Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055

 
Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
Lebanon High School
 Program of Studies
    2019-2020

    195 Hanover Street
    Lebanon, NH 03766
      (603) 448-2055
Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
Hunter Robb

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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
Table of Contents

  Lebanon School District Mission Statement                                   4
  Accreditation                                                                5

CURRICULAR EXPECTATIONS                                                        5
  Diploma Requirements                                                         6
  Class Standing                                                               6
  Early Graduation                                                             7
  Standardized Testing                                                        7
  International Exchange Students                                              7
  Reassessment and Competency Recovery Procedures                              9
  Summer School                                                               10
  Academic Honesty                                                            10
  Meeting College Requirements for Admission to Post-Secondary Institutions   12
  Homework                                                                    13

SCHOOL COUNSELING SERVICES                                                    14
  Course Registration and Scheduling Procedures                               14

ENGLISH                                                                       15

MATHEMATICS                                                                   22

WORLD LANGUAGES                                                               43

TECHNOLOGY, BUSINESS, AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS                              48

PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                                            53

HEALTH EDUCATION                                                              54

ESSENTIAL ARTS                                                                55
  Visual Arts                                                                 55
  Performing Arts                                                             58
     Music                                                                    58
     Theater                                                                  60
     Dance                                                                    61

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELL)                                               62

HARTFORD AREA CAREER & TECHNOLOGY CENTER PROGRAMS                             63

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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
Welcome to Lebanon High School!

                              Administration:
                            Ian Smith, Principal
                      Kieth Matte, Assistant Principal
    Bonnie Robinson, Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
                       Mike Stone, Athletic Director

                          Subject Coordinators:
                          Michael Anikis, Science
                        Marceny Bourne, Counseling
                             John Carey, Arts
                       Andrew Gamble, Social Studies
                          George Hanna, English
                      Nancy Menard, World Languages
                        Jane Rice, Special Education
                            Louise Valliere, Math

    A complete list of the faculty and staff can be found on our website.
        To send an email, use this combination without punctuation:
                       first initial + last name @sau88.net

                             Acknowledgements
                               Thank you to...
●    All the educators who contributed to this Program of Studies
●    Administrative Assistant Sheena Youngman
●    The Education Committee and School Board for their support
●    Art teachers John Carey, Todd Matte, and Jonathan Warren
●    The following students whose artwork is used in this booklet:
     Celia Barnett, Ashley Fogo, Sierra MacDonald, Jillian Miller,
     Hunter Robb, Alecia Roy, Libby Tafe, Anna Wolke, ​Luke Greene,
     Ethan Sullivan-Dupuis, ​Hunter Gallien, Logan French, Dalton Shea,
     Emily Brady​ ​and Annie Zhao

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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
LEBANON HIGH SCHOOL
                                       EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

                                                  Core Values
                                                         ​L​earn
                                                     to ​ ​H​elp
                                                      ​ ​S​ucceed

                                                      Beliefs
            Lebanon High School graduates, with the support of the faculty, parents, and community
            members, will take responsibility for themselves, their community and their environment.
             Lebanon High School graduates will participate actively, creatively, and responsibly in
                           society while following their unique paths to self fulfillment.

                                                     Expectations
         To achieve the Academic, Social, and Civic Expectations, Lebanon High School community will:
                      •promote a collaborative and supportive learning environment;
                      •provide opportunities to become inquisitive, self-directed learners;
                      •encourage critical thinking;
                      •utilize varied instructional practices which may include inquiry-based, differentiated, and
                         cooperative instructional methodologies;
                      •incorporate technological skills;
                      •utilize problem-based learning which encourages analysis, synthesis, generalization, and
                         application;
                      •provide opportunities for personal reflection and for clear communication;
                      •encourage responsible decision making;
                      •provide a safe, accepting, equitable, secure, and clean environment.

Lebanon School District Mission Statement
The Lebanon School District, in partnership with the community, is committed to providing a challenging, positive
and safe learning environment that ​CARES​:

                                C​ultivates curiosity and collaboration
                                A​chieves academic excellence
                                R​espects and values diversity
                                E​ncourages responsible citizenship
                                S​upports the needs of every learner

21st Century Learning Expectations
Students at Lebanon High School will:
Academic Expectations                 1. Read, think, and research critically and creatively.
                                      2. Communicate effectively using a variety of means.
                                      3. Reason logically to solve problems.
Social and Civic Expectation:         4. Students at Lebanon High School will be active citizens and contribute
                                         positively to the LHS community.

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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
Accreditation

Lebanon High School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a non-governmental,
nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering
post-graduate instruction. Accreditation of an institution by the New England Association indicates that it meets or exceeds
criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a peer group review process.

An accredited school or college is one which has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through
appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the
foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation.

Accreditation by the New England Association is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee
of the quality of every course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable
assurance about the quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution.
Inquiries regarding the status of an institution's accreditation by the New England Association should be directed to the
administrative staff. Individuals may also contact the Association:

                                        New England Association of Schools and Colleges
                                                      209 Burlington Road
                                              Bedford, Massachusetts 01730-1433
                                             (617) 271-0022 • FAX (617) 271-0950

Competencies
Competency-based credit acquisition has been mandated by the New Hampshire Board of Education. Competencies are defined
as content, skills, and understandings that are critically important to the students’ current and future academic success. In order
to earn credit for a course, students must demonstrate competence by achieving a grade of 70% or better.

                                           CURRICULAR EXPECTATIONS
Philosophy
It is our objective at Lebanon High School to promote the intellectual growth of our students by placing students in courses of
appropriate challenge. Placement is meant to inspire students to excel in academics and to meet the required competencies for
each course. Students, their parents, and their teachers should work together to make the most appropriate course selections to
provide the best possible preparation for life beyond high school. Students’ grades are based on the mastery of competencies as
demonstrated through formative and summative assessments.

