COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College

 
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
HIGHER EDUCATION

       COLLEGE HANDBOOK

                        2018-2019

BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees:   Higher Nationals validated by:
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
If you require any part of this Student Handbook in larger print, or
an alternative format, please contact:

Wendy Cavill
Senior Higher Education Administrator
Tel: 01458 884404
E-mail: wcavill@strode-college.ac.uk

All the information in this Handbook is correct at the time of production.

Strode College is rightly proud of its teaching and research and it undertakes all reasonable steps
to provide educational services in the manner set out in this Handbook and in any documents
referred to within it. It is not, however, not able to guarantee the provision of such services in certain
situations. Should industrial action or circumstances beyond our control interfere with our ability to
provide educational services, Strode College undertakes to use all reasonable steps to minimise the
resultant disruption to those services.

         Strode College Student Handbook 2018-19                                  Page 2 of 38
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
Dear Student

We are delighted that you have chosen to study a university level course at Strode College. We
deliver a range of Degrees and Higher Nationals in partnership with, and validated by, University of
Plymouth and Pearson. This College Handbook contains important information to support you in
your studies and is primarily generic across all courses. Some information is specific to either
Pearson or University of Plymouth courses only and this is indicated throughout as applicable.

Important: please note

If you have a disability
Strode College is very supportive of students with disabilities, and year-on-year we are making
adjustments to assist these students. It may be that we have already put in place changes which
will assist you – but unless we know what your needs might be, we cannot guarantee that this will
be the case. If we can identify your needs sufficiently well in advance of your start at the College,
we are better able to put in place appropriate arrangements. If there is a health and safety issue or
an issue about the expectations of students on the course, appropriate notice will allow us to advise
you on alternative options.

If you have not told us about your disability
Please contact our Student Services Manager or, for students on University of Plymouth validated
courses, you may also contact the University’ Disability Assist Services to discuss your needs:

   •   Tanya Schottlander, Strode College, Head of Student Services and
       Head of Equality and Diversity
       01458 844433
   •   University of Plymouth Disability team (01752) 587676 or email ds@plymouth.ac.uk for
       more information or see the website http://www1.plymouth.ac.uk/disability

While we seek to make reasonable adjustments to our provision, we may not ultimately be able to
meet your individual needs if we do not have the opportunity to assess them in advance and that
could impact negatively on your experience on the course or even your ability to take up your place.

If you have told us about your disability
You may be asked for additional information or invited to attend an interview with the College’s
Disability Advisor / University’s Disability Team. This is in order that we can properly assess your
individual needs and ensure that we have the best possible chance of meeting them. Please provide
any information requested and come in to see staff, if asked to do so; otherwise we could find
ourselves in a position in which it is difficult or even unsafe for you to take up your place.

So, please tell us about any disability – even if you do not think it will affect you while you
are at the University – and respond positively to any requests for further details or for an
information interview.

         Strode College Student Handbook 2018-19                              Page 3 of 38
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
Contents
1.      Welcome and Introduction ........................................................................................................ 6
     1.1. Students as Partners .......................................................................................................... 6
     1.2. Term Dates, Welcome/Induction Lunch, End of Year Showcase ........................................ 7
1.3       United Kingdom Visas and Immigration (UKVI)...................................................................... 8
2.      Meet the Team who are here to support you ............................................................................ 9
3.      Induction ................................................................................................................................. 11
     3.1. Your Library and Access to All Learning Resources ......................................................... 11
     3.2. Moodle - College VLE (Virtual Learning Environment)...................................................... 11
        The College’s VLE .................................................................................................................. 11
     3.3. Wi-Fi access ..................................................................................................................... 12
     3.4. Audio Visual Equipment .................................................................................................... 12
        The AV Centre ........................................................................................................................ 12
     3.5. Computers and Laptops for HE Students’ Use on Campus .............................................. 12
     3.6. Strode College Student Card ............................................................................................ 12
     3.7. Room Access & Common Room Facilities ....................................................................... 12
4.      Student Voice, Enhancement, Liaison, Evaluation, Representation & Feedback ................... 13
     4.1. Course Representatives ................................................................................................... 13
     4.2. Student Voice ................................................................................................................... 13
     4.3. Strode College on-programme/exit surveys; electronic Student Perception Questionnaire
     (e-SPQ); Annual Student Survey (Pearson) and National Student Survey (NSS) ...................... 14
     4.4. The Plymouth Award......................................................................................................... 14
     4.5. Sport and Leisure.............................................................................................................. 15
     4.6. University of Plymouth Student Union............................................................................... 15
     4.7. Student Support ................................................................................................................ 16
5.      Money Matters - Student Finance ........................................................................................... 17
6.      External Examiner Arrangements ........................................................................................... 17
     6.1. Exam Procedures ............................................................................................................. 18
     6.2. Personal Tutoring Policy ................................................................................................... 18
     6.3. College Policies & Key Documents ................................................................................... 18
7.      Key Features of Higher Education Study ................................................................................ 19
     7.1. Attendance........................................................................................................................ 19
     7.2. Your Approach to Studying ............................................................................................... 19
     7.3. Suggested Reading for New Students .............................................................................. 21
     7.4. Reading for your study ...................................................................................................... 21
     7.5. Private Study .................................................................................................................... 21
     7.6. Study Groups .................................................................................................................... 21
     7.7. Personal Development Planning ....................................................................................... 21
8.      Work-Based Learning (WBL) / Work Related Learning (WRL) and Employability .................. 22
9.      The University of Plymouth Portal ............................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.
     9.1. To access the Plymouth portal............................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.
              Strode College Student Handbook 2018-19                                                                Page 4 of 38
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
9.2. University of Plymouth Computing Helpdesk .................................................................... 24
  9.3. Pearson Resources for Higher Nationals .......................................................................... 24
10.    Procedures for dealing with late submissions and extenuating circumstances ................... 25
  10.1.      Extenuating Circumstances ........................................................................................... 25
  10.2.      Academic Offences ....................................................................................................... 27
  10.3.      URKUND ....................................................................................................................... 28
10.4      Complaints Procedure ...................................................................................................... 29
11.    Submission of Assessed Work ............................................................................................. 30
  11.1.      Coursework Submission ................................................................................................ 30
  11.2.      Marking Policies ............................................................................................................ 31
12.    Progression .......................................................................................................................... 31
  12.1.      Careers Education, Information and Guidance .............................................................. 32
  12.2.      Graduation ..................................................................................................................... 32
  12.3.      Plymouth Alumni............................................................................................................ 33
13.    Factors Affecting Your Learning ........................................................................................... 33
  13.1.      Effective Learning .......................................................................................................... 33
  13.2.      Time Management ......................................................................................................... 33
  13.3.      Coping with Stress ......................................................................................................... 34
  13.4.      Learning Skills ............................................................................................................... 34
14.    United Kingdom Visas and Immigration (UKVI).................................................................... 34
15.    Referencing System ............................................................................................................. 34
  15.1.      Harvard Referencing System......................................................................................... 35
  15.2.      Further Help................................................................................................................... 38

