Saint Louis School - COURSE CATALOG ACADEMIC GUIDE and GRADES 6-12 2021 2022

 
Saint Louis School - COURSE CATALOG ACADEMIC GUIDE and GRADES 6-12 2021 2022
Saint Louis School

ACADEMIC GUIDE and
 COURSE CATALOG
     GRADES 6-12
      2021 - 2022
Saint Louis School - COURSE CATALOG ACADEMIC GUIDE and GRADES 6-12 2021 2022
2

CONTENTS
ACADEMIC GUIDE

         Advisory (Homeroom)

         Report Cards & Progress Reports

         Grading Policy

         Middle School Requirements

         High School Graduation Requirements

         Grade Point Average

         Academic Honors & Awards

         Honors & Advanced Placement Programs

         Directed Study

         Collegiate Dual Enrollment

         Online Courses

         International/Global Studies Programs

         Community Service Requirement

         Student-led Conference Requirement

COURSE CATALOG

Course Descriptions by Departments including Period 8 Specials for 2021-2022 School
Year

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
Saint Louis School - COURSE CATALOG ACADEMIC GUIDE and GRADES 6-12 2021 2022
3

                          Six A’s of Our Mission
                            Akua – god, spirit; recognizing the
                           spiritual love and support that radiates
                            out to and supports everything we do
                                          [the palm]

                          Aloha – love, affection, grace, charity,
                            mercy, compassion, that which gives
                            us meaning, purpose, and will to do
                            what we need to do and keeps things
                                    together [the thumb]

                          Alakaʻi – to lead, a guide, a leader; that
                                  which shows us the way
                                    [the pointer finger]

                          Akamai (Academics) – smart, clever,
                           expert and focused [the middle finger]

                          ʻĀheona (Arts) – in the nature of being
                              artistic; esthetically appealing or
                            having artistic talent [the ring finger]

                           ʻĀlapa (Athletics) – athletic, active,
                                      athlete [the pinky]

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
4

ACADEMIC GUIDE
A sound and relevant academic curriculum forms the foundation of Saint Louis School’s college preparatory
program. This Academic Guide and Course Catalog outlines the various course offerings that constitute the
academic program for grades 6 through 12.

ADVISORY (HOMEROOM)
The homeroom program serves as the primary vehicle for communicating and developing a unified school
culture. It also functions as a focal point for the collection and distribution of information and materials.
Homerooms are categorized by grade levels and homeroom rosters are generally assigned alphabetically by
student surnames. All students are assigned to homerooms and attendance is mandatory. When attending
homeroom-based activities, such as assemblies and Masses, students are to report to the area designated
to their homeroom. Absence from homeroom will be treated as an unexcused absence.

REPORT CARDS & PROGRESS REPORTS
Grades are available online to students and parents/guardians throughout and at the completion of each
quarter. Access to grades is through the Educate parent portal. Parents should check the portal for updates
to their child’s grades. Teachers enter grades weekly. Report cards are made available during the academic
year as emailed digital documents at request of parent or guardian to either view or print at their
convenience; access to grades is available through the Educate parent portal. The hardcopy year-end final
report card is mailed to all families.

Students are expected to consult with their counselor and parents/guardians during the pre-registration
process to ensure that their course of study provides the best possible path to support their post-secondary
plans.
    ● Preliminary registration for continuing students: held mid-spring for the upcoming school year
    ● Registration for new students: coordinated by the Director of Admissions and the Counseling
       Services Guidance Department

Communication
Timely and accurate communication ensures that students, parents and teachers share a common
understanding of student progress. Parents/guardians are encouraged to contact counselors and/or
teachers at any time during the course of the school year.

GRADING POLICY
Students are expected to put forth maximum effort and take full advantage of opportunities for moral,
physical, and intellectual growth. Grades measure student progress and provide parents, teachers, colleges,
and employers with information regarding student performance.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
5

Grades help teachers communicate the progress regarding the knowledge, concepts and skills students
have learned in relation to course expectations and objectives. Departmental and individual teacher grading
practices are outlined in the course syllabi. Parents and students who have questions should first contact
the teacher, then the academic counselor for clarification. The Vice Principal or Principal may be contacted
if a resolution cannot be reached.

  LETTER GRADE                PERCENTAGE               GRADE PT              GRADE PT                 GRADE PT
                                RANGE                   WEIGHT:               WEIGHT:                  WEIGHT:
                                                      STANDARD-            HONORS-LEVEL              ADVANCED
                                                         LEVEL                                       PLACEMENT

             A                    90-100                   4.0                     4.5                    5.0

             B                    80-89                    3.0                     3.5                    4.0

             C                    70-79                    2.0                     2.5                    3.0

             D                    60-69                    1.0                     1.0                    1.0

             F                     0-59                     0                       0                      0

Definitions of Grades as Measures of Student Achievement

        A        Student work goes significantly beyond the basics and demonstrates mastery of curriculum
                 standards and course expectations.

        B        Student work goes beyond the basics and demonstrates consistent mastery of curriculum
                 standards and course expectations.

        C        Student work meets minimum expectations, satisfies course requirements, and is sufficient
                 for continued study in the discipline.

        D        Student work approaches minimum expectations and demonstrates below average
                 understanding of curriculum standards and course expectations.

        F        Student work is insufficient to demonstrate understanding of the curriculum standards and
                 course expectations. (A student who earns a grade of “F” may not automatically repeat the
                 course during the summer. Approval from administration is required.)

         I       Student work does not fulfill the requirements of the course. The “I” grade is calculated as 0
                 grade points for the purpose of academic eligibility requirements. The student must make up
                 this work within two weeks from the end of the quarter, during which time he may be
                 ineligible for all extra-curricular activities contingent upon GPA calculations. Failure to make
                 up the incomplete work may result in an “F” for the course.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
6

        W      Withdrawn from the course

       WF      Withdrawn with a grade of 55% or lower

       AU      Audit (no credit is earned for an audited course)

       CR      Credit (student work meets or exceeds the minimum expectations, satisfies course
               requirements and is sufficient for continued study in the discipline; may not be elected for
               required courses)

       NC      No Credit (student work does not meet the minimum expectations)

Academic Credit
Students receive academic credit for courses taken at Saint Louis School and passed with a minimum grade
of “D”. High school students may only proceed to the next level course with a minimum grade of “C” for
courses in the English, Math, and World Language departmental categories.