    ●    Open​ courses, as the name implies, are open to all students at identified grade levels. All departments offering the
         courses assume responsibility for ensuring that the expectations placed on students in these courses will be
         differentiated in ways that will enable students of all abilities and achievement levels to be successful in meeting course
         competencies.
    ●    Level 1 ​courses focus on the development of fundamental skills necessary to achieve competency in the course.
         Courses begin to focus on critical thinking and higher order skills.
    ●    Level 2 ​courses contain content typical of a particular grade level. Courses focus on critical thinking and higher order
         skills.
    ●    Intensive and Level 3​ courses focus on critical thinking and higher order skills to a greater degree and frequency than
         the courses at the previous levels. Habitual completion of short and long-range assignments is essential for both
         acceptance and continuance in these courses.
    ●    Honors​ courses are intended for those students who have been successful at mastering and exceeding the
         competencies expected in previous courses. Honors courses are among the most challenging in the curriculum.
         Students should consider their total course-load and other commitments prior to choosing an Honors level course.
    ●    Advanced Placement​ courses set expectations for student performance at a level comparable to the level of a college
         freshman. Students must be able to work independently, be able to exchange their views with others in a productive
         manner, and to complete research papers and significant long-range assignments.​ ​Students taking an AP course are
         encouraged to take the AP exam for the course in early May. The fee for each exam is approximately $90.00. Where

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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
there is the potential for economic hardship in taking the exam, the student should meet with a school counselor in
           September to seek alternatives for meeting financial obligations.

Certificate Of Completion
Students with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) may earn certificates of completion that are not equal to a regular high
school diploma per the State of New Hampshire Department of Education and Lebanon School Board. It is important to note that
all students with disabilities will be entitled to continue with their high school educational program until such time as each student
has earned a regular high school diploma or has attained the age of 21, whichever comes first. Certificates of completion
indicate that the school district has recognized the fulfillment of educational objectives, the time required by an individual’s IEP,
and fulfillment of a minimum attendance of four years. Certificates of completion are subject to the approval of the High School
Principal and Superintendent or designee.

Diploma Requirements
A Lebanon High School diploma requires a minimum of twenty (20) credits. One credit is given for satisfactory completion of
each course which meets five periods per week for the entire school year. Semester courses earn ½ credit. The following credits
are required of all students.

                               Number of
     Content Area                                                              Required Courses
                            Credits Required

 English                             4            English 9, English 10, American Literature in Grade 11,
                                                  English Electives in Grade 12

 Social Studies                      3            Current World Issues (½), World Studies Elective (½), American History (1),
                                                  Government (½), Economics (½)

 Mathematics                        3+            Completion of Algebra/Geometry 1.
                                                  Beginning with the class of 2019, students must have a math class or
                                                  math-embedded experience in all four years.

 Science                             2            Physical Science, Biology

 Arts Education                     ½             All Performing Arts, Art, Music, Theater, and Woodworking courses meet
                                                  this requirement.

 Physical Education                  1            Human Performance and one Physical Education elective

 Health                             ½             Teen Roles

 Technology                         ½             Students choose from: Digital Media Studies, Video Games and Interactive
                                                  Design, Applied Digital Electronics, Computer Science Principles 1, AP
                                                  Computer Science Principles, ​Intro to Robotics, Introduction to Digital
                                                  Cartography, Product Design, Development, Manufacturing, & Marketing,
                                                  Cybersecurity, Introduction to Computer-Aided Architectural, Interior, and
                                                  Mechanical Design, and Digital Filmmaking.

 Electives                         5½             Additional courses to complete the 20 credits

Class Standing
A typical pathway through LHS includes these credits to stay on track for graduation.
From Grade:
9 to 10                    5 credits
10 to 11                  10 credits
11 to 12                  15 credits
Graduation                20 credits.
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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
Early Graduation
Students and their parents may consider the possibility of early graduation from high school when plans for work or further
education would be enhanced by this experience. If you are interested in investigating this possibility, please make an
appointment with your school counselor. A parent conference with a counselor and a written request to the administration will be
required prior to approval.

NCAA Eligibility
Student Athletes should be aware that there are academic requirements to play in Division 1 and/or Division 2 colleges. It is a
student’s responsibility to register on the NCAA Eligibility Center website, ensure that his/her high school course load has been
approved by the NCAA, and meet with a school counselor to discuss aspirations. In addition, SAT scores and cumulative GPA
are factors in eligibility. More information is available at ncaa.org

Eligibility for School Activity Participation
LHS requires full-time student status and adheres to the New Hampshire Interscholastic Athletic Association policy. Two factors
determine students’ eligibility to participate in athletic, co-curricular, or clubs.
     1. Students must be full-time: enrolled in a minimum of five (5) credits per semester.
     2. Students must be passing four courses.
More information is available in the LHS Student and Parent Handbook as well as the LHS Athletic and Co-Curricular Handbook.
Any exceptions to this policy must be granted by the Principal.

Standardized Testing
The following standardized tests are offered at LHS
    ● NWEA Measures of Annual Progress will be given to students below grade level in the fall and spring. This test is given
         beginning in elementary school, and students and parents will be able to watch progress over time. Many of our
         students have “topped out” on NWEA, and they will no longer be required to take it in high school.
    ● All 9th and 10th graders will take the PSAT during our school-wide testing day in early spring. This will give students
         practice in taking a major annual exam leading to the all-important SAT in their junior year.
    ● As required by the state, all 11th grade students will take the SAT in early spring and the Science Statewide
         Assessment in late May.
    ● Students in AP classes will take exams during the first two weeks in May, at a cost of approximately $94 per exam.
         Students and parents are responsible for these costs, though some scholarship funding is available.

International Exchange Students
Lebanon High School welcomes up to five international exchange students each year. Students should apply by June 1 of the
year of attendance. These students follow a regular class schedule and participate fully in school activities. Exchange students
attend for a period of one year. At the end of that year, they receive a Certificate of Attendance. Exchange students are not
eligible to receive a Lebanon High School diploma and are not considered in determining rank in class.