           Strode College Student Handbook 2018-19                                                             Page 5 of 38
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
1. Welcome and Introduction

Welcome to Strode College

As a higher education student at Strode College you are joining one of the very best providers of
university level education in the country. We believe strongly in supporting you as an individual and
hope that your time studying at Strode College will be enjoyable and productive.

This Student College HE Handbook contains important information including:

            •   The College Procedures
            •   Student Support including careers education, information and guidance
            •   Money Matters
            •   Learning Resources

Note: the information in this handbook should be read in conjunction with the specific Programme
Teaching, Learning and Assessment Handbook, which will be given to you by your tutor and/or
available via Moodle.

Students on University of Plymouth validated courses should also consult the current edition of the
University’s Student Handbook: https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/your-university/governance/student-
handbook and the specific Programme Quality Handbook.

     1.1.       Students as Partners

The Strode College HE Student Charter is available on the College website and also on Moodle.

     University of Plymouth
                          Founded in 1862 as a school of navigation, The University of Plymouth
                          has been placed second in the UK and 86th globally in the 2018 Times
                          Higher Education young University Rankings. Twice awarded the Queen’s
                          Anniversary Prize for Higher Education, it has won numerous accolades
in respect of its teaching and its research. The University has one of the highest number of
National Teaching Fellows of any UK university. With two-thirds of its research ranked as world-
leading or internationally excellent (2014 Research Excellence Framework). It was also the first
university in the world to receive the Social Enterprise Mark.
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
The Institution is part of Academic Partnerships within the University
                          of Plymouth, which houses around 15,000 students studying across
                          the region and overseas. Academic Partnerships works closely to
                          support the Institution in development and review of the programme to
                          ensure the highest quality of teaching and learning is offered. The
                          majority of provision delivered is at HE Level 4, 5 and 6 comprising of
                          HNCs, HNDs, Foundation Degrees, Bachelors Awards, Higher and
Degree Apprenticeships, however some masters-level study is also delivered.

     1.2.    Term Dates
w/c Monday 17 September 2018            to    12.00 Thursday 20 December 2018
(College ½ term 29 Oct – 2 Nov 2018)

w/c Wednesday 9 January 2019            to    Thursday 21 March 2019
(College ½ term 18 - 22 Feb 19)

w/c Tuesday 23 April 2019               to    Friday 14 June 2019
(College ½ term 27 - 31 May 19)

Semester Dates (applicable to semesterised modules)
                   Week commencing                         Week commencing
 Semester 1        17 September 2018         to            21 January 2019
 Semester 2        28 January 2019           to            10 June 2019

NB the HE year is delivered over 30 weeks in total; the period 17 September 2018 to 14 June
2019 allows for bank holidays and college ‘closed to student days’ which may fall on an HE course
teaching day.

                           Student Handbook 2018-19      Page 7 of 38
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
1.3   United Kingdom Visas and Immigration (UKVI)

If you are an EEA (European Economic Area) or Swiss national and you have been accepted onto
a course of study you are free to enter the UK and live here for the duration of your study.

However if you are a non-resident of the EEA and your intended course has a duration of 6 months
or more you will be required to obtain a Tier 4 (General) Student Visa. https://www.gov.uk/tier-4-
general-visa/overview

                           Student Handbook 2018-19      Page 8 of 38
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
2. Meet the Team who are here to support you

Staff / Student Communication
Students have access to support from many members of College staff. Please see below:

    Katy Quinn             Alison                Adrian Ash             Assistant       Wendy Cavill
     Principal           Leaverland                 HE &               Principal A       Senior HE
                       Deputy Principal         International       Levels, Creative    Administrator
                        & Head of HE              Manager            Industries, HE
   kquinn@strode-      aleaverland@strode-       aash@strode-       abouchen@strode-    wcavill@strode-
    college.ac.uk          college.ac.uk         college.ac.uk        college.ac.uk      college.ac.uk