Courses taken outside of Saint Louis School are reflected on the student’s transcript but are not factored
into the cumulative grade point average (CGPA).

MIDDLE SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS BY GRADE LEVEL

                                                            Grade 6          Grade 7           Grade 8

                      English Lang. Arts                       ✔                 ✔                 ✔

                      Mathematics                              ✔                 ✔                 ✔

                      Religion                                 ✔                 ✔                 ✔

                      Science                                  ✔                 ✔                 ✔

                      Social Studies                           ✔                 ✔                 ✔

                      Physical Education                       ✔                 ✔                 ✔

                      Elective                                 ✔                 ✔                 ✔
             A middle school student with two or more failed courses may be asked to repeat the
             grade level or withdraw from school.
HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
   ● Graduation credit requirements—a minimum of 27.0 total credits* earned
      *Class of 2025 and later
   ● Graduation service requirements—20 hours community service annually (to include required
      HEEDS hours)

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
7

The Saint Louis School diploma is an esteemed document that is upheld as an honor and privilege.
Graduation or Commencement is a traditional school ceremony for conferring diplomas to graduating
seniors in the presence of their invited family and friends. It is the school’s way of honoring each student
who has completed all academic requirements for graduation and has met his community service and
financial obligations to the school. Participation in the Commencement Exercises is a privilege.

The Saint Louis School administration has the responsibility to ensure that the Commencement is a
safe, dignified, and memorable event for all participants and guests. For this reason, the school may
revoke a student’s participation privilege if the student poses a risk to the safety, order, and decorum of
the Commencement. Students who fulfill all graduation requirements [academic, financial, behavioral]
as required will have earned the privilege of receiving their diploma certificate from Saint Louis
Administration.

High School Requirements for Graduation - Class of 2025 and onward
*denotes required course
❈ elective courses: original credit fulfills one category and may not be used to fulfill two categories simultaneously;
e.g., LET II will not fulfill the Leadership component; it will fulfill the second of two required credits in Health &
Fitness.
Earned credits can only be used to fulfill requirements in one content area.

 CONTENT AREA                     COURSES                                                                CREDITS

 ENGLISH LANGUAGE                 *English 9 (1 cr) or Honors English 9 (1 cr)                                4.5
 ARTS                             *Speech & Research (0.5 cr)
                                  *English 10 (1 cr) or Honors English 10 (1 cr)
                                  *English 11 (1 cr) or
                                    AP English Language and Comp.
                                  *English 12 (1 cr) or:
                                     AP English Literature and Comp. (1 cr)
                                  *The following courses may be applied to fulfill 11th and 12th grade
                                  ELA requirements:
                                  ● Creative Writing (1 cr)
                                  ● Journalism (1 cr)
                                  ● Asian Literature (0.5 cr) and Asian American Literature (0.5 cr)
                                  ● Magical Realism in Latin America (0.5 cr)
                                  ● Pacific Island Literature (0.5 cr)

 MATHEMATICS                      (Min. 3.0 credits; four years strongly recommended)                         3.0
                                  Pre-Algebra (1 cr)
                                  *Algebra I (1 cr) or Honors Algebra I (1 cr)
                                  *Geometry (1 cr) or Honors Geometry (1 cr)
                                  *Algebra II (1 cr) or Honors Algebra II
                                  Statistics (1 cr)
                                  Algebra III: College Math Prep (1 cr)
                                  Pre-Calculus (1 cr) or Honors Pre-Calculus
                                  AP Calculus (1 cr) AB, BC

 RELIGION                         *Religion 9 (1 cr)                                                          4.0
                                  *Religion 10 (1 cr)
                                  *Religion 11 (1 cr)

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
8

                          *Religion 12 (1 cr)

 SCIENCE                  Biology (1 cr)     Honors Biology (1 cr) AP Biology (1 cr)                  3.0
                          Chemistry (1 cr)   Honors Chemistry (1 cr) AP Chemistry (1 cr)
                          Physics (1 cr)     AP Physics (1 cr)
                          Kinesiology (1 cr)
                          AP Environmental Science (1 cr)
                          Honors Forensic Science (1 cr)

 SOCIAL SCIENCE           *Hawaiian Geography/History (0.5 cr)                                        3.5
                          *World History (1 cr) or AP World History (1 cr)
                          *US History (1 cr) or AP US History (1 cr)
                          *AP US Government & Politics (1 cr)
                          *BUSINESS THREAD (Pick 1)
                             Economics (0.5 cr) or Personal Finance (0.5) or Accounting (0.5)
                                                           AND
                          *CIVICS THREAD (Pick 1)
                             Contemporary Issues (0.5 cr) or Law & Society (0.5 cr) or US
                                Government (0.5 cr)
                          ❈AP Psychology (1 cr, elective)

 WORLD LANGUAGES          (Min. 2.0 credits must be earned for the same language; three               2.0
                          years strongly recommended)
                          *Language I (1 cr)            Honors Language III (1 cr)
                          *Language II (1 cr)           Honors Language IV (1 cr)
                          AP Language & Culture course offered in: Japanese, Spanish

 FINE ARTS❈               1 credit required from choice of:                                           1.0
                          Art, Ceramics, Orchestra, Band, Video/Film Media Production, Drama
                          Productions (Spring & Fall), Hui O Na Opio, Music Ministry

 HEALTH & FITNESS❈        2 credits from the following courses:                                       2.0
                            PE, JROTC, Marching Band, Hui O Na Opio
                          *courses must be taken consecutively; e.g. JROTC LET I-II, PE I-II
                          *ILH varsity sports involvement fulfills PE II if paired with completion
                          of PE I

 LEADERSHIP❈              1 credit from one of the following courses:                                 1.0
                             Band / Orchestra 3rd or 4th year
                             Civil Air Patrol  3rd year or higher
                             Hui O Na Opio 3rd or 4th year
                             JROTC             3rd year or higher
                             L.I.F.E. Team     12th grade
                             Ka Lamakū Program 11th grade or higher
                             Directed ‘Āina-Based Learning Project, Gr. 11-12
                             Business Leadership

 MISCELLANEOUS            3 additional credits required from any of the above content areas.          3.0

 TOTAL CREDITS                                                                                       27.0

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
9

GRADE POINT AVERAGE
Computation of Grade Point Average (GPA)
  ● The GPA is computed by adding the points earned in each course at the quarter/semester then
     dividing by the number of courses. Year grades are not factored into GPA calculations.
  ● Only grades for courses taken at Saint Louis will be used for the computation of the GPA and
     CGPA. The Administration will determine whether course credit from another school will be
     recognized and counted toward graduation.

