pupils see art as a waste of time and it is difficult to get them to finish work, The overriding concern of PGDE students was how to manage behaviour in the classroom. This need was discussed by the team and led to the organisation of a behaviour management workshop specifically for PGDE students. (see Appendix L) This has been incorporated into the PGDE induction procedure at Kinsale Community School and will be continued next year. 10. What difficulties do you think are coming down the track? Do you have any one particular nightmare?

Progressing at appropriate rate with class Schemes of work – I find it difficult to plan 7 or 8 weeks in advance. Get the course covered with first year. I find the transition year Spanish class hard because I’ve had so little time with them. I’m worried they won’t really have learned anything! Typical nightmare of inspector walking in at really bad moment. The next inspection, although the first one went well there is always the worry that something won’t flow on the day. Also having to film a class as it just seems so invasive. Classroom management as first years come out of their shell. In future years classroom management of Tys Difficulties teaching/supervising classes of behaviour problems. Would love some tips on behaviour management.

No nightmares! I think there will always be challenges as a teacher. That the 4th years wont have learnt anything by Christmas. That it will become a battle to get work done. Page 45 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 11. What do you want from induction in K.C.S.? Yes I found the whole experience to be very welcoming and understanding I want to get a well rounded experience of teaching. I would like to experience dealing with older classes and not just first years. Good experience as a teacher. Experience and ideas To gain an insight into the life of a professional teacher and to hopefully become one myself. Perfect the teaching of my subjects with more closer help from parallel teachers Want to have a good experience with all type of classes. Hope to learn from observations, watching other teacher’s management components etc.

I felt that the induction we had had in May worked well. I want to experience the full role of being a teacher, dealing with the various year groups, break supervisions and class supervisions. These responses demonstrate the range of expectations held by PGDE students. They are useful in helping to determine the roles of the PGDE student and the parallel teacher. (see Appendix T) 12. What contribution do you see yourself making to KCS? I’ve already been involved in extra curricular activities and enjoy contributing in any way possible I aim to meet the professional requirements of the school. I am available if needed for extra curricular activities.

Helping students through their studies. Hopefully I will fulfil all my professional duties in a meaningful way. I will do my best to teach students and to convey to them information in a clear/ concise fashion. I am involved in s+s everyday; I hope to get involved in extra curricular activities. I would like to think that I will make a valuable contribution. I hope to contribute to TY’s mini company with demonstrations of what they will make and any other projects that will be going on. 13. How can your parallel teacher fulfil his/her role? Parallel teachers have been great so far this term. Really, really helpful. I feel very lucky in comparison to college classmates in different schools My parallel teachers have been very helpful and supportive so far. I have been given handouts and extra notes which have been very helpful.

Keep me on track with regard to curriculum Both parallel teachers have been excellent for advice and support By offering me much needed guidance in the role of discipline and context and method Advice on classroom activities, how to make material interesting, particularly maths. Well my parallel teachers are excellent. I am benefiting from their advice and feedback after every class, I find this excellent – give great tips on management etc. Share key teaching skills that they found valuable I think she is fulfilling it perfectly. I feel that I can approach her with any difficulties or problems.

These responses demonstrate the range of expectations held by PGDE students. They are useful in helping to determine the roles of the PGDE student and the parallel teacher. (See appendix T) Page 46 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 14. How important is class preparation? Crucial for beginning of the year it can give you a confidence that might be faltering Vital. Lesson planning is very important in order to determine what material you want to use and what you want students to know. Very important – must know what you’re going to cover. extremely very, I spend hours preparing my third year English it helps me feel more confident and I come across better/clearer.

Imperative – don’t feel confident if I don’t know the material inside out. Lack of confidence means lack of clarity. Extremely important I feel the more prepared you are the more one can talk and teach in class especially in PE – have to be prepared. Essential – ‘fail to prepare – prepare to fail’ Within art it is vital. Visual aids of other artist’s work as well as examples of the task are necessary. I also think you need to be prepared for the unexpected eg. if a student is of exceptional standard and needs to be challenged to get more from the class. 15. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? Yes but they were prearranged before I had the opportunity At the moment the seating plan is working for me. There are no disruptions in class as of yet.

Yes I have made out seating arrangements for students as students can be very talkative next to their best friend. Yes: changes transition year students around. I have not moved any students yet. I have asked my third year English not to sit right at the back of class as it is a small group of 15. Yes I have changed this a couple of times as I get to know the students. Very important for motivation and focus in the classroom as well as classroom management. Not yet. My maths class were seated by their class teacher. This plan was ok. On the first period with each group, I asked them to line up at the top of the classroom. Firstly, I asked if anyone needed to be near the board. The I assigned them seats – boy girl and made a seating plan. In cases where teachers had already made a seating plan I took a copy. I made a seating plan for each class using photographs. Yes. I let the class sit where they wanted on the first day and I told them that is where they would sit from there on in. I since found it difficult to keep them quiet and gave seating places in a few weeks. The level of work became higher and the level of noise reduced.

16. Have you put any thought into your style of questioning? Yes its an area I’ve learned about in college and continue to do so I have looked into the different forms of questions, literal, inferential, evaluative. I try to incorporate a few of each in lessons. I try to distribute the questions evenly. Ask questions to the entire class and then name someone so all students are alert. Yes: I try to use questioning in such a way that every student eventually gets the answer right, making it positive.

Yes I try to ask questions that will illicit the proper response, something that tells me the students have understood the theme. I will – it will be a portfolio entry I try to get information from students by asking them questions. Haven’t put thought into style. Questioning needs to be varied. This I discovered after my first week. Hands up gives the other students a chance to opt out. Use of both low level and high level cognitive questions. Yes. The questions I ask are purposeful to generate a discussion within the group. It is important to get the groups talking about the art they see before them. Questions are put in a way as to try to encourage every pupil to answer. By not looking for a particular right or wrong answer the pupil has more of a chance to express their opinion. Page 47 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 The responses to 14/15/16 demonstrate that PGDE students are already aware of best practice in relation to these issues. The incorporation of a behaviour management workshop will enhance these practices within Kinsale Community School. 17. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? Yes, reflection is heavily emphasised as part of the experience Self analysis has a huge role to play in my teaching. We are required to reflect on all lessons and assess the issues and successes.

