THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH

 
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
FAREWELL MR. DEVENISH | RUGBY SPRING TOUR | PLACE-BASED LEARNING

THE SAINT  THE MAGAZINE OF ST. GEORGE’S SCHOOL | SPRING 2018

CHARACTER EDUCATION
         THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
THE SAINTTHE MAGAZINE OF ST. GEORGE’S SCHOOL

  ACTING MANAGING EDITORS
  NIK WILLIAMS-WALSHE
  DOMINIQUE ANDERSON

   SENIOR COPY EDITOR
   NANCY KUDRYK

   GRAPHIC DESIGNER
   BRUCE ELBEBLAWY

  GEORGIANS EDITOR
                                                                                          COVER STORY
  IAN YEN ‘03

                                                                                           36
  Head of Georgian Relations

   PRESIDENT OF THE
   ST. GEORGE’S OLD BOYS’ ASSOCIATION
   DIRK LAUDAN ‘87

                                                                                          CHARACTER EDUCATION
  PHOTOGRAPHERS
  Richelle Akimow Photography
  Bob Frid
  St. George’s School Archives
  Clement Woo
  Ian Yen '03
                                                                                          THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH

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THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
24

                                        FAREWELL
                                        MR. DEVENISH

>
     SPRING 2018
12                                 40

       FAREWELL MR. RNIC            GLOBAL STEWARDSHIP CONFERENCE
                                                            60

                            ADVENTURES IN HOCKEY

44                     16                     54

PLACE-BASED LEARNING       BAND SPRING TOUR    RUGBY SPRING TOUR
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
SAINTS LIFE

4 | THE SAINT
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
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THE
              On April 19th, 2018, Mr. Andrew D. Grant, Mr. Sam H. Gudewill, and
              Dr. Tony Mercer were inducted as Builders of St. George’s School.
              Board Members, faculty and staff, Georgians, family members,
              and the community gathered to honour these individuals who have
              made an extraordinary, transformational contribution over time to
              the building of the School. The Builders designation represents the
              highest award the School will confer in recognition of extraordinary
              support. Reflecting a genuine love of St. George’s School, this
              support may involve either personal effort ‘above and beyond the
              call of duty’ and/or financial support.

BUILDERS
 2018 BUILDERS OF ST. GEORGE’S INDUCTEES
                                                                                        SPRING 2018 | 5
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
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6 | THE SAINT
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
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                                                   BUILDERS OF ST. GEORGE’S SCHOOL

MR. ANDREW D. GRANT
                             HONOURED IN 2018       MR. SAM H. GUDEWILL                                DR. TONY MERCER
Georgian Parent (Timothy ’00, Douglas ’03);         Georgian Parent (Spencer ’10); Foundation Chair    Senior Master; Robinson Distinguished Service
Honourary Old Boy; Board Member (1991-2003);        (2005-2012), Board Member (2007-2012); Chair of    Award Recipient; past Director of Senior School,
Board Chair (1994-1996); Foundation Chair (1999-    Advancement Committee (2007-2010); Member of the   Head of Grade, and Head of Science; Outstanding
2001); Chair and Member of Building & Grounds       Headmaster’s Council. Major donor since 2003.      Educator Awards from the University of Chicago and
Committee (1990 -2002). Major donor since 1991.                                                        Stanford University; Soccer, Rugby, Field Hockey,
                                                    A tireless volunteer and supporter of              and Golf Coach; Skydiving Aficionado and CSPA
When his eldest son joined St. George’s             St. George’s School, Sam played a key              Master Course Facilitator; Photographer and World
School in 1989, Andrew went ‘all in’ to             leadership role at a definitive point in the       Traveller
contribute to the building of St. George’s          School’s history. Already familiar with the
School. As president and founding partner           world of Canadian independent schools,             Coming to Canada from England to pursue
of PCI, and with development projects               as a member of the School’s two Boards             a PhD in X-ray crystallography at the
around the city, his experience proved              he emphasized the importance of thinking           University of British Columbia, Dr. Tony
invaluable to the School during a period of         big and of striving to establish St. George’s      Mercer then went on to complete his teacher
expansion. Along with his wife, Joan, he was        as one of the country’s pre-eminent                training before finding a life-long home
generous with his time and energy, putting          independent schools. In particular, as Chair       at St. George’s School. Having served St.
his heart into everything he did for Saints.        of the Foundation Board, he focused his            George’s for more than four decades, Tony
                                                    attention on the importance of the School’s        has worked with six different Headmasters,
His many realms of service to the School
                                                    Endowment, pursuing the audacious goal             and he has held many of the key positions
include stints as Foundation Chair and
                                                    of building an Endowment large enough              in the School, including Director of the
Board Chair and over a decade as a member
                                                    to cover the entire cost of the School’s           Senior School (now Principal), Head of
of the Board of Directors. He served
                                                    Financial Aid Program.                             Grade, and Department Head. As Director,
with the Nominating Committee and the
Advancement Committee, and was involved             Under Sam’s leadership, the operations of          he led the Senior School during a period
with the Excellence in Education Campaign.          the St. George’s School Foundation were            of change and growth. Among his most
                                                                                                       significant accomplishments was his focus
However, it was as Chair of the Building            systematized and professionalized. He also
and Grounds Committee he made his mark,             worked hard to grow the Endowment from             on improving the overall quality of the
formally serving from 1990 to 2002, and then        $3M to over $20M through a combination of          School’s academic program. Tony has seen
                                                                                                       his share of changes, but he has never lost
remaining as advisor through 2010. Andrew           adept financial management and ongoing
                                                                                                       his commitment to his students and their
oversaw the first master plan for the Senior        fundraising. The retirement of Headmaster
                                                                                                       learning, nor his passion for teaching and
and Junior Schools and then the seismic             Nigel Toy in 2010 helped facilitate this
                                                                                                       learning.
upgrade and rebuilding of the Junior School,        process through the creation of an endowed
the building of Harker Hall, new playing            fund in his name. For Sam, the overriding          The Senior School’s Senior Master since
fields for the junior campus, the construction      goal was to build the Endowment so that            2012, he truly is a master teacher who has
of the Headmaster’s Residence, two                  financial aid could be provided to deserving       inspired generations of Science students
upgrades to the Senior School (including            boys who would otherwise be unable                 through his dynamic and innovative
McLean Hall and the Chan Arts and Science           to attend the School. Sam’s loyalty and            approach to teaching. As one of his former
Wing), and was instrumental in guiding the          commitment is reflected in the fact that he        students noted, “What a journey it has
School through dealings with City Hall and          still serves on the Foundation’s Investment        been through Dr. Mercer’s teaching, from
the neighbours. He was also a member of             Committee, even though he stepped down             intellectual challenges along the way to
the Search Committee that brought us past           from his role as Chair of the Foundation           continuous reminders about the importance
Headmaster, and Builder, Nigel Toy.                 more than five years ago.                          of connecting knowledge to the real world.
                                                                                                       Dr. Mercer’s teaching sparked in me an
                                                                                                       intellectual passion for science that I can
                                                                                                       never thank him enough for.”
                                                                                                       Highlights of Dr. Mercer’s tenure also
                                                                                                       include various school trips to locations like
                                                                                                       Mount Kilimanjaro, Mount Everest, and the
                                                                                                       Galapagos Islands, as well as the annual
                                                                                                       CAIS Soccer Tournament and numerous
                                                                                                       golf tournaments. Many of our Old Boys
                                                                                                       remember his spectacular entry to the 1992
                                                                                                       Fair – skydiving from a plane! This is Tony’s
                                                                                                       42nd year at St. George’s, making him the
                                                                                                       longest serving faculty member in the
                                                                                                       School’s history.