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is computed at the end of each semester, beginning with
the Saint Louis School summer session immediately preceding the entry year. Each letter grade has a
numerical equivalent. Honors and AP (Advanced Placement) courses receive extra weight. Points for
grades earned are added and divided by the total number of courses taken to determine the CGPA.
    ● The CGPA is computed on the basis of academic work completed at Saint Louis School.
    ● Grades for courses taken during the summer at Saint Louis will be incorporated in the
       computation of the CGPA in the consecutive fall semester.

Promotion to the Next Grade Level
In order to be assigned to the next grade level students must have accumulated the minimum number
of credits as follows:

        Grade 9           6.0

        Grade 10          13.0

        Grade 11          20.0*
*Students with fewer than 20 credits earned by the end of their junior year may not return to Saint Louis
School without approval of the Administration.

Successful completion of a semester course earns a half-credit (0.5). Successful completion of a year
course earns a full credit (1.0). Participation in division activities is contingent on accumulation of the
required credits.

ACADEMIC COURSE ENROLLMENT
Course Load
Students are required to enroll in seven courses each semester. Students enrolled in two or more
Advanced Placement (AP) courses may be exempted from this policy with administrative approval.
Students with 23 or more credits prior to the start of their senior year and a cumulative GPA of at least
3.0 may qualify for a non-academic period with approval of the Principal.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
10

Schedule Changes and Course Withdrawals
During the first two weeks from the first day of instruction, a student may withdraw and/or add a course
with no penalty. Beyond the initial two-week add/drop period, schedule changes are discouraged and
require prior approval. If a student or parent requests a course change after the initial two weeks of
instruction, the change requires approval of: 1) all affected teachers, and 2) administration. Additionally,
a course transfer fee of $20 per moved course shall apply. The dropped course will remain on the
transcript and be awarded a grade of a W (withdrawal - passing) or WF (withdrawal - failed).

ACADEMIC PROBATION/ELIGIBILITY
Start of School Year (Quarter 1)
Academic probation is determined by those who have received less than a 2.0 and/or received 2 or
more Fs for the preceding Quarter 4 and Semester 2. Students placed on Academic Probation at the
start of the school year shall be eligible to participate in extracurricular activities until the first grade
check report scheduled for Quarter 1. Their continued participation for the remainder of Quarter 1 will be
determined by regular grade check reports. If the student falls below 2.0 and/or has two or more Fs
during the grade check period, he will be ineligible to participate until his grades meet the minimum
qualifications during the subsequent grade check report and/or posted quarter grades.

At the beginning of the school year all students, except those on Academic Probation, shall be eligible
to participate in all school extracurricular activities. Students who have received at least a 2.0 and who
have not received two or more Fs in the preceding Quarter 4 or Semester 2 at Saint Louis School, are
eligible until the Quarter 1 grades are posted with no restrictions.

Quarters 2, 3, or 4
Eligibility for the 2nd and 4th quarter will be determined by using quarter 1 and 3 grades, respectively.
For the 3rd quarter, the school will take the higher of the 2nd quarter or 1st semester grades to
determine eligibility. Students whose GPA fall below 2.0 and/or receive two or more Fs will be
immediately ineligible to participate at the beginning of the next quarter. Eligibility will then be
determined using the Grade Check procedures set forth above.

Counselors will monitor progress of all students placed on Academic Probation/Student Contract.

The procedure for review of the status of ineligible students:
   ● The Grade Check Report (GCR) is generated upon authorization by the Registrar, who will notify
       the Athletic Department. The Athletic Department will also notify the coaches of ineligible
       athletes.
   ● The student ineligibility list will be communicated to faculty. Club and activity advisors are
       responsible for ensuring student eligibility prior to participation in their respective activities.
   ● Grade Check Reports will be calculated twice a quarter. Grade Check dates will be posted on
       Educate’s Parent Portal and/or the weekly bulletin.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
11

Failed Courses/Student Academic Probation Plan
Any student who fails a graduation required course must retake the failed course and complete it with a
passing grade and/or receive a minimum C grade if they need to proceed to the next level course. The
counselor and school administration will review the student’s record to determine a course of action. A
student with multiple failures may be placed on a counselor-generated Student Academic Probation
Plan or face dismissal from the school.

Credit Recovery and Repeating a Failed Course
For credit recovery of failed courses, grades from each attempt at the course will be recorded on the
transcript; only the passing grade will be factored into the GPA.

In-School Learning Support Program (“Tutorial”)
The In-School Learning Support Program (referred to as “Tutorial”) provides additional time for students
to seek assistance from teachers and other students. Activities include peer tutoring, small group and
one-to-one work with teachers, directed study and other activities as are appropriate to support student
achievement.
The in-school learning support services take place during part of the school day. With exception of
official league events, after school learning support sessions take precedence over extracurricular
activities. Student employment and other commitments should begin after the end of the after school
program session if there is a conflict in scheduling.

Honors and Advanced Placement (AP) Programs
In addition to the regular program, eligible Saint Louis School students may enroll in Honors and Advanced
Placement courses. Each of these courses will have its own set of prerequisites. Interested students must
consult with their counselor or the course instructor prior to entering the pre-registration procedures.
Prerequisites for Honors and AP courses may include: satisfactory completion of prior courses, minimum
standardized test scores, writing samples, teacher recommendation or other data.
    ● Honors classes offer the same curriculum as regular classes but are designed with higher rigor
        intended to challenge high-achieving students. Honors courses include additional topics or topics
        explored in greater depth.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
12

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES
Saint Louis offers Advanced Placement courses in a range of academic areas, including English, Social
Studies, Science, and World Languages. AP curricula are developed by the College Board and prepare
students for undergraduate college courses. This program is recognized by thousands of schools and
colleges. Eligible high school students experience college-level rigor while in high school. Universities’
admissions policies will vary in how they recognize AP scores; students who successfully pass an AP exam
may earn college credit, and accelerate placement into upper-level classes.