One should be aware of their own way of learning in order to become aware of students. Yes: reflection is strongly encouraged by UCC and I find it very useful for learning where I go wrong and what I can do to improve. Yes I question myself everyday. Could I have done that better if so how? Yes, impossible to avoid with class and weekly evaluations and supervisions! More helpful than I anticipated – seeing what I have to change and improve upon written down in black and white makes it clearer. Well I believe that weekly reflections are good for self analysis. I feel reflections after every class can be repetitive and often time wasting.

Self analysis plays a key part in my teaching. I focus on determining what the strengths of my lessons were and how I can incorporate this into future lessons as well as analysing my weaknesses so that I can develop as a teacher. Yes. Each class is different and it is important to adapt to that class, so they can achieve better learning. By analysing my actions through evaluations of each lesson, I get to improve my role as a teacher. 18. How would define effective teaching? Good management, creative Effective teaching incorporates positive student engagement and student learning and comprehension of the material.

Enthusiastic about subject, getting students involved – up to the board etc Effective teaching is when learning is achieved within a positive classroom environment. Giving students accurate information delivered in a clear concise manner as possible. Insure that they have taken it in correctly and can give information back in their own words ( understanding information rather than just memorising) When students are motivated to ask questions on the topic and have an interest in subject outside the classroom.

TEACHER – good management, approachable, different methods of teaching, good explanations, good rapport with students. Maximising learning by identifying and addressing different student learning styles and matching these with our teaching styles and methods. That each pupil would leave the classroom having learnt something new. Effective teaching – the pupil will remember what they have learnt. 19. How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach? Observation, questioning (triangulated) exam I will implement regular quizzes and mini-tests throughout the year, I am constantly using target questioning in class. Activities are also a big part of my lessons and help in assessing student’s engagement and understanding of a topic. Asking questions and assessment.

Continuous assessment through questions in class, homework and worksheets. Exams of course cannot be ignored either. I wish to ask pointed questions that will enable them to give the information back to me. I will prepare exercises that will aid students to further comprehend information and which will let me know whether they have truly understood. In the case of languages – they are able to use it/write it, spell it. In class assessment as well as tests. Questioning students, their facial expressions, checking homework.

By questioning verbally – homework and checking it, tests – giving tests which challenge students. Questioning throughout the class. Homework, tests, discussion. It is evident from a pupil’s art work if they haven’t tried of if they haven’t understood. So at the end of each class we look at all the work as a group and point out certain aspects of the work. In particular what the lesson was about. Giving each pupil a reminder of what Page 48 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 they have learnt. 20. How do you know when a lesson has been successful? Feedback from questioning pupils relevant When students are willing and able to answer target questions in the recap stage of the lesson. When students are still attentive and alert at the end of the lesson. If students go away having learned something constructive then the lesson has been a success. When every student has a proven that they have learned and has enjoyed the process of learning.

Students are more enthusiastic. I think they are happy when they have the feeling they have learnt something new, that they are having success in learning. They also give plenty of feedback. When in class assessment yields the right answer ( questioning, exercises etc) When students ask sensible questions themselves, facial expressions. Students are able to practice questions; students can answer questions when recapping etc. When anticipated learning outcomes of the lesson have been met. All pupils involved in the learning.

Usually I know when a lesson has been successful by asking at the start of the next class ‘ who can remember what we learnt last week?’ Judging by the response I know if I need to go over it again. 21. What do you hope to gain from your year as a PGDE student? Experience is the main this I hope to gain I hope to learn of and utilise effective teaching methods in the classroom. I hope to build my confidence in the classroom and work on being firm but approachable with students. Experience in class room, teaching skills, knowledge of different abilities. Experience and ideas Valuable teaching experiences – knowledge on discipline ( experienced teachers seem to have little problem with discipline) Perfect sub teaching, learn about curriculum, and learn about motivation, classroom management, questions.

Good overall experience of school life, to gain confidence when teaching, have experience in teaching content, be able to control the class. Develop and learn teaching skills. Identify strategies that work for different classes. I hope to gain experience as a well rounded teacher, and that I will have the ability to instruct clear and purposeful tasks within the classroom. These responses demonstrate the value that PGDE students place on gaining experience. . The team are aware that while the School Induction Policy is an integral part of a PGDE student’s training, there can be no substitute for experience. These comments are a point of reference for encouraging PGDE students to get involved with school life as much as possible and to grasp opportunities that arise through out the year. They will be useful in defining the roles for PGDE students.

22. What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date? Teachers input and experience The internet – I use the internet for all lesson plans, Data projector – this was very useful in lessons and students were more attentive. Textbook, internet. Creative approaches to lesson plans Other teachers who are more experienced than my experience in the classroom. An Irish textbook called ‘is feidir liom’. Internet, resource CD given to us by Physical Education Dept in UCC (very good) Teachers At the moment the projector. A powerpoint is a great way to show visuals to first years. Page 49 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Any other comments you wish to make at this time Kinsale offers a great environment for PDGE students. I think it would have been good to be introduced to the class teachers as well as our parallel teachers at the start of term. This point was discussed by the team and it was considered vital that PGDE students have the chance to meet the wider staff body before their first day of teaching. In particular, PGDE students should be introduced to their parallel teacher and time should be allocated to allow them to meet, discuss their roles, discuss the curriculum, class lists etc.

This is important, as once the time table is fully operational it is very difficult to find time for these vital meetings. Page 50 of 73

Parallel teacher before? 61% 31% 8% Yes No Notspecified How often do you meet? 38% 8% 31% 23% weekly monthly as needed other The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix P Initial survey of Parallel Teachers –responses with analysis (in blue ink) 1. Have you ever been a parallel teacher for a PGDE student before? ( please tick) Yes No not specified The allocation of PGDE students is dependant on a number of factors including subjects of the PGDE students and timetable. It is reassuring that some teachers are well experienced in working with PGDE students, this is reflective of PGDE students often having similar/same subjects year on year – other subjects do not have PGDE students working in that area. The fact that the school has experienced increasing enrolment over the last number of years reflects its ability to increase the number of PGDE students.

2. How often do you meet with your PGDE student? (please tick) Once a week once a month as the need arises other (please specify) about every second week at the end of each chapter to discuss the next one Tried once a week but she was off and had supervision so – when we can Currently, meetings between parallel teachers and PGDE students are often sporadic. They depends on – time, the needs of the PGDE student, the willingness of the parallel teacher to make themselves available. We would recommend that a new system be implemented in this area to ensure regular structured contact is made.

