FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...

 
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
University College Dublin

                   FUTURE
                   CAMPUS

INTERNATIONAL
DESIGN COMPETITION
Search Statement
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
This document has been assembled by Malcolm Reading Consultants from research content
and original content provided by University College Dublin. The combined content is
intended for use only in the procurement process as described in this document. All material
is provided in good faith but no warranty or representation is given as to its accuracy or
completeness. Neither UCD nor its advisers shall be liable for any error, misstatement or
omission in the material and no reliance shall be placed on it.

Malcolm Reading Consultants is an expert consultancy which specialises in managing design
competitions to international standards and providing independent, strategic advice to clients
with capital projects. With over twenty years’ experience of projects, we are enthusiastic
advocates of the power of design to create new perceptions and act as an inspiration.

Images on front cover and pages 16, 30, 46-47, 48, 50, 60
and inside back cover courtesy of Keith Arkins.
Images on pages 10, 12 and 26 courtesy of Donal Murphy photography.
Image on page 22 courtesy of Barrow Coakley Photography.
All other images © University College Dublin.

malcolmreading.com
T +44 (0) 20 7831 2998
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
University College Dublin

                   FUTURE
                   CAMPUS

INTERNATIONAL
DESIGN COMPETITION
Search Statement
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
Contents
 Foreword                        5

Part One                        9
 Overview                       11
 Aims and Objectives            15
 The Site                       19
 The Project (Emerging Brief)   25
 Teams                          29
 University College Dublin      33
 Context                        41

Part Two                        47
 Project Details                49
 Competition Details            53
 How to Enter                   61
 Submission Requirements        63
 Evaluation Criteria            69
 Appendices                     71
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
4
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
Foreword                                                            5

University College Dublin (UCD) is Ireland’s largest and most
globally-engaged centre for higher education. Offering a
strongly diverse mix of academic disciplines, UCD is the
destination of choice for international students coming to
Ireland, and is now widely known as Ireland’s Global University.
We attract over 30,000 students from more than 120
countries annually, with students from the US and China
among the largest of our international cohorts. At the same
time, we have become the most popular choice for Irish
students seeking a university place in their home country.
So balancing these dual audiences – international and
national, reflecting their interests in being global in
perspective while also supporting the flourishing of Ireland
itself – is essential to UCD’s identity.
The University has, since its foundation, been a vital and
influential force in shaping modern Ireland, counting among its
graduates three Presidents, four Taoisigh, five ministers in the
current cabinet and six of Ireland’s European Commissioners.
UCD’s exceptional ability to foster talent is seen too in our
sustained contribution to business, science, medicine, the
arts, culture and sport – and one of the world’s most original
minds, the 20th-century author James Joyce, remains our
most well-known alumnus.
Our aim is to equip our students with a great student
experience, a high-calibre education and a holistic
perspective on their place in the world, while developing and
fostering their creativity and expressiveness. But, crucially, we
are also a research-intensive university, recognising that
research and scholarship underpin innovation and our
success in delivering long-term solutions to economic, social,
cultural and public policy challenges.
The University’s ambition is to establish itself as a world Top
100 university by 2020. To achieve this, UCD’s Strategy 2015-
2020 puts particular focus on increasing the quality, quantity
and impact of its research, scholarship and innovation.
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
Foreword

6

    In parallel, the UCD Strategic Campus Development Plan
    2016-2021-2026 guides the future development of the
    campus and includes a commitment to high architectural
    quality with a focus on sustainable design.
    So, with these values and ambitions very much in mind, we
    are delighted to commission this international design
    competition focused on enhancing and enlivening our
    campus: Future Campus – University College Dublin
    International Design Competition. This is a global call for
    integrated teams of international architects, urban designers
    and masterplanners to express an interest in our Entrance
    Precinct Masterplan and Centre for Creative Design project.
    We are hugely fortunate to have an expansive parkland and
    wooded campus, 133 hectares in total, close to the centre of
    Dublin. As UCD has grown and expanded in recent years, so
    it has developed its architectural pedigree, adding to its
    mid-20th-century core with a new Student Centre and a raft
    of other world-leading facilities – some of which are
    illustrated in subsequent pages.
    Through the new masterplan, which covers nearly 24 hectares
    of University land (with a further five hectares of land under
    the stewardship of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County
    Council) we need to address the following questions:
    How can the campus communicate UCD’s identity more
    eloquently? How can UCD become a Dublin landmark,
    better connected to the city and local communities? How
    can the entrance and arrival experience give the University
    immediate and deserved physical presence and visibility?
    Can the campus experience inspire new ways of learning
    and thinking? As well as, practically, become much more
    welcoming to pedestrians and cyclists?
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
Foreword

                                                                       7

Additionally, we intend our new Centre for Creative Design to
be emblematic of the University, so that design, creativity
and innovation are integral to how we are perceived. It is our
belief that engineering and architecture will be crucial to
Ireland’s future as a high-tech economy and attractor of
foreign direct investment.
So the new Centre – a charismatic yet integrated building, a
making and learning lab – will, through form and fabric,
express its purpose as the University’s home of design
studios and laboratories and maker, project and fabrication
spaces. New ‘future spaces’ will allow for more experimental,
cutting-edge work at a variety of scales, from materials and
spaces to cities and regions. They will give us scope for
collaboration with industry and public partners, and enable
us to share new ideas through a programme of exhibition
and display.
UCD was founded as an independent university 160 years
ago by the religious and educational visionary John Henry
Newman. We understand, as Newman did, that it is the
people we attract to study and teach here that are our
greatest resource and inspiration.
Today, the intellectual insights and innovation they generate
drive our economy and give the University, and Dublin and
Ireland, their competitive edge.
Creating a highly attractive environment that appeals to the
visual and other senses of our faculty, students and
community partners, that works both in the day and at night,
and through all the seasons, is the fascinating and
demanding challenge ahead.
We warmly invite you to enter the competition.
Professor Andrew J Deeks
President, University College Dublin
FUTURE CAMPUS - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION Search Statement - Malcolm Reading ...
Part One
10
Part One