    ● Students enrolled in AP classes must take the respective College Board Advanced Placement exam in
      May in order to receive the weighted grade for the course.
    ● Students enrolled in AP courses are required to submit the AP exam fee. Exceptional students who
      enroll in more than two AP courses concurrently may be allowed an additional open class period to
      devote more study time to their efforts.
    ● AP Grading Scale: Only letter grades of C and above are weighted.
    ● An exam score of 3 or above (on a five-point scale) may earn the student college level credit at
      participating colleges and universities. If a student passes an AP exam with a 3, 4 or a 5 prior to his
      senior year, his second semester grade may be changed.
          ○ A student who achieves a score of at least a 3 on his AP exam will receive no lower than a
               “C” for his second semester grade and his final year grade.
          ○ A student who achieves a 4 or a 5 on his AP exam will receive an “A” for the second
               semester and his final year grade. Scholarships and awards given prior to the grade change
               will not be altered. However, class rankings and the cumulative grade point average will be
               adjusted, as needed, to reflect the changes.
Additional AP Exam and materials fee are assessed separately from tuition (does not include textbook and workbook
costs). For information specific to each AP course, visit: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
         2025     Advanced Placement English Language and Composition
         2031     Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
         2061     Advanced Placement Seminar *does not qualify for fulfillment of ELA requirements

MATHEMATICS
         8035     Advanced Placement Calculus AB
         8037     Advanced Placement Calculus BC

SCIENCE
         1111     Advanced Placement Biology
         1115     Advanced Placement Chemistry
         1140     Advanced Placement Physics I
rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
13

         1141     Advanced Placement Physics C
         1151     Advancement Placement Environmental Science

SOCIAL SCIENCE
         1229     Advanced Placement Psychology
         1213     Advanced Placement World History: Modern
         1217     Advanced Placement United States History
         1221     Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics

WORLD LANGUAGES
         1425     Advanced Placement Japanese Language & Culture
         1446     Advanced Placement Spanish Language & Culture

AP CAPSTONE TO BEGIN 2022-23 SCHOOL YEAR

This is a new program developed by the College Board, and consists of two full-year AP Courses: AP Seminar
and AP Research. Students who successfully complete these two courses in addition to four other AP
exams, all receiving a score of 3 or higher, will receive an AP Capstone Diploma. Those who complete only
AP Seminar and AP Research with a score of 3 or higher will receive the AP Capstone Certificate. For more
information, please inquire with the school’s Academic Counselors.

2061 AP SEMINAR (WE/FR)
Prerequisite: teacher approval
This is a college preparatory course open to grades 10, 11, or 12. This full-year AP course engages students
in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues
by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing
articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing
speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students
learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays,
and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Students are
assessed on three components: a team project and presentation, an independent research essay and
presentation, and a written exam in May. Students must obtain a score of 3 or higher to be able to receive
AP certification. Students may elect to take only AP Seminar without completing the entire AP Capstone
program.

2063 AP RESEARCH is usually taken in Grade 12. Students design, plan and conduct a year-long research-
based investigation on a personally-chosen subject. The assessment culminates with a 5000-word academic
thesis paper, as well as a public presentation. Students must obtain a final score of three or higher to be
able to receive AP certification. Students must have successfully completed AP Seminar to take this course.
Course will be offered during 2022-2023 school year.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
14

DIRECTED STUDY OPTION
Exceptional seniors and juniors may discuss a proposal for directed study in a subject that is neither offered
in the regular Saint Louis course catalog nor offered in the current term. Eligible students must make prior
arrangements with their counselor and appropriate academic department chairperson. Proposals for
directed study should be submitted prior to the proposed semester/year course. Interested students are
urged to see their counselor for information.
COLLEGIATE DUAL ENROLLMENT
Saint Louis students may fulfill their high school graduation requirements through concurrent enrollment in
college courses made possible through collaborative agreements with Chaminade University of Honolulu,
Hawaii Pacific University, and the University of Hawai`i system. Passing the college course with a C or higher
enables the student to acquire credit applicable to his college undergraduate transcript.

EARLY COMPLETION
A student who will fulfill all of his graduation requirements by the end of his seventh semester may apply
for Early Completion. The purpose of this program is to encourage the student to begin his college
education at the earliest opportunity.

The student who intends to participate in this program must inform the Principal by the end of the sixth
semester. The student’s letter of request must include the following information: an explanation of how he
will benefit from the program, a compilation of all courses taken and credits earned, his current CGPA, and
evidence of involvement in student activities. The student must also submit a written statement from his
counselor attesting to his maturity and his ability to benefit from Early Completion.

The student request for Early Completion is reviewed and approved by the Principal. The student will be
notified of the decision prior to the beginning of the seventh semester.

A student approved for Early Completion is expected to keep in contact with the senior division coordinator
regarding the schedule for graduation practice sessions, proms, et cetera. The Early Completion student
relinquishes membership in Saint Louis clubs, sports programs, and other school activities.

ONLINE COURSE OPTIONS
By arrangement through their counselors, students may also fulfill their high school graduation
requirements through enrollment in outside online courses. Enrollment in any of these courses requires
approval of school administration prior to registration.

         ASU PREP DIGITAL

         ASU ONLINE COLLEGE COURSES

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
15

INTERNATIONAL & GLOBAL STUDIES PROGRAMS
A number of programs offer opportunities to interact with peers in schools overseas. These programs range
from international travel to hosting overseas student visitors to Hawai`i. Since 1974 Saint Louis has nurtured
sister school relations with schools in other countries.

         JAPAN SISTER SCHOOL EXCHANGES - Saint Louis maintains sister school relationships with several
         institutions and government agencies in Japan. On occasion representatives from these
         organizations will visit Kalaepōhaku, and vice versa.

         JAPAN CULTURE STUDY TOUR pending international travel clearance - Saint Louis conducts custom-
         designed international travel experiences in Japan. These tours are scheduled during school break
         sessions and successful completion of student activities and materials may earn the student ½
         elective credit that can be applied to graduation requirements. Inquire with the international
         programs coordinator for more information. Students are responsible for payment of fares, fees, and daily
         living costs associated with this travel opportunity. Nominal fundraisers are also available to offset expenses.

         OTHER INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE & STUDY PROGRAMS MAY INCLUDE: LATIN AMERICA, EUROPE,
         TAIWAN.