                                                          Ashley Fogo

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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
GRADING
Grades are updated a minimum of every two weeks and are available online through the PowerSchool student and parent
portals. If students/parents/guardians do not have access to the PowerPoint Parent Portal via the internet, they may request a
printed grade report. Report cards are available on a quarterly basis online and are mailed only by parent/guardian request.
Each teacher will include a descriptive comment on the student's performance at the end of each quarter. Parents and guardians
are encouraged to discuss areas of concern with their son/daughter's teachers.

Grading Policy
The guidelines for the school's grading policy and grade equivalents for both regular and honors/AP/College courses are as
follows

                                                                          Grade Equivalent and            Honors, AP, and
  Grade                            Description
                                                                           Points toward GPA              College Courses

             Significantly exceeds competencies; outstanding            A+       97-100       4.33               4.66
     A       achievement and understanding of the course                A        93-96        4.00               4.33
             competencies.                                              A-       90-92        3.67               4.00

             Exceeds competencies; clearly above-average                B+       87-89        3.33               3.66
     B       achievement and understanding of the course                B        83-86        3.00               3.33
             competencies.                                              B-       80-82        2.67               3.00

                                                                        C+       77-79        2.33               2.66
             Competent level work; meets class expectations of
     C                                                                  C        73-76        2.00               2.33
             the course competencies.
                                                                        C-       70-72        1.67               2.00

     F       Does not meet course competencies.                         Below 70

Note: Students who attend the Hartford Area Career and Technical Center are graded using HACTC’s grading system which
includes D’s for grades between 60 and 70.

Passing a Course
A grade of 70% represents a minimum level of competency to pass each quarter and to obtain credit for the course.

Repeating Elective Courses
Performance based courses such as Band and Chorus may be repeated. Elective courses may repeated for credit with the
written permission of the teacher. Students should check with the teacher before signing up to repeat an elective course that has
already been passed

Grade Point Average (GPA)
A student's GPA is determined by adding the grade points earned for all courses and dividing that sum by the number of credits
attempted. Weighted grade points (.33) are added to the regularly assigned grade points for Honors, Advanced Placement (AP),
and college courses. Class rank is determined by the GPA.

Honor Roll Criteria
Students must be enrolled in at least five (5) full-time courses to be eligible for Honor Roll status. Exceptions to this may be
granted by the principal. Honor Roll classification is determined according to the GPA received during the quarter. There are
three categories:

         Highest Honors     GPA of 4.0 or higher with no grade lower than an A-
         High Honors        GPA of 3.51-3.99 with no grade lower than a B-
         Honors             GPA of 3.0-3.5 with no grade lower than a C-

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Lebanon High School Program of Studies 2019-2020 - 195 Hanover Street Lebanon, NH 03766 (603) 448-2055
Grading And Assessment Procedures
Grading has many purposes: providing feedback to students, parents, and teachers, documenting progress, and guiding
instructional decisions.
Formative and Summative Assessments
Formative assessments​ help students move forward in their learning for a specific goal. Examples include verbal and written
checks, activities which reinforce skills, small daily quizzes, worksheets, and practice exercises. Formative assessments will
constitute no more than 20% of the quarter grade. Formative assessments will be recorded in the grade book as a single
category.

Summative assessments​ are assessments that demonstrate what students know or are able to do and directly relate to the
course competencies. Examples include quizzes, tests, projects, and/or papers. Summative assessments will constitute 80% or
more of the quarter grade. Summative assessments will be recorded in the grade book as a single category.

Midterm and Final Exams
For all classes: Midterm Exams or Performance Assessments are worth 10-20% of the Semester 1 grade; Final Exams or
Performance Assessments are worth 10-20% of the Semester 2 grade.

Late Work/Due Dates
Formative assessments — Late work may be accepted at each teacher’s discretion, not to exceed a 20% reduction in grade.

If a formative assessment is deemed competent prior to any reduction in Credit, a minimum grade of 70% will be recorded.
Summative assessments — Late work will be accepted, with the deadline at the discretion of the teacher, and is subject to a
grade reduction of no more than 30%. If a summative assessment is deemed competent prior to the 30% reduction, a minimum
grade of 70% will be recorded.

Make-up Work
Make-up work will use the following guidelines as stated in the Lebanon High School Handbook
   1. When a student returns to school following an excused absence, the student will be granted the number of days he/she
       was absent to make up the work that was missed. If work has been assigned previously (e.g., a long-term reading or
       writing assignment of which the student is aware), the student will be expected to be prepared for the next class. In
       addition, if a student's assignments are posted online/or other, such as an assignment calendar, and there is no new
       material/assignment, the student will be expected to be prepared for the next class. At the teacher's discretion,
       additional days to make up work may be offered.
   2. Any formative or summative assessment due the day of an unexcused tardy or absence must be completed on the day
       of return and will receive a maximum grade of 75%.
   3. The student is responsible for the completion of all formative or summative assessments assigned during an unexcused
       absence. Failure to complete these assessments will be follow the late work/due date policy.

Extra Credit
Extra credit will not be offered.

Demonstration and Recognition of Honest Effort
Students who fail, but in the opinion of the teacher, demonstrate an honest effort on a formative or summative assessment task
will receive a minimum score of 50% when recorded in the grade book. Honest effort is demonstrated by providing evidence that
time has been spent attempting completion and/or preparation for an assignment or assessment.

Reassessment and Competency Recovery Procedures
When a student fails, it is expected that he/she will reassess in order to achieve minimum competency (70%). If a student has
demonstrated an honest effort in attempting completion of, or preparation for, a summative assessment and earns a score below
70%, he/she will be given the opportunity to reassess. Students will complete a competency recovery plan with tasks and
deadlines established by the classroom teacher. Students will be allowed to reassess once with further reassessment at the
discretion of the teacher. The maximum grade on a reassessment is a 75%. Students need to have completed and have a
passing grade on all formative work prior to the summative assessment in order to be eligible for reassessment, and students

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need to have made an attempt to complete the summative task in order to reassess. Reassessments will take place during
Academic Block, or at the discretion of the teacher.