  Andy Pickering         Daniel Basra         Tessa Podpadec         Jake Williams       Sarah Shaw
    Programme            Programme            Programme Mgr         Programme Mgr      Programme Mgr
     Manager              Manager             FdSc Psychology       HND Computing      FdSc Managing
  FdA/BA History,           HND                                       (Computer          in the Public
   Heritage and          Engineering                                   Systems)        Sector Services
   Archaeology
  apickering@strode-     dbasra@strode-       smansbridge@strode-   omorris@strode-     sshaw@strode-
     college.ac.uk        college.ac.uk          college.ac.uk       college.ac.uk       college.ac.uk

     Bill Scott            Tanya               Chris Harvey         Angela Leavens
  Student Support       Schottlander          Careers Advisor           Head of
     Manager           Head of Student                                 Learning
                          Services                                  Resources & E
                                                                       Learning
  01458 844545          01458 844433           01458 844409          01458 844564
   bscott@strode-      tschottlander@strode     charvey@strode-     aleavens@strode-
    college.ac.uk          -college.ac.uk         college.ac.uk        college.ac.uk

                                  Student Handbook 2018-19                Page 9 of 38
COLLEGE HANDBOOK HIGHER EDUCATION - 2018-2019 BA (Hons) & Foundation Degrees: Strode College
College and programme staff will communicate with students in the following ways:

   •   Strode College email
   •   HE Common Room notice board/LRC HE notice board
   •   College intranet / virtual learning environment https://moodle.strode-
       college.ac.uk/moodle/login/index.php
   •   University of Plymouth Student Portal (see section below)

                           Student Handbook 2018-19        Page 10 of 38
3. Induction

The College provides a thorough induction programme which includes subject specific and general
information about college processes and procedures including access to the VLE (Moodle), the
process for assignment submission etc. The induction is led by your Programme Manager
supported by specific college staff as appropriate.
Plymouth Students may access additional induction information from the University via the Student
Study File which contains key resources for induction and throughout your study. It is vital that you
should look through this and download any essential documents you will require, such as the
Plymouth Library Guide.

     3.1.    Your Library and Access to All Learning Resources
Strode College provides the resources that you need to successfully complete your studies. We
have a range of textbooks, e-books and other online sources available to you, our staff can help you
access these. We can also borrow resources on your behalf from the British Library, many other
UK libraries and for students on Plymouth validated course via the University of Plymouth Library.

If you have come across materials or resources that you think would be useful for your programme
or to other students, please speak to a member of the Learning Centre Staff as we will consider
purchasing the item for our collection.

If you have any questions regarding the resources or service provided by the Learning Centre,
please speak to Angela Leavens, Head of Learning Resources and eLearning or your Programme
Manager.

If you need more specific advice regarding IT equipment on campus, the IT team are located on
the first floor of C block.

     3.2.    Moodle - College VLE (Virtual Learning Environment)

The College’s VLE is Moodle. All HE programmes have a Moodle page where you can access
course handbooks, assignments, presentations, ebooks, journals and other resources. You will also
find links to email, your documents, and college services.

To access Moodle from within the College: click on Internet Explorer. Moodle is set as the College
homepage. Moodle can also be accessed from home by searching the internet for ‘Strode Moodle’
and logging in using your Strode College username and password.

In addition to formally submitting a hard copy of your course work to Senior HE Administrator (Wendy
Cavill in the Principal’s office), the majority of HE students will also be required to upload their
coursework via Moodle so it is important that you familiarise yourself with your Moodle course.
Please do not hesitate to ask your Programme Manager or a member of the LRC staff if you
have any queries or if you require a refresher session as we will be only too happy to help.

                           Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 11 of 38
3.3.    Wi-Fi access

Your phone, tablet or laptop should detect the Strode wifi signal.

Please click wifi name:    Strode_BYOD
Login:                     Use your Strode College login details

     3.4.    Audio Visual Equipment

The AV Centre is based in the LRC and students can (with their tutor’s permission) borrow laptops,
DSLRs and other equipment for short term loan to support studies.

     3.5.    Computers and Laptops for HE Students’ Use on Campus

All students have access via their student card to the Quiet Study room, top floor of D block. Please
respect this study environment to enable all students to study quietly.

Laptops are available for students’ use whilst on the college campus either via the AV Centre (in the
Learning Centre) or please ask your Programme Manager to book you out a laptop from the HE
Team Room.

     3.6.    Strode College Student Card

At enrolment students are issued with a Strode College ID card. This card provides access to the
HE rooms in D Block and records printer credit information.

     3.7.    Room Access & Common Room Facilities
All HE students will be able to access HE rooms in D block (e.g. the HE Common Room, the Quiet
Study room and teaching rooms) by scanning their student ID card on the reader outside each door.

The HE facilities in D block are provided to support and enhance your study experience. Students
using the kitchen facilities provided in the Common Room are asked to ensure it is left clean and
tidy after use.

Lockers are available in the Common Room. Students can use their own padlock to secure a locker.
Please ensure the padlock and contents are removed at the end of each academic year.

                           Student Handbook 2018-19        Page 12 of 38
4. Student Voice, Enhancement, Liaison, Evaluation, Representation &
   Feedback

Expressing your opinions and needs, often referred to as ‘Student Voice’, is an important aspect of
being an HE student. The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education suggests that:
‘Student engagement is all about involving and empowering students in the process of shaping the
student learning experience’.

All students are therefore encouraged to get involved at a range of levels in their learning and in
quality assurance, enhancement and management of their course.

     4.1.    Course Representatives
Each programme should have one or more student representatives, who have been elected by their
fellow students to sit on the relevant Programme Committee. Course representatives are a vital
conduit between staff and students, so that issues concerning the quality of provision that students
receive can be promptly and appropriately addressed. In addition, these representatives provide
feedback to the programme’s staff on innovations and can assist the programme team in developing
the curriculum to meet student needs.