Page 51 of 73 8 5 1 4 3 4 1

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 3. Do you feel that your role as a parallel teacher is clearly defined? (please tick) Yes No not specified Is the role of the parallel teacher defined? 54% 31% 15% Yes No Not specified Until now the role has not been defined in writing. Many parallel teachers have defined their role based on their own experience of being a parallel teacher. The 54% yes reflects the parallel teachers that have experience of this role in the past. 4. How do you see your role as a parallel teacher?

To ensure the PGDE student covers the course while allowing him/her the freedom to teach the class on their own. Regular communication – monitor progress of course work\momentum , assistance in class preparation\methodology ideas Offer support and guidance – discuss curriculum with PGDE student and give advice as needed . To support the PGDE student with class content, class management etc and to liaise between the student teacher and the school system. To mentor the PGDE student . To advise them about the subject and how to teach it.

To act as a mentor. To give advice with regards to classroom management and teaching strategies. To mentor the PGDE student. To guide the student teacher in classroom planning, being prepared, having proper schemes of work for each class group etc-confidence. To mentor my student teachers. To appraise their lessons. To induct them into teaching. To support my PGDE student re course content, classroom management. To help the PGDE student at the start of the year. To give advice if needed.To allow them the space to develop as a teacher. To facilitate the trainee teacher in learning how to prepare, plan and present a successful lesson. Provide encouragement and support /be available to discuss any matter that may arise/ outline the material which needs to be covered and indicate a time frame.

To mentor PGDE students. Advise them re course content to be covered and Re exams and resources available. These were discussed with the team at a meeting on the 11th March 2011. This data was a useful point of reference for defining the roles of the parallel teacher and the PGDE student within the context of the school (appendix T) 5. What are the main challenges for you as a parallel teacher? To ensure we meet often enough To supply PGDE student with new ideas \suggestions. To monitor class progress from a distance. Time constraints can impede at times – would like to meet for a longer period of time. We have to try to fit our class content into the course expectations of the PGDE student. Finding time when we both have time for a meeting can also be a challenge.

Finding time to meet with the PDGE student, to have meaningful discussions.Each meeting is often rushed and inconclusive. To ensure that we meet up on a regular basis. Question not answered. Question not answered. Keeping continuous contact to ensure that we are covering the same aspects of the course. Taking the class over the following year. Being absent from classes meaning I have to spend another week readjusting to the class. Ensuring I make the time to be available to the PGDE student. Time to meet. PGDE student is very slow to share ideas /class plans they are using. Clearly time and meaningful contact is a predominant challenge for parallel teachers. A structured approach to monitoring was identified by the parallel teachers and suggestions for addressing this issue were piloted. (Appendix E and Appendix F) 6. What are your main concerns as a parallel teacher? Page 52 of 73 7 4 2

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 That the PDGE student feels he/she can approach me with their concerns. Aware that progress\pace not as good as if I had them myself. Worry that students may choose German if class is not adequately stimulating. I would hope PGDE teachers would be informed of children with special needs and of children with health problems As an option subject if our students ( especially first years) have a bad experience of the subject It affects the uptake in subsequent years . That the PDGE student is getting the support that she deserves from me.

That the course content /syllabus is being covered. To ensure that effective teaching is being carried out and that the pupils learn effectively and efficiently. Student teachers need more experience before participating in 4th year TP. Too little pupil contact in previous years. Missing out on year group/class group > not familiar with my methods. Making sure that we meet regularly. Discipline issues arising. Course being covered. That the trainee teacher may not cover the required content, that they may not follow up on all the discipline procedures to ensure classroom management.

That all relevant material is being covered in class. That there is no discipline issues in the classroom. PGDE student seems to be working through course work too quickly. When I suggest ideas to slow down it often involves me doing extra work eg photocopying source resources , do group activity. 7. What in your opinion are the benefits of being a parallel teacher? Mutual Learning I can see the problems a new teacher has. Gives me a chance to reflect on my own teaching. Free time to attend to other duties . It gives me more time for preparation and corrections. I would hope my experience would reflect positively during meetings with PGDE. PGDE students bring in new and interesting approaches keeping our dept up to date. If I have a pupil who is struggling I can use the time to take them out of class and give them extra help.

It is a great opportunity to share ideas and to learn new and up to date teaching strategies. PGDE students bring lots of new ideas and teaching strategies into classroom. I can incorporate these strategies into my own teaching. - none- To gain new ideas \ fresh ideas. Makes you think more about your own classes. Getting a fresh insight into teaching methodology. Sharing of ideas and resources. Time off to work on duties relating to post. to be able to see and experience new ideas and learning methods coming out of college. That you have an active role in the training of a new teacher. May pick up new ideas. PGD E students could bring new ideas into the department. Frees me up to work on other things. The team felt that this is a reflective of the level of staff commitment. It reflects the parallel teachers’ openness to continued professional development and their willingness to embrace new ideas.

8. What impact does having a PGDE student have on the pupils at school? I believe it has a positive impact as generally PGDE students only have two classes and they focus all of their attention on their classes. Probably an overall negative impact but they have to practice somewhere. PGDE students have huge enthusiasm for their subject and pass this on to our pupils. They often come from a different art background bringing a more diverse knowledge to our subject. Pupils are often inspired by young new teachers so the pupils often benefit. However, PDGE students often face discipline problems that may result in poor behaviour.

It can be very positive addition to the school. PGDE students are enthusiastic and use very creative teaching strategies. good teaching can make the difference between success and failure for most pupils because it helps pupils achieve their potential. The student teacher must establish a positive and productive relationship with the pupils. the teacher must be energetic, enthusiastic, committed, dedicated and act responsibly at all times. Depending on the PGDE student, Students can gain a positive/negative experience of the subject. The PGDE student brings with them a huge amount of enthusiasm and creativity. Positive – new teaching methods.