Students who fail, and in the opinion of the teacher, do not demonstrate an honest effort to complete a formative or summative
assessment task will receive the grade they earned on that task and will not be given the opportunity for reassessment.
Additional re-learning opportunities are at the discretion of the teacher. If there are extenuating circumstances, students should
speak directly with the teacher.

Some assessments, such as midterm and final exams, do not lend themselves to the possibility of reassessment. Prior to this
type of an assessment, teachers will identify the assessment as not eligible for reassessment to students and notify students of
the decision.

Summer School
The purpose of LHS Summer School is to provide a focused opportunity to master course competencies not achieved during the
traditional school year. Summer school builds a common base of knowledge that promotes students’ success in future courses.

In addition to competency recovery, students are also allowed to obtain credits in the following situations: to improve a grade, to
meet a prerequisite, and/or to cover missed material in a class due to an educationally based trip. These unique cases are
reviewed on an individual basis by the teacher, summer school coordinator, and administration. Students are able to do
competency recovery during summer school for English, Spanish, Social Studies, Science and Math. For additional information,
contact the Lebanon High School Counseling Department or the Summer School Coordinator, Mike Anikis.
Note: All students are eligible for credit recovery through the Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS) or summer
school when their final average is between 50-69%. Some seniors may be eligible for a credit recovery ELO if graduation
depends on it and the student demonstrates commitment and independence. Any exceptions must receive approval of the
administration. (See more about Extended Learning Opportunities later in this Program of Studies and on the LHS website.)

Academic Honesty
Academic honesty requires students to do their own work. There is a difference between cooperative learning and academic
dishonesty. Students are expected to perform honestly through the production of their own work and through the demonstration
of respect for the individual and the work of others.
When preparing papers or research projects, students must acknowledge or cite sources from which they take any ideas,
language, or thoughts that are not their own. To take the ideas or words of someone else and present them as one’s own is
plagiarism and subject to the consequences outlined in the Student Handbook.

                                                          Alecia Roy
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PLANNING A COURSE OF STUDY

Recommended Plans for Meeting Diploma Requirements
All students must be enrolled in at least five (5) credits. Any exceptions to this policy must have permission from the Principal.

 Grade                 Courses                                                                         Credits

 GRADE 9               English                                                                        1 credit
                       Math                                                                           1 credit
                       Science                                                                        1 credit
                       Social Studies                                                                ½ credit
                       Physical Education                                                             ½ credit
                       Electives (Arts, Technology, and World Language                              ½ - 2 credits
                       Electives recommended)

 GRADE 10              English                                                                        1 credit
                       Math                                                                           1 credit
                       Science                                                                        1 credit
                       Social Studies                                                                 ½ credit
                       Teen Roles                                                                     ½ credit
                       Physical Education                                                             ½ credit
                       Electives (Arts, Technology, and World Language                              ½ - 2 credits
                       Electives recommended)

 GRADE 11              English                                                                         1 credit
                       Math                                                                            1 credit
                       Social Studies                                                                  1 credit
                       Electives                                                                     2 - 4 credits

 GRADE 12              English                                                                         1 credit
                       Social Studies (Economics and Government)                                       1 credit
                       Electives                                                                     4 - 6 credits

                       Total to graduate                                                             20 Credits

 Notes:
     ● Students may also wish to plan to have a study hall, English Language Learner services, or time in the Learning
        Center, depending on their needs.
     ● The New Hampshire Department of Education requires a Math or Math-embedded course in all four years of high
        school.

To meet the minimum Lebanon High School diploma requirements, the overview below will give an indication of the required
courses and credits. Note that there is a great deal of flexibility- for example, students may take their ½ arts and technology
credits at any time during their four years of high school. Students who hope to attend Hartford should discuss it with their school
counselor.

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Minimum Four-Year Course Pathway

            Grade 9                         Grade 10                           Grade 11                       Grade 12

 English                          English                            English                        English

 Math                             Math                               Math                           Social Studies

 Science                          Science                            Social Studies                 3 Electives

 ½ Social Studies                 ½ Social Studies                   2 Electives

 ½ Physical Education             ½ Physical Education

 ½ Technology                     ½ Teen Roles

 ½ Arts                           ½ Elective

               5                                 5                                 5                               5

Meeting College Requirements for Admission to Post-Secondary Institutions
In general, colleges and universities prefer applicants who have taken a challenging high school program, who have
demonstrated a good work ethic, and who have shown the development of skills and knowledge with a strong grade point
average. In addition, colleges and universities are looking for applicants who are well rounded and will make their campus more
diverse. This could mean an applicant that shows leadership skills in the classroom and through co-curricular activities, athletics,
volunteer work, a sense of working well with others (both peers and adults), and demonstrating independent accountability.
Extended Learning Opportunities and VLACS are recognized by colleges and universities as independent learning outside of the
classroom.

The following table offers suggestions for a four-year course of study for college-bound students at Lebanon High School.
Students should meet with their school counselor on a regular basis to ensure that they are on the educational path that is going
to be most successful for their current and future needs. Counselors will discuss which courses are necessary to meet the
entrance requirements for specific colleges and/or majors

                              Courses                 Recommended

 Four-Year College            English                 4 years
                              Social Studies          3-4 years depending on college/major
                              Math                    3-5 years depending on college/major
                              Science                 3-5 years depending on college/major
                              World Language          0-5 years depending on college/major
                                                          (for example, UNH requires 2 years and prefers 3)
                              Electives               Electives should be taken based on personal interests and educational
                                                      goals (e.g. Art, Business, Computer and Technology Education, Music,
                                                      and Theater)

 Two-Year College and         English                 4 years
 Technical Schools            Social Studies          3 years
                              Math                    3-4 years
                              Science                 2-4 years
                              World Language          0-4 years depending upon college/major

                              Electives               Electives should be taken from those available based upon personal
                                                      interests and educational goals, (e.g. Art, Business, Computer and
                                                      Technology Education, Music, and Theater)

                                                                12
Homework
Homework is a constructive tool in the teaching/learning​ ​process when geared to the needs and abilities of students. Purposeful
assignments not only enhance student achievement, but also develop self-discipline and associated good working habits. As an
extension of the classroom, homework must be planned and organized, must be viewed as purposeful to the students, and
should be evaluated and returned to students in a timely manner.

