YEAR 9 SUBJECT SELECTION 2019 - INFORMATION 2019 - Stretton State College

 
YEAR 9 SUBJECT SELECTION 2019 - INFORMATION 2019 - Stretton State College
YEAR 9
        YEAR 9
        SUBJECT
       SUBJECT
       SELECTION
    INFORMATION
          2019
         2019

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YEAR 9 SUBJECT SELECTION 2019 - INFORMATION 2019 - Stretton State College
Table of Contents

    WELCOME ..................................................................................................................... 3

    YEAR 9 SUBJECT OPTIONS AND LIGHTHOUSE PROGRAM ............................................... 4

    CORE SUBJECTS ............................................................................................................... 5
                    ENGLISH ........................................................................................................ 6
                    MATHEMATICS .............................................................................................. 7
                    SCIENCE ......................................................................................................... 8
                    HUMANITIES .................................................................................................. 9
                    HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION ............................................................ 10

    ELECTIVE SUBJECTS ........................................................................................................ 11
                    EINSTEIN’S COURSE ..................................................................................... 12
                    VISUAL ART ................................................................................................. 13
                    DRAMA ....................................................................................................... 14
                    MUSIC ......................................................................................................... 15
                    MEDIA ARTS ................................................................................................. 16
                    JUNIOR ENGINEERING ................................................................................. 17
                    DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGIES ...................................................................... 18
                    JUNIOR DESIGN ............................................................................................ 19
                    FOOD TECHNOLOGY .................................................................................... 20
                    DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES ............................................................................. 21
                    BUSINESS STUDIES ....................................................................................... 22
                    CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP ............................................................................. 23
                    GEOGRAPHY ................................................................................................ 24

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WELCOME!

Dear Students and Parents

Year 9 is the final year of Junior Secondary as students transition into the Senior Phases of learning.
The Year 9 curriculum offered at Stretton State College is structured to assist in this transition and to
cater for the varied pathways that students may choose as they move from Junior Secondary into the
Senior School and beyond.

The Year 9 Curriculum Framework is based on the eight Key Learning Areas and is designed to cater
for a range of abilities and interests. Students are required to study English, Mathematics, Science,
History, & Health and Physical Education along with two electives.

Students may chose an elective for a semester or an entire year. This allows students to either choose
between a number of experiences or to choose earlier specialisation if they are clear about their
present and future skills. All electives are designed to cater for the varied interests of students, whilst
setting the foundations for future study within that particular curriculum area.

It is important to note that all subjects emphasise the development of literacy, numeracy, thinking skills,
technology skills and values.

I encourage students to seek more information about the subjects on offer here at Stretton State
College, and the requirements to reach their future career goals and aspirations by talking to their
parents and other key people in our College.

It is important to remember that a balanced curriculum keeps future options open.

I trust the following information will be helpful in making your choices in what to study in Year 9.

I wish you well in making your decisions.

Jan Maresca
Executive Principal
Stretton State College

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YEAR 9 SUBJECT OPTIONS
In 2019, Year 9 students will study a core program of English, Mathematics, Science, History and Health and Physical
Education and also have the opportunity to select up to four elective subjects to study for either a semester or for the
year. Electives are designed to cater for the varied interests of students, whilst setting the foundations for future study
within that particular curriculum area. This allows them to begin to focus in their areas of interest or areas in which they
achieve most success.

ALL STUDENTS AND PARENTS ARE ADVISED THAT SUBJECTS WILL RUN ONLY IF SUFFICIENT NUMBERS OF STUDENTS CHOOSE
THEM AND THEY CAN BE TIMETABLED. IN SOME CASES STUDENTS MAY BE ASKED TO RE-SELECT.

All Year 9 subjects are studied for 3 lessons per week. Core subjects English, Mathematics and Science must be
studied for the whole year and History and Health and Physical Education for one Semester. Electives can be
studied for a Semester or a whole year depending on student’s selection from Line A and B below.

                                 ALL STUDENTS STUDY THE CORE KEY LEARNING AREAS

        ENGLISH               MATHEMATICS                 SCIENCE                  HISTORY           HEALTH & PHYSICAL
                                                                                                        EDUCATION

               STUDENTS MUST SELECT TWO ELECTIVE SUBJECTS EACH SEMESTER FROM THE FOLLOWING
                                  These may be studied for a semester or for the entire year
    Line A          Civics and Citizenship            Digital Technologies                Drama
                    Food Technology                   Geography                           Junior Design
                    Visual Arts
    Line B          Business Studies                  Design and Technologies             Digital Technologies
                    Einstein’s Course                 Junior Engineering                  Media Arts
                    Music

                          STRETTON STATE COLLEGE LIGHTHOUSE PROGRAM
    Stretton State College proudly promotes academic excellence in which bright young students are challenged
    to fulfil their academic potential and make connections with their future pathways. Stretton State College has
    a goal of creating 21st century employees, employers and entrepreneurs. The Lighthouse Academic
    Excellence Program prepares students for the digital world as well as ensuring that they will be highly
    numerate, literate and creative.

    The Lighthouse Curriculum Program focuses on developing, extending and enriching knowledge acquisition
    and higher order thinking in the core academic subjects of Mathematics, English, Science, History and
    Geography. A small team of dedicated and experienced teachers deliver the program and one of the key
    features is the high level of contact they are able to maintain with the students and parents throughout each
    year.

    Places within the Lighthouse Academic Excellence Program are very competitive, with a large number of
    students applying each year. Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and places in this program
    for 2019 will be offered based on merit, academic performance, behaviour and effort during 2018. Students
    will also be required to undertake the Australian Council for Educational Research General Ability Test and
    complete a written task. The General Ability Test assesses student ability to use verbal, numerical and abstract
    reasoning items, giving a comprehensive picture of students’ general ability.