Overview                                                              11

This international design competition focuses on enhancing
and enlivening University College Dublin’s extensive campus.
The competition seeks an outstanding integrated design
team for two much-needed design initiatives. Firstly, to
create a strong urban design vision that foregrounds a highly-
visible and welcoming entrance precinct, one combining
placemaking with a stronger physical presence and identity
for the University. And, secondly, to devise a concept design
for a charismatic new building that expresses the University’s
creativity – a making and learning lab – the Centre for
Creative Design.
Known as Ireland’s Global University, University College
Dublin (UCD) is the country’s largest and most
internationally-engaged higher education body. Offering a
strongly diverse mix of academic disciplines, UCD is the
destination of choice for international students coming to
Ireland. It attracts over 30,000 students from more than 120
countries annually, and is the most popular choice for Irish
students seeking a university place in their home country.
The competition centres on a project with two aspects: the
Entrance Precinct Masterplan and the Centre for Creative
Design. The Entrance Precinct Masterplan will create a new
urban design strategy for a 23.8 ha area that will guide UCD
in defining the quality of the campus through placemaking,
architecture and the public realm, as well as allowing for
future planning. Essential to this will be a distinctive,
confident and highly-visible entrance and arrival experience
that expresses the University’s identity and showcases its
Dublin site. The Centre for Creative Design is conceived as a
charismatic yet well-integrated architectural addition – a
maker space that is a living learning lab – that will promote
inter-disciplinary engagement. The total value of the Centre
for Creative Design is circa €48m (inclusive of VAT and
professional fees).
Part One Overview

12

     Stakeholders and Funding
     UCD is working closely with Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown
     County Council and the National Transport Authority on this
     initiative. UCD has secured initial funding and will continue to
     fundraise for the project, targeting a mixture of private
     sources and public grants.
Part One Overview

                                                                                 13

Previous Competition
A previous competition for development on the UCD
Campus, including its entrance, was launched in 2007. This
project was to be led by UCD in conjunction with a
development partner, but was subsequently cancelled due to
the global economic downturn in 2008.
The new project will be led and financed by UCD exclusively.

The International Competition
This competition is being managed on behalf of UCD by
independent competition specialists Malcolm Reading
Consultants. The competition is being run in accordance with
EU procurement rules and the Republic of Ireland’s S.I. No.
284/2016 European Union (Award of Public Authority
Contracts) Regulations 2016. This competition has been
advertised in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU).
Details on the format of the competition are provided in Part
Two of this document.
No design is required at the first stage. Initially, competitors
are invited to submit an Expression of Interest – the deadline
for this is: 14:00 BST Monday 26 March 2018.
competitions.malcolmreading.com/universitycollegedublin
14
Part One

Aims and Objectives                                                    15

University College Dublin’s Future Campus project
strategic objectives are:
• Immediate physical presence
Give the University immediate physical presence and visibility
as an internationally-minded, dynamic and creative place of
learning and research, addressing the currently recessive and
largely anonymous arrival experience.
• An enhanced campus
Enhance and enliven the campus by making a highly
attractive environment (day and night, season to season) that
promotes a strong sense of community and sociability and
inspires students and faculty, visitors and local innovators to
explore new ways of learning and thinking.
• A future-proofed vision
Create a strong and flexible urban design vision for this
23.8 ha area of the overall campus, informed by placemaking,
accessibility and people flows; this anticipates the potential
for up to 335,000 sq m of new development (representing
a footprint of circa 67,000 sq m).
• UCD’s creative identity
Make creativity, innovation and sustainability central to UCD’s
identity through exemplary design.
• Sustainable values
Affirm holistic sustainable values – from design through to
operations and use – achieving a near zero energy target,
making design choices incorporating energy-saving, green
technologies where possible, and respecting the campus’
natural environment and biodiversity, notably the 200-year-
old woodland walks.
Part One Aims and Objectives

16

     • A Dublin landmark
     Make the University a landmark on the Dublin map –
     improving connections with the city and the immediate
     community/vicinity.
     • UCD’s international reputation and image
     Raise the profile of UCD nationally and internationally
     through the quality of its campus and architecture to draw
     more diverse, high-performing candidates and academics.
Part One Aims and Objectives

                                                                                          17

Physically, the Future Campus project will:
• Create an Entrance Precinct Masterplan: a strong urban
  design vision that foregrounds a highly-visible and
  welcoming entrance experience and, overall, combines
  placemaking with a stronger physical presence and identity
  for the University, while also strengthening links between
  the campus and the surrounding city.
• Create a charismatic yet well-integrated Centre for Creative
  Design that is a living learning lab – using innovative
  materials and new technologies to express its purpose as
  the University’s home of design studios and laboratories,
  and maker, project and fabrication spaces.
• Increase permeability of the campus boundary – and the
  quality of this – including a possible new vehicular
  entrance and influence improvements to the public realm
  within the liminal zone between city and campus, taking
  advantage of planned public transportation connections
  and sustainable transport innovations/modes.
18
Part One