Teachers may give homework to students to aid in the student’s educational development. The purposes should always be
clearly understood by both the teacher and the pupil. Teachers may assign homework as part of their curriculum. If homework
is to be used by teachers as part of a student’s grade, the teacher will explain to students how such homework assignments
relate to the teacher’s grading system. Homework should be an application or adaptation of a classroom experience, and
should not be assigned for disciplinary purposes. The information for any homework assignment should be clear and specific so
that the pupil can complete the assignment independently.

Homework Guidelines for Students
  ● Stay organized: write assignments in an agenda, planner, or calendar
  ● Do your best work; be sure to read all questions and prompts thoroughly
  ● Make sure you understand assignments and expectations clearly before leaving class
  ● Bring home the proper materials to complete assignments or projects
  ● Bring completed homework and assignments to class and hand them in on time
  ● Use teacher feedback on homework to increase your knowledge and performance
  ● Budget time properly for long-term assignments
  ● Complete any work missed due to absence from class
  ● Talk to your parent and teacher if you are having difficulty with homework
  ● Use Academic Block time to get extra help, reassess, or work on homework assignments
  ● Check PowerSchool regularly for missing assignments and grades

Homework Guidelines for Parents
  ● Be familiar with the philosophy and guidelines of the homework policy
  ● Check to see that your child has a system for writing down assignments
  ● See that your child effectively uses Academic Block
  ● Provide a time and place to do homework assignments with limited interruptions
  ● Actively supervise homework completion, assisting, but not doing the work
  ● Oversee completion of long-term assignments to assist in understanding time management
  ● Ask your son/daughter how he/she is using Academic Block time daily
  ● Check PowerSchool for missing student assignments and grades at least weekly

Homework Guidelines for Teachers
  ● Routinely communicate homework expectations with students and families as needed
  ● Ensure students are aware of and understand clearly all homework assignments
  ● Provide meaningful and timely feedback on homework
  ● Adjust instruction as needed based on student performance on homework
  ● Invite students to use Academic Block time to support their performance
  ● Update grades in PowerSchool on a bi-weekly basis

Homework Guidelines for Administrators
  ● Include the homework policy in all teacher, parent and student handbooks
  ● Require teachers to communicate homework statement to students and parents
  ● Ensure that teachers are implementing the homework statement consistently and uniformly
  ● Assist teachers, when necessary, in implementing homework expectations
  ● Give suggestions to teachers, when necessary, on how assignments could be improved

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SCHOOL COUNSELING SERVICES
The purpose of the school counseling services is to support the learning process and promote academic achievement. School
Counselors help students make informed decisions that meet personal, educational, and career objectives. The counseling staff
is dedicated to assisting students to achieve academic success as well as promote personal health and well being Through the
comprehensive school counseling program, students gain a clear understanding of their abilities and interests, strengths and
challenges. Students have the responsibility to determine the important goals for their lives and counselors assist them in the
process of attaining these goals.

         Some of the topics students discuss with counselors include:
            ● Course selection
            ● Status of grades
            ● Proper placement in classes
            ● Interventions needed for support
            ● Career planning
            ● Military service opportunities
            ● College entrance examination information
            ● College planning
            ● Scholarship and financial aid for continuing education
            ● Personal issues that may impact their education

Counselors request meetings with students frequently, however, students are encouraged to contact their counselors as needed.
Students should plan to see their counselor during a study hall, free period, before or after school. Parents are encouraged to
call their student's counselor should they have a concern. Counselors and teachers welcome conferences with parents. The
Counseling Office telephone number is 448-2055, Ext. 2006.

                             Course Registration and Scheduling Procedures
Registration
   1. Review the information in this booklet with your parents, teachers, and counselor.
   2. Based upon this review and your educational/career plans, select courses which you would like to take and which you
        believe are appropriate to your future goals. In many instances your selections will be dictated by graduation
        requirements, departmental requirements, or future goals.
   3. For each course you select, you must satisfy any prerequisite for taking the course and get the written approval of your
        current teacher in the department which is offering the course.
   4. In order to progress to the next course in a sequence, the student must meet the competencies of the preceding
        course. In order to move to the next course in a sequence at the next level, the student must exceed the competencies
        of the preceding course.
   5. Parents are encouraged to call the School Counseling Office to make an appointment to discuss the course selections
        and the future goals of the student before the final schedule is given to the student in the spring.
   6. All placements must be recommended by teachers and the school counseling department and be approved by parents
        or guardians before they become final.

Scheduling
Some scheduling conflicts are inevitable and students may not be able to enroll in all of the courses they have selected. Be
prepared to choose alternatives, especially among your electives. We will do everything possible to see that you get the classes
you selected.

                                                               14
ENGLISH

  The chart below is intended to illustrate the options students have in earning their four English credits at Lebanon
  High School. It is recommended that students discuss their choices with current teachers, school counselors, and
  parents/guardians.

Notes:
         ●   Some English courses may not be offered every year.
         ●   Semester courses ​Creative Writing​ and ​Bestsellers from Page to Screen​ can be combined to fill the English
             credit in grade 12.
         ●   English 11 American Skill Building and English 12 Skill Building, when offered, are eligible for English
             credit.
         ●   Students who participate in the STEM Internship have the option of receiving an English credit.
         ●   English Electives include Reading and Writing Advancement in both grades 9 and 10.