Discipline and classroom management may slip and pupils may be confused due to the new teacher coming in. PGDE students are learning the newest teaching methodologies and implementing these in the classroom. Young and enthusiastic and the PGDE students can relate to the pupils and enhance their learning. They can influence whether a pupil will keep on the subject. The 1st year course may not be revised by the pupils before Junior Cert. Therefore their knowledge of topics covered has to be very good to maintain /achieve high grades. Page 53 of 73

Would you mentor a PGDE student? 70% 15% 15% Yes No Not specified The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 9. How can we improve the quality of PGDE student participation in order to promote enhanced learning in the classroom? Question not answered. We recently had a French Department meeting where the sole item on the agenda was the PDGE student. They attended too. More formal meetings recommended. Ensure if possible there are lots of projectors, so that the PGDE teacher can use PowerPoint. Encourage them to talk about problems/successes with students. Imbue H.Dip teachers with confidence to share experiences. Have a weekly appointed time for meetings. I think we do a very good job with PGDE student participation.

Afford time for PDGE students to meet with parallel teachers. Mentoring system – especially in September with regards to discipline and classroom management. Every young teacher should aspire to become an excellent teacher. This requires knowledge of the best practises and the development of the skills to implement these in the most effective manner in accordance with the personality of the teacher and the needs of the pupils. The student teacher must be prepared to work hard and take advice on board.

Question not answered. Question unclear. Get them to give a presentation to their subject departments at a meeting on one area/aspect that worked well for them, possibly focusing on modern teaching methodologies. Set out the parameters as to when the teacher should be in school, how much they have to get fully involved in school life. Ensure we provide clear, concise instructions/guidelines. Ensure that there are clear lines of communication so if there are any difficulties experienced by the PGDE student would be happy to discuss them with us and we could help them solve these problems. Structure the system better. Set a time for them to meet with their parallel teacher- free from supervision. It was felt that a structured/ more formal means of contact between parallel teachers and PGDE students required. PGDE/Parallel teacher liaison form -Appendix F) It was recommended that PGDE students should be encouraged to observe some lessons of their parallel teacher/experienced teacher. Similarly, the parallel teacher should observe some lessons given by the PGDE student.

10. Would you be prepared to be involved in a mentoring/ buddying system with a PGDE student? Yes No Not Specified Why/why not? Not specified. Not if it requires extra time. Not this year. School show will require my time. Otherwise there is no benefit in me being freed up. I have though met him on a number of pre arranged occasions to discuss work. Is this not mentoring? Yes. We all need support and guidance. Yes , as I am doing it already. Yes. In order to build a rapport with them and to share ideas on the subject and classroom management . Yes it would be beneficial for both parties.

Not specified. Yes. Already am through UCC. Mentor students every week. No. no reason given. Yes, would see it as being of mutual benefit. Yes, In order to ensure that both the pupils in the class and the trainee teacher benefit while learning and teaching with the help of the teacher. Yes. Important PGDE student has a positive experience in their training year. Its refreshing for a parallel teacher to work with PGDE students – transfer of ideas both ways. Yes. I feel this is a two way process and both PGDE student and parallel teacher have to learn from each other. This again, reflects the willingness of the parallel teacher to develop professionally – the PGDE students contribute many positive experiences to the school that enhance learning.

Appendix Q Provisional Development Service for Teachers (responses with analysis) PARTICIPANTS’ EVALUATION FORM Page 54 of 73 9 2 2

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Schools: Kinsale Community School Date: 28th January 2011 Topic: Positive Behaviour Management Please rate how you found today’s programme: Very Helpful Helpful Not very helpful No of Participants: 9 What did you find most helpful? Have you any recommendations or suggestions for future in service? Is there anything you wish to add? Summary prepared by E. O’Keeffe PDST Regional Advisor This workshop arose because the PGDE students expressed a concern about behaviour management in original questionnaire.

The workshop was well received by 100 % of the participants and will become a feature of the induction programme for PGDE students to be held at the start of the academic school year. Appendix R PGDE Student /Parallel liaison form feedback - Analysis of Questionnaire in blue ink- Page 55 of 73 9 • Fantastic practical examples of different strategies to implement in the classroom • Draws attention to many misconceptions about how to handle misbehaviour more effectively • Helpful advice &examples from experienced presenter on how to handle classroom management (4) • Specific tactics for all classroom behaviour supplied • Very practical, really enjoyed session ( 2) • Different strategies very helpful • Giving examples of different classroom environments & how to deal with them • More time ( 2) • More examples in a longer session • Very good • Very helpful • Perhaps use of case studies in a longer session • Very informative and most relevant • Very good and helpful • Very helpful, relevant & insightful • Appreciated the realistic approach

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 1. Do you think that completing this form is beneficial? Yes 100% positive response The following responses were given by those who said yes to question 1. If you are sharing a class this is very good for collaborative planning and essential in my opinion. It takes the stress off the PGDE student and lets them know whether they are going in the right direction, concerning the right topic, whether they are spending too much/too little time on a particular topic. Helps get ideas for resources. It can also be hard to find time for meetings so the written recording saves time and ensures proper planning.

Allows you to reflect, learn and move on incorporating what you have learned from a period of time. Beneficial if oral contact is limited. Also good to keep a written record of work done. Allows parallel teacher to keep track of the work being covered by the PGDE student. Helps parallel teacher to get an insight into what is being covered in class. It is good to see what the PGDE student has done in class. It was good to let the parallel teacher know exactly what I had been doing . It is very clear The team felt that this reflects the need to have structured communication between the PGDE student and the Parallel teacher. It also highlights the need for written documentation to track progress. ‘ If it doesn’t exist in writing it doesn’t exist at all’ No The following responses were given by those who said no to question 1. 2. How often do you think this form should be completed? Weekly Fortnightly Monthly Other The benefits of this form cannot be under-estimated. However it was felt that completing it weekly may put undue pressure on PGDE students. Completing monthly make result in some material being omitted. After long discussion it was agreed that fortnightly /bi monthly would be the best option.

Page 56 of 73 8 3 1 4

Would you recommend adding something to this form? 25% 50% 25% Yes No Not specified The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 6. On average how much time did it take you to complete/ process this form? Ten minutes 7 – 10 minutes 10 minutes 5 minutes 3 – 5 minutes Less than 10 minutes 5 minutes 2 minutes Is there any section of the form that you would omit? Approximate average time taken as 8 minutes. It was felt that this was appropriate and therefore set as the recommended. 4. Is there any section of this form that you would omit?

yes no other not specified 6 2 It was felt that this reflects the cooperation/acceptance of this suggested system by BOTH the PGDE students and the parallel teachers. 5. Would you recommend adding something to this form: Yes No Not specified If yes please explain: Could you suggest an alternative way to document progress between the PGDE student and the parallel teacher? Yes No Not specified No alternative was offered. There was a general acceptance of this form. Its pros out-weigh it’s cons! Additional comments: Page 57 of 73 2 4 Perhaps separate it into days. Then there is clear planning when sharing a class between two teachers and one can also check if one is spending too much time on a topic. Whether class was inspected or not.