The Site                                                               19

The Belfield Campus
UCD’s main Belfield Campus, located just four km from
Dublin city centre, is notably green and expansive. The estate
is contiguous with the R138 road into Dublin – one of the
main access routes from the south of the city centre.
The Belfield Campus is a collection of smaller estates, many
of which contained period houses, with the original estate
dating back to the 12th century. The University purchased
the land in a series of acquisitions starting in the 1930s.
The campus is a unique national resource, with the most
diverse array of publicly accessible educational, cultural,
sports and recreation facilities in Ireland. UCD is engaged in
extensive outreach programmes and, as a hub for the wider
local community, Belfield provides playing pitches, a
swimming pool, woodland walks, heritage houses, art
sculptural trails, cultural exhibitions, a theatre, seminars, a
cinema and other recreation facilities.
The first campus masterplan was conceived by Polish architect
Andrzej Wejchert, the winner of a competition held by UCD
in 1963. Wejchert’s plan centred on an arrangement of key
campus buildings either side of a main pedestrian walkway,
with the buildings sited to maintain a walking distance of
about six minutes from one end of the walkway to the other.
The covered walkway – a centre line of columns supporting
waffle slabs – spans approximately 600 m, running between
the original Science Building and the Restaurant Building.
The walkway was intended to define a path and a core to
the University, putting the pedestrian route at the heart
of the campus.
As well as conceiving the campus masterplan, Wejchert also
designed the Administration Building and the Arts Block.
The Agriculture Block designed by Rooney Associates, the
James Joyce Library by Sir Basil Spence, Glover & Ferguson,
and the Restaurant Building by Michael Scott & Partners,
were added in the 1970s.
Part One The Site

20

     Today, the campus covers 133 ha and contains over eight km
     of woodland walks, some of which are flanked by mature
     trees that date back to the 18th and 19th centuries. Prominent
     features on campus include the UCD Lake, a manmade
     feature developed in the 1970s and covering 7,000 sq m, and
     the Water Tower, a 60-metre concrete structure with a
     pentagonal stem and a dodecahedron shaped tank. There are
     ten listed structures on campus, including seven period
     houses, notably Ardmore House (a typical example of a 19th
     century country villa) and Merville House (originally a country
     villa built in the mid-1700s), both of which are the focus of an
     on-going preservation and restoration programme.
     The campus is loosely divided into three character areas:
     education, research and innovation; residential; and sport and
     recreation. The long term ambition is to co-locate all of the
     education, research and innovation buildings, this mainly
     affecting the School of Architecture, Planning and
     Environmental Policy currently located at the western end of
     the campus in the Richview Buildings, the School of Civil
     Engineering currently located in Newstead (adjacent to
     Richview), and the School of Biosystems and Food
     Engineering currently located in the Agriculture and Food
     Science Centre.
     The current access to the campus is predominantly from
     Stillorgan Road (R138) – here, despite over a kilometre of
     frontage, the University makes no real impact, appearing largely
     anonymous. While the campus is elevated above the height
     of the road, it is mostly obscured by a heavy tree canopy.
     Notable historic buildings on campus include Roebuck Castle,
     a 19th-century gothic revival castle; Belfield House, an 1801
     period house restored and housing the Clinton Institute for
     American Studies; the Magnetic Observatory, originally
     located in the Fellows’ Garden at Trinity College Dublin and
     gifted to UCD in 1874; and Richview House, a 1790 house
     formerly used as a boys’ school and an infirmary which now
     houses the School of Architecture and Landscape.
Part One The Site

                                                                                  21

The Campus and Campus
Development Plan
UCD has developed its Strategic Campus Development Plan
2016-2021-2026 to guide the future development of the
campus, in order to create the facilities needed to support
the University’s ambition of becoming a Top 100 global
university by 2020.
The Development Plan includes a commitment to high
architectural quality with a focus on sustainable design which
minimises environmental impact and protects the sylvan
setting and biodiversity of the campus. The University
intends, where possible, to co-locate academic and other
uses in contiguous spaces, with appropriate adjacencies, to
create a compact campus with core activities co-located.
For further information on the Development Plan,
please see: www.ucd.ie/campusdevelopment/

UCD University Club
UCD is continually improving the quality of its built and
natural environment – including how, through its campus, it
can better engage with communities of interest. The new
UCD University Club, which includes a café, restaurant and
meeting facilities, is designed to support relationships with
alumni, partner universities, agencies and national and
international companies. The building is due to start on site
this year. It is part of a programme of initiatives designed to
raise the profile and visibility of the University, incorporating
architecture, artwork, landscape and other public realm
features to enable UCD to connect with the wider city as an
approachable cultural thought-leader.
Part One The Site

22

     The Competition Site
     The masterplan area under consideration in this competition
     covers the area indicated on the plan below. The masterplan
     site contains 23.8 ha of University land, with a further 5.35 ha
     of land under the stewardship of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown
     County Council.
Part One The Site

                                                                                           23

The masterplan area covers the main entrance and arrival
network to the campus as well as the predominant route into
the campus core. It includes existing buildings such as the
Engineering and Material Science Centre, Belfield House and
NovaUCD, the University’s start-up incubator.
The Centre for Creative Design should be located in a
prominent place within the masterplan area, taking into
consideration appropriate adjacencies with the Engineering
and Material Science Centre, proposed Engineering and
Architecture Precinct, and visibility from outside the campus.

                                                UCD ownership (23.8 ha)

                                                Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County
                                                Council ownership (5.35 ha)

                                           Note: This site plan is indicative only.
                                           For a detailed site plan, please see the
                                           Competition Conditions.

                                                  N.T.S.