    Further information can be found by visiting the school website: http://strettonsc.eq.edu.au/wcms/ or by
    contacting Ms Heather Boreland (Deputy Principal).

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English

English is a core subject in Year 9. The study of English is central to the learning and development of all young Australians.
It helps create confident communicators, imaginative thinkers and informed citizens. Through the study of Australian
Curriculum: English students learn to analyse, understand, communicate and build relationships with others and with the
world around them. The study of English helps young people develop the knowledge and skills needed for education,
training and the workplace. It helps them become ethical, thoughtful, informed and active members of society.

Australian Curriculum: English aims to ensure that students:
        Learn to listen to, read, view, speak, write, create and reflect on increasingly complex and sophisticated spoken,
         written and multimodal texts across a growing range of contexts with accuracy, fluency and purpose.
        Appreciate, enjoy and use the English language in all its variations and develop a sense of its richness and power
         evoke feelings, convey information, form ideas, facilitate interaction with others, entertain, persuade and argue.
        Understand how Standard Australian English works in its spoken and written forms and in combination with non-
         linguistic forms of communication to create meaning.
        Develop interest and skills in inquiring into the aesthetic aspects of texts, and develop an informed appreciation of
         literature.

Australian Curriculum: English also helps students to engage imaginatively and critically with literature to expand the scope
of their experience, preparing them for studies of General or Applied English in the senior years.

Pathways
A course of study in English promotes open-mindedness, imagination, critical awareness and intellectual flexibility —
skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a wide range of contexts.

Structure
English in Year 9 consists of four term-long units.

                          SEMESTER 1                                                    SEMESTER 2

             Unit 1                         Unit 2                         Unit 3                         Unit 4

     What if…? Speculative       Differing Perspectives        The Power of the Pen          Documentaries
      Fiction Study                                               Novel Study

Assessment
Student performance is recorded in two categories: spoken/signed and written. Assessment is completed in a range of
genres for a variety of audiences and purposes. Conditions vary from process writing to test conditions.

                           SEMESTER 1                                                    SEMESTER 2

    Unit 1: Persuasive – Speech                                  Unit 3: Imaginative – Diary Entries
    Unit 1: Imaginative – Narrative Stimulus Response            Unit 3: Informative – Analytical Essay
    Unit 2: Informative – Reading Comprehension                  Unit 4: Persuasive – Documentary Trailer and Pitch
    Unit 2: Informative – Memoir Analysis

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.

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Mathematics
The Key Learning Area of Mathematics aims to ensure that students are confident and creative users and communicators
of mathematics, able to investigate, represent and interpret situations in their lives. At Stretton, we also aim to instil in
students an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematical reasoning.

The beginning of Year 9 marks a further shift in mathematics learning to more abstract ideas, and foundations built in
previous years prepare students for this change. Previously established mathematical ideas can be drawn upon and
subsequently develop more complex mathematical ideas as the year progresses.

The curriculum focuses on developing increasingly sophisticated and refined mathematical understanding, fluency, logical
reasoning, and analytical thought and problem solving skills. Mathematics at Stretton shall provide students with essential
mathematical skills and knowledge in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability

Pathways
The study of Year 9 Mathematics provides students with carefully paced, in-depth study of critical skills and concepts. It
encourages students to become self-motivated, confident learners through inquiry and active participation in challenging
and engaging experiences, preparing them for studies of General or Applied Mathematics in the senior years.

Structure
Mathematics in Year 9 consists of four term-long units. Students have opportunities to develop understandings of:

                              SEMESTER 1                                                SEMESTER 2

              Unit 1                          Unit 2                      Unit 3                         Unit 4

     Real numbers                   Patterns and algebra      Real numbers                  Real numbers
     Linear and non-linear          Geometric reasoning       Money and financial           Linear and non-linear
      relationships                  Pythagoras and             mathematics                    relationships
     Using units of                  trigonometry              Patterns and algebra          Using units of
      measurement                                               Data representation and        measurement
                                                                 interpretation                Chance

Assessment

                              SEMESTER 1                                                SEMESTER 2

    Unit 1: Problem-solving and modelling task                  Unit 3: Problem-solving and modelling task
    Unit 1: Examination                                         Unit 3: Examination

    Unit 2: Examination                                         Unit 3 and 4: Examination

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.

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Science
Science is a core subject in Year 9. Through the study of Science, students develop an in-depth understanding of
interdependent life systems, homeostasis, chemical processes, and uses of natural radioactivity and wave models of
energy transfer. Students also explore global features and events in terms of geological processes and timescales and
describe the social and technological factors that have influenced scientific developments in order to predict the future
applications of science and technology.

Australian Curriculum: Science aims to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable students to:
    Design questions that can be investigated using a range of inquiry skills
    Design and implement safe and ethical methods that include the control and accurate measurement of variables
        and the systematic collection of data
    Analyse primary and secondary information and data in order to reveal trends, interrelationships and
        inconsistencies
    Evaluate others’ methods and explanations from a scientific perspective and use appropriate language and
        representations when communicating their findings and ideas to specific audiences
    Become scientifically literate and informed consumers and producers of information and ideas

Pathways
Through the medium of scientific inquiry students develop critical and creative thinking and interpersonal collaboration and
communication skills, enabling them to be informed, active and productive citizens in an ever-changing world. The
Australian Curriculum: Science also prepares students for studies of the General Science subjects: Biology, Physics,
Chemistry and Earth and Environmental Science or the Applied Science Subject: Science in Practice in the senior years.

Structure
The Year 9 Science curriculum covers the focus areas and achievement standard from the Science Australian Curriculum
Year 9 band. Students complete two semesters of year 9 Science composed of four units of study. Student performance in
the Year 9 Science learning area subject is an indicator of the likelihood of successful study in the Year 10 Core Science
subject as well as the two streams of year 10 Science elective courses (Life Sciences and Physical Science).