5 2 3

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Reflection is a focal point of a learning teacher’s experience so they are constantly reflecting on each lesson, week, scheme, etc. This form is similar and allows the mentor teacher an insight as to how they feel about things, what they are happy with, what needs improving, which keeps the lines of communication open even in hectic busy periods, which in turn will allow for an effective learning experience for any PGDE student.

It would be good to have a written copy of what is usually discussed informally. Page 58 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix S End of Year PGDE Questionnaire – responses – (analysis in blue ink) March 2011 Please feel free to use additional paper if necessary 1. Do you still wish to pursue a career in teaching – Please explain? Yes, definitely. I think this year has made me realise I enjoy sharing knowledge and showing pupils to be creative. Watching first years grow in confidence is very rewarding as a teacher. Yes, I do wish to pursue a career in teaching as I love my subjects. Yes, it’s what I have always wanted to do, and have enjoyed the past three years teaching.

Yes, I really enjoy teaching and I love my subject. Yes Of course. I have invested time, energy, money so I am not about to give up. Yes, its s career that is very special taking into account the role and inspiration you can be to the development of a person’s life during their formative years! The positive responses of PGDE students reflect a positive experience of teaching at Kinsale Community School. Overall PGDE students wish to continue teaching. 2. From your experience of teaching this year what is (a) a good teacher? (b) a poor teacher? Good teacher: Relate to where a pupil is at, making sure the pupil can learn at every level. A good teacher should be inspirational, passionate about their subject and a good listener Uses a range of resources and methodologies, gets students actively involved.

Good knowledge of pedagogy and methodology, good relationship, good knowledge of resources, recognises students as individuals. Prepared, flexible, facilitates and supports good learning. Organised, patient, assertive Understanding, driven, challenging Poor teacher: A teacher who looks down on a pupil, doesn’t listen, isn’t clear Just relies on the book, does not get students involved in the learning process. Disorganised, unimaginative Disorganised, not assertive enough, does not enforce sanctions. unprepared In general, there is no change here from previous opinions as to what makes a good teacher.

3. How do you feel going in/coming out the door of your classes in general? Every class is different, that’s why I like it, going in I feel ok and hope things go to plan but in general I leave feeling content that pupils have done something new. In general. I feel pleased coming out of my classes if I know the students have learned something. Positive, exhausted! Children are good so I know classes will go well. Confident, of course there are days when students don’t engage with what you Page 59 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 thought would be a great lesson and that’s disappointing. Sometimes elated sometimes deflated. Happy, appreciative, grateful. Very positive responses to experiences in the classroom, while at the same recognising the challenges that are faced. 4. How have your experiences in KCS since Sept influenced these feelings? They have helped me deal with any incidents in the class. Break supervision has given me confidence in dealing with pupils I don’t know, dealing with your own pupils becomes easier. So I go into and out of the class room feeling confident. Yes my experience in KCS has been good as the majority of students are well behaved and are interested in their learning.

Not answered I’m a lot more confident now. They haven’t really – how I feel is dependent on how well I got on with students that day – how interested they were in the task and how they responded. Positively, a lot more relaxed and confident in conducting lessons. Clearly, PGDE students are a lot more confident and the sense of anxiety presented in the initial survey is no longer present. 5. How have your experiences in University since September influenced these feelings? College has shown me how to simplify techniques for a younger age group. It has also made me aware of motivation that even pupils who are excellent at a subject need to be motivated. That pupils misbehaving need to be steered in a different direction.

University classes are not always beneficial as some of the objectives are unrealistic. Lectures have been very insightful and feel positive going in. Though information given in the lectures can sometimes be impractical I have learnt a lot and I have managed to test various methods of teaching in the classroom. The H-dip is really a roller coaster ride and so much to do. University has not been part of the day I’ve looked forward to after teaching in the morning. Energy is usually sapped and concentration levels depleted. As in the first survey, PGDE’s responses to the academic side of the course are varied. 6. What strategies have you found helpful in overcoming difficulties in the classroom? For introductions having a variety of power points and visual aids keeps pupils interested. Also doing demonstrations in different areas in the room keeps pupils listening.

I found using PowerPoint slides good to help me communicate topics to students. Going around checking homework is good as students then know they should have it done. Don’t shout, positive feed back, don’t ask or apologise – tell them to do something- no question and say thanks. Circulating the room, constantly scanning, never sitting down. Taking a deep breath! Having a sense of humour, realising that one mistake is not the end of the world. Waiting for silence, use energy of boisterous pupils productively. Page 60 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 PGDE students have devised their own personal strategies for overcoming difficulties in the classroom, a clear indication of the fact that there is no one system for managing a classroom. We are also reminded here of the importance of gaining experience and finding one’s own system. 7. As a newly qualified teacher what difficulties do you think are coming down the track? Being a new teacher pupils want to test their limits so I think having school rules and the run of the school will quickly let pupils know you know your stuff and they won’t get away with a lot.

I feel discipline issues will also be a difficulty although I do feel I have controlled the class reasonably well. Gaining employment, project maths. I have had no real experience in teaching senior classes and I definitely think that this will be quite challenging. Hard to find work (full time) although I would be very happy to start slowly with a few part time hours. Employment!! Unemployment, Redeployment PGDE students anxieties have altered here, from dealing with classroom issues to practical issues such as gaining employment or having the opportunity to build on their experiences following the PGDE course.

8. What have you gained from induction in K.C.S.? KCS gave us talks which made me really consider my approach in dealing with behaviour and also positive teaching. I have given insights into classroom management. I have also become familiar with the syllabus to be covered. Good experience of first year students. It was good to be immersed in the general school environment for the whole year as opposed to block placement. H-Dips (PGDE) students given the freedom to find their own way.( A little bit of guidance where class structure is involved would be helpful). A thoroughly supportive group of people Overall a positive response to K.C.S induction programme, however reference is made to the lack of guidance in some cases, once again reinforcing the importance of the project. 9. How have you contributed to KCS?