                                           Entrance Precinct Masterplan Site Boundary
24
Part One

The Project                                                               25

(Emerging Brief)
The project brief is in two parts: the Entrance Precinct
Masterplan and the Centre for Creative Design.
The Entrance Precinct Masterplan covers an area of 23.8 ha,
within which there is the potential for up to 335,000 sq m of
new development (representing a footprint of circa 67,000 sq m).
The precinct is conceived with a mix of uses, including a focus
on innovation, outreach, engagement and hospitality.
The new masterplan needs to give the University immediate
physical presence and visibility, communicating its intent as an
internationally-minded, dynamic and creative place of learning.
It should cue a highly attractive environment (day and night,
season to season) that promotes a strong sense of community
and sociability, and creates an atmosphere conducive to new
ways of learning and thinking.
The masterplan should look to address the current difficulties
with the arrival experience at UCD, which is considered to be
underwhelming. The entrance, framed by 1960s traffic
engineering, is low key, nondescript and unfriendly to
pedestrians and cyclists.
A welcoming arrival experience is essential to showcase the
expansive green campus and needs to reflect the University’s
long-term ambition to consolidate the core estate, ensuring an
approximate five minute walk between key academic buildings.
The Entrance Precinct is intended as a nexus between city and
University; between entrance and the campus core. So to
support this approach, a further 5.35 ha of land owned by
Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, adjacent to and
contiguous with the campus boundary, is included within the
brief. This embraces wider initiatives planned for the Greater
Dublin Area, but which are advantageous to the University,
such as Bus Connects, a Bus Rapid Transit service with its initial
southern terminus planned at the University’s entrance.
Part One The Project (Emerging Brief)

26

     Competitors should also be aware of the University’s interest
     in contributing to an innovation district for Dublin (see page
     38) which might influence the Entrance Precinct Masterplan
     through the way in which the University’s future relationships
     with the city and wider business community are conceived.
     Long-term the University looks to create a series of
     academic clusters, all easily connected to, and in some cases
     overlapping with, the Entrance Precinct. This will help to
     re-establish the legibility and compactness of the original
     plan. A strong Sciences and Health Sciences cluster already
     exists to the north of the Entrance Precinct, and an
     Engineering and Architecture cluster is considered close to
     the entrance, incorporating the current Engineering and
     Materials Sciences Building.
Part One The Project (Emerging Brief)

                                                                                                27

The first building to be delivered within the Entrance Precinct
Masterplan is the circa €48m (inclusive of VAT and
professional fees), 8,000 sq m Centre for Creative Design.
The competition seeks concept designs for a charismatic yet
well-integrated new building that expresses the University’s
creativity. The building should be located within a prominent
position, a landmark when viewed from within and outside
the campus. A building for creative experimentation and
fabrication, it will contain a range of design studios,
laboratories and maker spaces. Linking these creative
workspaces together will be formal and informal spaces for
gathering and engagement. New ‘future spaces’ will allow for
more experimental, cutting-edge work at a variety of scales,
from materials and spaces to cities and regions. They will
give UCD the platform to stimulate collaboration with
industry and public partners, and enable UCD to share new
ideas through a programme of exhibition and display.
In line with the University’s values, the Centre is conceived as
an exemplar of sustainability. As a living lab, it will be a
teaching resource as creative and experiential as the
functions it contains. Although part of the Engineering and
Architecture cluster, the building is intended for all to use,
allowing for ‘true enlightenment of the mind’ across all
academic disciplines.
The Centre for Creative Design will include education,
research and outreach facilities, and will be home to the
UCD Creative Skills Academy. The Academy will bring
together artists, designers, engineers, architects and
technologists and provide formal and informal opportunities
for interdisciplinary collaboration, as well as supporting
strategic links through the creation of a Centre for the
Internet of Things.
28
Part One

Teams                                                                 29

UCD is seeking integrated creative multidisciplinary teams
organised under a lead consultant and including expertise in
masterplanning, urban design, architecture, landscape
architecture, sustainability, engineering and transport
planning. It is anticipated that the lead consultant will be
either an architect or a masterplanner. UCD is a progressive
patron and is keen to encourage both established and
emerging talent.
At Stage Two, teams will be invited to propose additional
consultancy including, but not limited to, planning, lighting
design, wayfinding and accessibility. In addition, competitors
will be expected to propose an executive team which will be
based in Ireland for the duration of the contract. These
additional consultants will be assessed at Stage Two, for
quality and integration into the design team, including the
requirement to pass minimum qualification standards.
Cost consultancy and project management will be
appointed directly by UCD.
UCD is seeking a team:
• who can demonstrate exceptional design flair
  and creative ability;
• who will create outstanding, contemporary
  and sensitive design;
• skilled at integrated design, including masterplanning,
  urban design, architecture and landscape architecture;
• who will understand and acknowledge the national and
  international, historic and cultural importance of the site
  and its civic and academic context;
• who will consider all potential uses and users
  of the campus;
Part One Teams

30

     • with a keen eye for detail and the ability to implement a
       design approach at a variety of scales, from the micro to
       the macro;
     • experienced in all facets of project design and delivery;
     • appropriate in size and skills for the project;
     • with skills in communications and experience of consultation
       with multiple statutory and community stakeholders; and
     • who can support fundraising initiatives.
Part One Teams

                                                                             31

Sub-consultant companies may enter with more than one
team if they wish to do so. However, in the event that a
company is shortlisted on more than one team, that company
will be required to name different senior individuals for each
team, and will be expected to comply with the competition’s
requirements for non-collusion, which may include the
requirement to sign confidentiality agreements and to supply
a Management Policy for potential conflicts of interest.
Individual companies, including those with multiple offices,
may not lead more than one design team bid. Companies
may lead one bid and sub-consult on multiple additional
bids, noting the above guidance on sub-consultants.
Please note: UCD reserves the right to determine the final
composition of the design team appointed for the project,
and this may include the appointment of sub-consultants
that are not suggested within a competitor’s bid. For the
avoidance of doubt, this is to ensure the correct mix of skills
and expertise and will not be imposed unreasonably.
32
Part One

University                                                             33

College Dublin
Foundation and John Henry Newman
  An assemblage of learned men, zealous for their own
  sciences, and rivals of each other, are brought, by familiar
  intercourse and for the sake of intellectual peace, to
  adjust together the claims and relations of their respective
  subjects of investigation. They learn to respect, to consult,
  to aid each other. Thus is created a pure and clear
  atmosphere of thought, which the student also breathes.
            – John Henry Newman, The Idea of a University

