My School Community A Transdisciplinary Social Studies Unit for Kindergarten - Unit Designers: Kindergarten Teachers Health Lessons Provided by ...

 
My School Community A Transdisciplinary Social Studies Unit for Kindergarten - Unit Designers: Kindergarten Teachers Health Lessons Provided by ...
My School Community

                My School Community

   A Transdisciplinary Social Studies Unit for
                 Kindergarten

Unit Designers: Kindergarten Teachers
Health Lessons Provided by Greenwich Health
Curriculum
My School Community

Theme: Creating a Classroom Community
Topic: My School Community
Unit Designers: Kindergarten Teachers

Transdisciplinary: Transdisciplinary learning is the exploration of a relevant issue or
problem that integrates the perspectives of multiple disciplines in order to connect new
knowledge and deeper understanding to real life experiences. Transdisciplinary units
culminate in authentic assessments with a genuine audience. Transdisciplinary units
weave throughout the school day and are taught though multiple disciplines. Although
content may be grounded in a discipline, the unit is not considered a science unit or social
studies unit.

Inquiry: A student-centered, active learning approach focusing on questioning, critical
thinking, and problem solving. It's associated with the idea "involve me and I
understand."

Unit Summary: This unit covers topics in the areas of social studies, language arts,
mathematics, health, media, and physical education. Students will examine their most
immediate community, their classroom, and set up classroom routines, rules, and
expectations. They will launch the reading and writing workshop and become a
community of learners. They will understand the meaning of good sportsmanship and
identify and understand feelings and how to solve conflicts with peers. As a final
performance task, students will ____________

Enduring Understanding:
My	
  community	
  influences	
  and	
  shapes	
  the	
  way	
  I	
  develop.	
  
     • Good	
  citizens	
  are	
  part	
  of	
  a	
  successful	
  school	
  community	
  
     • It	
  takes	
  many	
  individuals	
  working	
  together	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  school	
  community	
  	
  
     • We	
  have	
  both	
  rights	
  and	
  responsibilities	
  in	
  our	
  communities	
  
     • We	
  have	
  rules	
  to	
  help	
  us	
  work	
  together	
  and	
  keep	
  us	
  safe.	
  

Over-arching Essential Question
   • What	
  does	
  it	
  mean	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  good	
  citizen	
  in	
  the	
  classroom	
  and	
  the	
  school	
  
      community?	
  
   • What	
  are	
  the	
  rules	
  that	
  we	
  need	
  to	
  follow	
  every	
  day?	
  
   • How	
  does	
  working	
  together	
  help	
  create	
  a	
  successful	
  school	
  community?	
  

Unit Questions
Social	
  Studies:	
  	
  
   • What	
  is	
  my	
  community?	
  	
  
   • How	
  are	
  classmates	
  alike	
  and	
  different?	
  
                 	
  
Math:	
  
   • 	
  	
  	
  How	
  can	
  collecting,	
  organizing	
  and	
  displaying	
  data	
  help	
  us	
  analyze	
  
                 information	
  and	
  make	
  reasonable	
  predictions	
  and	
  informed	
  decision?	
  
My School Community

Language	
  Arts:	
  	
  
     • How	
  are	
  we	
  developing	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  ourselves	
  as	
  readers?	
  
     • How	
  are	
  we	
  building	
  a	
  reading	
  community?	
  
         	
  
Media/technology:	
  	
  
     • How	
  can	
  reading	
  become	
  a	
  foundational	
  skill	
  for	
  learning,	
  personal	
  growth,	
  
         and	
  enjoyment?	
  
     • How	
  can	
  I	
  use	
  technology	
  to	
  be	
  productive	
  and	
  solve	
  problems?	
  
         	
  
Physical	
  Education:	
  
     • What	
  is	
  good	
  sportsmanship	
  and	
  how	
  will	
  it	
  help	
  me	
  be	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  a	
  
         community?	
  
	
  
Health	
  
     • How	
  can	
  understanding	
  other	
  people’s	
  feeling	
  help	
  me	
  be	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  a	
  
         community?	
  