                                                              15
ENGLISH

The English Department at Lebanon High School offers a sequence of courses to enable students to take four required years of
English classes. The mission of the department is to expose students to a variety of literature, both classic and contemporary,
and to help them develop vocabulary, writing, comprehension, and critical thinking, discussing, and viewing skills.

209 Reading and Writing Advancement (Grade 9)
Grade:              9                 Level:             Open
Credit:             1                 Length:            Year
Prerequisite: Assignment by the administration.
This course will provide an intensive and prescriptive review of reading and writing skills for students needing support in working
at grade-level. In the 9th grade, students work to build their skills in the areas of fluency, vocabulary, comprehension and writing.
Daily skills work helps students develop and practice reading techniques. Students also complete a large scale project.

211 English 9
Grade:              9                  Level:             Open
Credit:             1                  Length:            Year
This class is appropriate for students at all levels of reading ability, who wish to take an interesting, active, and hands-on course,
with explicit instruction in reading comprehension techniques and writing, as well as classroom based activities. Students who
choose English 9 may or may not enjoy reading and writing, but want an interesting English class with a lighter reading load.
Most reading is done in class, and reading missed in class is expected to be completed as homework. Some reading may be
assigned outside of class. There will be increasing expectations for independence as the year progresses, especially reading
and working with high-interest texts. Essays and writing are prepared in class, using outlines and templates. Group work and
projects are also frequent. Common Core State Standard-aligned short stories, poems, and novels of challenge and rigor will be
read.

212 English 9 Intensive
Grade:            9                  Level:             Intensive
Credit:           1                  Length:            Year
This course is appropriate for students who are strong readers and/or enjoy reading who wish to select an English course that
emphasizes reading and writing at an intensive level. Students are expected to read extensively, both during and outside of
class. Students who choose Intensive love to read and write, want to challenge themselves in English class, and are able to
handle the heavy reading load. Most reading is done independently outside of class, and daily homework may include up to 25
pages per night, depending on the text. Students are expected to come to class prepared and to participate in class discussions.
Students who select this course should be reading at or above grade level. Essays and writing frequently involve several drafts,
and require work outside of class. Common Core State Standard-aligned short stories, poems, and novels of challenge and rigor
will be read; however, pacing, as well as extent of reading and writing expectations, will deepen in English 9 Intensive.

213 English 10 - World Literature and Composition
Grade:              10                 Level:             Open
Credit:             1                  Length:            Year
This course builds upon the foundation mapped in English 9 but is focused on diverse literature from around the world. This
class is appropriate for students at all levels of reading ability, who wish to take an interesting, active, and hands-on course, with
explicit instruction in reading comprehension techniques and writing, as well as classroom-based activities. English 10 is suitable
for those students who had success in and enjoyed English 9. Within the course, cross-disciplinary work is expected. The course
material and methodology will foster reading comprehension, writing, vocabulary, critical thinking, as well as information literacy
and organizational and time-management skills. Students will be expected to write essays with some independence. In writing
skills, students will be expected to learn to integrate more than one work in their writing, cite properly, and learn to paraphrase
and summarize effectively. Some reading is done in class, and reading missed in class is expected to be completed as
homework. Students should plan for an average of 30 minutes of daily homework, dependent on student reading rates, and
frequent weekend homework. Group work and projects are also frequent. Common Core State Standard-aligned short stories,
poems, and novels of challenge and rigor will be read.

                                                                 16
214 English 10 - World Literature and Composition Intensive
Grade:             10                Level:             Intensive
Credit:            1                 Length:            Year
Prerequisite: Exceed the competencies of English 9.
This course builds upon the foundation mapped in English 9 but is focused on diverse literature from around the world. This
class is appropriate for students who are strong readers and/or enjoy reading who wish to select an English course that
emphasizes reading and writing at an intensive level. Students will be expected to write essays with a great deal of
independence. In writing skills, students will be expected to learn to integrate more than one work in their writing, cite properly,
and learn to paraphrase and summarize effectively. Students should plan for an average of 30-45 minutes of daily homework,
dependent on student reading rates, and frequent weekend homework. Common Core State Standard-aligned short stories,
poems, and novels of challenge and rigor will be read; however, pacing, as well extent of reading and writing expectations, will
deepen in English 10 Intensive.

219 English 10 - World Literature and Composition Honors
Grade:             10                Level:             Honors
Credit:            1                 Length:            Year
Prerequisite: Exceed the competencies of English 9 Intensive and recommendation of current English teacher.
This course builds upon the foundation mapped in English 9 but is focused on diverse literature from around the world. This
class is appropriate for students who are very strong readers and/or enjoy reading who wish to select an English course that
emphasizes reading and writing at an Honors level. English 10 Honors is appropriate for those students who excelled in English
9 Intensive, and are seeking an Honors level course. Students will be expected to write essays with a significant amount of
independence. In writing skills, student will be expected to learn to integrate more than one work in their writing, cite properly,
and learn to paraphrase and summarize effectively. Students should plan for an average of 45 minutes of daily homework,
dependent on student reading rates, and frequent weekend homework. Common Core State Standard-aligned short stories,
poems, and novels of challenge and rigor will be read; however, pacing, as well as extent of reading and writing expectations,
will deepen in English 10 Honors.

216 Reading and Writing Advancement (Grade 10)
Grade:             10                Level:              Open
Credit:            1                 Length:             Year
Prerequisite: Assignment by the administration.
This course will provide an intensive and prescriptive review of reading and writing skills for students needing support in working
at grade-level. In 10th grade, students build on the fluency, vocabulary and comprehension skills learned in 9th grade Reading
and Writing Advancement, while deepening knowledge in comprehension, research, long form writing and metacognitive skills.
Students complete a research project.