                          SEMESTER 1                                                   SEMESTER 2

             Unit 1                        Unit 2                         Unit 3                        Unit 4

     My Body in Balance and      Energy on the Move:          Chemical Patterns             The Changing Earth
      Responding to Change         Making Waves

Assessment
Student assessment in Year 9 Science is designed to provide opportunities for individual and collaborative group work
and research and evaluation skills in spoken and written modes.

                          SEMESTER 1                                                   SEMESTER 2

    Unit 1: Exam – Homeostatic Mechanisms and Ecology           Unit 3: Exam – Atomic Structure and Chemical Patterns
    Unit 2: Student Experiment – Energy Transfer                Unit 4: Multimodal Presentation – Natural Disasters
    Experiment                                                  Unit 3 and 4: Collection of Work – Practical Folio
    Unit 1 and 2: Collection of Work – Practical Folio

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme. Students may be required to supply
additional consumables for the purpose of practical work.

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History
History is a core subject in Year 9; all students will complete one semester. In addition to offering an understanding of the
world we live in, the study of history provides a practical skill set that is transferable to a wide variety of contexts.
Research and writing skills are at the heart of historical inquiry, as is analytical thinking. Our students learn how to read
critically, conduct research, write with clarity, and make a persuasive evidence-based argument.

The Year 9 curriculum provides a study of the history of the making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918. It was a
period of industrialisation and rapid change in the ways people lived, worked and thought. It was an era of nationalism
and imperialism, and the colonisation of Australia was part of the expansion of European power.

The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence,
continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. Students investigate
these concepts within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding of the past and to provide a focus for
historical inquiries. History also encourages students to engage analytically and critically with sources to expand the
range of their experience, preparing them for studies of any Humanities subjects in in the senior years.

Pathways
A course of study in History promotes critical reasoning and analytical skills, including the capacity for solving problems
and thinking creatively — skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a
wide range of contexts. As a Humanities subject, student performance in Year nine History is an indicator of the likelihood
of successful study in Humanities electives in future years.

Structure
The Year nine History curriculum provides a link between the junior and senior school, preparing students for success in
Years 10, 11 and 12. All students study a one-semester course covering elements of the ACARA Achievement Standard.
A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions
through the use and interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions for Year 9 are:

        What were the changing features of the movements of people from 1750 to 1918?
        How did new ideas and technological developments contribute to change in this period?
        What was the origin, development, significance and long-term impact of imperialism in this period?
        What was the significance of World War I?

Students will complete two units of work over the course of one semester.
                             UNIT 1                                                        UNIT 2

    The Industrial Revolution                                    Australia in World War 1
    This unit of works allows students to develop an             Students are introduced to the concept of a world war,
    understanding of the impact of changing technology on        and evaluate the impact of the involvement of Australian
    the human condition and society.                             troops on the development of the ANZAC legend.

Assessment
                             UNIT 1                                                         UNIT 2

    Short Response to Historical Sources (Exam)                  Independent Source Investigation (Research
                                                                 Assignment)
    Essay in Response to Historical Sources (Exam)               Multimodal Presentation (Spoken)

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.

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Health and Physical Education
Health and Physical Education (HPE) is a core subject in year 9. Through studying HPE, students acquire an understanding
of how the body moves and develop positive attitudes towards physical activity participation. Movement is a powerful
medium for learning, through which students can practise and refine personal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills.
Australian Curriculum: HPE aims to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable students to:
     Access, evaluate and synthesise information to take positive action to protect, enhance and advocate for their own
        and others’ health, wellbeing, safety and physical activity participation across their lifespan
     Develop and use personal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills and strategies to promote a sense of personal
        identity and wellbeing and to build and manage respectful relationships
     Acquire, apply and evaluate movement skills, concepts and strategies to respond confidently, competently and
        creatively in a variety of physical activity contexts and settings
     Engage in and enjoy regular movement-based learning experiences and understand and appreciate their
        significance to personal, social, cultural, environmental and health practices and outcomes
     Analyse how varied and changing personal and contextual factors shape understanding of, and opportunities for,
        health and physical activity locally, regionally and globally

Pathways
A course of study in HPE promotes critical inquiry skills, resilience, empathy, active engagement in their own and others’
wellbeing and the skills to not only cope with life’s challenges but also to flourish as healthy, safe and active citizens in the
21st century.

Structure
The Year 9 HPE curriculum covers the focus areas and achievement standard from HPE Australian Curriculum year 9 and
10 band. Students complete one semester of year 9 HPE, which includes two units of study. While still working towards the
Achievement Standard, students will also undertake learning experiences, which ensure that there is exposure to
appropriate assessment types, skills and assumed knowledge aligned to each of the Senior HPE Subjects (Physical
Education, Sport and Recreation and Certificate III in Fitness).Student performance in the Year 9 HPE learning area subject
is an indicator of the likelihood of successful study in the two year 10 HPE elective courses (Foundation Physical Education
and Health, Sport & Recreation).
Students will complete two units of work over the course of one semester.
                    UNIT 1- Personal Wellbeing                                     UNIT 2- Community Wellbeing

  Students will explore their own wellbeing and strategies to     Students will explore the concept of community wellbeing,
  enhance their mindfulness, inclusion of others, relationships   including strategies to enhance wellbeing for diverse members
  and emotional responses to various situations. Focus Areas      of the local community. Students will expand their knowledge
  include:                                                        and understanding of diverse cultures, community fitness and
          Mental health and Wellbeing                            the role of physical activity in our society. Focus Areas include:
          Relationships and sexuality                                     Food and nutrition
          Alcohol and other drugs                                         Health benefits of physical activity
          Lifelong physical activities                                    Expressive and rhythmic
          Challenge and adventure                                      Games and sports
          Safety

Assessment
Students are assessed within two strands: personal, social and community health, and movement and physical activity.
Physical activities will vary throughout the semester.