More information about becoming a course representative is available via the University of Plymouth
Students’ Union: http://www.upsu.com/studentvoice/reps/

Students are also represented on University of Plymouth Joint Board of Studies (JBS), which
scrutinises all the University of Plymouth programmes delivered at your college. Your college has a
person who liaises with University of Plymouth’s Students’ Union (Wendy Cavill) who can advise on
student representation. All course representatives will be given training through University of
Plymouth’s Students’ Union.

     4.2.     Student Voice
The HE team meet and regularly consults with students throughout the academic year via various
formats including but not limited to: ‘Welcome’ and ‘follow up’ visits within classes, Programme
Committee Meetings, Joint Boards of Study.

The College holds an HE Student Forum twice a year and all students are encouraged to join the
forum which is a cross-programme event. In order to provide students with the maximum opportunity
to participate, two forums are held on different teaching days as follows:

      Autumn Forum: HE Common Room, 12.15 – 1.15pm
      27 October 2018 28 October 2018 29 October 2018

      Spring Forum: HE Common Room, 12.15 – 1.15pm
      25 March 2019    27 March 2019   28 March 2019

                           Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 13 of 38
Student feedback is welcomed and positively encouraged on an informal and formal basis.

University of Plymouth values the Student Voice and is actively promoting the work supported
through the student community. More can be found at:
https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/student-life/student-voice

     4.3.   Strode College on-programme/exit surveys; electronic Student
        Perception Questionnaire (e-SPQ); Annual Student Survey (Pearson) and
        National Student Survey (NSS)
Over the course of the academic year, your views as HE students will be sought through a number
of surveys. The responses you give will help shape HE provision at Strode College for yourself and
other students.

For Strode College:
   • An annual, on-programme survey
   • An exit survey as you complete your course
   • Via Ipsos Mori, you will be asked to participate in the National Student Survey (NSS) during
       your second year of HND or Foundation Degree study

For University of Plymouth:
   • An online Student Perception Questionnaire (SPQ) specifically focused on your experiences
      as a Higher Education student.

You will receive feedback from the College via the Programme Committee Meetings on any changes
that have been made due to your responses to these questionnaires. It is therefore very important
to engage with these surveys and to ensure that your voice is heard.

For Students Studying a Higher National Diploma/Certificate
   • Your awarding body, Pearson, undertake an Annual Student Survey which is held in the
      spring. Students are invited to take part via their student account on Pearson’s HN Global
      student portal (where you may also find additional resources on HN Global that support and
      enhance your overall student experience): https://www.highernationals.com/

     4.4.    The Plymouth Award
Plymouth students are encouraged to sign up for the Plymouth Award which is
designed to recognise and celebrate student achievements outside the curriculum.
Many students already make significant contributions to the life of their institution
and the communities in which they live and work. The Plymouth Award is one way
of recognising the value that we place on these contributions and on the learning
and personal growth that students gain from these activities. It is also recognized
by many employers as a demonstration that you have gone above and beyond your
studies.

                           Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 14 of 38
4.5.     Sport and Leisure

Whatever your fitness level, we have outstanding sports facilities and activities for you!

The College has a multi-purpose sports hall with an indoor climbing wall, a state-of-the-art fitness
suite, dance studio, astro-turf pitch and multi-use games area.

There is a wide range of sporting activities available to all students including football, rugby, netball,
hockey, trampolining and badminton, as well as a range of more unusual opportunities such as Spin
Cycling, Kettle Bells, Insanity Live, Running/Mountain-biking/outdoor fitness/Trim Trail.

Gym membership is available as follows

       Regular season pass (excludes college holidays):
       £35 = Monday - Friday; 9:00am-5:30pm

       Extended season pass (includes college holidays):
       £55 = Monday - Saturday; 9:00am-9:00pm

Please ask at the sports reception for details of all of the activities taking place. To find out more
contact the Sports Team on Tel. 844408 or visit the sports facilities.

     4.6.     University of Plymouth Student Union

All University of Plymouth students invited to be a member of UPSU.
                              You can register on the website www.upsu.com to get all the latest
                              information about offers, activities, gigs, campaigns and contact
                              information for your current ‘Institution Reps' and full-time Executive
                              Officers. The website is where we run our elections so partner
                              students can get involved too. You can vote online to make your
                              choice and help make changes to your Union.

Please feel free to get involved with all aspects of UPSU life, whether that be campaigning for
change, becoming a course rep, coming along for a night out, volunteering with our volunteering
department, playing in one of our sports teams, using our advice centre or writing for our student
newspaper.

                             Student Handbook 2018-19        Page 15 of 38
The main contacts at UPSU are the Vice President of International & Outreach and the Outreach
Coordinator.

The role of the Vice President Outreach involves representing Partner College/Institution Students
by visiting, meeting and communicating with partner college/Institution students and representatives
as well as attending strategic boards and committees to champion the Student Voice.

To get in touch with the Vice President Outreach please contact: vpoutreach@upsu.com. The
Outreach Coordinator is responsible for providing a link between partner college/institution students
and UPSU, and promoting opportunities for involvement. If you would like to get in touch, please
contact:

partnershipstudents@upsu.com or www.upsu.com/offcampus

More information on UPSU is available at: http://www.upsu.com/societies. There are many clubs
and societies you may wish to join, please follow the URL to find out more.
Find out more about UPSU by visiting our website: www.upsu.com

     4.7.     Student Support
The College’s Student Support Centre is a one-stop shop providing information, advice, guidance
and support to all students. Partnership working with external agencies and organisations enables
effective College referrals for appropriate support.