SERVICE LEARNING REQUIREMENT
High school students must complete and provide documentation of a total 80 community service hours to
earn a diploma. Of these 80 hours, 50 must qualify as H.E.E.D.S. hours. (A Saint Louis Man HEEDS the call:
directly servicing the homeless, elderly, environment, disadvantaged, or sick). Students who do not
complete and properly document the required 80 hours of service may not receive a diploma nor be
allowed to participate in the graduation ceremony. The required minimum total of 80 hours must be earned
in increments at each grade-level year; i.e., a student may not fulfill the total service learning requirement
during one contiguous session.
     ● 6th Grade - Must complete and document 5 hours of community service by April 30 of their 6th
        grade year.
     ● 7th Grade - Must complete and document 10 hours of community service by April 30 of their 7th
        grade year.
     ● 8th Grade - Must complete and document 15 hours of community service by April 30 of their 8th
        grade year.
     ● 9th Grade - Must complete and document 20 hours of community service hours including 5 HEEDS
        hours by April 30 of their freshman year.
     ● 10th Grade - Must complete and document 20 hours of community service hours including 10
        HEEDS hours by April 30 of their sophomore year.
     ● 11th Grade - Must complete all 20 hours of community service by April 30 of their junior year,
        including 15 HEEDS hours.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
16

    ● 12th Grade - Must complete all 20 HEEDS hours of community service by April 30 their senior year.
      Failure to complete the annual Community Service Learning requirement will deem a senior
      ineligible for participation in the graduation ceremony and will suspend the awarding of his diploma.

The deadline for documentation and completion of the 20-hour requirement per year is April 30 of that
current academic school year. All hours must be properly documented on either the sponsoring agency’s
letterhead or on the Saint Louis School Community Service Contract form.

STUDENT-LED CONFERENCES
For every K-12 Saint Louis student the culmination of the academic year is the Student-Led Conference
(SLC). Artifacts and evidence of Six A’s are compiled and showcased before parent/guardian and teacher
and utilized by the student in presenting and how the past months have contributed to making him a Saint
Louis man. In the SLC, a student potentially may demonstrate mastery in one or more areas of the Six A’s
and/or Characteristics of Marianist Education (CME). Student work on the SLC is coordinated and compiled
in his religion class. For grades 6-12, the SLC is graded as the final exam for religion. Parents and guardians
will be notified in advance of the schedule of presentations (conducted on weekends).

ACADEMIC HONORS AND AWARDS
HONOR ROLL

The Honor Roll is announced at the end of each semester, and includes students who maintain a grade
point equivalent of 3.14 to 3.66, with no semester grade lower than a C and with no unsatisfactory conduct
record or incomplete grade.

PRINCIPAL’S LIST

The Principal’s List is announced at the end of each semester and includes students who maintain a grade
point equivalent of 3.67 to 3.99, with no semester grade below a C and no unsatisfactory conduct record or
incomplete grade.

PRESIDENT’S LIST

President’s List Certificates will be awarded to students in grades 7–12 who have earned a 4.0 grade point
average or better at the end of each semester, have no semester grade below a C and no unsatisfactory
conduct record or incomplete grade.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
17

       Honor Roll                                    3.14 to 3.66 semester GPA

       Principal’s List                              3.67 to 3.99 semester GPA

       President’s List                              4.0+ semester GPA

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
A student will be recognized as Honor’s Graduate if upon completion of their final semester they have
attained at least a 3.85 cumulative grade point average with no semester grade below a B and completed at
least five Advanced Placement courses.

CLASS RANKING
Class ranking is calculated in order of highest to lowest cumulative grade point average. For the
Valedictorian and Salutatorian award, qualifying students must also have completed seven consecutive
semesters at Saint Louis High School. Priority is given to students with more AP classes, all other categories
being equal. Final ranking is determined and approved by the school administration.

Valedictorian and Salutatorian
The positions of salutatorian and valedictorian are the highest honors available to Saint Louis students. To
be considered for these positions, students must:
    ● Have completed the past seven high school semesters at Saint Louis School
    ● Be classified as a senior in the seventh semester
    ● Demonstrated good conduct and behavior
    ● Have completed Advanced Placement and Honors classes

Valedictorian
The Valedictorian is the senior who:
     ● has earned the highest cumulative grade point average in his division
     ● has earned the most Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors credits
     ● has met all community service requirements
If class standing is equal, the Administration reserves the right to recognize more than one Valedictorian.

Salutatorian
The Salutatorian is the senior who:
     ● has earned the second-highest cumulative grade point average
     ● has earned Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors credits
     ● has met all community service requirements
If class standing is equal, the Administration reserves the right to recognize more than one Salutatorian.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
18

ACADEMIC EMBLEM AWARD

By the end of Quarter 3, each academic department will select a student in each grade level 7 through 12 to
receive the Academic Emblem Award for each respective area of study. This award is presented to the
student from each grade who is currently enrolled in that specific content area and who has consistently
demonstrated highest excellence during the current school year. Eligible students must have a cumulative
GPA of 3.0 or better in the respective course, and demonstrate the traits of a Saint Louis Man.

COMMENCEMENT EMBLEM PLAQUE

At the annual Commencement Exercises, selected graduating seniors will receive the Saint Louis
Commencement Academic Emblem plaque. Each academic department selects the senior in their respective
discipline who have demonstrated overall superior performance and exceptional achievement during the
four years preceding graduation.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
19

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Since 1846, Saint Louis School has served as an integral establishment in the foundation of education in
Hawai`i. The school continues this tradition while keeping pace with the evolving demands of a global
society that becomes increasingly connected through technological advances and geopolitical change.
Providing young men with a well-rounded curriculum that offers rigor and relevance prepares students for
steward leadership in the Marianist philosophy of education. This catalog as a starting point for planning
student schedules is an overview of the courses offered for grade levels 6-12.
Please note that some courses listed in this catalog may not be offered every school year and are subject to
sufficient enrollment. In addition, limited availability of courses may result in scheduling conflicts, and
academic counselors will assist students to revise their course selections accordingly.