Because of college being very demanding I feel I haven’t had the time to contribute as much as I know I can. I have portrayed a very positive attitude and I hope this has inspired pupils to be positive in the work that they do. I have contributed to KCS as I have taught my classes to the best of my ability. Unfortunately, have not had the time for any extra-curricular activities. I have taken on an extra English resource class. I would like to get involved more with sports teams but college and time constraints prevented this. I have done my best. I have made an effort to get along with everyone in the staff room. I have tried my best to get along with students, firm but fair. Involvement in extra curricular events such as Eacht awards night, matches (soccer, GAA etc.) supervision when asked (halls and classes) Added ideas and resources to PE Dept.

Page 61 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 The answers to this question allude to the lack of clarity of the role of the PGDE teacher and what is expected of them. While PGDE students have expressed a desire to get involved with extra curricular activities at Kinsale Community School and gain as much experience as possible, many felt that the constraints on their time did not allow this. 10. Do you feel your parallel teacher fulfilled his/her role? Could this be improved – explain? Yes, my parallel teacher fulfilled her role. She gave me excellent advice and never made me feel like I was in her way. She has encouraged me all the way and this has given me lot of confidence in my teaching.

Yes, both my parallel teachers fulfilled their role. They gave me advice and directed me towards relevant resources for teaching. Perhaps not – more meetings, ideas for classes, advice about resources, more clarity on what their role is is needed. My parallel teachers were always so helpful and available for a chat or much needed advice. I didn’t have a parallel teacher in English, but _ was especially helpful and I thank her for that. Yes particularly with PE. The whole PE Dept were amazing. Can’t give enough praise.

While the above answers reflect a positive relationship between parallel teacher and PGDE student, this appears to be at an informal, adhoc level. This reinforces the necessity of having a more structured system of liaison between parallel teacher and PGDE students and has been addressed with the introduction the liaison form (Appendix F) 11. Do you feel that school management fulfilled their role? Could this be improved explain? Yes, all the staff are more than helpful and it is all managed very professionally. Yes the school management fulfilled their role.

Yes, very supportive. School management were always very approachable. Maybe more regular meetings with the PGDE students. Yes . Yes the lines of communication were always open. 100% Positive response to management’s conduct in relation to PDGE students. 12. Did you find the behaviour management workshop useful? Could you recommend other workshops that would be of benefit PGDE students? Yes, I did it was a well needed reminder that pupils misbehave in all classes and gave me confidence to handle these situations. Maybe a workshop on teaching transition years – what motivates them, how to keep them engaged.

Yes, behavioural management workshops were very useful, Perhaps a workshop on how to use an interactive board may be beneficial. It was excellent, highly recommended. For those not clear on IT- perhaps a workshop would be useful. Definitely, really learnt a lot during the workshop. – workshops on special ed needs(how to better accommodate special ed needs students in the classroom), - ICT workshops. Yes, I thought it was very useful. Page 62 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Yes, good as a refresher halfway through the year. PDGE students clearly appreciated the behaviour management workshop and also made some useful suggestions as to other workshops that might be considered. 13. How important is class preparation? Vital, If I don’t have certain materials with me it could mean I can’t move on in a certain discipline. If my visual aids aren’t interesting enough this could lead to no class discussion or creative thinking.

Class preparation is very important and is essential for a good class. The students will learn the most from a well planned and prepared class. Vital, if you feel prepared going in, you’re a lot more confident. Crucial – I would feel lost if I didn’t have work prepared. For the student teacher it is very important. You feel more confident going into the classroom when you are organised and ready. Very important particularly when starting off. 14. Have you put any thought into seating arrangements? Yes, with first years I think it is important. With a subject they only have once a week it’s a good idea to have some routine, normality as the disciplines change nearly every two weeks. Yes, I rearrange my seating plans every few weeks as this improves the classroom setting. Yes, and seating plans are changes regularly.

Seating arrangement s are very important in the classroom. Need to be put in place at the beginning of the year. Moving them around throughout the year can also help re-awaken them! Yes, I have moved students when I feel where they are sitting is not working for them or me! Yes, had one in place at beginning of year which was good and set tone. 15. Has your style of questioning evolved? Do you incorporate differentiated questioning? Yes, what started as recall questions has now developed into questions that make the pupils question their environment and the world they live in today.

Yes, now I feel I ask the same question in a number of different ways so I will get a range of different answers. Yes, need some work on this (differentiated questioning). Yes, I try to use lower and higher order questions to accommodate all students. I ask more challenging questions to brighter students and more straight forward questions to weaker students so that they can experience success. Definitely, I’m engaging with pupils significantly more. 16. Has self analysis any role to play in your teaching? This has played a major role. I evaluate every lesson but my focus is on the how did I make learning possible, what could I improve on for next week. I think this has improved my teaching.

Yes, one must look at ones teaching in order to know how he/she could improve. Massively, thought of lesson/weekly reflections as a chore at first, but it forces me to evaluate lesson and I have developed hugely because of it. Self reflection has been a huge part of teaching throughout the year. Completely, you really have to ask yourself some honest questions, you have to be able to critique yourself, think about how you could improve how you handle Page 63 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 something. Yes….every lesson = reflection Every week = reflection. 17. How would define effective teaching? If the pupil leaves the room and never does art again but has taken some new knowledge /experience with them I see that as effective teaching. If you can motivate a class to working (making art) for themselves I think this is effective teaching. Effective teaching is when the teacher communicates his/her ideas clearly and where learning has taken place.

Good varying assessment - good resources, - fulfilling learning outcomes. Effective teaching =effective learning. Preparation, confidence etc. are key but you must ensure learning is taking place. A majority of students learning, being able to use/demonstrate the information you have given them. Question was not answered. 18 How will you know that your students have learned what you’re trying to teach? It is evident in the pupils work. If they have made an attempt, what I have tried to teach will be there.

I ask them questions and I get them to explain what they have learned in their own words. I also give them regular tests. Numerous forms of assessment – observation, oral discussion, teacher questioning, written homework, written and oral feed back, oral and written tests. From constant questioning, class exams, students enthusiasm and willingness to get involved. They can apply it to something else. Variety of questioning techniques (PE) informed observation. 19. How do you know when a lesson has been successful? When a pupil’s facial expression is one of achievement and pride, I know the class has been a success. Also if a good discussion develops because of an image or pupils work, I also see this as a successful class.