221 American Studies
Grade:              11                Level:             2/3
Credit:             2                 Length:            Year
(English, Social Studies)
Prerequisite: Exceed the competencies of previous English and Social Studies classes and have a readiness and a willingness
to engage in college preparatory work.
This interdisciplinary course is designed to give students a dynamic educational experience as they come to appreciate the
complexities of American History, Literature, and Culture. This course is taught both chronologically and thematically,
emphasizing aspects of literature, art, music, history, and the social sciences. Students do nightly homework (generally one hour
of homework each night), write essays, complete research projects, read novels, and keep an organized notebook. One grade is
awarded for the course and two credits are given to complete the graduation requirements in English and United States History.

                                                                  17
223 American Studies Honors
Grade:              11                 Level:              Honors
Credit:             2                  Length:             Year
(English, Social Studies)
Prerequisite: Exceed the competencies of previous English and Social Studies classes and recommendation of English teacher.
This interdisciplinary course is designed to give students a dynamic educational experience as they come to appreciate the
complexities of American History, Literature, & Culture. This course is taught both chronologically and thematically, emphasizing
aspects of literature, art, music, history, and the social sciences. Additional expectations for the Honors course include that
students will be self-motivated and active participants in demanding cross-disciplinary work. The course emphasizes critical
thinking, independent work, and significant class discussion. Students will do a good deal of analytical writing and independent
work. Students do nightly homework (generally 1 hour of homework each night), write essays and extended papers, read novels
and other literature, and keep an organized notebook. One grade is awarded for the course and two credits are given to
complete the graduation requirements in English and United States History. A summer reading/writing/viewing assignment will
be assigned.

222 American Literature / Skill Building
Grade:            11                 Level:             1
Credit:           1                  Length:            Year
Prerequisite: Teacher Placement.
This course is focused on literature of the United States. Within the course, cross-disciplinary work is expected. The course
material and methodology will foster reading comprehension, writing, vocabulary, critical thinking, as well as information literacy
and organizational and time-management skills. Students should plan for an average of 30 minutes of daily homework,
dependent on student reading rates, and frequent weekend homework.

224 American Literature 2
Grade:             11                  Level:              2
Credit:            1                   Length:             Year
American Literature 2 is a college preparatory course focused on literature of the United States. Within the course,
cross-disciplinary work may also expected. The course material and methodology will foster reading comprehension, writing,
vocabulary, critical thinking, as well as information literacy and organizational and time-management skills. Students should plan
for an average of 30 minutes of daily homework, dependent on student reading rates, and frequent weekend homework.

225 American Literature 3
Grade:               11                 Level:           3
Credit:              1                  Length:          Year
Prerequisite: Exceed the competencies of previous English course.
American Literature 3 is a college preparatory course focused on literature of the United States in which significant reading and
writing is required for success. Within the course cross-disciplinary work may be expected. The course material and
methodology will foster reading comprehension, writing, vocabulary, critical thinking, as well as information literacy and
organizational and time-management skills. In writing skills, students will be expected to learn to integrate more than one work in
their writing, cite properly, and learn to paraphrase and summarize effectively. Students should plan for an average of 45
minutes of daily homework, dependent on student reading rates, and frequent weekend homework.

233 English 12: Literature and Composition
Grade:              12                 Level:            2 and 3
Credit:             1                  Length:           Year
This course offers students to introduction to classical texts from ancient civilizations to the 21st Century, and the class will move
at an accelerated pace. Students will be reading cultural touchstones and will be expected to do periodic research assignments
and shorter written analyses. In-depth discussions will focus on interpretations of literature. Writing assignments will emphasize
literary analysis that incorporates textual evidence. Common Core State Standard-aligned short stories, poems, and novels of
challenge and rigor will be read in this course; however, pacing, as well as extent of reading and writing expectations will be
accelerated.

                                                                 18
243 Creative Writing
Grade:             11-12              Level:               Open
Credit:            ½                  Length:              Semester
Students will write fiction and poetry in a variety of forms. By studying examples of stories and poems, they will gain insight into
the techniques and styles of successful writers and become more creative, powerful, and sophisticated as writers themselves.
Students must be prepared to write often and share their work in class. Writing assignments are frequently completed outside of
class. This course is not offered every year.

246 Bestsellers / Page to Screen
Grade:             11-12             Level:             Open
Credit:            ½                 Length:            Semester
This course offers students a selection of popular novels which are intended to increase their interest in reading. The class as a
group will read novels selected from recent bestseller lists. Student will also select books of their choice. It is crucial that students
who take the course realize that part of almost every class period will be devoted to reading. Students will talk and write about
the books they read, with an emphasis on deepening their understanding of themselves as readers. Students will view film
adaptations, and compare and contrast them with the original work. Students engage in discussions about the content of the
written works and the nature of the film adaptations and write short critical papers on them. Independent reading and viewing of
film adaptations is encouraged. This course is not offered every year.

250 Shakespeare
Grade:             12                 Level:            3
Credit:            1                  Length:           Year
Prerequisite: Meet the competencies of any grade 11 English course.
This course will focus on Shakespeare as an historical literary figure and as a significant presence in our lives and culture.
Students will read at least ten of Shakespeare's thirty-seven plays. Students will also read related modern drama in order to
enhance their understanding of both Shakespeare and the modern works. This course will provide opportunities for students to
be actively involved - reading and acting in readers’ theater, producing video adaptations, participating in ongoing discussions of
plays and other reading matter, and performing their own material written in iambic pentameter. Student will write analytical
essays on themes, motifs, and theatrical and textual elements, and they will incorporate research in a 4-6 page paper on a topic
of their choice. Reading will be supplemented by watching renowned (and occasionally controversial) film versions of the plays.