         COURSE DESCRIPTION DESIGNATORS:
            ● Year Course             = 1.0 credit
            ● Semester Course         = 0.5 credit
            ● Courses marked with two asterisks** require instructor approval/recommendation in
              addition to verification from counselor and final approval of an administrator.
            ● WE/FR indicates a course that meets Wednesdays and Fridays, period 8
            ● NCAA indicates National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-approved course

CONTENT AREAS:            CIVIL AIR PATROL CADET PROGRAM                                    Page 20

                          ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) Page 21

                          FINE ARTS                                                         Page 26

                          HAWAIIAN STUDIES & HAWAIIAN ACADEMY: KAUHALE KĀNA LUI             Page 30

                          JROTC                                                             Page 34

                          MATHEMATICS                                                       Page 35

                          PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                                Page 38

                          RELIGION                                                          Page 39

                          SCIENCE                                                           Page 41

                          ROBOTICS & ENGINEERING                                            Page 44

                          SOCIAL SCIENCE                                                    Page 45

                          BUSINESS                                                          Page 48

                          WORLD LANGUAGES                                                   Page 49

                          NON-CREDIT COURSES                                                Page 54

                          MIDDLE SCHOOL ELECTIVES                                           Page 55

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
20

CIVIL AIR PATROL (CAP) CADET PROGRAM
Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is a notable cadet program that allows students ages 12 through 18 the benefit of
working in tandem with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) curriculum. CAP gives cadets
the opportunity to learn the basics of flight and eventually the opportunity to pilot an airplane, as well as
compete against other CAP and JROTC programs in various events throughout the year. The CAP program
allows students to take other courses during the school day that may not have fit their schedules previously.

7500 Civil Air Patrol                                                Ages 12-18 (year; 1 credit)
The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is an Auxiliary to the United States Air Force and requires membership. The enrollment
process is not handled by Saint Louis School counselors, but by CAP personnel.

    ●    The applicant must attend a 30-minute Orientation Briefing with at least one parent. Orientation Briefings are by
         appointment only. In addition, applicants must attend at least three meetings. During this period, they are
         evaluated for suitability as CAP members pending the Commander’s approval.
    ●    After being approved, cadets submit online a $31 annual membership, complete a questionnaire, take an oath, and
         commit to remain a member for at least one year. All of this is done online with assistance from the Commander
         or one of his staff.
    ●    These rules also apply to Senior Members (Adults) interested in joining CAP. However, adult membership is $69
         annually and done via US mail. Adults are required to be fingerprinted for FBI screening.

Interested parents, please call for an Orientation Briefing:

Lt Col Ed Green, CAP Commander, 77th St. Louis Crusaders Composite Squadron: 808-779-0300

NOTE: This course is classified as an ELECTIVE credit; however, successful completion of the Civil Air Patrol introductory
course may allow the student to select the option of fulfilling one P.E. credit. Please consult with the designated
academic counselor. Meeting times are outside the standard school day.

CAP Wednesday / Friday Courses
PERIOD 8 SPECIALS FOR 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR
The following courses meet on Wednesdays and Fridays. Students enrolled in these courses will not be required
to attend the ABL Field Labs.

________CAP Aviation           WE/FR                                       Grades 9-12 (year; 1 credit)
Cadets learn about the fundamentals of aviation through classroom activities, self-study texts, orientation
flights, and formal flight training. In addition, three of the biggest aviation organizations in America – AOPA,
EAA, and SSA – show their support for CAP cadets by offering them free memberships and other benefits.
Cadets who are aspiring aviators should take advantage of these great opportunities.

________CAP Leadership         WE/FR                                   Ages 12-18 (year; 1 credit)
The CAP leadership program is a multi-step process to develop a student’s leadership ability by employing
two essential sources: natural talent and leadership education, training, and experience. Leadership in the
CAP program requires hard work and an uncommon willingness to put the team’s needs ahead of one’s
own.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
21

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
NOTE: All students must complete 2.0 credits in ELA courses. Students may select from multiple course
offerings to fulfill the English Language Arts requirements for grades 11 and 12. Please note that some
courses are for one semester (0.5 credit). Students should consult with their designated counselor for
assistance and verification of credit count.
COURSES THAT CAN FULFILL ELA GRADUATION REQUIREMENT, GRADES 11-12:
 GRADE 11 ONLY                        OPEN TO GRADE 11 OR 12                GRADE 12 ONLY

   English 11 (1.0)                     Journalism (1.0)                   English 12 (1.0)
   AP English Language &                Asian Classical Literature (.5)    AP English Literature &
    Composition (1.0)                    Asian American Literature (.5)      Composition (1.0)
                                         Creative Writing I (.5)
                                         Magical Realism in Latin
                                          American Literature (.5)
                                         Pacific Island Literature (.5)

2007 English 9                                                             Grade 9 (year)            NCAA
The course focuses on a variety of themes that will allow students to build critical thinking skills and
express themselves through writing and speaking. Using traditional and non-traditional texts, students
will build on their knowledge of literary elements, and study the relationship between narrative voice
and style.

2011 English 9 Honors **                                                     Grade 9 (year)          NCAA
Same as English 9, with added emphasis on reading and writing rigor.
Prerequisite: Teacher/Admin Recommendation

2040 Speech and Research 09*                                                 Grade 9 (semester)      NCAA
*paired with the Geography and History of Hawaii course
An introductory course to develop the student's skills, knowledge, and understanding of the public speaking
process. Target skills include reasoning, audience analysis, selecting resources, outlining, and delivery. As
the second half of the History of Hawaii course, content topics will pertain to issues relevant to Hawai’i.
Culminating activities will hinge on oral presentation of prepared speeches with implementation of
computer technology.

2013 English 10                                                               Grade 10 (year)        NCAA
The course focuses on the themes of identity and perspective. Students will read and analyze works of
world literature, with emphasis on analysis of how stylistic choices and rhetorical elements develop tone in
persuasive and argumentative texts.

2017 English 10 Honors **                                                    Grade 10 (year)         NCAA
Prerequisite: Teacher/Admin Recommendation
The Honors class is the same as English 10, with added emphasis on rigorous reading and writing geared
toward preparation for the AP test their junior year.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
22

2019 English 11                                                              Grade 11 (year)      NCAA
The course primarily focuses on American literature, using traditional and non-traditional texts to make
connections with various thematic concepts. Students will evaluate the ideals and realities of American
life in the past, present and future, while making personal connections to their own values and
experiences. The course will further build on reading and writing skills, with an emphasis on
synthesizing multiple sources into coherent research-based papers.