I know when my lessons are successful when students are able to answer my questions correctly. Positive, hard working atmosphere, students asking questions, students prepared for tasks and successful. When students willingly put up their hands and are engaged in the material, rather than dragging the answers out of them. Generally I know when a class has been successful as you can see that pupils seem more alert/ animated – learning something is stimulating so yes I think students more alert/interested.

Learning outcomes met. Page 64 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 20. What have you gained from your year as a PGDE student? I have gained knowledge in my subject. I have learned how to project my voice. I have learned how to get the most from a class. I have learned how to keep my eye on everything that is going on in the room and to ask effective questions. As a PGDE student I have gained insights into the teaching profession and I have learned how to deal with students. Getting experience of school environment. I have experienced life as a teacher not just in the classroom but within the whole school environment.

Insight into the world of teaching. Experience, something that has no substitute. PGDE students cite gaining experience as being a key achievement. This point further affirms the need to encourage PGDE students to get involved with as many areas of school life as possible and this is reiterated in the roles for PGDE students (Appendix S) 21. What do you consider to be your most valuable resource to date? My laptop – couldn’t do this year without it. Lesson plans, evaluations, and power points are what I need for every lesson.

I particularly find PowerPoint slides shows that I have made out very valuable as students learn a lot from their visual presentations. Teachnet.ie Internet and data projector. Internet: Makes things relevant for students and great for lesson ideas. Data projector: really engages the students and caters for visual learners. Tes connect – teachers website - experienced teachers. Mentor (PE) … Internet (French – (tes.co.uk)). PGDE students cite many resources which could also be shared with parallel teachers in order to enhance learning. PGDE students also see their parallel teachers as experienced professionals.

Paralle teachers should be encouraged to impart their knowledge and this is expressed in the revised roles for parallel teacher (appendix T) 22. How would you define the role of the PGDE student? The role of the PGDE student is to gain as much subject and school experience. By getting involved in the school and covering classes you become part of the staff, talking to experienced teachers is some of the best advice a PGDE student can get and watching your parallel teacher teach gives you an insight to how it is done.

Be prepared and plan well and try to get the best out of students. Teacher in training. Teacher in training. Accepts responsibility for the classes he/she is given and though in training, is accountable for their learning. As a student teacher you are required to behave professionally at all times, prepare adequately for classes and teach to the best of your ability. There to learn from staff of experienced knowledgeable teachers. Page 65 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Answers here are short and general, the development of clear roles (appendix T) aim to provide a more concise outline of what is expected of the PDGE student. 23. How would you define the role of the parallel teacher? Answer any questions the PGDE needed to know, act as someone to turn to for advice. Guide the PGDE student along and offer them support and advice. Direct the PGDE student to relevant resources. Advisor on resources, lessons, curriculum, observe my classes, give us opportunity to observe them.

A teacher there to support and mentor the PGDE student. Assist the student teacher by feed back on lesson plans, class work. A support to learning teacher with whatever issue they may need help with. Clearly, the parallel teacher plays a vital role in guiding the PGDE student. The development of clear roles and guidelines (appendix T &U) aim to provide a more concise outline of what is expected of the parallel teacher and the PDGE student. 24. How would you define management’s role in relation to PGDE students? Somebody to go to for professional advice if something had happened in your classroom or school grounds.

The management role is very efficient in helping PGDE students out. Relevant workshops were set up to help PGDE students to create positive classroom environment. Background support. A supportive voice to whom the PGDE student can turn. Assistance with problems when they arise. Really helpful with settling into the school and its atmosphere. Allowing for as smooth a transition as possible. Management supports the development of clear roles (appendix T & U) which aim to provide a more concise outline of what is expected of the PDGE student and the parallel teacher..

Page 66 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix T - Suggested roles for PGDE students and parallel teachers Roles Parallel Teacher Outline the course content to be covered as per department plan and actively support the PGDE in covering this. Arrange text books for PGDE student. Make the PDGE student aware of resources available. Liaise with PGDE student at pre-agreed intervals. Provide encouragement and incite confidence to the PGDE student. Encourage PGDE student to observe lessons of experienced teachers. Promote communication and exchange of teaching strategies, resources and skills. As a mentor to the PGDE student strive to adopt best practice. PGDE Student Familiarise themselves with the School’s Code of Behaviour, Child Protection Guidelines, Subject Department Plan and other relevant policies/documentation.

Teaching practise should reflect the School’s Mission Statement and Ethos. Cover the prescribed curriculum as outlined in the subject plan. Liaise with their parallel teacher at pre-agreed intervals. Promote communication and exchange of teaching strategies, resources and skills. Observe lessons taught by an experienced teacher (parallel teacher recommended) . Inform the school and their parallel teacher in advance of being absent. Attend subject meetings, workshops, in-services, parent-teacher meeting etc. provided by the school or send apologies.

Must dress appropriately. Official correspondence (e.g. micro teaching letters) to parents or guardians must be shown to parallel teachers/management in advance. Are encouraged to integrate with staff. Are encouraged to get involved in co- curricular activities. Page 67 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix U Some Elements to Consider when Developing Teaching Practice Competences. Mentoring • Development of a working and learning relationship between the PGDE student and the parallel teacher in the sense of an expert- novice- relationship. • Reflecting on own preconditions: the voluntary or involuntary taking over of a mentoring function, previous experience with PGDE students, experience based on own teaching practices and studies, consulting and guidance competence.

• Reflecting on preconditions of the PGDE student: previous experiences and development of competences during his/her studies and teaching practice. Observation • Precise observation tasks help the PGDE student to gradually grasp the complexity of the events during a lesson. For example, a PGDE student could be instructed to observe a pupil’s progress over a longer period of time by noting his/her perceptions in non judgemental language. • Observation and documentation: e.g. when do certain pupils participate actively and when to they participate passively in a lesson, which pedagogic measures have a favourable or unfavourable influence on learning processes and group dynamics.

• Observation by the parallel teacher: where does the trainee succeed, the beginning and the conclusion of a lesson (conducive for the learning processes?) the formulation of tasks, presentation etc. Discussions on Planning and Reflection • Establishment of a temporary framework for regular discussions on planning and reflection • Conversation management; appreciation, authenticity, the PGDE student should start with reflection. Guidance • In the field of organisation, whiteboard, handling of media, instructions of tasks, correction, teacher language, role of the teacher, educational tasks..