                               UNIT 1                                                           UNIT 2

  Personal, social & community          Movement and physical      Personal, social & community           Movement and physical
             health                           activity                        health                            activity

  Investigation – Report             Physical Performance         Investigation - Project                Physical Performance

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.
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Einstein’s Course
Einstein’s is an elective subject in Year 9. The aim of this STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)
course is to inspire our next generation to become the ‘bearers of the torch of discovery in our quest for knowledge’
(Professor Stephen Hawking). Through this collaborative inquiry-based course, students integrate scientific, mathematical
and technological concepts and apply them to real-world STEM problems. Students explore the origin, development and
processes of STEM innovations and apply scientific concepts and mathematical algorithms to contexts such as space
exploration, terraforming, and vehicle design and safety. They critically evaluate the social and technological factors that
have influenced various STEM priorities in order to predict future applications of innovations in this field.

Einstein’s Course aims to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable students to:
  Design questions that can be investigated using a range of inquiry skills and implement safe and ethical methods
     that include the control and accurate measurement of variables and the systematic collection of data
  Analyse primary and secondary information and data in order to reveal trends, interrelationships and inconsistencies
  Evaluate others’ methods and explanations from a STEM perspective and use appropriate language and
     representations when communicating their findings and ideas to specific audiences
  Develop problem-solving skills and apply them to real-world contexts

Pathways
Through the medium of STEM inquiry students develop critical and creative thinking and interpersonal collaboration and
communication skills, enabling them to be informed, active and productive citizens in an ever-changing world. Einstein’s
also prepares students for study of the General Science subjects: Physics and Earth and Environmental Science or the
Applied Science Subject: Science in Practice in the senior years. Student performance in the Einstein’s Course is an
indicator of the likelihood of successful study in the two streams of year 10 Science elective courses (Life Sciences and
Physical Science) as well as the Year 10 Newton’s elective course.

Structure
The Einstein’s Course curriculum complements the delivery of the focus areas and achievement standard from the
Science and Mathematics Australian Curriculum Year 9 band. Students can complete two semesters of the Einstein’s
Course which is composed of four units of study.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: STEM innovations and innovators                   Unit 1: Future Transport

     Unit 2: Mission Mars                                      Unit 2: New Frontiers in STEM

Assessment
The range of student assessment in Einstein’s Course is designed to provide opportunities for individual and collaborative
group work as well as research and evaluation skills in spoken and written modes.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                 SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: STEM Research Investigation Report                 Unit 1: Collection of Work
            STEM Conference Presentation Multimodal                   - Task 1: Article analysis
                                                                      - Task 2: Building a Land Yacht Practical
     Unit 2: Exam: Physics of Space Travel and Terraforming           - Task 3: Data Test (Kinematics)
                                                                Unit 2: Individual Project – Open Inquiry and Evaluation

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.

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Visual Art
The Arts have the capacity to engage, inspire and enrich all students, exciting the imagination and encouraging them to
reach their creative and expressive potential. In the Australian Curriculum, the Arts is a learning area that draws together
related but distinct art forms. Each subject focuses on its own practices, terminology and unique ways of looking at the
world. Together they provide opportunities for students to learn how to create, design, represent, communicate and share
their imagined and conceptual ideas, emotions, observations and experiences.
In Visual Art, students experience and explore the concepts of artists, artworks, world and audience. Students learn in,
through and about visual arts practices, including the fields of art, craft and design. Students develop practical skills and
critical thinking which inform their work as artists and audience.
In Visual Art, students experience and explore the concepts of artists, artworks, world and audience. Students learn in,
through and about visual art practices, including the fields of art, craft and design. Students develop practical skills and
critical thinking which inform their work as artists and audience. In addition to the overarching aims of the Australian
Curriculum: The Arts, Visual Art knowledge, understanding and skills ensure that, individually and collaboratively,
students develop:
 conceptual and perceptual ideas and representations through design and inquiry processes
 visual arts techniques, materials, processes and technologies
 critical and creative thinking, using visual art languages, theories and practices to apply aesthetic judgment
 respect for and acknowledgement of the diverse roles, innovations, traditions, histories and cultures of artists,
  craftspeople and designers; visual arts as social and cultural practices; and industry as artists and audiences
 confidence, curiosity, imagination and enjoyment and develop a personal aesthetic through engagement with visual arts
  making and ways of representing and communicating.

Pathways
Visual Art supports students to view the world through various lenses and contexts. They recognise the significance of
visual art histories, theories and practices, exploring and responding to artists, craftspeople and designers and their
artworks. They apply visual art knowledge in order to make critical judgments about their own importance as artists and
audiences. Learning in Visual Art helps students to develop understanding of world culture and their responsibilities as
global citizens. This course leads from Year 8 Art and links to Year 10 Visual Art.

Structure
Visual Art is offered as an Elective Course in Year 9. The Year 9 Visual Art curriculum aims to provide a link between
junior and senior Visual Art curriculum preparing students for success in Years 11 and 12.

                    SEMESTER 1 – Fame & Fantasy                             SEMESTER 2 – Cultures in Conjunction

     In this unit, students will develop their understanding,   In this unit, students identify and analyse how other
     application and resolving of visual conventions through    artists can influence each other across cultures, time and
     the creation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional      places, focussing on the similarities between modern
     artworks that represent the concepts of two art            artists such as Pablo Picasso and ancient artists from
     movements: Pop Art and Surrealism.                         Indigenous African cultures.