251 AP English Literature and Composition
Grade:             12                  Level:           AP
Credit:            1                   Length:          Year
Prerequisite: Significantly exceed the competencies of American Literature or American Studies or exceed the competencies of
American Studies Honors.
The course readings include ancient classics, world masterpieces, and contemporary works from around the world. Students
read literature and about literature, write numerous essays, and continue to improve their reading and writing skills. Varied
approaches to literature are studied to provide students with the ability to respond to novels, poems, plays and other genres on
their own. Students’ knowledge of literary terms, devices and concepts are reviewed and extended. Often functioning as a
seminar, English LIterature and Composition (AP) requires students to bring to class their ideas and reactions in response to the
reading, and to share them with others. Lectures provide background on authors and works, techniques for literary analysis, and
on reading and writing issues. Library research, especially in literary criticism, deepens students understanding of the works and
their authors.Students in English Literature (AP) are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in Literature and
Composition.

                                                                   19
259 English 12: Media Studies
Grade:              12                 Level:             Open
Credit:             1                  Length:            Year
In the constantly growing and changing digital age, it is increasingly important to be literate in a variety of media platforms.
Students in this course will explore, analyze, and create stories through film, graphic novels, short stories, nonfiction articles,
photography, television, advertisements, and the internet. Each unit of study involves a multi-media approach to studying an
important concept. Potential course units involve strategies for effective and captivating storytelling, persuasive techniques used
in advertising and news reporting, sparking social change with meaningful storytelling and reporting, and analyzing credible
information online.Students explore these concepts via a variety of platforms (print, digital, and video) and then create a final
project utilizing these platforms. This course is not offered every year.

262 AP English Language and Composition
Grade:              12                 Level:            AP
Credit:             1                  Length:           Year
Prerequisite: Significantly exceed the competencies of American Literature or American Studies or exceed the competencies of
American Studies Honors.
The course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of contexts and in becoming skilled writers
who compose for a variety of purposes. Most compositions will be a response to various nonfiction readings. Often functioning
as a seminar, English Language and Composition AP requires students to share their ideas and their writing.The teacher will
instruct on writing style, convention, and technique. In-class focus will concentrate on the writing process, on the study of
language itself, and on sophisticated research and argumentation.To reflect the increasing importance of graphics and visual
images in both print and electronic texts, students will be asked to analyze how such images relate to written texts and serve as
alternative forms of themselves.There will be an extensive research paper on a topic of the student's choice. It is expected that
the AP exam will be taken.

238 English 12 Skill Building
Grade:            12                Level:             1
Credit:           1                 Length:            Year
Prerequisite: Teacher Placement.
This course is focused on reading strategies, writing skills, and literary studies. The course includes an integrated approach that
fosters reading comprehension, writing, vocabulary, critical thinking, as well as information literacy and organizational and
time-management skills. Students should plan for an average of 30 minutes of daily homework, dependent on student reading
rates, and frequent weekend homework.This course is not offered every year.

634 Learning Studio — Humanities
Grades:             11-12             Level:               Open              Requirement Met: US 1/2 History or Government
Credit:             2                 Length:              Year                    & 1/2 Individual Social Studies Choice
(English, 1 credit ; US History ½ credit or 1/2 Government credit , and ½ credit individual choice​)
The Humanities Learning Studios is a two period year-long interdisciplinary team taught college-level course which involves an
English and Social Studies teacher working together to drive long-term inquiry and project-based learning. Students work
together, with the guidance of their instructor, to formulate an overarching question or problem that will drive their final project.
The first half of the year focuses on United States culture which integrates literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, film and
the disciplines of philosophy and history to better understand why we are the way we are. The study of the philosophies behind
United States history government and politics offers students the understanding and appreciation of the legacy of our country
through the analysis and synthesis of the political, economic, and social historical record. In their study of the course content,
students will work to refine the analytical skills they will need as responsible adults to participate in the democratic process. In
addition to the study of US History, Government and Politics, students will learn the skills necessary to research, evaluate
sources, write and present so that they can create an individualized learning project for the second semester.The second
semester project can take one of two forms: either an independent project as unique as the​ Psychogeography of London​;
designing a college course on the​ Influence of Slavery on Hip Hop​ and​ ​Black Feminism and a History of Misogyny​; or an
individual learning project about US Government, Law, History or Economics to meet a credit requirement for graduation.

                                                                  20
880 STEM Internship: High Tech Manufacturing and Engineering
Grade:             12                Level:           Open
Credits: 2, customized for students. Options include: Math, English, Science, Economics, Technology,and Elective credits.
Length: Semester (Pds.5, 6, 7, Academic Block);
Prerequisite: Submit Letter of Interest
This course will explore career readiness and employment opportunities in the Upper Valley. The experience will be at
Hypertherm on their three campuses and FUJIFILM Dimatix on the Etna Road. Students will first prove competency in industry
safety standards and understand the employability skills needed for a successful career. Then, students will have hands-on and
classroom experiences in all aspects of business including but not limited to history, marketing, assembly, accounting,
engineering, and research and development. Students will rotate through all departments to develop an overview of the
opportunities in the manufacturing industry and emphasize expectations of a professional work environment. At Hypertherm,
students may participate in a Project-Based challenge, identifying a problem, designing and manufacturing a solution, and
presenting findings. At FUJIFILM Dimatix, students will experience their wide range of products, including those produced in the
Clean Room. These diverse experiences will develop perspective and give students the opportunity to see the benefits and
challenges in two Upper Valley high-tech manufacturing and engineering facilities. This course will take place after first lunch
and through the rest of the day, earning 2 credits.

                                                     Sierra MacDonald

                                                               21
MATHEMATICS
The chart below may seem complex at first, but it indicates the multiple pathways students may pursue in
studying mathematics at Lebanon High School.

Notes:

*Successful completion of either of these courses fulfills the Algebra 1 graduation requirement.

Highly motivated students may accelerate by taking Algebra/Geometry 3 and Precalculus simultaneously.

Thicker Arrows indicate the standard pathways.

Thinner Arrows indicate alternate pathways.

Students who participate in the STEM Internship are eligible for math credit.

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