     • How do we deal with put-downs?
     • How do we deal with our feelings?
     • What are values and how do they influence our decisions?
     • How can we resolve and manage conflict?
My School Community

                                            State/district standards

Social Studies
1.4	
  Geographical	
  space	
  and	
  place.	
  
      • 1.4.7	
  Explain	
  the	
  geographical	
  relationships	
  of	
  familiar	
  places	
  in	
  one’s	
  own	
  
           community	
  (e.g.	
  home	
  to	
  school,	
  home	
  to	
  store).	
  
      • 1.4.8	
  Identify	
  and	
  explain	
  the	
  significance	
  of	
  important	
  locations	
  in	
  one’s	
  
           neighborhood.	
  
	
  
1.6	
  Patterns	
  of	
  human	
  movement	
  across	
  time	
  and	
  place.	
  
      • 1.6.10	
  Describe	
  types	
  of	
  transportation	
  and	
  related	
  geographical	
  features	
  
           (e.g.	
  boats	
  go	
  in	
  the	
  water,	
  cars	
  have	
  wheels	
  to	
  drive	
  on	
  land).	
  
      • 1.6.11	
  Explain	
  how	
  one	
  travels	
  to	
  and	
  from	
  school	
  and	
  other	
  places	
  in	
  the	
  
           community.	
  
	
  
1.7 The	
  purpose,	
  structures	
  and	
  functions	
  of	
  government	
  and	
  law	
  at	
  the	
  local,	
  state,	
  
      national	
  and	
  international	
  levels.	
  
      • 1.7.12	
  State	
  basic	
  classroom,	
  school,	
  family	
  and	
  community	
  rules/laws.	
  
      • 1.7.13	
  Explain	
  the	
  reason	
  for	
  rules	
  related	
  to	
  basic	
  safety	
  and	
  fairness.	
  
	
  
1.8 The	
  interactions	
  between	
  citizens	
  and	
  their	
  government	
  in	
  the	
  making	
  and	
  
      implementation	
  of	
  laws.	
  
      • 1.8.14	
  Work	
  collaboratively	
  to	
  develop	
  classroom	
  rules.	
  
      	
  
1.9 The	
  rights	
  and	
  responsibilities	
  of	
  citizens.	
  
      • 1.9.15	
  Participate	
  in	
  leadership	
  roles	
  within	
  classroom.	
  
      • 1.9.16	
  Give	
  basic	
  reasons	
  for	
  the	
  functions	
  of	
  classroom	
  leaders	
  (e.g.	
  line	
  
           leader,	
  messenger).	
  
      • 1.9.17	
  Discuss	
  responsibilities	
  students	
  have	
  to	
  classmates	
  and	
  school	
  
           community.	
  
	
  
1.11How	
  different	
  economic	
  systems	
  organize	
  resources.	
  
      • 1.11.19	
  Identify	
  and	
  role-­‐play	
  diverse	
  jobs.	
  
      • 1.11.20	
  Describe	
  basic	
  functions	
  of	
  key	
  community	
  roles	
  (e.g.	
  police	
  officer,	
  
           mail	
  carrier,	
  farmer,	
  merchant).	
  
      	
  
1.13	
  The	
  characteristics	
  of	
  and	
  interactions	
  among	
  culture,	
  social	
  systems	
  and	
  
institutions.	
  
      • 1.13.22	
  Identify	
  cultural	
  characteristics	
  of	
  self	
  and	
  family	
  (e.g.	
  food,	
  language,	
  
           religion,	
  traditions).	
  
	
  
3.1	
  Use	
  evidence	
  to	
  identify,	
  analyze	
  and	
  evaluate	
  historical	
  interpretations.	
  
      • 3.1.1	
  Predict	
  how	
  another	
  person	
  might	
  feel	
  given	
  a	
  simple	
  scenario.	
  
           	
  
My School Community

3.2	
  Analyze	
  and	
  evaluate	
  human	
  action	
  in	
  historical	
  and/or	
  contemporary	
  contexts	
  
from	
  alternative	
  points	
  of	
  view.	
  