Assessment
Content descriptions in each Arts subject reflect the interrelated strands of Making and Responding.
 Making includes learning about and using knowledge, skills, techniques, processes, materials and technologies to
  explore arts practices and make artworks that communicate ideas and intentions.
 Responding includes exploring, responding to, analysing and interpreting artworks.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                  SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Making - 3D Sculptural Form                        Unit 1: Making - 3D Sculptural Form
     Unit 1: Making - 2D Drawing                                Unit 1: Responding to Artworks - Exam
     Unit 1: Responding to Artworks - Essay                     Unit 1: Making - 2D Form

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.

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Drama
In Drama, students explore and depict real and fictional worlds through use of body language, gesture and space to make
meaning as performers and audience. They create, rehearse, perform and respond to drama.
In addition to the overarching aims of the Australian Curriculum: The Arts, Drama knowledge, understanding and skills
ensure that, individually and collaboratively, students develop:
 confidence and self-esteem to explore, depict and celebrate human experience, take risks and challenge their own
  creativity through drama
 knowledge and understanding in controlling, applying and analysing the elements, skills, processes, forms, styles and
  techniques of drama to engage audiences and create meaning
 a sense of curiosity, aesthetic knowledge, enjoyment and achievement through exploring and playing roles, and
  imagining situations, actions and ideas as drama makers and audiences
 knowledge and understanding of traditional and contemporary drama as critical and active participants and audiences.

Pathways
In the Arts, students learn as artists and audience through the intellectual, emotional and sensory experiences of the Arts.
They acquire knowledge, skills and understanding specific to the Arts subjects and develop critical understanding that
informs decision making and aesthetic choices. Through the Arts, students learn to express their ideas, thoughts and
opinions as they discover and interpret the world. Students develop a sense of inquiry and empathy by exploring the
diversity of drama in the contemporary world and in other times, traditions, places and cultures. This course leads from
Year 8 Drama and links to Year 10 Drama.

Structure
Drama is offered as an Elective Course in Year 9. The Year 9 Drama curriculum aims to provide a link between junior and
senior drama curriculum. The course builds upon knowledge and assessment styles presented in junior drama and allows
students focus and build upon their knowledge and skills associated with the elements of drama. Students also experience
live theatre and are encouraged to engage in live theatrical performances in preparation for Years 11 and 12.

                              SEMESTER 1                                                        SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: The Drama Elements and Conventions - Improvisation           Unit 1: Melodrama (Semester)
     (Students will study the elements and conventions of Drama
                                                                          (Students make and respond to drama by exploring, analysing
     focusing on the rules of Improvisation. Students will apply
     literacy skills by responding to live theatre through the analysis   and manipulating the elements and conventions of Melodrama
     and evaluation of dramatic conventions.)                             through script-writing and performing tasks.)

     Unit 2: Australian Gothic Theatre
     (Students will study the elements and conventions of Drama
     focusing on Australian Gothic Theatre. They will selectively and
     creatively manipulate their application of dramatic conventions
     in collaboration with other students. Students will perform their
     own live theatre, focusing on a Gothic Play: Wolf Lullaby,
     Dracula, Frankenstein, Ruby Moon.)

Assessment
Content descriptions in each Arts subject reflect the interrelated strands of Making (learning about and using knowledge,
 skills, techniques, processes, materials and technologies to explore arts practices and make artworks that communicate
 ideas and intentions) and Responding (exploring, responding to, analysing and interpreting artworks).
                              SEMESTER 1                                                        SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Making - Performing - Improvisation                          Unit 1: Making - Forming
     Unit 1: Responding to live theatre - Written Assessment              Unit 1: Making - Performing a Melodrama
     Unit 2: Making - Forming/Performing                                  Unit 1: Responding to live theatre – Written Exam

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.

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Music
In Music, students listen to, compose and perform music from a diverse range of styles, traditions and contexts. They
create, shape and share sounds in time and space and critically analyse music. Music practice is aurally based and
focuses on acquiring and using knowledge, understanding and skills about music and musicians.
In addition to the overarching aims of the Australian Curriculum: The Arts, Music knowledge, understanding and skills
ensure that, individually and collaboratively, students develop:
 the confidence to be creative, innovative, thoughtful, skilful and informed musicians
 skills to compose, perform, improvise, respond and listen with intent and purpose
 aesthetic knowledge and respect for music and music practices across global communities, cultures and musical
  traditions
 an understanding of music as an aural art form as they acquire skills to become independent music learners.

Pathways
In the Arts, students learn as artists and audience through the intellectual, emotional and sensory experiences of the Arts.
They acquire knowledge, skills and understanding specific to the Arts subjects and develop critical understanding that
informs decision-making and aesthetic choices. Through the Arts, students learn to express their ideas, thoughts and
opinions as they discover and interpret the world. Music exists distinctively in every culture and is a basic expression of
human experience. Students’ active participation in music fosters understanding of other times, places, cultures and
contexts. This course leads from Year 8 Music and links to Year 10 Music.

Structure
Music is offered as an Elective Course in Year 9. The Year 9 curriculum aims to provide a link between junior and senior
music curriculum preparing students for success in Years 11 and 12. The course builds upon knowledge and assessment
styles presented in junior music and further allows students for the first time, to focus on specific and individualised areas
of interest in music whilst continuing to build upon their knowledge and skills associated with the elements of music.
Students also engage with specialist software to aid their music making as well as prepare for senior music.

                         SEMESTER 1                                                   SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: The Disney Channel – Performance & Analysis        Unit 1: Baroque to Rock – Performance and Analysis
     (A study of Disney Songs both Instrumental and Vocal       (A study of music from 1700 – 2000’s; the famous
     works used in Disney Films and Soundtracks with a          Classical works to popular Rock and Pop with a focus on
     focus on Performing and learning about the musical         Performing and learning about the musical elements with
     elements with the musical works).                          the musical works).
     Unit 2: The Disney Channel – Composition Focus             Unit 2: Baroque to Rock – Composition Focus
     (A study of Disney Songs both Instrumental and Vocal       (A study of music from 1700 – 2000’s; the famous
     works used in Disney Films and Soundtracks with a          Classical works to popular Rock and Pop with a focus on
     focus on composing original works using some of the        composing original works using the musical elements).
     musical elements).