                                                                                                                                                  SPRING 2018 | 7
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
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                             Dr. Hughes has wanted to write a novel set in Morocco
                             since he first visited there as a boy and explored the
                             Spanish Foreign Legion forts (not French) and learned
                             about the Rif War and the Spanish Civil War. After
                             receiving a doctorate in history in the UK, writing
                             nonfiction, and teaching in the United States and
      ST. GEORGE’S VERY      Canada, he finally wrote that novel. Dead in Tangier, the
      OWN DR. JOHN HUGHES    first Captain Equi mystery novel, is set in Tangier against
                             intrigues in Spanish Morocco that ignited Spain’s civil
      RECENTLY PUBLISHED     war in 1936. Those who have heard Dr. Hughes speak
                             at ArtsWeek or attended his lecture series are eagerly
      DEAD IN TANGIER, THE   anticipating reading his story.
      FIRST IN A SERIES OF   Notes from Kirkus Review: “In his series opener, Hughes
                             makes excellent use of place, history, and character to
      MYSTERY NOVELS,        tell a moving story that goes deeper than crime-solving.
      NOW AVAILABLE FROM     Tangier of 1936 comes alive in his telling, with its tangle
                             of cultures, languages, people, and neighborhoods.
      AMAZON/KINDLE.         It’s a fine metaphor for moral ambiguity, summed up
                             by Tangier rules, a phrase so central that it should
                             be the book’s title. Equally well-drawn are the tale’s
                             characters, particularly Equi, who has a complicated
                             past that includes an English mother, an abusive father,
                             and a wife who died 15 years previously.”

      AUTHOR IN THE HOUSE

8 | THE SAINT
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
25Years
                                                                                        SAINTS LIFE

                                                   H O N O U RIN G

              OF SERVICE
AT OUR ST. GEORGE’S DAY CELEBRATIONS EACH YEAR, EMPLOYEES WHO HAVE REACHED 25 YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE SCHOOL ARE HONOURED AT A SPECIAL ASSEMBLY AND LUNCHEON. RETIRED LONG-STANDING FACULTY
AND STAFF ARE INVITED BACK TO THE SCHOOL, AND MANY STORIES AND FOND MEMORIES ARE SHARED.

  FROM THE 1993 GEORGIAN: “THE ROOKIES”
  L TO R, BACK ROW: MS. WESSLER, MR. SHERMAN, MS. BASSETT, MR. PALMER
  L TO R, FRONT ROW: MR. CROMPTON, MR. MARTIN, MR. ZIFF, MR. BECOTT

                                                                                           SPRING 2018 | 9
THE SAINT - CHARACTER EDUCATION THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH
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                                                                                        Mr. Becott was born in New Westminster but attended school in Prince
                                                                                        George and then Brentwood College. He went to journalism school in
                                                                                        London, Ontario, worked briefly as a reporter, then went back to the
                                                                                        University of Western Ontario for a degree in history. With the passing of
                                                                                        his father in 1986 he moved back to BC, and studied education at UBC.
                                                                                        Mr. Becott learned about St. George’s through a friend in the education
                                                                                        faculty and was immediately hired. Over the years he has participated
                                                                                        in 46 international Model United Nations and loved every one of them.
                                                                                        He has coached rugby, sailing, curling, skiing/snowboarding, public
                                                                                        speaking, and MUN and loves the opportunity to make friends with both
                                                                                        faculty and students. Mr. Becott met his partner, Eli, in Lebanon and he
                                                                                        immigrated to Canada in 2012. They have two dogs - Zac who comes to
                                                                                        school every day and Poco who came with Eli from Lebanon. Mr. Becott
                                                                                        loves travelling, and his favourite trip was in 1986 – around the world,
                                                                                        including the Soviet Union and China.

                                                                                        Verne Becott

      Martha Bassett
      Martha first came to St. George’s in 1991 to lead a lunchtime Japanese Club and
      a student tour to climb Mt. Fuji in the summer. She inaugurated the Japanese
      Language & Culture program that now culminates in Advanced Placement
      Japanese 12. Over the years, she has led student tours to Paris and Barcelona,
      Turkey, seven tours to Japan, and accompanied Outdoor Education cycling
      and kayaking trips. She inaugurated Comparative Civilizations 12 and currently
      teaches Japanese and Advanced Placement Art History. Her experience as a
      Senior School teacher has been complemented by Grade 6 guest workshops
      about Chinese characters, and also being a parent of Grads (Conrad ’00 and
      Gavin ’02). She plans to retire in 2019 after one more student tour to Japan.

                                                                                                                  Marc Crompton
                                                                                                                  Mr. Crompton was born in New Westminster.
                                                                                                                  He has always lived in the Lower Mainland,
                                                                                                                  attending elementary school at Seaview
                                                                                                                  Elementary in Port Moody, Champlain Heights
                                                                                                                  Elementary in Killarney, and Killarney High
                                                                                                                  School. High School is where Mr. Crompton
                                                                                                                  discovered his passion for music. He studied
                                                                                                                  music at UBC before getting a teaching degree,
                                                                                                                  after which he began work at St. George’s as a
                                                                                                                  band teacher. After 18 years teaching music,
                                                                                                                  Mr. Crompton took a temporary, part-time
                                                                                                                  position in the library that has since become
                                                                                                                  less temporary and less part-time. While at St.
                                                                                                                  George’s, Mr. Crompton has directed all of the
                                                                                                                  bands, started Music AP, has taught classes
                                                                                                                  on both organizational and library skills, and
                                                                                                                  has inaugurated both the Maker Club and the
                                                                                                                  Fusion Cohort. Mr. Crompton’s favourite thing
                                                                                                                  about St. George’s is that it is a place where
                                                                                                                  he has never stopped learning. He finds it
                                                                                                                  inspiring that he is challenged to stretch his
                                                                                                                  knowledge and abilities nearly every day. Mr.
                                                                                                                  Crompton is a family man; he has been married
                                                                                                                  for nearly 24 years and his daughter is now
                                                                                                                  studying Musical Theatre at Sheridan College.
                                                                                                                  In his sparse spare time, Mr. Crompton is a
                                                                                                                  practicing amateur photographer, avid reader
                                                                                                                  of books, and a Civilisation VI addict.

10 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

                                                          Ms. Wessler was born in Vancouver, B.C. After completing
                                                          a Bachelor of Arts in French and German Literature at
                                                          UBC and spending a year at Law School, she decided to
                                                          complete her Bachelor of Education and, later, a Masters
                                                          in Education at the University of Calgary. Her first position
                                                          at St. George’s School was as a full-time French teacher.
                                                          While Ms. Wessler has had many memorable experiences
                                                          over her 25 years, she says, “My pinnacle moment at St.
                                                          George’s School was watching my son cross the stage
                                                          during Prize Day. He is a lifer, and that was a moment of
                                                          sheer happiness and pride for me.”
                                                          As a teacher, Ms. Wessler has taught French, German,
                                                          Social Studies, and English, and she inaugurated the Film
                                                          Studies program. She was also the Head of Languages and
                                                          since 2011 has been the Head of University Counselling.
                                                          Within the Saints community, she ran the Georgian
                                                          Yearbook, and has been involved with Model UN for 17
                                                          years. She was also a House Supper organizer and teacher
                                                          sponsor for the Green Machine, Film Club, Documentary
                                                          Film Club, Multicultural Club, German Cultural Club, and
                                                          Alley Outreach, to name just a few. In the sports field,
Joao Medeiros                                             she has been involved with softball, yoga, table tennis,
                                                          trail running, and rock climbing, and, in her early years,
aka “Little John”                                         as an assistant coach for competitive Grade 8 basketball
John immigrated to Canada from Azores, Portugal           and a Grade 8/9 soccer. She has served on many school
with his wife Maria and three young children,             committees that have helped keep St. George’s School
Sergio, Bruno and Claudia, in 1989. He joined St.         innovative and continually improving.
George’s in 1993, first at Harker Hall and then as a
custodian at both the Senior and Junior Schools.          Outside of school, Ms. Wessler loves spending time with
                                                          her family and friends. She loves to see new parts of the
Little John is skilled in carpentry and gardening
and has made many impressive renovations on               world, watch rom-coms, and laugh with her friends. She          Christine Wessler
                                                          never takes herself too seriously, after all, life is short!
his own home. John lives with his wife in North
Delta, and now has two wonderful grandchildren,
                                                                                                                          (BOENSCH)
Adriano and Wally.