University College Dublin was founded as the Catholic
University of Ireland in 1854 by Cardinal Paul Cullen, the
Archbishop of Dublin, and religious and education visionary
John Henry Newman (1801-1890). Newman was the
University’s first Rector, presiding from 1854 to 1858, and was
the intellectual driving force behind the new institution.
Newman rose to prominence as an Oxford academic, a
fellow at Oriel College, and was well-known as a leading
member of the Oxford Movement – a group which argued
for the reinstatement of traditional Christian (Catholic)
traditions into the Anglican faith and argued against the
perceived increasing secularisation of the Church of England.
The Catholic University was intended to be the intellectual
headquarters for Catholics in the English-speaking world,
making higher education available to a broader spectrum of
Irish citizens, at a time when most universities were
predominantly Protestant institutions. The University was
based on the style of education at Oxford – students were
housed in a number of colleges and educated in small
groups under a dean and private tutors.
Newman introduced many successful initiatives at the
University, including the introduction of evening lectures for
those in fulltime employment, the foundation of the Literary
and Historical Society, the oldest debating society at UCD,
and the commissioning of John Hungerford Pollen to design
the University Church, which still stands in St Stephen’s
Green in Dublin, beside the original University buildings.
Part One University College Dublin

34

     The outstanding success story of this period however was
     the foundation of the Catholic University Medical School,
     which by the end of the century was the largest medical
     school in Ireland.
     Newman’s university received international support, but
     struggled to establish itself in its early years. As a private
     institution, the Catholic University did not hold a Royal
     Charter, and so it received no state funding and its degrees
     were not officially recognised by the State. Despite this, the
     Catholic University was at the pinnacle of European
     academic advancement, with chairs of poetry, political and
     social science, political economy and geography. The
     University was the first in Ireland to establish a chair of
     archaeology and Irish history.
     During the early stages of his time in Dublin, Newman gave a
     series of lectures which later became The Idea of a
     University, Newman’s most famous work.
Part One University College Dublin

                                                                                                35

The Idea of a University sets out a number of arguments for
the ideals of higher education, including the overarching
principle that a university should be a ‘seat of universal
learning’, whereby the student, although focused on his own
subject, learns from proximity to a wide range of intellectual
topics and pursuits. Newman declared ‘the very name of
University is inconsistent with restrictions of any kind’.
Newman argued for the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake;
the true purpose of a university being not to confer degrees
but to foster a community of thinkers and to ‘produce a habit
of mind, which is free, equitable, moderate, calm, and wise’.
Whilst the ideals distilled by Newman in his most famous work
were never truly realised at the Catholic University, the impact
of his publication can be seen throughout the higher education
sector in initiatives such as active learning and interdisciplinary
exchange and interaction. The influence of this thinking can
be seen today at UCD, with the introduction of UCD Horizons,
which allows students to take modules from a different course
in order to broaden their educational experience.

The Belfield Campus
UCD relocated to Belfield, now its main campus, from the
1960s through to 2008, moving from its original city centre
location as the University expanded and found itself
constrained by the original buildings in Dublin city centre.
The campus masterplan was conceived by Polish architect
Andrzej Wejchert, the winner of a competition held by UCD in
1963. Wejchert’s plan centred on an arrangement of key campus
buildings either side of a main pedestrian walkway, with the
buildings sited to maintain a walking distance of about six
minutes from one end of the walkway to the other. Wejchert
also designed the Administration Building and the Arts Block.
Part One University College Dublin

36

     The Agriculture Block designed by Rooney Associates, the
     James Joyce Library by Sir Basil Spence, Glover & Ferguson,
     and the Restaurant Building by Michael Scott & Partners,
     were added in the 1970s.
     Since the move to Belfield, UCD has continued to expand
     and strengthen its academic standing. Recent additions to
     the campus include the Student Centre, voted Ireland’s
     favourite new building (2013), and other world-leading
     facilities, notably the UCD O’Brien Centre for Science, UCD
     Sutherland School of Law, and UCD Lochlann Quinn School
     of Business. UCD’s new Confucius Institute for Ireland, which
     will support national and international engagement and is
     designed by Robin Lee in conjunction with Arthur Gibney
     Architects, is due to open in 2018.
Part One University College Dublin

                                                                                               37

Originally intended as a leafy suburban campus university,
Dublin’s growth in recent decades means Belfield is now well-
connected to the city and easily reached from the centre of
Dublin by bus. The campus is well-served by shops and cafés,
a cinema, post office, bank, pharmacy, laundry, supermarket
and health centre.

The University Today
Today, UCD is the largest university in Ireland, with over 33,000
students, including over 8,000 graduate students, and over
1,500 faculty members.
The University consists of six colleges and their associated
schools (37 in total), as well as multiple research institutes and
centres. The colleges are Arts and Humanities; Business;
Engineering and Architecture; Health and Agricultural Sciences;
Social Sciences and Law; and Science.
UCD’s ambition reflects the breadth of its faculty and its
internationally-minded and progressive character: its purpose is
no less than the flourishing of Ireland, Europe and the wider
world. This it seeks to achieve through the study and discussion
of people, society, business, economy, culture, languages and
the creative arts, and through its leadership in science, medicine
and engineering.
The story of UCD provides a great insight into the development
of Ireland. Many staff, students and graduates were involved in
critical events in its history and were heavily involved in the
foundation and development of modern Ireland. UCD counts
amongst its graduates three Presidents, four Taoisigh, five
ministers in the current cabinet, and six of Ireland’s European
Commissioners. Amongst its alumni and current and former
staff are five Nobel laureates.
The University’s ambition is to establish itself as a world Top 100
university by 2020. To achieve this, the UCD Strategy 2015-2020
puts particular focus on increasing the quality, quantity and
impact of its research, scholarship and innovation.
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38