Assessment
Content descriptions in each Arts subject reflect the interrelated strands of Making and Responding.
 Making includes learning about and using knowledge, skills, techniques, processes, materials and technologies to
  explore arts practices and make artworks that communicate ideas and intentions.
 Responding includes exploring, responding to, analysing and interpreting artworks.

                         SEMESTER 1                                                   SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Making - Performance                                Unit 1: Making - Performance
     Unit 1: Responding – Analysis of Music                      Unit 1: Responding – Analysis of Music
     Unit 2: Making and Responding - Composition                 Unit 2: Making and Responding - Composition

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.

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Media Arts
In Media Arts, students use communications technologies to creatively explore, make and interpret stories about people,
ideas and the world around them. They engage their senses, imagination and intellect through media artworks that
respond to diverse cultural, social and organisational influences on communications practices today.
In addition to the overarching aims for the Australian Curriculum: The Arts, Media Arts knowledge, understanding and
skills ensure that, individually and collaboratively, students develop:
      enjoyment and confidence to participate in, experiment with and interpret the media-rich culture and
         communications practices that surround them
          creative and critical thinking, and exploring perspectives in media as producers and consumers
          aesthetic knowledge and a sense of curiosity and discovery as they explore imagery, text and sound to express
           ideas, concepts and stories for different audiences
          knowledge and understanding of their active participation in existing and evolving local and global media cultures.

Pathways
Media Arts enables students to create and communicate representations of diverse worlds and investigate the impact and
influence of media artworks on those worlds, both individually and collaboratively. As an art form evolving in the twenty-
first century, Media Arts enables students to use existing and emerging technologies as they explore imagery, text and
sound and create meaning as they participate in, experiment with and interpret diverse cultures and communications
practices. This course links to Year 10 Media Arts.

Structure
Media Arts is offered as an Elective Course in Year 9. The Year 9 curriculum aims to provide a link between junior and
senior Film Television and New Media curriculum preparing students for success in Years 11 and 12. The course builds
upon knowledge and assessment styles presented in Year 9 Media Arts and allows students focus and build upon their
skills associated with the elements of Media as outlined ACARA achievement standards. The Year 9 Media Arts program
introduces use of subject specific software essential to studies of Media/Film and Television in the senior curriculum.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                        SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Shots Fired – Media Foundations (Semester long)          Unit 1: The Art of the Moving Image

     (Students develop knowledge and understanding of key media       (Students further develop knowledge and understanding of key
     terms: Shot type, camera angle, mise en scene, sound effects,    media terms: Shot type, camera angle, camera movement,
     cinematography, dialogue, music, Foley sound/Audacity, sound     mise en scene, cinematography, sound effects, dialogue,
     design, sound mixer).                                            music; as well as develop skills for using editing software (e.g.
     Unit 2: Advertising – Invention/Revolution and Change            Premiere Pro, iMovie). Students will also engage in and
                                                                      evaluating meaning-making in films/film clips from a range of
     (Students analyse and evaluate both print and video ads from a   examples).
     range of contexts as well as develop knowledge and
     understanding of the following terms: advertisements, AIDA,
     demographic, logo, slogan, aesthetic, style, graphic design
     elements and principles).

Assessment
Content descriptions in each Arts subject reflect the interrelated strands of Making (learning about and using knowledge,
 skills, techniques, processes, materials and technologies to explore arts practices and make artworks that communicate
 ideas and intentions and Responding (exploring, responding to, analysing and interpreting artworks).
                            SEMESTER 1                                                         SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Making – Production – Film Still and Foley               Unit 1: Making - Design – Storyboard (10 – 18 shots)
     Sound/Audacity Folio                                             Unit 1: Making Production – Short Film
     Unit 2: Making – Digital Print Advertisement                     Unit 1: Responding – Reflective Journal
     Unit 2: Responding: Reflective Journal

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme.
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Junior Engineering
Junior Engineering is an elective subject in Year 9. Junior Engineering includes the introductory studies of mechanics,
materials science and control technologies through real-world engineering contexts where students engage in problem-
based learning.
Students learn to explore open-ended problems and develop engineered solutions. They recognise and describe
engineering problems, determine solution success criteria, develop and communicate ideas and predict, generate,
evaluate and refine prototype solutions.
Students justify their decision-making and acknowledge the societal, economic and environmental sustainability of their
engineered solutions. The problem-based learning framework in Junior Engineering encourages students to develop into
self-directed learners and develop beneficial collaboration.
During this introductory course in students will learn how recognise and describe engineering problems, concepts and
principles. They will be introduced to engineering symbolise and how explain ideas and solutions, analyse problems and
information. Students will gather information and ideas to predict possible solutions, then generate prototype solutions to
provide data to assess the accuracy of their predictions.

Pathways
A course of study in Junior Engineering promotes critical and creative thinking – skills that prepare students for Pre-
Engineering in Year 10. A course of study in Junior Engineering can establish a basis for further education and
employment in the field of engineering. The direct subject pathway is Engineering in senior years.