  Stephen Ziff
  Stephen Ziff was born in Montréal, and grew up
  in Montréal, Québec City, Dundas, and Windsor.
  His summers were spent at a camp in upstate
  New York, where he developed a love of the
  outdoors, especially hiking and climbing. His
  time there led him to a degree in Geography
  from McGill, and then a teaching diploma from
  SFU. In the summer of 1992, Mr. Ziff read an ad
  for a teaching position at St. George’s School
  for a “senior socials teacher with a geography
  degree and experience in outdoor education”, he
  decided to apply, and the rest is history! In his
  time here, he taught Socials 9, 10 and 11, Earth
  Sciences, Geography 12, AP Human Geography,
  Outdoor Education, and SRE. Highlights of his
  career at St. George’s include inaugurating and
  coaching the Ultimate Program that spanned
  two decades, a magical kayaking trip with six
  Grade 12 students around the Broken Islands
  in BC, and a two-week Discovery 10 year-end
  trip in the Broughton Archipelago. He is an
  avid outdoor enthusiast, enjoying activities
  such as sea kayaking, backcountry skiing,
  mountaineering, and rock-climbing, often
  accompanied by his wife and two daughters. Mr.
  Ziff’s love for the outdoors, music, food, social
  justice, and his family, all reflect in his teaching,
  and makes the classroom experience with him a
  truly memorable and impactful one.

                                                                                                                                           SPRING 2018 | 11
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12 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

I cannot believe how quickly the past 30 years have gone by. It seems like just
yesterday that Headmaster Alan Brown telephoned me at my former school in
Ontario to arrange for a job interview. At the time, St. George’s was looking for a
music teacher who could also teach mathematics. As these were my two areas,
I eagerly made the trip west to investigate this exciting prospect. After a tour of
the new Senior School building and a hearty welcome from legendary teacher
Mr. Geof Stancombe, my wife and I and our two-year-old daughter relocated to
Vancouver and began a lifelong adventure at St. George’s School.

FAREWELL        30 YEARS AT ST. GEORGE’S SCHOOL
                                 BY: MARKO RNIC

                                                                                         SPRING 2018 | 13
SAINTS LIFE

  “
                       WHAT IS ST.
                       GEORGE’S TO ME?
                       ST. GEORGE’S IS
                       NOT A SCHOOL
                       WHERE STUDENTS
                       GRUDGINGLY ARRIVE
                       AT 8:25 AM
                       EACH DAY AND GO
                       THROUGH A DULL AND
                       BORING ROUTINE.
                       RATHER, IT IS A PLACE
                       WHERE BOYS ARE
                       BOTH CHALLENGED
                       AND SUPPORTED TO
                       MAKE THE MOST OF
                       EVERY DAY.

       The School was much smaller then, with only 400 students at the             joy to see the boys laughing and smiling as they go through their
       Senior School and 180 at the junior campus. The Boarding House              daily lives, even though life today seems far more busy and stressful
       was contained entirely on the fourth floor of the Junior School             than I recall years ago. It is just as gratifying to see this same spirit
       building, McLean Hall was a lovely outdoor courtyard, and there             within the faculty and staff. From my travels to other schools in
       was only one school nurse for both campuses. School life was far            Canada and the United States, I know this is a rare thing. Where
       less complex as well: AP courses had not yet been introduced, it            some other schools suffer from a lack of caring and mediocrity, we
       was next to impossible for any activity to take students out of class,      have something here that is truly special, something that I hope will
       Mr. Tosh Ujimoto took care of all university applications by himself,       continue for many years to come.
       and the Counselling Department simply did not exist. After seriously        What is St. George’s to me? St. George’s is not a school where
       considering whether St. George’s should become a co-educational             students grudgingly arrive at 8:25 am each day and go through a
       school, the decision was made not only to remain a ‘single-sex              dull and boring routine. Rather, it is a place where boys are both
       school’, but to grow in size. I believe it was this decision to grow that   challenged and supported to make the most of every day. I believe
       has led to the magnificent school that we have today.                       St. George’s offers a huge amount to enrich the lives of each
       Over the past 30 years, the student population, the faculty, and            student, encourages all to grow, develop, and experience new
       the staff have essentially doubled in number. Along with this,              ways of thinking. It is much more a way of life than a school. The
       our curricular and co-curricular offerings have grown by leaps              fabric of St. George’s lies in the people that make up this wonderful
       and bounds. Yet, many fundamental aspects of the School have                community. It is the way we celebrate the successes of our friends
       remained constant. Most importantly, our school spirit has                  and colleagues just as much as it is the way we help each other
       remained vibrant, positive, and full of vigor. Those of you who know        through difficult times. It is the way we laugh, joke, and play just
       me understand that I see the world through rose-coloured glasses.           as much as it is the way that we console, support, and comfort. St.
       That is, my viewpoint is perpetually positive and enthusiastic. And, I      George’s is a wonderful place, and I feel so privileged to have been
       truly feel this is most appropriate with respect to St. George’s. Since     a part of this community.
       the day I arrived, I have always noticed a wonderful joie de vivre          While retirement will bring many new opportunities and exciting
       amongst both faculty and students. During the past three decades,           times, I will greatly miss everyone here. Thinking of the raw energy
       this delightful atmosphere and approach to life has also grown and          of our remarkable students and the passion of our extraordinary
       deepened, I believe, just as much as the population has expanded.           teachers, I find it almost impossible to believe that I will not be here
       The ‘twinkle in the eye’ of many boys is just as strong today as it was     in September. I wish you the very best of what life will bring, and
       in the past and may even be even stronger now. It brings me great           may our paths cross again soon.

14 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

MARKO BROUGHT ME TO ST. GEORGE’S 25 YEARS AGO AND INITIATED A PATH THAT HAS
RESULTED IN AN EXCITING AND STIMULATING CAREER. I AM TRULY GRATEFUL TO HIM FOR
PROVIDING ME THE OPPORTUNITIES TO WORK WITH SOME OF THE MOST AMAZING AND
TALENTED STUDENTS THAT ONE COULD EVER WISH TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH.
MARC CROMPTON, HEAD OF SENIOR LEARNING COMMONS

                                                                            SPRING 2018 | 15
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16 | THE SAINT
                   FRÜHLINGSB
                   BEHIND THE SCENES WITH THE EUROPEAN BAND TOUR
SAINTS LIFE

BAND-TOUR
       BY: DR. DEAN MARKEL

                                SPRING 2018 | 17
SAINTS LIFE

        THE EUROPEAN BAND TOUR IS A LONG-STANDING TRADITION AT ST. GEORGE’S THAT CONTINUES TO THRIVE TODAY.
        THIS IS DUE, IN NO SMALL PART, TO THE STRONG RELATIONSHIP CULTIVATED BY MARKO RNIC BETWEEN THE
        ST. GEORGE’S MUSIC DEPARTMENT AND THE AICHACH MUSIC SOCIETY (MUSIKVEREIN AICHACH) IN GERMANY.
        ITvirtually
             BEGANuninterrupted,
                     IN 1994, when   the Aichach Stadtkapelle answered the call to host a school band from Vancouver, Canada and has continued
                                 every three years, since. Fast forward to 2018 and you see the kind of relationship that can develop over 24 years.
        Despite the fact that we have actually spent only 24 days in Aichach, each time we visit it feels like returning home. Our students, directors,
        and chaperones are each greeted with warmth and joy and given the opportunity to visit and live in a German home; perform a joint
        concert with the Aichach Stadkapelle; and have a “family day” where they have no other commitments. While it is a one-time chance for
        the students, as directors we continue to stay with the same family each trip and develop a long-term relationship. I continue to be amazed
        at how quickly bonds form and how strong they are. It is not unusual to see students and adults wiping tears away as we say farewell at
        the end of the homestay. Beyond all the musical benefits of our tour, the homestay plays an enormous role in developing character in our
        students—they see first-hand the beautiful friendship that exists between these two groups of people from distant lands and the shared
        value of music.