     UCD’s College of Architecture and Engineering is similarly
     ambitious; the College is in the final stages of working
     towards SE (Substantial Equivalence) accreditation from the
     American Institute of Architects (AIA) for its MArch course – a
     rare achievement for an international university outside
     North America. The University also plans to run a
     forthcoming joint Master’s degree with the National College
     of Art and Design and Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design
     and Technology that will combine architecture with art.
     UCD is a major contributor to the Irish economy, generating
     circa €1.3bn in total output annually, and is at the forefront of
     Ireland’s technology and innovation sector, through its
     research and its start-up hub, NovaUCD.
     The University is currently exploring opportunities for UCD to
     contribute to an innovation district for Dublin, and envisages
     this initiative as strengthening both intellectual and business
     links with the city. It could, potentially, be reflected in the
     visions for the Entrance Precinct Masterplan in terms of how
     porous and how connected the University’s physical
     relationship is with the wider civic community.
     Ireland is the second largest exporter of IT services in the
     world and eight of the top ten global IT companies have a
     presence in Dublin. UCD works to strengthen its ties to
     industry through strong interdisciplinary research and
     education that tackles global challenges.
     UCD operates remotely and internationally, educating 5,000
     students at locations outside of Ireland and has four Global
     Centres – in New York, Beijing, Delhi and Kuala Lumpur.
     For further information on the UCD Strategy 2015-2020
     please see:
     www.ucd.ie/strategy2015-2020/ourvisionfor2020/index.html
Part One University College Dublin

                                                                                                      39

UCD in Numbers
1                    Ranked within top 1% of higher education institutions world-wide
27                   Percentage of international students
28                   Percentage of international staff
29                   Percentage of undergraduate students from under
                     represented cohorts
64                   Percentage of non-Exchequer funding
133                  Hectares making up the woodland campus
138                  Number of nationalities within the student body
443                  Million euro annual turnover
525                  Million euro won in externally funded research in last 5 years
1,536                Number of PhD students
1,588                Academic staff (FTEs)*
1,784                Support staff (FTEs)
1854                 Year founded by John Henry Newman
4,947                Number of international students in overseas operations
7,789                Number of international students on main campus
8,857                Number of awards conferred each year
9,154                Number of graduate students
33,724               Total number of students (including overseas operations)**
167,177              Square meters of science, engineering and innovation
                     related facilities
239,000              Number of alumni across 165 countries
1,700,000            Approximate number of annual visits to library facilities

* FTEs – Full Time Equivalents
** Student and staff numbers relate to academic year 2016/17
40
Part One

Context                                                                    41

Ireland
A confident, prosperous, outward-looking nation of some 4.7
million people, the Republic of Ireland extends over five-sixths
of the island of Ireland. It is situated to the west of the
continent of Europe and bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the
north and west, the Celtic Sea to the south, and separated
from Great Britain by the Irish Sea to the east.
Ireland has a compelling history, and is famous for the richness
of its customs, folklore, religion, literature, language and sport.
Ireland today boasts a dynamic, export-led economy, a young
and well-educated population, world-leading universities and
research, and a thriving arts and cultural sector.
The modern Republic of Ireland is known for its openness to
business and trade and its attractive, enterprising business
culture. The Irish economy has recovered its health after the
global financial crisis and is currently the fastest growing
economy in Europe1 .
Ireland’s international outlook and low rate of corporation tax
make it an attractive outpost for a number of multinational
companies, among them the pharmaceutical heavyweights
Pfizer and Allergan and the technology giants Google, Apple,
Facebook, Amazon, Twitter and Microsoft. Ireland is the second
largest exporter of computer and IT services in the world and
also trades extensively in medicines and medical equipment,
electrical machinery, aircraft, chemicals, and food products.
With one of the most educated workforces in the world, the
share of 25-to-34-year-olds with a third-level qualification in
Ireland currently stands at 52%, compared with the
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
average of 43%. The Republic is home to seven public
universities and a number of other higher education
institutions; the four highest-ranked Irish universities are in the
top 300 globally.

1 Source: IMF World Economic Outlook, October 2017
Part One Context

42

     Ireland has much to offer its residents and visitors, with an
     abundance of attractions and landmarks, activities and
     events. Its rolling countryside is a gift to walkers, sports
     enthusiasts, budding naturalists and all lovers of the
     outdoors, with highlights including the Cliffs of Moher, the
     179 kilometre-long Ring of Kerry tourist trail, a number of
     medieval castles and settlements, and the island of Skellig
     Michael, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that is home to a
     sixth-century Celtic monastery.
     As well as the stunning natural beauty of its countryside,
     tourists flock to Ireland for the rich and varied culture of its
     cities. Cork, Ireland’s second city, was European Capital of
     Culture in 2005, when it attracted a million visitors to the city
     – seven times its population. Galway, famed for a varied
     programme of cultural events including the Galway
     International Arts Festival, is a UNESCO Creative City of Film
     and will be European Capital of Culture in 2020.