Structure
The Year 9 Junior Engineering curriculum provides a link between the junior and senior school, preparing students for
success in Year 10. All students study introductory units which focus on the development phase of the engineering concepts
and principles. This then leads to students using engineering processes to respond to an open-ended problem. Students
will undertake learning experiences, which ensures that there is an opportunity to explore engineering solutions. Students
can elect to study Junior Engineering in semester 1 or semester 2 or as a full year course over both semesters.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                  SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Engineering Materials                               Unit 1: Engineering Forces

     Unit 2: Engineering History                                 Unit 2: Engineering Structures

Assessment
Student performance is recorded in two categories: project and examination. Assessment is completed that explores
understanding of engineering concepts and principles and testing possible engineered solutions. Conditions vary from
project and examination.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                  SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Project – How it's Made                            Unit 1: Examination – Forces at Play

     Unit 2: Examination – Ancient Technology                   Unit 2: Project – Structure Design

Cost
The costs associated with this course are $70 per semester, used for consumable items, such as materials for testing and
prototyping of projects.

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Design and Technologies
By the end of Year 9, students will have had the opportunity to design and produce four designed solutions focused on
one or more of the five technologies contexts. Students will be exposed to materials and technologies specialisations
while also having opportunities to experience creating designed solutions for products, services and environments. This
offering of open content will provide students with flexibility and choice.
In Year 9 students use design and technologies knowledge and understanding, processes and production skills, and
design thinking to produce designed solutions to identified needs or opportunities of relevance to individuals. Students
work independently and collaboratively. Problem-solving activities acknowledge the complexities of contemporary life and
make connections to related specialised occupations and further study. Students specifically focus on preferred futures,
taking into account ethics; legal issues; social values; economic, environmental and social sustainability factors and using
strategies such as life cycle thinking. Students use creativity, innovation and enterprise skills with increasing confidence,
independence and collaboration.
Using a range of technologies including a variety of graphical representation techniques to communicate, students
generate and represent original ideas and production plans in two and three-dimensional representations using a range of
technical drawings including perspective, scale, orthogonal and production drawings with sectional and exploded views.
They produce rendered, illustrated views for marketing and use graphic visualisation software to produce dynamic views
of virtual products.
Students identify the steps involved in planning the production of designed solutions. They develop detailed project
management plans incorporating elements such as sequenced time, cost and action plans to manage a range of design
tasks safely. They apply management plans, changing direction when necessary, to successfully complete design tasks.
Students identify and establish safety procedures that minimise risk and manage projects with safety and efficiency in
mind, maintaining safety standards and management procedures to ensure success. They learn to transfer theoretical
knowledge to practical activities across a range of projects.

Pathways
A course of study in Design and Technology promotes elements of critical and creative thinking with focus on skills that
prepare students for the Manufacturing and Engineering Pathways in Year 10.

Structure
The Year 9 Design and Technology curriculum provides a link between the junior and senior school, preparing students for
success in Year 10. All students study introductory units, which focus on the ‘develop’ phase of the design process. Students
will undertake learning experiences, which ensures that there is an opportunity to explore a range of manufacturing and
engineering fields while utilising a range of different communication techniques and practical outcomes. Students can elect
to study Design and Technology in semester 1 or semester 2 or as a full year course over both semesters.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                  SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Design and Manufacture                              Unit 3: What is Manufacturing

     Unit 2. Experimental Prototyping                            Unit 4: Experimental Prototyping

Assessment
Student performance is recorded across a range of projects. Assessment is completed following specific parts of the design
process.
                            SEMESTER 1                                                  SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Project – Experiencing Technologies                 Unit 3: Project – Technologies in Society

     Unit 2: Project – Racing Prototypes                         Unit 4: Project – LED Prototypes

Cost
The costs associated with this course are $70 per semester, used for consumable items.
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Junior Design
Design is an elective subject in Year 9. The Design subject focuses on the application of design thinking to envisage creative
products, services and environments in response to human needs, wants and opportunities. Designing is a complex and
sophisticated form of problem solving that uses divergent and convergent thinking strategies that can be practised and
improved. Designers are separated from the constraints of production processes to allow them to appreciate and exploit
new innovative ideas

The teaching and learning approach uses a design process grounded in the problem-based learning framework. This
approach enables students to learn about and experience design through exploring needs, wants and opportunities;
developing ideas and design concepts; using drawing and low-fidelity prototyping skills; and evaluating ideas and design
concepts. Students communicate design proposals to suit different audiences. Students will learn how design has
influenced the economic, social and cultural environment in which they live. They will understand the agency of humans in
conceiving and imagining possible futures through design.

Students will develop valuable 21st century skills in critical thinking, creative thinking, communication, collaboration and
teamwork, personal and social skills, and information & communication technologies (ICT) skills. Collaboration, teamwork
and communication are crucial skills needed to work in design teams and liaise with stakeholders. The design thinking
students learn is broadly applicable to a range of professions and supports the development of critical and creative thinking.

Students will develop an appreciation of designers and their role in society. They will learn the value of creativity and build
resilience as they experience iterative design processes, where the best ideas may be the result of trial and error and a
willingness to take risks and experiment with alternatives. Design equips students with highly transferrable, future-focused
thinking skills relevant to a global context.

Pathways
A course of study in Junior Design promotes critical and creative thinking – skills that prepare students for Pre-Design in
Year 10.

Structure
The Year 9 Junior Design curriculum provides a link between the junior and senior school, preparing students for success
in Year 10. All students study introductory units which focus on the develop phase of the design process. This then leads
to students using the entire design process to respond to an open-ended problem. Students will undertake learning
experiences, which ensures that there is an opportunity to explore a range of design fields and utilise a range of different
communication techniques including various software. Students can elect to study Junior Design in semester 1 or
semester 2 or as a full year course over both semesters.

                          SEMESTER 1                                                 SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Experiencing Graphic Design                      Unit 1: Experiencing Design Professions

     Unit 2: Experiencing Industrial Design                   Unit 2: Experiencing Design Styles

Assessment
Student performance is recorded in two categories: project and examination. Assessment is completed following specific
parts of the design process. Conditions vary from project and examination.