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WHILE THE PROSPECT OF TOURING EUROPE WITH 80 TEENAGE BOYS CERTAINLY BRINGS CHALLENGES, IT
IS WONDERFUL TO SEE HOW THIS EXPERIENCE IMPACTS EACH BOY. IT IS A TRULY VALUABLE AND UNIQUE
EXPERIENCE TO BE ABLE TO TRAVEL WITH ONE’S CLASSMATES AND COLLEAGUES.

This year’s European Band Tour was my third since coming to St.         our arrival in Frankfurt to Heidelberg, Rothenburg ob der Tauber,
George’s in 2011. Knowing this would be his final tour, I was asked     Nuremberg, Prague, Aichach, Munich, Salzburg, Budapest, and
by Marko Rnic to take on the role of organizing the trip. In doing      Vienna. During our 16-day European Tour we performed four
so, I knew I would be both removing the stress of planning and          concerts, worked with a guest conductor from Jeunesses Musicales
managing the many details and allowing Marko to relax and enjoy         in Weikersheim, Germany; attended performances by the Prague
his final European Band Tour. It was an exciting, if not daunting,      Symphony Orchestra and the Hungarian National Ballet Company;
opportunity to take on the task of planning the tour with the goal      toured cities, castles, and cathedrals throughout central Europe;
of preserving the elemental aspects while implementing some             visited a Concentration Camp Memorial in Austria; enjoyed the
new ideas to reflect our changing society. This year’s tour, quite      relaxation of thermal baths in Budapest; and immersed ourselves in
by accident, was a throwback to some of the early European Band         the culture of Europe. Our route took us (mostly) from west to east,
Tours. We stayed north of the Alps in Central Europe and visited        and we returned home via a connecting flight from Vienna, Austria
Germany, Czech Republic, Austria, and Hungary—the last time the         (a first for a St. George’s European Band Tour!)
European Band Tour visited Prague was in 1994, the first year of
the homestay in Aichach! During our visit, it was delightful to see     While the prospect of touring Europe with 80 teenage boys certainly
the photos and memorabilia from the first tour and a much younger       brings challenges, it is wonderful to see how this experience impacts
looking Mr. Rnic and Mr. Crompton.                                      each boy. It is a truly valuable and unique experience to be able to
                                                                        travel with one’s classmates and colleagues—to connect outside of
Since my first European Band Tour, it was clear to me that the
                                                                        the classroom is priceless. The homestay in Aichach was especially
homestay and relationships built with this small village about 45
                                                                        poignant this year, as it was a chance for everyone involved over the
minutes northeast of Munich are key to the success of the European
                                                                        past 24 years to celebrate the long friendship, say farewell to Marko,
Band Tour. Thus, our itinerary was planned to prioritize the homestay
                                                                        and to plan for our next visit in 2021.
which would include a Saturday joint concert and Sunday “family
day.” To allow for the most cultural time and least amount of bus       For a more detailed account, check the European Tour blog at:
time, an itinerary was planned that was the most direct route from      www.saintsbandtour.blogspot.com

                                                                                                                                       SPRING 2018 | 19
SAINTS LIFE

       “Hi Sir, can I talk to you about an idea?”
       “Hi Sebastian. Certainly, what’s the idea?”
       “We want to break a world record.”
       “OK, well, I’m going to need some more information…”
       “We’re going to row a million metres.”
       “Great, that’s a long way! And, I’m still going to need some more information…”

       AND THAT’S HOW IT ALL STARTED.

       1 MILLION KILOMETRES NON-STOP ON 1 ROWING ERG –

       BREAKING A WORLD RECORD!
       BY: CHRIS BLACKMAN

20 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

After a few more meetings and quite a bit more clarity, we identified a list of initial challenges for our shot at the Large Team
Million Metres world record. First, we needed a date and we needed to be able to set-up a single erg that would be used
continuously for close to 72 hours. Secondly, we needed a space that was easy to supervise and could handle 5-10 people
hanging out around the erg. Thirdly, we needed to have supervisors around the clock for close to 72 hours. It all came
together, and suddenly it was time for the first shift and the first pull on the erg.
In the end, nearly all the boys on the Grade 10 team or older were involved, and a few Grade 9s supported the event as
well. Grade 11 Sebastian Smith played a central role in pulling it all together and was helped out by Simon Liu, William Li,
and Andrew Wei. Coach Duncan added, “Darius Chan and Emre Alca did a lot of the heavy lifting by physically leading the
overnight teams and all the Senior coxies—Aaron Han, Aaron Qiu, and Jameson Eng—did a great job managing the logging
of the event.”
It was nice that the boys got to set a new World Record; however, two accomplishments from that weekend really stand out.
First, it was a fantastic team-building experience for the boys and it wasn’t a coach-led initiative. The time the boys spent
together, late in the night and into the early morning hours, strengthened their bond of friendship. Secondly, they supported
a charity of their choosing—United World Schools—and raised over USD$12,000 that will be used to provide teacher training
and resources for the Pa Bee Five School in the Mine-Koe District of Eastern Myanmar.
“We recognize the opportunity that we have been given at St. George’s and understand that schooling changes lives”
said Sebastian Smith. “Without our help, the kids in the Pa Bee Five School would likely never learn how to read, write,
or even count. Let us give these children the opportunity to learn!” added Darren Kwan, another organizer of the event.

You can now see their accomplishment, their World Record from November 23-26, 2017, on the Concept2 website:
http://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/racing/records/ultra-distance/world/million-meters

                                                                                                  CITY OF VANCOUVER
                                                                                                  PROCLAIMS ST. GEORGE’S
                                                                                                  ROWING DAY
                                                                                                  The City of Vancouver proclaimed
                                                                                                  January 29, 2018 “St. George’s
                                                                                                  Rowing Day,” in recognition of the
                                                                                                  Saints Rowing Team breaking the
                                                                                                  U19 Large Group Million Meters
                                                                                                  World Record on November 23-
                                                                                                  26, 2017 by rowing continuously
                                                                                                  on a single erg for nearly 72
                                                                                                  hours, beating the old record by
                                                                                                  more than 23 hours.

                                                                                                                              SPRING 2018 | 21
SAINTS LIFE

22 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

ESTABLISHED IN 1980,          the Philip N. Rigg Scholarship
was created in honour of Philip Rigg, a “scholar, athlete, and
artist of considerable merit” who succumbed to leukemia
at the age of 16. Over the years, being named a Rigg
Scholar in the Visual and Performing Arts “in recognition of
                                                                  RIGG
                                                                  SCHOLARS
contributions to the creative and performing arts, citizenship,
and academic achievement” has become one of the most
prestigious designations at the School. At a special ceremony
during ArtsWeek, the current Rigg Scholars perform, and the
incoming Rigg Scholars are announced.