2025 English 11 Advanced Placement English Language/Composition **                  Grade 11 (year)         NCAA
Prerequisite: Teacher/Admin Recommendation, . Students should be able to read and comprehend college-level texts and
write grammatically correct, complete sentences
This introductory college-level literary analysis course is designed to help students become skilled
readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and to become skilled writers who compose
for a variety of purposes. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the
connections with the choices a writer and/or speaker makes in relation to purpose, audience
expectations, and subjects, as well as understand the way basic rhetorical conventions contribute to
effectiveness in writing.
Additional AP Exam and materials fee required (does not include textbook and workbook costs). Students are required to
take the AP Exam in May in order to receive a weighted grade for this class.

2021 English 12                                                                  Grade 12 (year)       NCAA
Writing plays a crucial role in the college experience and prepares us to be effective communicators in the
workplace. In this course, students are trained to recognize that their growth as writers and communicators
is something not only necessary for the completion of a Saint Louis diploma and college degree, but also a
practical and lifelong undertaking. Throughout the year, students will respond to the complex demands of
writing specifically for professional and college-level academic audiences. The process of identifying the
subtleties of these genres is no easy task, so we will work on a variety of assignments to better understand
and perform both types of writing. Together, we will develop a stronger sense of what it means to represent
ourselves professionally to our peers, colleagues, and mentors in college and the workforce.

2031 English 12 Advanced Placement English Literature/Composition **                Grade 12 (year)            NCAA
Prerequisites: Teacher/Admin Recommendation
The AP English Literature and Composition course focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about
imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, drama) from various periods. Students engage in close reading and
critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to
provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes,
as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, and symbolism. Writing assignments include expository,
analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.
Additional AP Exam and materials fee required (does not include textbook and workbook costs). Students are required to
take the AP Exam in May in order to receive a weighted grade for this class.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
23

2063 AP RESEARCH                                                          Grade 12 (year)              NCAA
Prerequisite: Completed AP Seminar
This course is usually taken in Grade 12. Students design, plan and conduct a year-long research-based
investigation on a personally-chosen subject. The assessment culminates with a 5000-word academic thesis
paper, as well as a public presentation. Students must obtain a final score of three or higher to be able to
receive AP certification. Students must have successfully completed AP Seminar to take this course. Offered
2022-2023 school year.

2033 Asian Classical Literature                                    Grades 11-12 (one semester)         NCAA
Prerequisite: Teacher/Admin Recommendation
This course surveys major works of Asian literature written between 500 BC and 1500 AD. Readings include
the Ramayana, Heike Monogatari, the Tale of Genji, The Analects, Hinilawod and feature epic battles
against mythical monsters, miracles, and adventures in love. Students will learn to understand literature as
both artifact and shaper of culture. Course activities develop student skills in literary criticism, creative
writing, and oral communication.

2035 Asian American Literature                                     Grades 11-12 (one semester)         NCAA
Prerequisite: Teacher/Admin Recommendation
This course introduces the texts and contexts of Asian American authors. Students examine primary texts
(novels, poems, and short stories) by representative authors like Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry
Hwang, Amy Tan, Carlos Bulosan, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and Hawai‘i-based writers. Students will also
do close readings; examine the diverse cultural groups that make up Asian communities; explore contexts;
conduct literary critiques; and formulate essays that address issues important to students as the next
generation of global citizens.

2037 Pacific Island Literature                                   Grades 11-12 (one semester)            NCAA
Literature from a variety of contemporary writers as well as oral traditions provides the launching point for
individual explorations in the tradition of the great navigators of the Pacific region. Students are expected to
explore their own identities and cultures through class discussions and activities stemming from themes and
characters in mo‘olelo, chant, and epics of the Pacific island cultures.

2043 Creative Writing I                                            Grades 11-12 (one semester)         NCAA
Prerequisite: Recommendation of prior English Language Arts instructor
A course designed for the student interested in writing short stories, poetry or short plays. Students will also
work in groups to conduct peer reviews of their work. At the end of each term, selected works from each
student will be featured in an online publication.

2029 Journalism                                                           Grades 11-12 (year)          NCAA
Prerequisite: Teacher/Admin Recommendation
Students learn to interview sources, collect information, write and edit news stories and arrange effective
layout. They also write features, sports stories and commentaries. Other skills involve composing headlines
and applying multimedia and web programs. Student work forms the corpus of content for the quarterly
publication Collegian. Students assume editorial responsibilities and assist in peer learning. Management of
the Collegian is a primary expectation under the guidance of the instructor. Students collaborate with
Digital Photography to produce the quarterly student publication.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
24

English Language Arts Wednesday / Friday Courses
PERIOD 8 SPECIALS FOR 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR
The following courses meet on Wednesdays and Fridays. Students enrolled in these courses will not be required
to attend the ABL Field Labs.

2061 AP SEMINAR                     WE/FR                                     Grades 10-12 (year)               NCAA
Prerequisite: instructor approval
This full-year AP course engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of
academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework,
students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and
philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing
artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop
their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both
individually and as part of a team. Students are assessed on three components: a team project and
presentation, an independent research essay and presentation, and a written exam in May. *does not fulfill
English Language Arts requirement for graduation. Students must obtain a score of 3 or higher to be able to receive AP
certification. Students may elect to take only AP Seminar without completing the entire AP Capstone program.

2039 Magical Realism in Latin American Literature WE/FR Grades 11-12 (semester, .5 core credit) NCAA
The genre of magical realism was popularized by Latin American writers in the 1950s such as Jose Martí and
Ruben Darío. Though every work of literature varies in its content and style, the common thread is that of a
realistic environment with magical elements. Magical realism is that it blurs the line between realistic fiction
and fantasy. In this course, students will read and discuss short stories in English translation by Latin-
American writers such as Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, Rudolfo Anaya, and
others. Spanish language background is helpful though not required. May fulfill ELA requirement for graduation.