•   Healthcare
      GP services are available via Vine Surgery, Hindhayes Lane, Street 01458 841122
      Minor Injuries Unit, West Mendip Hospital, Glastonbury 01458 836450

•   Student counselling services are available via Student Support

•   Catering
       Hot meals and snacks are available to purchase on campus in the Refectory and the
       Brasserie

•   Parking
       Parking is free in the main car park. Please respect our neighbours by not parking on the
       side roads

•   Childcare
       The College Nursery is located behind E block and is open term times. For more details
       please contact Student Support.

                           Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 16 of 38
5. Money Matters - Student Finance

Students can seek guidance on a range of finance matters as below:

•   Student Tuition Fees/Maintenance Loans – Mandy Greville, Financial Advisor, Student Support
    Centre
•   Strode College HE Bursary – Wendy Cavill, Senior HE Administrator, Principal’s Office
•   Disability Support (Disabled Students Allowances) – Tanya Schottlander, Student Services
    Manager (Equality & Diversity), E Block
•   Proof of student status – apply to the Exams office (ground floor, B block) for a Certificate of HE
    Student Status. Alternatively, if you require a letter confirming your enrolment, please contact
    Wendy Cavill.

6. External Examiner Arrangements

University of Plymouth validated courses: Each programme has an External Examiner who
comes from a Higher Education Institution in the UK (not University of Plymouth). The Subject
External Examiner is primarily concerned with the standards of assessment of the subject and
therefore attends the subject assessment panel. They will verify the process of assessment
throughout your modules advise upon re-assessment (further information can be found within your
teaching learning and assessment handbook). Your final
result is decided by an Examination Board which happens in
June followed by resit boards in September.

You can find your External Examiner reports online through
the      Digital    Learning       Environment     or     DLE
(https://dle.plymouth.ac.uk/): click on “Tools/Resources” then
“Your External Examiners”. For further programme external
examiner details please see your teaching, learning and
assessment handbook.

External Examiners for 2018-19:
    FdA / BA (Hons) History, Heritage & Archaeology :           Dr John Reeks
    FdSc Psychology:                                            Dr Heike Elchleppe
    FdA Management (Public Sector)/(Business)                   Mr Euan Black

                            Student Handbook 2018-19        Page 17 of 38
Higher National Diploma/Higher National Certificates: Assessed work is sampled by the External
Examiner during their annual visit. The EE is primarily concerned with the standards of assessment
of the subject and providing feedback for the further enhancement of the programme where/if
required.

External Examiners for Pearson validated courses are for the following programmes:

    Elisabeth Newman HND/C Computing & Systems Development (QCF)
    Elisabeth Newman HND/C Computing (Computer Science) (RQF)
    Chris Morris     HND/C General Engineering (RQF)

     6.1.    Exam Procedures

At the end of the academic year (circa end June/early July), Module/Unit reports are received by the
relevant Subject Assessment Panel and marks/grades are considered by an HND/C Award
Assessment Board and a Degree Award Assessment Board (AAB).

Each student will receive a Transcript of Results and Results Letter which is posted by recorded
delivery to the student’s home address, within 10 working days of each AAB. Both documents will
identify the next steps that students need to take in order to progress.

For further information, see College website:
http://www.strode-college.ac.uk/college-docs/college-documents/

     6.2.    Personal Tutoring Policy
Personal tutors are designated as a sustained and first point of reference for individual students on
personal, domestic or academic matters, detailed information will be available in your teaching,
learning and assessment handbooks. Information will be available in your teaching, learning and
assessment handbooks.

Further information regarding University of Plymouth Personal Tutoring including the personal
tutoring policy can be found here: https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/your-university/teaching-and-
learning/guidance-and-resources/personal-tutoring

     6.3.    College Policies & Key Documents
College policies key documents are available on the College Website http://www.strode-
college.ac.uk/college-docs/college-documents/.
    • HE Student Charter
    • HE Admissions Policy
    • HE Academic Offences Regulations
    • HE Appeals Procedure
    • HE Complaints Procedure
    • Student Code of Conduct
    • Safeguarding Children & Vulnerable Adults Policy including Prevent Duty
    • Anti-Bullying Policy
    • E-Safety Policy
    • Equality & Diversity
    • Fitness to Study Policy

                           Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 18 of 38
Prevent Duty:
The College is committed to supporting and promoting the welfare of its students and is committed
to the provision of a safe environment conducive to work, study and the enjoyment of a positive
experience for all members of its learning community. The College will take all safeguarding
concerns, including suspicions and allegations of exploitation, radicalisation, harm or abuse,
seriously. If a concern is found to be valid, the College will promptly make a referral to the relevant
statutory authority.

7. Key Features of Higher Education Study

Outlined below are key features of University or Higher Education (HE) level education, including
what differentiates this from other forms of education (e.g. at school, college or in the workplace).

     7.1.     Attendance
You are expected to take responsibility for your learning and for ensuring your attendance in
timetabled sessions. In some modules/units, if you do not attend consistently you may risk losing
marks, either directly or by missing an assessed presentation or group activity. Any absence also
affects your peers as it may disrupt planned group activities and limit the range of discussions. You
will be expected to be available for every week of your college terms. Please ensure that holidays
are only arranged outside of term and assessment commitments. Students who do not attend run a
very high risk of failure.