                                                                  The process and expectations for this scholarship
                                                                  are different from others at the School. Grade
                                                                  11 students apply within their discipline (Music,
                                                                  Theatre Arts, or Visual Arts) and must meet a
                                                                  rigorous set of criteria to demonstrate their
                                                                  dedication, facility, participation, and leadership.
                                                                  During their Grade 12 year, they will support and
                                                                  mentor younger students and work to promote
                                                                  the arts throughout the Saints community.
                                                                  Kevin Tang ’18, Rigg Scholar in Visual Arts,
                                                                  noted, “To have impact as a mentor requires
                                                                  empathy, humility, and responsibility. You need
                                                                  to simply be present for younger students,
                                                                  to respect their explorations of the various
                                                                  mediums, and know when to offer your help. You
                                                                  demonstrate your work ethic, and, hopefully,
                                                                  inspire them with your level of skill. Being
                                                                  named a Rigg provided a validation of my skills
                                                                  that gave me a greater level of confidence and
                                                                  allowed me to demonstrate humility because I
                                                                  didn’t need to prove my expertise.”
                                                                  Joe Goetz ’18, Rigg Scholar in Performing Arts
                                                                  (Acting), talked about integrity, responsibility,
                                                                  and resilience. “Being named a Rigg was a
                                                                  transformational experience for me because it
                                                                  allowed me to explore the full range of acting. I
                                                                  defied the expectations of myself and everyone
                                                                  around me. The major time commitment
                                                                  required for theatre productions provides lots of
                                                                  time to simply hang out and engage with many
                                                                  different kinds of people, and to offer them help
                                                                  with acting, but also with other things like time
                                                                  management and study habits.”
                                                                  And two of our Rigg Scholars in Music, John Kim
                                                                  ’18 and Jack Li ‘18, both felt a responsibility to
                                                                  hold themselves to a higher standard than they
                                                                  would have otherwise. For some, The audition
                                                                  process was their “biggest performance to
                                                                  date.” Humility becomes key, because “…in the
                                                                  music world, your performance is never perfect;
                                                                  there is always room for improvement.” They
                                                                  viewed empathy as “…a necessary component
                                                                  of leadership because you deal with different
                                                                  levels of ability in those you are mentoring.
                                                                  And resilience is key when you are stepping
                                                                  outside of your comfort zone when performing
                                                                  or speaking.”

                                                                                                              SPRING 2018 | 23
SAINTS LIFE

24 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

I ARRIVED AT THE JUNIOR SCHOOL ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1999.
After settling the family in the guest suite (Boiler House) I proceeded to the Junior
School building for a look around. I walked straight in the building and proceeded
to my office. To my surprise, nothing was secured. A quick stroll around the building
and a peek in the classrooms revealed blackboards, chalk brushes, and chalk. I
also noticed some new whiteboards with whiteboard markers. There were a few
computers around the classrooms. There were green garbage buckets on the fourth
floor. However, these were not for garbage. Having viewed the ceiling, I surmised
they were for catching leaks from rainwater. The upper classrooms had single
desks, but to my surprise, they were old wooden desks, which had to have been
around since the 1950s. Some of them even had inkwells!

CHANGE
  &
IMPACT                           SINCE 1999
REFLECTIONS FROM THE JUNIOR SCHOOL PRINCIPAL
BY: GREG DEVENISH

                                                                               SPRING 2018 | 25
“
     SAINTS LIFE

                   EDUCATION IS THE GREAT ENGINE OF PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT. IT IS THROUGH
                   EDUCATION THAT THE DAUGHTER OF A PEASANT CAN BE A DOCTOR, THAT THE SON OF A
                   MINEWORKER CAN BECOME THE HEAD OF THE MINE, THAT A CHILD OF FARMWORKERS
                   CAN BECOME THE PRESIDENT OF A GREAT NATION. IT IS WHAT WE MAKE OUT OF WHAT
                   WE HAVE, NOT WHAT WE ARE GIVEN, THAT SEPARATES ONE PERSON FROM ANOTHER.
                   NELSON MANDELA

26 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

Looking back over almost 20 years, there have been significant changes in terms of new learning spaces, reporting, pedagogy,
counselling, administrative structures, technology, and student learning support. There is no question that during this period
our Strategic Plans and our two Headmasters, Mr. Nigel Toy and Dr. Tom Matthews, have had an incredible impact in moving
the School forward, both inside and outside the classroom.
My purpose in this article is not to conduct a historical review of the School over the last 20 years—I will leave that to a future
historian in 2030 when the School marks its centenary. I want to highlight some significant changes that have impacted St.
George’s School over my time as Junior School Principal. The School does not work in isolation and, like all schools in our
community, it has been impacted by world events and changes in pedagogy. I thought it prudent to highlight 10 key themes
that stand out for me:

1. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL NETWORKING
Since 2000, IT services have expanded into all areas. All students
have access to computers. Today, students from Grades 3 to 7 are
assigned a computer, and students in Grades 1 and 2 have tablets.
At the Senior School, students bring their own devices. Students no
longer rely on binders, pencils, and paper, and can now research,
collaborate, and produce work online. Libraries are moving away
from books to digital services. In the classroom, students are online
working on Khan Academy and Google Docs. Smartboards and
projectors are replacing whiteboards. The School has invested heavily
in hardware, software, projectors, and professional development.
Massive amounts of funding are required just to support IT.
Today, we teach students not only how to use technology but also
digital responsibility. This generation of students is “digitized” with
hand-held devices and 24/7 access to Wikipedia, Google, Instagram,
and Facebook. Schools are dealing with addiction to social media.
This new world presents both new opportunities and new challenges
for faculty and students.

2. RISK MANAGEMENT
Over the last 20 years, the need for security protocols, including
locked entrances and lockdown drills, has increased dramatically.
Since 9/II and the rise of school shootings, schools have been
forced to implement new protocols and security measures. Striking
the right balance between security and an open, friendly campus
has led to increased costs. During the day, access to the School is
restricted to one entrance, and we have security personnel on site
24/7. Trips and tours are more carefully assessed, and there are
more protocols in place regarding the ratio of teachers to students,
types of activities, emergency procedures, and obtaining informed
consent from parents, to name a few.

3. CLASSROOM PEDAGOGY
There has been a dramatic shift away from rote memory, surface
learning, and testing towards allowing students to delve deeper
and then demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways. Students
have more choice, with a greater emphasis on collaborative work
with peers. There is more time for self-reflection and assessment.
There are more inquiry-based projects at all levels, and the Grade 10
cohorts allow students to investigate areas of interest and deepen
their learning while exploring, or finding, a passion. The teacher’s
role is shifting from a disseminator of information to a facilitator.

4. PROVINCE-WIDE TESTING
The Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA) is an annual province-wide
assessment of academic skills for Grades 4 and 7 that has been in
place since the early 2000s. It provides parents, teachers, schools,
and the Ministry of Education with important information on how
well students are progressing in the foundational skills of reading,
writing, and numeracy. The Fraser Institute also uses this information
to rank schools, and this has become a sensitive and controversial
issue, pitting different constituencies against each other.

                                                                                                                              SPRING 2018 | 27
SAINTS LIFE

                   5. THE RISE OF SINGLE-SEX SCHOOLS
                   Since 2000, there has been a greater acceptance of single-sex schools. This is
                   particularly true for boys’ schools. In the ‘70s and ‘80s, many traditional boys’
                   schools went coeducational. Today, there is a reversal, and the demand for single-
                   sex schools is increasing. Boys’ schools are back. Public schools are adapting to this
                   need by opening single-sex schools. There has been new research into how boys
                   learn, and organizations such as the International Boys’ Schools Coalition (IBSC)
                   are doing much work in this area. This has influenced the delivery of education in
                   the classroom, which programs we support, and the design of new learning and
                   workspaces. There are now numerous books on how to raise and educate boys,
                   such as Boy Smarts by Barry Macdonald, and Reaching Boys, Teaching Boys by
                   Michael Reichert and Richard Hawley.
                   6. THE RISE OF HELICOPTER PARENTS
                   All parents are keen to meet all the academic, recreational, emotional, and
                   nutritional needs of their children. My parents were keen to do that in the ‘50s and
                   ‘60s, but today it has become a 24-hour-a-day requirement. In the words of Dr.
                   Alex Russell, “…the desire to excel at raising kids has led to the professionalization
                   of parenting”. Play dates are organized and students are rushed from tutors to
                   sports academies to volunteer activities. Students are overprescribed, and with the
                   addition of cell phones, they are in contact with their parents 24 hours a day. It’s
                   exhausting for parents, and, “It’s really no better for children to have their [parents’]
                   fingerprints all over their lives, all of the time…Increasingly, our children live in
                   adult-controlled worlds,” notes Dr. Russell. Schools now provide counselling for
                   parents and arrange information evenings such as our BoyOBoy Speaker Series to
                   educate parents about best practices in raising boys and help them find balance
                   in their lives.