________ SAT Skills & Strategies Preparation                 WE/FR            Grades 10-12 (semester, .5 credit)
It is highly recommended that students complete this course prior to Semester 1 of their 12th grade year.
Tackling new things makes most of us nervous, but when we can learn a great deal about a new situation in
advance, we feel more capable of taking a deep breath and meeting the challenge. Learning about the SAT
through this course will assist in developing the knowledge and skills measured on the test, identifying ways
to familiarize yourself with the test, and discussing some things to do (and not do) on the test day. The
strategies provided through tools and habits will contribute to being well prepared when your test date
arrives.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
25

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)
English as a Second Language (ESL) course is available for non-native speakers entering grades 6, 7, 8, 9,
and 10. Content focuses on conversational skills, listening, speaking, grammar, reading, and writing. Based
on the initial placement test and writing sample, each student is enrolled into courses at the beginning,
intermediate or advanced level. As language proficiency develops, students are mainstreamed into non-ESL
classes, such as fine arts, physical education, music, and mathematics.

ESL Wednesday / Friday Courses
PERIOD 8 SPECIALS FOR 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR
The following courses meet on Wednesdays and Fridays. Students enrolled in these courses will not be required
to attend the ABL Field Labs.

3000 ESL                                         WE/FR          Grades 6-10 (year, 1 credit)
English as a Second Language (ESL) course is available for non-native speakers entering grades 6, 7, 8, 9,
and 10. Content focuses on conversational skills, listening, speaking, grammar, reading, and writing. Based
on the initial placement test and writing sample, each student is enrolled into courses at the beginning,
intermediate or advanced level. As language proficiency develops, students are mainstreamed into non-ESL
classes, such as fine arts, physical education, music, and mathematics.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
26

FINE ARTS
4084 Visual Arts I: Exploration in the Visual Arts               Grades 9–12 (year)
This high school level course will provide opportunities to explore, examine, experience, and manipulate
several different types of media in art. Students will accomplish this through a variety of media. They will also
experiment with ceramic forms and use tools made for ceramics. Students will also study art history, art
criticism, and art aesthetics and how it relates to creating their work of art.

4029 Ceramics I                                                Grades 9-12 (year)
This high school level course introduces students to basic hand-building techniques and basic thrown pieces
on the potter’s wheel and the finishing and firing process. They will use tools specifically for working with
clay and create works using the elements and principles of design.

4030 Ceramics II **                                                 Grades 10- 12 (year)
Prerequisite: prior completion of Ceramics I
In this course, students will expand their skills and knowledge taught in Ceramics I. They will create
advanced projects, including a variety of functional and artistic pieces thrown on the potter’s wheel.
Students will use a variety of tools to create clay sculptures, handles, lids, tile works, combination pots,
pitchers, and simple plates. They will also learn how to mix, combine glazes to enhance their artwork.

4061 Media and Communications I                                  Grades 9-12 (year)
This course will teach students skills in front of and behind the camera, film production, multi-media
marketing, speech/voiceover techniques, music recording, and insightful information needed to thrive in
current business and society as a young adult. Students will apply different industry skills in various
contexts. This course will equip students with the tools needed to succeed in the multimedia industry and
which can also be used in everyday life.

4062     Media and Communications II                                Grades 10-12 (year)
Prerequisite: prior completion of Media Communications I or instructor approval.
The second level of Media Communications provides advanced skills of being in front of and behind the
camera, commercial film production and editing, business communication skills, media marketing, and self-
branding techniques to prepare for college and business in this social media world. Students will apply
different industry skills in various contexts.

2047 Publications (Yearbook)                                        Grades 10-12 (year)
Prerequisite: instructor approval
The primary product of this course is the Saint Louis Crusader yearbook, and additional print collateral such
as digital magazines brochures for alumni relations and fundraising. Additional time outside of the
scheduled classroom hours may be required for information gathering, photography, and page layout
assignments. This course presents an excellent opportunity for students to learn the principles and practices
of journalism, publishing, and related computer software and programs. Students must be committed,
reliable, and willing to dedicate time outside of school hours to record a variety of activities and events.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
27

4027 Band HS I: Beginning                                                    Grades 9-11 (year)
No prior music experience required.
High School Beginning Band – This course is for High School students who have no prior experience or have
experience and want to reinforce their fundamental skills on their instrument. In this yearlong introductory
course, students will learn the fundamentals of playing an instrument found in one of the three band
instrument families: woodwind, brass, or percussion. Students will learn the fundamentals of musicianship
such as reading notes, rhythms, and ensemble skills. This is a performance based course, in which students
will play a variety of musical genres and demonstrate their learning through in-class playing as well as
performing in a concert at the end of each semester. Students will be required to purchase a Beginning
Band starter kit for their respective instrument once an instrument has been chosen. This class is awarded a
Fine Arts credit.

4026 Digital Music Composition                                               Grades 9-12 (year)
No prior music experience required
In this year-long introductory class, students will create music compositions using a digital audio
workstation (DAW), a keyboard, samples and other software. Students will also learn the basics of editing,
mixing and producing their compositions. Students will explore different genres of music as well as learn
fundamental music theory and composition concepts. This is a project-based course.

Grade 10-4090, Grade 11- 4091, Grade 12-4092             Digital Music and Production         Grades 10-12 (year)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Digital Music Composition and teacher approval
This year-long class builds on the fundamentals learned in Digital Music Compositions. Students will
continue work in DAWs, with a more in depth look at music theory supported composition. Students will
explore more with audio mixing and effects. Students will learn compose music in music production style
for short videos and games in a variety of genre. This is a project based course. This course is awarded a
fine arts credit. This course is repeatable and builds from year to year.

4025 String Orchestra I: Beginning HS                                        Grades 9-12 (year)
No prior music experience required
In this year-long introductory class, students will learn to play a classical string instrument (violin, viola, cello
or bass). Students will develop musicianship skills in note and rhythm reading, as well as skills in solo and
ensemble performance. This is a performance-based course, in which students will demonstrate their
learning through solo, small and large ensemble in-class playing, as well as at two or more public
performances. Students may be required to attend extra rehearsals. Students will be required to purchase
instrument-related supplies.

4006 String Orchestra: Adv HS                                                Grades 10-12 (year)
Prerequisite - Beginning Strings or minimum one year previous string experience, and faculty approval (interview and
audition may be required for transfer students)
Advanced String Orchestra is a continuation class for students with a minimum of one year of previous
string experience. Students will continue to advance their instrument technique and further develop
musicianship skills and music appreciation. This is a performance-based course, in which students will
demonstrate their learning through solo, small and large ensemble in-class playing, as well as at two or
more public concerts. Students may be required to attend extra rehearsals. Students will be required to
purchase instrument-related supplies.

rev 2021.MAY 3 (rev 12)
You can also read