      • 3.2.2	
  Describe	
  similarities	
  and	
  differences	
  of	
  their	
  own	
  feelings	
  compared	
  
          with	
  others.	
  
	
  
3.3	
  Apply	
  appropriate	
  historical,	
  geographic,	
  political,	
  economic	
  and	
  cultural	
  
concepts	
  and	
  methods	
  in	
  proposing	
  and	
  evaluating	
  solutions	
  to	
  contemporary	
  
problems.	
  
      • 3.3.3	
  Students	
  will	
  solve	
  conflicts	
  and	
  classroom	
  issues	
  using	
  appropriate	
  
          strategies.	
  

Math	
  
K.4-­‐-­‐Collect,	
  organize	
  and	
  display	
  data	
  using	
  appropriate	
  statistical	
  and	
  graphical	
  
methods.	
  	
  
      • K.22	
  Pose	
  questions	
  about	
  personal	
  experiences	
  and	
  the	
  environment.	
  
      • K.23	
  Collect	
  data	
  and	
  organize	
  information	
  through	
  counting,	
  sorting,	
  making	
  
           lists,	
  tallies	
  and	
  tables.	
  
      • K.24	
  Construct	
  real	
  graphs	
  and	
  picture	
  graphs	
  and	
  describe	
  the	
  data	
  using	
  
           the	
  terms	
  more,	
  less	
  and	
  same.	
  
	
  
Language Arts
Comprehend	
  and	
  respond	
  in	
  literal,	
  critical,	
  and	
  evaluative	
  ways	
  to	
  various	
  texts	
  
that	
  are	
  read,	
  viewed,	
  and	
  heard.	
  (taken	
  from	
  Unit	
  1	
  –	
  Building	
  Good	
  Reading	
  
Habits)	
  
           • Practice the routines of reading time.
           • Choose books that match interest and purpose.
           • Discuss books with others.
           • Read independently for 5 – 7 minutes.
Media
3.1	
  Use	
  technology:	
  Students	
  will	
  demonstrate	
  proficiency	
  in	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  computers	
  
and	
  applications	
  including	
  sound	
  understanding	
  of	
  technology	
  concepts,	
  systems	
  
and	
  operations.	
  
      • Demonstrate	
  beginning	
  skills	
  in	
  using	
  computers	
  and	
  applications	
  
           	
  
5.1	
  Develop	
  appreciation	
  and	
  self-­‐motivation	
  as	
  a	
  reader.	
  
      • Demonstrate	
  active	
  listening	
  skills.	
  
           	
  
5.3	
  Determine	
  and	
  select	
  materials	
  appropriate	
  to	
  personal	
  abilities	
  and	
  interests.	
  
      • Understand	
  and	
  use	
  the	
  library	
  as	
  an	
  information	
  and	
  pleasure	
  reading	
  
           source.	
  
My School Community

Physical Education
5.	
  Exhibits	
  responsible	
  personal	
  and	
  social	
  behavior	
  that	
  respects	
  self	
  and	
  others	
  in	
  
physical	
  activity	
  settings.	
  
       • 5.2	
  Follow	
  game	
  and	
  safety	
  rules	
  when	
  playing	
  with	
  others.	
  
       • 5.4	
  Share	
  and	
  takes	
  turns	
  while	
  participating	
  in	
  physical	
  activities	
  (e.g.,	
  using	
  
          sports	
  equipment).	
  
       • 5.5.	
  Participates	
  in	
  class	
  physical	
  education	
  activities	
  with	
  respect	
  for	
  the	
  
          rights	
  and	
  feelings	
  of	
  others.	
  
       • 5.6	
  Work	
  cooperatively	
  with	
  others	
  regardless	
  of	
  differences.	
  

Health
1.	
  Identify	
  themselves	
  as	
  unique	
  and	
  capable	
  individuals,	
  with	
  positive	
  traits	
  and	
  
qualities,	
  worthy	
  of	
  care	
  and	
  respect.	
  
2.	
  Identify	
  the	
  ground	
  rules	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  school	
  environment.	
  
3.	
  Identify	
  that	
  diverse	
  backgrounds	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  uniqueness	
  of	
  individuals.	
  