All students are expected to attend all scheduled classes, field trips (which may be optional) and
other events that are part of their programme of study. All teaching is developed to give you relevant
and necessary experience. We know that students who do not attend perform less well.

If you are ill or otherwise unable to attend, you should send apologies to your tutor and ensure that
you have caught up with the work.

Programme Managers work very hard to make sure that teaching sessions and assignments are
well designed and that they support your learning. Where only minimum attendance is required
before a particular assessment can be taken, this will be clarified in the Programme/Module
Handbook.

If you are an International student or on a programme that leads to professional body qualifications
please be aware that lack of attendance may lead to exclusion or not obtaining the qualification that
you are seeking.

     7.2.     Your Approach to Studying
Probably the most significant difference between university level study and other levels of education
is the amount of personal responsibility you have. This has implications for how you approach your
studies.

                            Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 19 of 38
Staff will use a variety of educational approaches, depending on the learning outcomes of the
module. These may include: lectures, group work, discussion, student led activities, simulation,
technology supported activity, practical scenarios and directed study. Your active participation will
enhance your learning. It is your responsibility to acquire the required knowledge and skills.

 Key strategies to become a Successful Student

 You must take proactive responsibility for your own studies. We will give you as much
 help and support as we can but ultimately your success (or failure) is down to you. Students
 are offered a Formative Assessment opportunity within the Assessment Schedule and those
 students who make use of this opportunity have consistently been shown to increase their
 overall mark/grade for that assessment.

 Plan your time carefully. Write a personal timetable as soon as you can.

 Attend all lectures and tutorials and take notes.

 Do not miss deadlines.

 Read extensively around your subject. Just being familiar with the set text books is unlikely
 to be enough to pass.

 Seek help, if you need it, as soon as possible. If you need specific help with your studies,
 speak to your lecturer or tutor or make a personal appointment to see them. Even if your
 problem has nothing to do with your programme, it may have an effect on your ability to study.
 Let someone at the College know - ignoring problems will only make things worse later on.

At this level, you will be treated as a responsible adult, capable of acting on your own initiative.

You may be used to a learning or workplace environment with fixed hours and routine activities.
However HE study requires you to develop new study, time-management and prioritisation skills to
make effective use of your study time and to meet programme deadlines. Your weekly timetable
consists of planned learning activities, such as lectures, and time for you to undertake additional
reading, assignment preparation and private study. The contact time that you have with lecturers is
only part of your module timetable. As an indication, the average amount of ‘total student effort’
expected for a 20 credit module will be around 200 hours, but you may only be timetabled for a
specific number of hours applicable to your course as detailed in your programme handbook. You
must, therefore, learn to use your time constructively.

Your most valuable learning will be done in your own time and in your own way

                           Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 20 of 38
7.3.   Suggested Reading for New Students
   •    Bedford, D. and Wilson, E. (2013) Study Skills for Foundation Degrees. Brighton: David
        Fulton Publishers

   •    Burns, T. and Sinfield, S. (2012) Essential Study Skills: The Complete Guide to Success at
        University. Sage Study Skills Series

   •    Cottrell, S. (2010) Skills for Success: the Personal Development Planning and Employability
        Handbook. Palgrave Macmillan.

   •    Greetham, B. (2013) How to Write Better Essays. Palgrave Macmillan.

       7.4.   Reading for your study
You won’t complete the programme successfully, if you do not read regularly and in-depth.
You will be given reading lists for each module/unit and should purchase at least one recommended
text for each study module/unit. Since books are expensive, however, it may be a good idea to pool
resources by sharing with friends in a study group.

Please note that you may only be able to borrow basic texts from the LRC on a short-term basis.
Demand for such texts may be very high at certain times in the year, so you should not rely on them
always being available.

You are strongly recommended to follow current issues relevant to your programme in the quality
press, for example by reading The Times, The Independent, The Guardian or Daily Telegraph. You
should also make use of subject-related journals held in the library.

Reading texts for Higher Education demands note-taking as well as reading skills; as with lectures
keep careful notes from your reading.

       7.5.   Private Study
Your private study time is likely to be taken up by completing different tasks for each module/unit,
by preparing for tutorials, by reading texts specific to your programme or by undertaking research.
In addition, private study time offers students the opportunity to ensure they have developed a good
understanding of the subject, to reflect on feedback given on assessed work and to build up a good
set of study notes from which to revise.

       7.6.   Study Groups
In all our programmes, students are encouraged to learn skills that will enable them to work in groups
and teams. Such skills are not merely useful during your programme; in any employment context
this experience will be invaluable. Sometimes you will find that you are assessed on a piece of
written work or presentation completed as a group. Many students benefit significantly from working
collaboratively in study groups, to check their understanding of difficult issues and concepts or as a
means to help them revise.

       7.7.   Personal Development Planning
It is important to bear in mind from the outset of your study that you are working towards a Higher
Education Award that will provide you with a foundation for a potential career. It is important to be

                            Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 21 of 38
aware of your own career direction from the early stages of the programme. Therefore, we place a
great deal of importance in Personal Development Planning (PDP). This describes the ‘means by
which students can monitor, build and reflect upon their personal development’.

Therefore, PDP is a structured and supported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon
their own learning, performance and/or achievement and to plan for their personal educational and
career development. You are ultimately in charge of your own career direction, but we are keen to
help and advise you throughout your higher education programme.