                   7. THE RISE OF POPULAR READING SERIES
                   There has been a significant increase in young people’s literature, notably the
                   explosion of literary series like John Flanagan’s Ranger’s Apprentice, Stuart Gibbs’
                   Spy School, and J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter Series, and a similar upsurge in graphic
                   novels. This means young people are avidly reading books, which is very exciting.

                   8. HEALTH AND WELLNESS
                   Health and wellness have gained importance in the life of schools with society’s
                   rising awareness of mental health issues. Students are stressed, and schools
                   now deal with everything from depression to anxiety disorders. There have been
                   increases in counselling services for students, parents, and staff. Schools arrange
                   for speakers to provide professional expertise in dealing with issues that affect
                   well-being. Through our BoyOBoy Speaker Series many of these issues are being
                   discussed and supported. For example, Dr. Shimi Kang, author of The Dolphin Way
                   has presented on 21st century parenting, the need for a balanced life, and practical
                   ways to achieve that.

                   9. DECLINE OF MEN PURSUING EDUCATIONAL CAREERS
                   A recent article in the Vancouver Sun (April 18, 2018) indicated that male teachers
                   make up only 25% of the public teachers employed in this province. That is certainly
                   a decline from when I started teaching in 1974. Only 11% of public school teachers
                   below the age of 25 are male. Even more alarming, only one out of every 10 people
                   entering B.C.’s teaching profession is a man. The downward trend continues
                   despite noted studies by a Stanford University education professor, Thomas Dee,
                   and others that suggest boys generally do better in classes taught by men. UBC
                   Professor Emeritus Marv Westwood, has found that boys need male role models.
                   “A male teacher,” writes Mr. Westwood, “validates boys’ experience.” As a male
                   teacher, it is disheartening to see a decline in men who want to pursue a teaching
                   career. St. George’s has a healthy ratio of male to female teachers, and this bodes
                   well for some years to come. The question for the School in the next decade is how
                   to attract quality male teachers.

                   10. SERVICE LEARNING
                   Schools have taken on many service programs. There are service hour requirements
                   for diplomas and a recognition that helping others develops empathy, which in
                   turn develops global citizens and improves society. Many schools have adopted
                   overseas projects such as building schools and constructing wells, and more
                   recently, have emphasized service in their local communities. The challenge for
                   educators is to develop these programs to instill an intrinsic need to help others in
                   our youth. There is a fine balance between giving them opportunities for service
                   and resume padding based on reward systems.
28 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

Throughout the decades, one area that remains constant is the boys; they have not changed much over my time here. Their energy and
competitive drive are still evident inside and outside the classroom. They have wonderful senses of humour and are more resilient than we
give them credit for. Their need to be part of a group make friendships very important to them. They continue to take pride in their School,
their wing, and their school teams. They are more empathetic today and certainly more digitized than boys of 20 years ago.
Going forward, I am certainly not worried about Canada’s future. The boys of this generation are in a good place and I am very confident
they will find success and contribute to the well-being of others. Despite the changes over the last 20 or even 100 years in how education
is delivered, at the heart of it there is always a constant that can be best summed up simply:
“Education is the great engine of personal development. It is through education that the daughter of a peasant can be a doctor, that
the son of a mineworker can become the head of the mine, that a child of farmworkers can become the president of a great nation. It
is what we make out of what we have, not what we are given, that separates one person from another.” Nelson Mandela

                                                                                                                                     SPRING 2018 | 29
‘
     SAINTS LIFE

                                                                                                GREG IS A PASSIONATE STORYTELLER
                                                                                                A VOCAL SPECTATOR OF SPORT, WIT
     I’VE NEVER MET A PRINCIPAL MORE                                                            FOCUSED ON EVERY ASPECT OF A STU
     EXCITED BY THE WINNING GOAL THAN                                                           “IT’S ALL ABOUT THE BOYS”. WE WIL
     MR. DEVENISH. GO SAINTS!                                                                   LOUISE JONES
     GARY KERN

   GREG IS THE KIND OF PRINCIPAL                   AS TEACHERS, OUR GOAL IS TO EDUCATE
   THAT TEACHERS WANT TO WORK FOR.                 OUR STUDENTS BOTH IN MIND AND HEART.
   WHEN YOU WALK INTO HIS OFFICE, HE               DURING HIS 19 YEARS AS OUR JUNIOR
   STOPS WHAT HE IS DOING. HIS FACE                SCHOOL PRINCIPAL, GREG DEVENISH
   BREAKS INTO A BIG SMILE AND HE                  HAS DONE BOTH WITH EXTRAORDINARY
   SAYS “HEY KIDDO!” TO YOU IN A WAY               PASSION AND COMMITMENT. HIS LOVE
   THAT MAKES YOU FEEL SEEN AND                    OF THE SCHOOL AND ITS STUDENTS IS
   APPRECIATED. IN MY FIRST YEAR AT                LEGENDARY, AND I FEEL PRIVILEGED TO
   ST. GEORGE’S, I SOMETIMES STOPPED               HAVE WORKED ALONGSIDE HIM DURING
   BY HIS OFFICE JUST TO HEAR A “HEY               MY TIME AT ST. GEORGE’S.
   KIDDO!” AND BELIEVE THAT I COULD DO             DR. TOM MATTHEWS

   ANYTHING. I HOPE THAT ONE DAY I’M
   AN ADMINISTRATOR LIKE GREG.                                                     G TH  S .  H E IS  K IN  D , P A  S S IO NATE
                                                          GREG HAS MANY STR    EN
   KARYN ROBERTS

                                                                             . U N FO R TU    N A TE LY  , G R  EG  ’S A  BILITY TO
                                                          AND ENTHUSIASTIC                    S TR O N G   A S S ET  . HE CALLED
                                                           REMEMBER NAM    ES  IS N O T  A
      MY FAMILY AND I OFTEN SPEAK ABOU
                                                                                       T S   IX  M O N TH   S   O F  M Y  TI M E AT THE
      GREG DEVENISH TO PEOPLE NOT T                                                  S
                                                           ME GEORGE FOR THE FIR HERE I SIMPLY RESPONDED
     CONNECTED TO THE SCHOOL. WE DE                         SCHOOL. IT GOT TO A POINT W. WE ARE AT A BETTER PLACE
     HIM AS THE HEART OF THE JUNIOR SCRIBE                  INSTEAD OF CORRECTING HIM T I WILL TAKE THAT.”
     SCHOOL—A RESPECTED DISCIPLINA                           NOW. HE CALLS ME STEVE, BU
     WITH A COMPLETE LOVE FOR THE SCRIAN                     STEPHEN ST
                                                                          URGEON

    AND, MORE IMPORTANTLY, A COMPLHOOL
    LOVE FOR EACH AND EVERY STUDEN ETE
    WILL BE SO VERY MISSED.        T. HE
   TAMMY YOUNG,
   BECKETT (GRA
                DE   7) AND FINNIA
                                     N (GRADE 9)
30 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