4.	
  State	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  acknowledging	
  emotions,	
  and	
  identify	
  the	
  ways	
  of	
  
appropriately	
  dealing	
  with	
  these	
  emotions.	
  
My School Community

Overview of Lessons

Lesson 1: What is a community?
Lesson 2: Our role in the classroom community
Lesson 3: Our rights and responsibilities in the classroom.
Lesson 4: Roles within the school community
Lesson 5: Our role in the school community
Lesson 6: Roles in the community outside of school
Lesson 7: Modes	
  of	
  Transportation	
  in	
  Our	
  Community
Lesson 8 Diverse	
  Community	
  Members
Lesson 9: Diverse	
  Community	
  Members
Lesson 10: Diverse	
  Community	
  Members
Lesson 11: Diverse	
  Community	
  Members
Lesson 12: The Culture of a Community
Lesson 13: Feelings in Our Community
Lesson 14: Problem Solving in Our Community

My School Community – Performance Task?

*All text in italic are suggestions

	
  
My School Community

Lesson 1: What is a community?

Topic(s): What is a community?

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.9 The	
  rights	
  and	
  responsibilities	
  of	
  citizens.	
  
    • 1.9.17	
  Discuss	
  responsibilities	
  students	
  have	
  to	
  classmates	
  and	
  school	
  
       community.	
  

Objective(s):
  • Students will share ideas of what is a community and what it means to be part of
      one.
  • They will recognize their classroom as their most immediate community.

Materials list:
-Chart paper
-Ms. Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten by Joseph Slate and Ashley Wolff

Vocabulary: community, greeting, introduce, introductions

Procedure:
Name activities: The teacher can begin by introducing each student with a greeting and
have students repeat the greeting and name. To help students learn each other’s name
you can do different name games. (Jack be nimble poem, “What’s your favorite…?)
Greeting activities: Students learn to greet each other in different ways. (How do you
greet someone? What do you do when you don’t know someone’s name?)

*These activities can be incorporated into your morning meeting routine.

Assessment:
Teacher observations
Ask students to name other students in the classroom (at their table, in line, on the rug,
etc.)
My School Community

Lesson 2: Our Role in the classroom community

Topic(s): Identifying the student’s role as a member of the classroom.

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.9 The	
  rights	
  and	
  responsibilities	
  of	
  citizens.	
  
    • 1.9.15	
  Participate	
  in	
  leadership	
  roles	
  within	
  classroom.	
  
    • 1.9.16	
  Give	
  basic	
  reasons	
  for	
  the	
  functions	
  of	
  classroom	
  leaders	
  (e.g.	
  line	
  
       leader,	
  messenger).	
  
    • 1.9.17	
  Discuss	
  responsibilities	
  students	
  have	
  to	
  classmates	
  and	
  school	
  
       community.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will create jobs for the classroom and routines for completing the classroom
jobs.

Materials list:
-Chart paper
-Job Chart (see Everyday Math daily routine)
-Miss Bindergarten Has a Wild Day in Kindergarten by Joseph Slate

Vocabulary: role, job, responsibility

Procedure:
   § Tell the students that each one of us has something unique or important about us.
      We also each work together to achieve our common goals. We call that the role
      we play in our community. A role is the part that you play. Today we will start to
      identify your role in our classroom community
     §   Identify things in the classroom that need to be done. Make a list of the jobs that
          are needed.

Assessment:
You may want to do a quick review of concepts learned so far by asking the class:
What is a community?
What is a role or job in our community?
My School Community

       Lesson 3: Our Rights and Responsibilities in the classroom

Topic(s): Rules of the classroom.

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.7 The	
  purpose,	
  structures	
  and	
  functions	
  of	
  government	
  and	
  law	
  at	
  the	
  local,	
  state,	
  
national	
  and	
  international	
  levels.	
  
    • 1.7.12	
  State	
  basic	
  classroom,	
  school,	
  family	
  and	
  community	
  rules/laws.	
  