• When the PGDE student develops a questioning mind-set (how are you doing that? Why are you doing it that way?) They have already learned many things but some PGDE may need guidance in one or more aspects. When mentoring /monitoring the PGDE student the parallel teacher should focus on both the planning and the teaching of lessons. Under these two broad headings the following points might be considered… Planning Lessons Page 68 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 • Sustained expertise • Effort to improve professional basics • Provision for the prerequisites of pupils • Objectives have been set in terms of the curriculum and according to the pupils • Detailed lessons planned (objectives, phases, classroom activity…) • Logical, field specific and pupil related conception of methods. • Well-founded use of media( choice and organisation of available media, preparation of own media) • Effort to differentiate and focus on pupils • Creativity • Quizzes/tests Teaching Lessons Presentation • Opening the lesson (silence, greeting, objective of the lesson, motivation) • Structuring of the different phases (clear instructions, comprehensive presentation, consequent attention, openness to ideas and reactions from the pupils, transition between the phases… ) • Organisation for good general conditions for learning and teaching processes (clean white board, operate media, provision for working materials, workbooks, textbooks, writing utensils…) • Attitude towards the class and individual pupils (gentleness, patience, encouragement, attentiveness, firmness, self confidence…) • Interaction with individual pupils and with the whole class • Competence in the use of media • Whiteboard charts, handwriting • Teacher language (comprehensive and age appropriate language…) Methodology and Class Arrangements • Activities of the teacher ( telling, presenting a model, posing questions and tasks, defining procedures, explaining facts, moderating discussions…) Page 69 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 • Establishment of working opportunities for pupils that are appropriate to the topics and the objectives (listening, classroom discussions, pair work, group work, individual work with different working materials…) • Establishment of opportunities for pupils to active participate in the lesson • Giving feedback (positive re-enforcement, constructive criticism) • Flexibility Educational Actions • Interpersonal skills and behaviour towards the class and individual pupils • Teaching style (concentration via clear assignment of tasks, type and degree of guidance, proportion of self guided or teacher guided learning…) • Classroom management, reference to class rules • Identification of disruptions during the lesson and appropriate reactions • Development of appropriate educational objectives and the attempt put them into practice range of learning aids Observation • Documentation and reflection of general observations • Accomplishment of specific observation tasks • Long term observation of pupils with documentation • Documentation of observation in a non judgemental language • Distinction between observation and evaluation Reflection • Willingness to reflect verbally on own etching practice with the help of agreed criteria • Openness towards questions, criticism and suggestions of the mentor • Constructive proposals of solutions of tasks, problems and conflicts • External and self evaluation of the growth of knowledge and competences • Written reflection of observations, experience, and developments in the teaching practice portfolio Page 70 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Overall impression • Attitude to work and reliability (willingness to get involved) • Self confidence and degree of independence when teaching • Strategies to overcome difficulties • Co-operation with mentors, year heads, and staff • Capacity to reflect, willingness to learn, and learning progress Appendix V– Micro teaching letter template. Page 71 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Date _ _ Dear Parent/ Guardian, In order to facilitate staff training and professional development, during the course of this year it may be necessary to record individual lessons that your son/ daughter attends in Kinsale Community School. This will be done with adherence to legal and ethical guidelines for the privacy and confidentiality of all parties. As normal practice the video will be erased once it has fulfilled its purpose. I would be grateful if you could sign the attached slip in order to indicate your acceptance of this practice. All forms must be returned to _ before _ .

Students who fail to return this form may not be part of the class on this day. Yours faithfully, _ _ - - I _ agree that my son/daughter _ may be present at a lesson that will be recorded for the purpose of staff professional development in Kinsale Community School. Signed _ _ (Signature of parent/guardian) Page 72 of 73

The Learning School Project 2 – Kinsale Community School 2010/2011 Appendix W - Amended Induction Policy for student teachers (amendments are in red) (b) Student Teachers: Newly appointed student teachers from U.C.C. including Year 4 students from the Sports Studies and P.E Department and from the College of Art are interviewed by the Deputy Principal in May/June of the preceding academic year. Appointments are usually made within a short period of time. Prior to being offered a place in the school prospective student teachers are invited to talk privately with the incumbent student teachers so that they may pick up relevant advice as to how to settle into the school quickly.

The student teacher shall receive copies of all relevant documents that facilitate speedy familiarisation with the organisation. A tour of the school will be arranged and each student teacher shall receive a key [SMK] and access/training in Eportal. Student teachers may have to attend in- house workshops /meetings as part of their induction. These may change from year to year and are at the discretion of school management. When the school year begins student teachers are introduced to their parallel teachers, year tutors and department co-ordinators who are obliged to advise them of relevant matters in the teaching of a particular subject. The parallel teacher is encouraged to keep in contact with the student teacher throughout the school year and to give advice where appropriate. This may involve observing lessons and offering feedback to the student teacher. Similarly the student teacher is encouraged to observe classes of experienced teachers during the course of the year. The parallel teacher is also asked to notify the Deputy Principal of any issue that concerns the performance of the student teacher.

Initially the Deputy Principal meets the student teachers on a daily basis in order to ensure that they are settling in quickly. The school routine is explained to them and they are reminded of its importance. From September until Christmas they are also met formally on a weekly basis and topics pertaining to their needs are discussed. The Deputy Principal encourages student teachers to liaise with him/her whenever the need arises and also encourages them to discuss problems as soon as they arise. The Deputy Principal also meets the student teacher supervisors when they visit the school and arranges for an office to be made available for supervisors to talk privately with the student teachers at the end of the class supervision.

Student teachers from the University of Limerick [Year 2 and Year 4]and from the Sports Studies and P.E Department U.C.C. [Year 2] engage in block release and do not do their teaching practice on a year long basis. Student teachers from UL who are doing a post graduate one year course also do block release. It is the norm that they visit the school in advance of their teaching practice where they meet the Deputy Principal and their parallel teachers. Induction begins at this point and all relevant documents are given to these students in advance of their teaching practice. It is the policy of Kinsale Community School to carefully monitor the performance of student teachers and either the Deputy Principal or a person nominated by him/her will visit classes on an occasional basis in order to assess the performance of the student teacher. Extra structures will be put in place to assist a student teacher where these are deemed necessary. Page 73 of 73

You can also read