 R, ENTHUSIASTIC HISTORIAN,
TH THE HEART OF A LION. HE IS                                       O P P O R TU N IT Y TO B E U N D ER MR.
                                                            HAD THE
 UDENT’S LIFE IN SCHOOL AND     I AM VERY GRATEFUL TO HAVE R SEVEN YEARS. ONE OF MY FAVOURITE
LL MISS HIM.”                    GREG DEVENISH’S GUIDANCE FOWAS OUR TIME IN FRANCE, THE NETHERLANDS,
                                 MEMORIES OF MR. DEVENISH TRIP. IT WAS AN EYE-OPENING EXPERIENCE
                                  AND BELGIUM ON THE EUROPEICES MADE BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WHO
                                  LEARNING ABOUT THE SACRIF US DURING BOTH WORLD WARS. I WOULD
                                   WERE NOT MUCH OLDER THAN FOR HIS DEDICATION AND PASSION TO THE
                                   LIKE TO THANK MR. DEVENISH BE MISSED.
                                   SCHOOL THAT WILL CERTAINLY
                                                              E8
                                                FFER - GRAD
                                   ARMA AN JA

                                                                   MR. DEVENISH IS A PRINCIPAL
                                                                   EXTRAORDINAIRE. WHETHER IT’S ON THE
                                                                   PLAYGROUND, THE CLASSROOM, OR EXTRA-
                                                                   CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES, HE BALANCES
                                                                   ENCOURAGEMENT AND SUPPORT WITH FIRM
                                                                   DISCIPLINE. HE GETS TO KNOW EACH BOY AS A
                                                                   UNIQUE INDIVIDUAL AND SERVES AS A MENTOR
                                                                   TO ALL. HIS CHARACTER IS THE EMBODIMENT OF
                                                                   THE CORE VALUES TAUGHT AT THE SCHOOL. HIS
                                                                   COMMITMENT TO SAINTS IS UNRIVALLED AND
                                                                   HE WILL BE GREATLY MISSED BY THE ENTIRE
                                                                   SAINTS COMMUNITY.
                                                                   JITI GILL & HARJINDER DHALIWAL
                                                                   TARAN (GRADE 3)

                                            MR. DEVENISH, YOU EXEMPLIFY THE CORE VALUES AND IDEALS
                                            OF THIS AMAZING SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY WHICH WE ARE
                                            SO THANKFUL TO BE A PART OF. AIDAN LOVED HIS PRINCIPAL’S
                                            PERIOD AND WE SELFISHLY WISH YOU COULD POSTPONE YOUR
                                            RETIREMENT UNTIL 2023. CONGRATULATIONS, AND ALL THE
                                            BEST FOR AN AMAZING RETIREMENT.
                                            DAVID HOWARD AND SUSAN LEUNG-HOWARD, AIDAN GRADE 3
                                                                                                        SPRING 2018 | 31
SAINTS LIFE

32 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

FOR   ALMOST TWO DECADES Junior School Principal Greg Devenish has been
leading and inspiring our young boys to become enthusiastic and motivated learners.
His caring, patient, and energetic personality, dedication to teaching, and unrivaled
passion for St. George’s have positively impacted countless members of our School
community.
As we celebrate his retirement, we have the opportunity to honour Greg for 19 years
of outstanding service and contribution to the School. Tribute Gifts made in Greg’s
name will support ongoing Junior School renovations and provide opportunities to
embrace dynamic new learning strategies and technologies which he has resolutely
championed over his time as Principal.
To make a gift please visit:
www.stgeorges.bc.ca/gregdevenish
or contact Tracie Watson at:
twatson@stgeorges.bc.ca
604-222-5800.
In the words of a Grade 7 leaving class, “Thank you for the guidance you have shown
us, for the places you have taken us, for the falls you have helped us stand up from,
and for the care and heart you have given us.”

THANK YOU,
GREG
FOR YOUR EXTRAORDINARY
COMMITMENT TO THE STUDENTS
OF ST. GEORGE’S SCHOOL!

                                                                                           SPRING 2018 | 33
SAINTS LIFE

      “IT’S OK
      TO COLOUR
      OUTSIDE THE
      LINES”

       THE GREAT THING ABOUT SAINTS, IS THAT
       IT KNOWS HOW BOYS THINK, AND THE NEW
       FLEXIBLE LEARNING SPACE AND PROGRAMS
       WILL NOT JUST TEACH STUDENTS WHAT TO
       LEARN, BUT HOW TO LEARN.
       JADEN BAINS
       SCHOOL CAPTAIN 2017-18

34 | THE SAINT
SAINTS LIFE

    INTRODUCING THE NEW GRADE 4 NEIGHBOURHOOD
    The Junior School will have some excitement on campus
    this summer as the Board has approved the renovation of
    the Grade 4 space into a brand new neighborhood. Through
    generous donations to the ONE Campaign, the current Grade
    4 classrooms will be completely revitalized to create flexible
    learning spaces conducive to 21st century boy-centred learning,
    which we call a “neighborhood.” Once completed, every boy in
    Grades 4 to 7 will learn, experiment, and collaborate in a grade-
    specific neighbourhood.

    To maintain consistency, the aesthetic of this new space will have a similar
    look and feel to the Grade 5 and 6 neighbourhoods. The movable furniture and
    different types of seating will create a comfortable atmosphere where students
    feel encouraged to take risks in their learning and are able to collaborate more
    easily with their peers and teachers.
    Our faculty often remark how students become more aware of who they are as
    learners through being able to decide how and where they best work to achieve
    success. The openness and fresh feel of these dynamic spaces are designed
    to foster these objectives. Flexible spaces encourage exploration and deeper
    learning as our students develop the necessary skills to thrive in an increasingly
    complex and changing world and, at an early age, learn how they learn best.
    Students also benefit from active engagement in classrooms where they can
    practice creativity, critical thinking, communication, teamwork, and individual
    learning. Colour, lighting, and ventilation are key to creating the environmental
    conditions for successful learning. This is a cornerstone of all the new
    neighbourhoods in the Junior School.
    One of the central elements that allows teachers to be effective is the provision
    of great spaces. The ONE Campaign is driven by the fundamental belief that our
    students and teachers need the right tools to succeed. The focus on providing
    outstanding educational spaces that ensure our faculty have the ability to focus
    on boy-centred 21st century teaching and learning is at the very core of the
    School’s vision.
    To learn more about the ONE Campaign and how your family can become a
    partner in this extraordinary project to shape the future of the School, please
    contact the Advancement Office.

IF WE BELIEVE THAT OUR BOYS NEED TO DEVELOP MULTIPLE
WAYS OF LEARNING, THEN WE MUST PROVIDE THEM WITH THE
SPACES THAT SUPPORT MULTIPLE STRATEGIES OF TEACHING.
GARY KERN
PRINCIPAL, SENIOR SCHOOL

                                                                                SPRING 2018 | 35
FEATURE STORY

            Character education has always been the cornerstone of a St. George’s
            education. As John Harker stressed during his time as Headmaster (1933-
            1962), the overriding goal of the School is to graduate young men of good
            character who will go on to make a positive contribution to their families and
            their communities. In order to promote values such as loyalty, courage, and
            commitment, Harker established rugby as the School’s defining sport, and
            over the years, he never wavered in his conviction that character education
            should permeate all aspects of the School’s program, both inside and outside
            of the classroom.
            In a speech delivered to the Vancouver Rotary Club, for example, Headmaster
            Harker went so far as to state that the curriculum set by the Ministry of
            Education was only a means to an end. Much more important than the material
            covered in English, Science, Math, or History class was the progress a boy
            made in developing the moral compass that would guide him throughout his
            lifetime. “The most important thing we teach,” he declared, “is proscribed
            in no particular programme of studies—loyalty and integrity, leadership and
            interdependence, poise and self-control; in other words, character building is
            the first and principal aim of our curriculum.”
            More recently, through our current Strategic Plan, we have reaffirmed the
            primacy of character education and identified six Core Values, namely
            empathy, humility, integrity, resilience, respect, and responsibility. Building
            on Harker’s legacy, our Core Values and our Mission of “Building Fine Young
            Men” remind us that we have a responsibility to educate our students’
            hearts as well as their minds. In our complex, rapidly changing world, this
            educational philosophy is more important than ever. There seems to be an
            acute shortage of positive role models for boys and young men, and we
            require a new generation of leaders, including young men of character, who
            will have the moral courage to do good and to help make the world a better
            place.
            I’m reminded of the feedback that our coaches received from an Air Canada
            cabin crew as they were returning from this year’s Rugby Tour to Argentina
            and Chile. Learning that the large group of young men boarding the aircraft
            was from St. George’s, the chief attendant said that they loved it when
            students from Saints were travelling with them because they are always so
            respectful and well behaved. “We never have to worry when St. George’s
            boys are on board,” she noted, “we know that it’s going to be a pleasant flight.”
            John Harker would have been incredibly pleased by these comments, just as
            I was, as they affirm our shared belief that “character building” is indeed “the
            most important thing we teach” here at St. George’s.