It is hoped that the PDP process available will enable you to:
     • become more effective, independent and confident self-directed learners
     • understand how you are learning and relate your learning to a wider context
     • improve your general skills for study and career management
     • articulate your personal goals and evaluate progress towards your achievement
     • encourage a positive attitude to learning throughout life

8. Work-Based Learning (WBL) / Work Related Learning (WRL) and
   Employability

WBL and WRL, in its various forms, is one of the major defining characteristics of your Higher
Education course. It plays a central role in enabling you to apply academic study to workplace
environments and problems. In turn, your programme of study should enable you to integrate
knowledge and skills developed in WBL / WRL into your project work and study in taught modules.

An employable graduate is one who is able to meet the requirements of employers and fulfil their
career aspirations at a graduate level. They will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and personal
qualities developed during their programme to the workplace and other contexts. An employable
graduate will need to be able to:

   •   demonstrate and apply graduate attributes and skills
   •   demonstrate and apply career management skills: e.g. preparing effectively for the
       recruitment and selection process
   •   demonstrate and apply lifelong learning skills: e.g. reflecting critically on academic, personal
       and professional development, identifying and articulating achievements and planning for the
       future
   •   demonstrate business and organisational awareness: e.g. understand changing working
       practices, including self-employment, with particular reference to the professions and sectors
       relating to their programme of study
   •   demonstrate an international outlook: e.g. understanding the attributes and breadth of outlook
       appropriate for working in a global economy

Your programme has been designed to put all this in perspective, and give you the opportunities to
develop the requisite skills. Work-related skills are integral to the modules/units and many
specifically offer you the opportunity to experience the world of work, even if you are studying full

                            Student Handbook 2018-19       Page 22 of 38
time. Your programme specification details the knowledge, skills and understanding you will be able
to demonstrate when you gain your award.

     8.1.     The Plymouth Online Study Guide
As a University of Plymouth student you are able to access the University’s e-resources through
the Plymouth portal (the University’s internal staff and student website).

There is access to over £2 million of e-resources and e-journals in a variety of different subject
ranges which can be used to support your studies. This link takes you to the University of
Plymouth Library page via the Digital Learning Environment (DLE) and if you then click on ‘Partner
Institution – ‘Your Library Subject Guide’ then ‘partner institutions’ it will lead you to your institution
pages which are essential to familiarise yourself with Plymouth services and e-resources. This
video guide demonstrates how to access Primo at your institution. In addition the University has
created a Student Study Guide available at www.studywithplymouth.ac.uk which signposts you to
a wealth of resources including UPSU (University of Plymouth Students’ Union), Study Skills
Guides and using the portal.

     8.2.     Forwarding your Plymouth Emails to your preferred account
Any communications with University of Plymouth will come via your Plymouth email account so it
is essential that you forward your University emails to your preferred email address. Please
forward your emails on as soon as your programme starts to prevent missing key communications
form tutors especially around the topics of module choice and dissertation choice as you enter
level 5 study. Instructions on how to complete this is available through
www.studywithplymouth.ac.uk under the Library and Digital Learning Environment Tab.

                             Student Handbook 2018-19         Page 23 of 38
To access The University of Plymouth website directly:
      • Type in www.plymouth.ac.uk and then click Login.
      • Enter the username and password given to you by your Programme Manager or
         Learning Resource Staff member.

You will automatically have a University of Plymouth e-mail account accessed through ‘My
Email’ structured as follows: Firstname.Surname@students.plymouth.ac.uk. Your password will
always be given in this format Dob.dd/mm/yyyy e.g. Dob.10/07/1984. You can change your
password once into the portal however please make sure it is something memorable as you will
need it throughout your studies.

       8.3.   University of Plymouth Computing Helpdesk
If you have any problems when you are creating your computer account or logging into the student
portal or if you can’t access the information you need, please contact the University’s computing
helpdesk by email: libraryandITenquiries@plymouth.ac.uk or by phone on: (01752) 588588. You
could also enquire within your Institution’s HE Office as they have access to the University
password changer tool to change your password.

                HN GLOBAL
8.4.    Pearson Resources for Higher Nationals
The Higher Nationals validating body, Pearson have created a free online platform for all students
studying their Higher National qualifications. The platform contains the following resources:

1) Textbooks for core units: containing selections from textbooks chosen to cover the learning
   outcomes of the core units
2) Study skills modules: resources and exercises to help develop your skills in areas like essay
   and report writing, giving presentations and critical thinking.
3) Career Development: access to online career services, including guidelines on CV writing,
   interview skills and a jobs board
4) Forum: for you to discuss your subject with or ask questions of students and tutors from
   around the world.

Students studying a Higher National course (HND/C Computing or HND/C Engineering) can go to
www.highernationals.com to complete their registration and access these resources.

                           Student Handbook 2018-19     Page 24 of 38
9. Procedures for dealing with late submissions and extenuating
     circumstances

     9.1.    Extenuating Circumstances

For further guidance please see your Programme Handbook available from your Programme
Manager/Moodle.

Extenuating Circumstances are circumstances which:
      •    affect your ability to attend or complete an assessment or a number of assessments
      •    are exceptional
      •    are outside the student’s control
      •    can be corroborated by independent evidence
      •    occurred during or shortly before the assessment in question

Students who wish to claim Extenuating Circumstances should obtain a claim form from the Senior
Higher Education Administrator wcavill@strode-college.ac.uk or download from your Moodle
course. The form should be submitted to the Principal’s Office, HE Admin accompanied by
independent corroborating evidence.

In the case of assessed coursework / major project / dissertation or equivalent, claims for
Extenuating Circumstances should be submitted as soon as possible, and normally no later than
ten working days after the deadline for the submission of the work.

Extenuating Circumstances claims with respect to formal examinations should be submitted no later
than the Monday after the end of the formal examination week.