     Dublin
     Dublin is the capital city of the Republic of Ireland and sits on
     the estuary of the River Liffey, on the country’s east coast.
     Home to 1.3 million people, Dublin benefits from a dynamic
     economy, world-class universities, exceptional heritage, a
     thriving arts and cultural sector, an attractive and varied retail
     offering, and a vibrant night-life.
     Tourists are drawn to the city by a number of historic and
     modern landmarks, including the medieval Dublin Castle,
     three branches of the National Museum of Ireland, the
     National Gallery of Ireland, the neo-classical Custom House
     Building, and the city’s three cathedrals. A particular draw for
     both residents and visitors is the Guinness Storehouse –
     Ireland’s most popular tourist attraction – along with the
     venerable Old Library at Trinity College.
Part One Context

                                                                                43

A number of modern landmarks have been added to
Dublin’s cityscape in recent years, including the James Joyce
Bridge and Samuel Beckett Bridge by Santiago Calatrava, the
Bord Gáis Energy Theatre by Daniel Libeskind, the Convention
Centre Dublin by Kevin Roche, and the 120-metre-high Spire
of Dublin by Ian Ritchie Architects, shortlisted for the Royal
Institute of British Architects’ Stirling Prize in 2004.
Dublin has played a central role in Ireland’s economic
development and acted as a magnet for many of the
multinationals with outposts in Ireland. It is home to the
EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) headquarters of the
technology heavyweights Google, Twitter, and Facebook;
and Accenture, Amazon and Groupon all have a significant
presence in the city. Many of these multinationals – along
with a number of smaller, emerging companies – are based
in the waterside district of Dublin popularly known as Silicon
Docks, a formerly derelict area where thousands of
technology professionals are now employed.
Dublin has an international reputation as a centre for
innovation and entrepreneurialism, and the city was named
Europe’s eighth-biggest start-up hub in 2017 by EU-Startups.
This has been aided by government programmes such as
the Digital Hub, which provides office space and support to
start-ups along with community-based digital learning and
training programmes.
But it is not only the city’s enterprising spirit and welcoming
approach to business that have bolstered its international
profile: Dublin is known as a thriving centre for culture and
the arts, nightlife, retail and sport. The historic Temple Bar
quarter of the medieval city centre underwent extensive
regeneration in the 1990s and is now home to a number of
artists, creative businesses and institutions as well as popular
restaurants, clubs and bars.
Part One Context

44

     The Irish National Opera and a number of theatres,
     museums and galleries are located in Dublin, as well as the
     National College of Art and Design and the Dublin Institute
     of Design. The city has served as European Capital of Culture
     (1991), and its exceptional literary history – featuring such
     luminaries as William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, George
     Bernard Shaw and Samuel Beckett – led to its designation
     as a UNESCO Creative City of Literature in 2010.
     Dublin is also a popular destination for shoppers, with major
     brands found alongside an eclectic range of pop-ups and
     boutiques. Sports fans can enjoy matches and events at the
     Aviva Stadium and Croke Park, which is the third-largest stadium
     in Europe. A highlight of the city’s calendar is the Dublin
     Women’s Mini Marathon, said to be the largest all-female
     event of its kind in the world, which has been held each
     June since 1983 and completed by over a million women.

     Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown
     County Council
     UCD’s Belfield Campus is predominantly located within Dún
     Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, one of four County
     Councils that form the Dublin Region, with the whole of the
     Entrance Precinct Masterplan area located within the County.
     The County covers an area of some 127 sq km and serves a
     population of over 215,000. UCD is both a major contributor
     into the County’s local economy and the County’s economic
     output, as well as being the single largest employer in the
     County, with some 4,000 employees.
     The County is the local planning authority for UCD, as well as
     having a responsibility for housing and community, roads and
     transportation, development, amenity and culture and the
     environment within the County.
Part One Context

                                                                                 45

The County’s policies related to sustainable development are
laid out in the Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Development
Plan 2016-2022 (CDP). All sections of the CDP are relevant to
this project, but of particular note is Section 3 on ‘Enterprise
and Employment Strategy’. This strategy, directly referencing
UCD, acknowledges the importance of Further and Higher
Education Institutions in fostering enterprise through research,
innovation and development activities, and the benefits this
could bring to the County’s economy. The links between
successful cities and their universities and businesses are
recognised and examples presented under this policy.
This points to how the campus may open up to a wider mix
of uses that draws in wider communities to create a genuine
civic place. The policy notes that the County will support the
endeavours of UCD to continue to develop (and compete)
as a world-class university.
UCD’s Belfield Campus also offers the County significant
opportunities to strengthen and reinforce their ‘Green
Infrastructure Strategy’ (Appendix 14). One of the larger (urban)
green spaces in the County, the campus could play an important
role in the County’s network of green spaces, as alternative
commuting routes, for leisure and recreational activities as well
as to support bio-diversity and ecological initiatives.
UCD is supportive of the County’s ambitions and the strategies
set out in the CDP, and is working towards contributing to the
sustainable development of the County within its campus.
Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council is also an important
stakeholder and statutory consultee for the project, including
as one of the landowners of part of the site area being
considered within the competition.
For further information on planning context for the project
please see the Competition Conditions.
For access to the County Development Plan 2016-2022,
please see:
www.dlrcoco.ie/en/planning/county-development-
plan/county-development-plan-2016-2022.
Part Two
48
Part Two

Project Details                                                             49

Budget and Project Programme
The contract commencement date is expected to be Q4 2018
(subject to findings and contract), with anticipated completion
by Q3 2021. The total project value for the 8,000 sq m Centre
for Creative Design is estimated to be €48 million (inclusive of
VAT and professional fees).