            DR. TOM MATTHEWS
            HEADMASTER

36 | THE SAINT
CHARACTER

CHARACTER EDUCATION
   THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE TEACH

                                         SPRING 2018 | 37
FEATURE STORY

                   JOHN BROMLEY, CLASS OF 1996,             has founded three successful charitable giving and community
                   engagement companies. As founder and CEO of his most recent venture, CHIMP: Charitable Impact,
                   Bromley established the first giving platform built for donors—when you deposit money into your account,
                   you receive a tax receipt immediately. That money can then be given away to any charity of your choice or
                   simply saved to give another day. To date, over 100,000 Canadians have used CHIMP to donate more than
                   $380 million to charities nationwide.
                   The Saint spoke to Bromley about the vision of his Charitable Allowance Program, its commitment to our
                   School’s Core Values, and the importance of teaching charity.

                   CHARITABLE ALLOWANCE
                   EMPOWERING STUDENTS TO CHANGE THE WORLD

38 | THE SAINT
CHARACTER
Tell us about the inspiration for your vision for         shown humility in their ability to share, grow, and
your Charitable Allowance Program.                        adjust the ways they consider charitable giving.
“Increasingly, there is nowhere to learn how to           Their intelligence and fearlessness in questioning
give, and as a result there are now fewer and fewer       and seeking knowledge is verification that you can,
Canadians donating to charity. In direct response         in fact, build and foster a culture of giving.
to this matter, we at CHIMP: Charitable Impact, are
                                                          An integral part of Charitable Allowance is teaching
investing in the development, and empowerment
                                                          financial literacy. Instead of focusing purely on ‘how
of future donors through education. Imagine, for a
moment, if we weren’t taught Math in school—do
you think there would still be engineers? I believe the
                                                          much to give to whom’, students are taught the
                                                          skills needed to make informed donation decisions.         FROM OUR STUDENTS
                                                          Revealing the opportunity costs of charitable              Donating money makes me
same very much applies to charity. If it’s not taught
                                                          giving demonstrates the importance of saving and           feel like I’m adding worth
and experienced, then how is it ever fully grasped?
                                                          spending wisely.                                           to the world, makes me feel
So, how does this program work?                                                                                      helpful, and makes me feel
                                                          The intent here is to nurture prosocial development,
Charitable Allowance has been providing the boys                                                                     good about myself.
                                                          and for students to develop, act on, and take              Keaton
with a monthly allowance of $10 each, thanks
                                                          responsibility for their allowances. It is CHIMP’s
to funding from an anonymous donor. Over the
                                                          hope that over the course of the program, students
course of the year, teachers and students engage
                                                          will learn about different avenues for giving and feel     I choose organizations that
in conversations around giving. Students then use                                                                    I feel are going to make a
their charity allowances to learn more about, and         the power that comes from creating greater impact
                                                                                                                     change in society and are
participate in, the charitable sector.                    through their own financial decisions. They are
                                                                                                                     using the money wisely.
                                                          learning that effective generosity is a tool that can      Charlie
While this program’s concept is relatively simple,        be used to actively impact change.
the complexity lies in its ‘giving away’ component.
Students are taught skills to enable them to              How will this affect the future of our students?
                                                                                                                     It feels like an achievement,
contribute to charity independently, whether they         My experience is that Vancouverites are generous
                                                                                                                     even if it is a small one…it can
want to donate to one, two, or ten causes. They are       and generally conscious of the environment and             still have an impact. Jason
empowered to give in a way that makes the most            the world around them. This means people already
charitable sense to them, as evolving donors. To          give. But are we proactive? Are we habitual in our
                                                          generosity? Generally speaking, the answer is no—          The purpose of CHIMP is to
assist in the research of this program, CHIMP has                                                                    teach young people about
enlisted Harvard Business School’s Dr. Ashley             and this is because we weren’t taught how to give.
                                                                                                                     donating money and how it
Whillans.                                                 Instead of experiencing our own charitable pathway,
                                                                                                                     is important that charities
                                                          most of us were just asked to participate. As a result,    get the money that they
And what about the program’s intent?                      for most people, our moments of generosity only            need. As a student, I think
My experience shows that when youth experience            occur as a reaction to fundraising asks.                   that I learned lots about the
giving in a context that empowers them, they’re                                                                      different charities and their
better able to become engaged citizens who                Our Charitable Allowance Program’s ultimate aim is
                                                                                                                     expenditures and revenues.
contribute consistently and positively to society.        to develop a generation of donors that not only gives,     Justin
                                                          but gives often and with intent, with the agency to
But I think it’s important here to take a look at how     donate to any registered charity they wish.
the Charitable Allowance Program aligns with St.                                                                     I feel good donating money
George’s Core Values and how the 250 students             How can parents, and the entire St. George’s               to an organization like this
involved are learning how purposeful giving can           community, get involved?                                   because it’s a great cause
impact meaningful change. Much like teaching art,         We see a future where every young person in Canada         and I can’t wait to see what
we promote the idea of giving and enable students         earns a Charitable Allowance. Share your favourite         happens in the future.
                                                          causes with your kids to inspire them to want to           Charlie
to donate in the hope that each of them will be
inspired to create change their own way, on their         create change. Give together and see how easy it
own terms. By exposing students to charity, we            is to make a bigger difference to the world. CHIMP
provide each young person with a chance and a             is the first giving vehicle built for donors, making it
pathway to develop into an effective and powerful         easy for families to make giving a part of everyday
philanthropist.                                           living. Sign up to CHIMP.net for free, deposit money
                                                          into your account for when you’re inspired to give,
By asking the question “What do YOU care about
                                                          or set up a monthly recurring donation for all your
changing?”, we empower students to make their
                                                          favourite Canadian charities. Join us in nurturing the
own decisions about supporting the causes that
                                                          future generation’s passion for creating change.
matter most to them. Facilitating this seemingly
simple conversation in classrooms has allowed St.         I would like to take this opportunity to thank St.
George’s students to gain not just a deeper level of      George’s for having trust in our program, and
empathy for their surrounding community, but to           for being innovative in their approach to student
really explore the notion that, while everyone wants      development. I hope our program manifests itself,
something in the world to change, taking real action      alongside the likes of math, sport and science, as an
is essential to creating impact. The students have        important tool in shaping positive futures.
learned that the more thoughtfully they give, the         As for St. George’s Junior School boys in particular,
more impact they will make on the world—whether           I would like to thank them for being themselves and
they care about Kitsilano beach, the Pacific Ocean,       for their willingness to grapple with this part of their
or the fish that live there.                              humanity. I am grateful for their enthusiasm and
Choosing to support a different charity than your         intelligence in helping us to pilot this program, and I
best friends can be a demanding notion for young          hope we have helped them to think, feel, and act like
people to grapple with. However, the students have        the fine young philanthropists they really are.

                          For more information, please contact our Head of Communities at hello@chimp.net
                                                                                                                                            SPRING 2018 | 39
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