Examples of circumstances which would not normally be considered valid:
• Alarm clock did not go off
• Car broke down, train/bus delayed or cancelled, other public transport problems (unless the
  student can demonstrate that he or she had allowed adequate time to compensate for such
  problems as might reasonably have been anticipated)
• Unspecified short-term anxiety from all sources, mild depression or examination stress.
• Minor illness, such as a cough/cold/sore throat or minor viral infection, unless the illness is
  incapacitating and at its peak at the time of a time-specific assessment such as an exam or
  test.
• Accidents or illness affecting relatives or friends, unless serious, or you are a sole carer.
• Financial problems, including debt sanctions imposed by the University, but excluding cases of
  exceptional hardship or significant changes in financial circumstances since enrolment.
• Family celebrations, holidays, house moves, or similar events, in which you have input to, or
  control over, the date or may choose not to participate.
• Computing problems, such as corrupt data or media, poor internet connectivity, printer failure,
  or e-submission of an assessment file in an incorrect format, or lack of access to IT facilities
  because of debt sanctions imposed by the University.
• Problems with postal or other third party delivery of work.

                           Student Handbook 2018-19      Page 25 of 38
•   Misreading timetables of any kind, or time management problems, such as assessment
    deadlines close to each other.
•   Appointments of any kind, including legal or medical appointments, which could be rearranged.
•   Sporting, recreational or voluntary commitments, unless you are representing the University at
    national level or your country at international level, or participating in an event that is of benefit
    to the University’s national or international reputation.
•   For full-time students, normal pressures of employment, because, by enrolling as a student,
    you have made a commitment to make time available to study.

Examples of circumstances which might be considered valid:

•   Your own health problems, including major accident or injury, acute ailments, hospitalisation
    (including for operations), or those affecting a significant period of study.
•   Personal or psychological problems for which you are receiving counselling, or have been
    referred to a counsellor or similarly qualified practitioner.
•   Clinical depression or other significant mental health issue.
•   Pregnancy-related conditions and childbirth (including a partner in labour).
•   Bereavement causing significant impact.
•   Separation or divorce of yourself or your parents.
•   Recent burglary, theft or serious car accident.
•   Jury service which cannot be deferred.
•   Representing the University at national level, or your country at international level, or
    participation in an event that is of benefit to the University’s national or international reputation.
•   For part-time students in full-time employment, exceptional pressure of work or permanent
    change of employment circumstances.
•   Late diagnosis of, for example, dyslexia, meaning you have not had the appropriate support for
    assessment, including provision in exams.
•   Unavailability of the DLE where the module lead confirms that this would have a significant
    impact on your preparation for an assessment or exam.
•   Disruption in an exam or assessment, such as a fire alarm going off, or excessive noise from
    building works.
•   A significant change to your financial circumstances after enrolment, such as withdrawal of
    Student Finance England (SFE) funding or its equivalent mid-year.
•   Interviews for placements, but only in cases where you have asked the employer or provider to
    reschedule, but this has not been possible.
•   Significant positive life events, such as weddings of close family members, where you can
    show that no alternative arrangement, such as the date or your attendance, is possible.
•   For research degree programme milestones (Project Approval and Confirmation of Route),
    methodological reasons why your research has not progressed at these stages as expected,
    submitted by your Director of Studies.

For more support please contact
Wendy Cavill, Senior HE Administrator wcavill@strode-college.ac.uk

For students studying University of Plymouth validated courses your programme operates under
University of Plymouth Academic Regulations and specifically the regulations for Foundation
Degrees. Call 0800 953 0155 or 01752 588373 - more information available at
http://www.upsu.com/advice/ or UPSU Advice on advice@su.plymouth.ac.uk

                             Student Handbook 2018-19         Page 26 of 38
9.2.     Academic Offences
Issues of plagiarism and any form of academic dishonesty are treated very seriously. It is defined
as the representation of another person’s work (including another student’s) as your own, without
acknowledging the source. If proven it could result in you failing a module/unit or even having to
leave your programme.

Types of Academic Dishonesty
       •    Buy an essay online
       •    Steal essays from another student
       •    Not doing your fair share of group work
       •    Copy bits of your housemate’s essay
       •    Copy and paste large chunks of an essay from the internet
       •    Just copy ‘a little bit’
       •    Work with a friend to produce an individual essay
       •    Taking bits from a coursework already submitted
       •    Making up results from a questionnaire

Types of Academic Dishonesty: Exams
       •    Take a paper out of an exam when you shouldn’t
       •    Bringing in a translator or dictionary or programmable calculator to the exam
       •    Bringing in crib sheets or notes
       •    Getting someone else to take an exam for you
       •    Using your mobile to get answers in an exam
       •    Copying the work of another student by looking over their shoulders
       •    Learning some exam answers off by heart from the internet
       •    Working with other students to prepare exam answers

Why Cheat?
       •    I got desperate at the last moment: I could not keep up with the work
       •    My family expect me to succeed: I have to get good marks
       •    The lecturers don’t care anyway
       •    Why not? I will probably get away with it
       •    All I need is that bit of paper at the end of the course
       •    But the teacher said, “Work together”!
       •    I am only showing respect for the original writer, who is far cleverer than I am
       •    If I write in my own words it will be full of mistakes

Plagiarism
    Definition: using others’ ideas, words or research without clearly acknowledging the
    source of that information.

    To plagiarise, you:
       • never have references to your sources
       • Reference some sources, but not all
       •    Reference bullet points or phrases without showing that they are direct
            quotations

                            Student Handbook 2018-19        Page 27 of 38
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