Procurement
UCD will require the winning team to provide full design team
services as outlined in this brief, and the Scope of Services
appendix to the Stage Two document the Competition
Conditions. Although UCD anticipates using the winning
team, it is not bound to use all members proposed by the
winning team.
Winning the competition does not guarantee appointment, but
it should be emphasised that it is the intention that it will do so.
It is anticipated that UCD will enter into contract with the lead
consultant, who will sub-contract all other consultancies.
The draft form of contract is also included as an appendix to
the Competition Conditions. It is anticipated that the contract
will be The Standard Conditions of Engagement for
Consultancy Services (Technical) as published by the Office of
Government Procurement with UCD amendments. It should
be noted that it is expected that sub-consultants to the Lead
Consultancy will enter into industry standard collateral
warranties with UCD.
UCD reserves the right to amend this Search Statement
and the Competition Conditions at any time. Amendments
to the Search Statement will be published on the competition
website. For the avoidance of doubt, this will not be
imposed unreasonably.
Part Two Project Details

50

     Scope of Services
     In summary the Scope of Services is in three parts:
     • Immediately following the competition the team will be
       contracted to develop a feasibility stage masterplan report
       for the Entrance Precinct Masterplan and a brief
       development and preliminary design stage report for the
       Centre for Creative Design project. These works are
       anticipated to take between six to nine months.
     • The team will then provide a full Scope of Services for
       the Centre for Creative Design building and related
       landscape and public realm works. A budget of €48 million
       (inclusive of VAT and professional fees) has been identified
       for these works.
Part Two Project Details

                                                                                       51

• The team will also develop the masterplan design report
  (and urban design guidelines report) for the Entrance
  Precinct Masterplan, in association with UCD and their
  stakeholders (namely Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County
  Council and the National Transport Authority).
The lead consultant will lead the design team and coordinate
and manage the work of all other consultants.
Competitors should note that during Stage One of the
competition, teams are required to propose the services as
set out in the Teams section on page 29. Additional
consultancy, including an executive team, should be
proposed at Stage Two.
Any additional consultants added to the team at Stage Two
will be required to pass minimum qualifications standards as
set out in the ESPD (Appendix A of this document).

Other Consultancy Services
Cost consultancy and project management will be
appointed directly by UCD.

Insurance Requirements
Competitors should also note that, should they be
successful, they must be willing to obtain the following levels
of insurance:
• Employer’s Liability Insurance: €13 million
  (maximum permitted excess €35,000)
• Public Liability Insurance: €6.5 million
  (maximum permitted excess €0)
• Professional Indemnity Insurance: €6.5 million
  (for each and every claim, maximum permitted excess €0)
52
Part Two

Competition Details                                                        53

Competition Management
Malcolm Reading Consultants (MRC), an independent expert
organiser of design competitions with over twenty years’
experience, will lead and administer a two-stage competition
on behalf of University College Dublin (UCD). This will result in
the selection of a winning team, who it is anticipated will be
appointed to develop their design and to deliver the project.
The two-stage design competition is comprised of:

Stage One:
This is an international call for participation that is aimed at
attracting technically competent and professional teams to
submit an Expression of Interest in the competition, as
described in this document. A shortlist of five teams will be
selected to move to Stage Two. Successful and unsuccessful
teams will be contacted by MRC prior to the start of Stage Two.

Stage Two:
The shortlisted teams will be required to produce a concept
design, based on the detailed information provided in the
Competition Conditions and its appendices. The teams will
be invited to a site visit and seminar in Dublin in late April 2018
and a mid-competition charrette may be held (at the
discretion of UCD) in early May. A Peer Review Panel will
review the entries and the Jury will conduct interviews to
select a winner.
An honorarium of €40,000 will be awarded, following the
selection of the winner, to each shortlisted team who submits
a compliant tender at Stage Two of the competition.
Part Two Competition Details

54

     The Competition Process
     This competition is being run under the Restricted Procedure
     in accordance with EU procurement rules and the Republic of
     Ireland’s S.I. No. 284/2016 European Union (Award of Public
     Authority Contracts) Regulations 2016. In line with
     procurement rules, the Stage Two Competition Conditions
     document (the Tender document) has been provided for
     information only at this stage. Competitors are not asked to
     respond in any way to the Competition Conditions document
     at this stage of the competition.
     This competition has been advertised in the Official Journal
     of the European Union (OJEU).
     As the competition is for the appointment of a multidisciplinary
     team, it is not being conducted as a Design Contest under
     S.I. No. 284/2016.
     All costs incurred by competitors in the competition must be
     borne by the competitors. UCD accepts no liability for any
     costs incurred irrespective of the outcome of the competition
     or if the competition is postponed or cancelled.

     Questions
     All enquiries relating to the competition should be addressed
     to Malcolm Reading Consultants, the independent
     competition organisers appointed to manage the process.
     During the competition, no contact in relation to this project
     should be made with UCD, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County
     Council, the National Transport Authority or members of the
     competition Jury. Failure to comply with this restriction may
     compromise your position within the competition.
     Questions should be emailed to:
     futurecampusucd@malcolmreading.co.uk.
     A question and answer log will be compiled and uploaded to
     the website on a weekly basis. Questions received before
     14:00 GMT on a Wednesday will be addressed in the Q&A log
     on a Friday.
Part Two Competition Details

                                                                                            55

Please note that telephone enquiries will not be accepted,
and the latest date for submitting enquiries is 14:00 GMT
Wednesday 14 March 2018.

Conflict of Interest
Competitors should declare any actual or potential conflict
of interest concerning the commercial, financial or other
interests of UCD, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council,
the National Transport Authority or members of the
competition Jury which may compromise the conduct of
this procurement exercise and/or the performance of the
contract, as requested in Q3.C.9 of the ESPD.
If competitors are satisfied that there are no such conflicts of
interest they must answer ‘no’ to Q3.C.9 of the ESPD.
UCD reserves the right to reject responses from applicants
where a conflict of interest is viewed as affecting either or
both of the conduct of this procurement or the performance
of the contract. Competitors are under a continuing
obligation to notify the competition organisers, MRC, if
circumstances change during this procurement process and
any statements given during this procurement process
become untrue.
The conflict of interest clause is intended to protect the
integrity of the process. A prospective competitor will be
deemed to have a conflict of interest if they have access to
information or a relationship with a member of the Jury, or an
employee of UCD, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council
and the National Transport Authority directly involved with
this project, that would or could unduly influence the process.

Non-Collusion
In order to ensure the competition is conducted in an
equitable manner, competitors are under a continuing
obligation to comply with the conditions as set out in this
Search Statement document.
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