                            SEMESTER 1                                                   SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Project – Design an app icon                        Unit 1: Project –Develop Phase

     Unit 2: Project – Design Lego accessories                   Unit 2: Examination – Design Challenge

Cost
The costs associated with this course are $70 per semester, used for consumable items.
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Food Technology
Food Technology is an elective subject in Year 9. Food Technology includes the application of nutrition principles and
knowledge about the characteristics and properties of food-to-food selection and preparation; and contemporary
technology-related food issues. There are increasing community concerns about food issues, including the nutritional
quality of food and the environmental impact of food manufacturing processes.

Students will progressively develop knowledge and understanding about the nature of food and food safety as well as
nutrition principles to help better prepare them for their future lives. Students will learn how to make informed food
preparation choices when experimenting with and preparing food in a sustainable manner. Students will develop
knowledge and understanding about the managed systems that produce food through creating designed solutions.

“A nutritious balanced diet and healthy eating habits are critical in childhood and adolescence in order to support growth
and development and to avoid the development of diet-related disease later in life.” (Saxelby: 2008) Fast food
consumption, frequent snacking and skipping meals commonly describe adolescent eating behaviours. Food choices are
an investment to future health and well-being. Students will be learning about nutrition including the six nutrients, the
Australian Dietary Guidelines, Australian guide to healthy eating and meal planning in order to make informed food
choices for long-term health.
Cooking is without a doubt, one of the most important skills a person can ever learn and share. As a nation, we have
reached a point where the lack of food knowledge and cooking skills is having a negative impact on our health and life
expectancy. For the first time in history, there is an expectation that younger generations will live shorter lives than their
parents due to poor diet and a lack of food preparation skills. The units aim to give students the basic skills to prepare
nutritious and appetizing food safely and hygienically. Investigating, designing and producing food products will improve
the overall quality of adolescent diets.

Pathways
A course of study in Food Technology can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of science,
technology, engineering and health. The course directly prepares students for Food, Nutrition & Hospitality in Year 10

Structure
The Year 9 Food Technology curriculum provides a link between the junior and senior school, preparing students for
success in Years 10. All students study introductory units which focus on the developing understanding of nutrition and
food sustainability. Students can elect to study Food Technology in semester 1 or semester 2 or as a full year course

                          SEMESTER 1                                                    SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: “Food for Balance and Health” (Nutrition)           Unit 1: “Love food, Hate Waste” (Food Sustainability)

     Unit 2: “Food Solutions for Healthy Eating” (Nutrition)     Unit 2: “No food is left behind” (Food Sustainability)

Assessment
Student performance will be demonstrated in two categories: Written and Practical.
                           SEMESTER 1                                                   SEMESTER 2

     Unit 1: Test (Written)                                       Unit 1: Assignment: Food wastage on the Home Front
     Unit 1: Participation in Weekly Practical Workshops          Unit 1: Participation in Weekly Practical Workshops

     Unit 2: Assignment: Mini cookbook & Info. package            Unit 2: Assignment – Reducing food wastage at home.
     Unit 2: Practical Exam – assignment task                     Unit 2: Practical Exam – assignment task

Cost
The costs associated with this course are $70 per semester, used for consumable items, such as ingredients for practical
design and experimentation.
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Digital Technologies                                                                                             

             
Digital Technologies is an elective subject in Year 9; students may complete one or two semesters. Digital technology is
part of almost every aspect of our lives and our future will increasingly be digitised and automated. It is critical to the
wellbeing and sustainability of the economy, the environment and society, that the benefits of information systems are
exploited ethically. This requires deep knowledge and understanding of digital systems (a component of an information
system) and requires new skills such as computational and systems thinking. Computational thinking is a way of problem
solving. It teaches you how to tackle problems by thinking and organising data logically, looking for patterns, and
breaking down problems into smaller, more manageable problems. Programming or coding promotes computational
thinking. Students develop computer science concepts and these concepts are built on to develop student’s logical
thinking and problem solving abilities, as well as their ability to use tools effectively to express information digitally.

The Year 9 Digital Technologies curriculum aims to further develop the knowledge, understanding and skills of student to
ensure that individually and collaboratively, they:
    Design, create, manage and evaluate digital solutions to meet current and future needs;
    Frame problems and create solutions using computational thinking concepts; and
    Use digital systems to efficiently and effectively transform data into information and to creatively communicate
        ideas.

Pathways
This subject links to the study of the subject Digital Technologies in Year 10 and Digital Solutions in Years 11 and 12.
Digital Solutions provides you with the foundations for a wide variety of pathways in many different areas after leaving
school including university courses, TAFE courses and job opportunities.

Structure
Digital Technologies, you will be using computational thinking to design and create innovative digital solutions. You will
sketch and annotate designs for user interfaces, write algorithms to plan out the structure of a program, use programming
languages to create applications, explore how data is stored, represented, and analyse and visualise data. Some
examples of digital solutions include instructions for a robotic system, an instructional game, a productivity application,
products featuring interactive data, animations and websites.

                           SEMESTER 1                                                  SEMESTER 2

     Physical Computing and Programming                        Data and Web App Development
            Programming                                              Data visualisation
            Digital and robotic systems                              Spreadsheets, graphs, infographics
            Developing and implementing algorithms as                Website Development using HTML, CSS and
             coded solutions.                                          JavaScript
            Build and program digital devices using text             Computer science fundamentals
             based programming languages                              Programming
            Game Design and Development.                             UI (User Interface) Design

Assessment
                            SEMESTER 1                                                 SEMESTER 2

     Project Folio                 Project                      Project - Website             Examination

Cost
The costs associated with this course are included in the Student Resource Scheme. Participating in the BYOD program
would be beneficial. A Windows or Mac laptop is recommended.

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