    • 1.7.13	
  Explain	
  the	
  reason	
  for	
  rules	
  related	
  to	
  basic	
  safety	
  and	
  fairness.	
  

1.8 The	
  interactions	
  between	
  citizens	
  and	
  their	
  government	
  in	
  the	
  making	
  and	
  
    implementation	
  of	
  laws.	
  
    • 1.8.14	
  Work	
  collaboratively	
  to	
  develop	
  classroom	
  rules.	
  

Health Curriculum Standard
Identify	
  the	
  ground	
  rules	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  school	
  environment.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will recognize that as members of a community they have rules and routines that
need to be followed.

Materials list:
-­‐Chart	
  paper	
  
-­‐No___________!	
  sheet	
  
-­‐No,	
  David!	
  and/or	
  David	
  Goes	
  to	
  School	
  by	
  David	
  Shannon

Vocabulary: rules, safety, responsibility

Procedure:
   -­‐Chart	
  paper	
  
   -­‐Read	
  No,	
  David!	
  and/or	
  David	
  Goes	
  to	
  School	
  by	
  David	
  Shannon	
  aloud.	
  	
  	
  
   -­‐Children	
  will	
  make	
  a	
  page	
  for	
  a	
  class	
  book,	
  “	
  No,	
  (Child’s	
  Name)”	
  which	
  illustrates	
  
   what	
  they	
  cannot	
  do	
  in	
  school.	
  

Assessment:
Have students name rules created in the classroom.
Teacher observations of students applying those rules.

	
  
My School Community

NO,	
  ___________________________________!	
  
	
  
	
  
My School Community

Lesson 4: Roles within the School Community

Topic(s): Identifying roles of members within the school community.

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.7 The	
  purpose,	
  structures	
  and	
  functions	
  of	
  government	
  and	
  law	
  at	
  the	
  local,	
  state,	
  
    national	
  and	
  international	
  levels.	
  
    • 1.7.12	
  State	
  basic	
  classroom,	
  school,	
  family	
  and	
  community	
  rules/laws.	
  
    • 1.7.13	
  Explain	
  the	
  reason	
  for	
  rules	
  related	
  to	
  basic	
  safety	
  and	
  fairness.	
  
1.8 The	
  interactions	
  between	
  citizens	
  and	
  their	
  government	
  in	
  the	
  making	
  and	
  
    implementation	
  of	
  laws.	
  
    • 1.8.14	
  Work	
  collaboratively	
  to	
  develop	
  classroom	
  rules.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will list school community members
Students will recognize the school community member roles within the schools

Materials list: chart paper
Pete the Cat Rocking In My School Shoes by Eric Litwin

Vocabulary: role, job

Procedure:
Read a book about school community
School Tour: Introduce students to school community members and where they are
around the building.
Take pictures of school community members to make a chart or class book for students to
refer back to throughout the year.

Assessment:
Students name at least one school community member and what they do.
My School Community

Lesson 5: Our Role within the School Community

Topic(s): Identify our role in the school community

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.7 The	
  purpose,	
  structures	
  and	
  functions	
  of	
  government	
  and	
  law	
  at	
  the	
  local,	
  state,	
  
    national	
  and	
  international	
  levels.	
  
    • 1.7.12	
  State	
  basic	
  classroom,	
  school,	
  family	
  and	
  community	
  rules/laws.	
  
    • 1.7.13	
  Explain	
  the	
  reason	
  for	
  rules	
  related	
  to	
  basic	
  safety	
  and	
  fairness.	
  
1.8 The	
  interactions	
  between	
  citizens	
  and	
  their	
  government	
  in	
  the	
  making	
  and	
  
    implementation	
  of	
  laws.	
  
    • 1.8.14	
  Work	
  collaboratively	
  to	
  develop	
  classroom	
  rules.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will identify their role in various school settings (PE, Music, Art, etc.)

Materials list: chart paper

Vocabulary: role, expectations, same, purpose, collaborate

Procedure:
Have each specialist teacher come into your classroom for the first 10 minutes of their
specialist class time to discuss; what their role is in the school community, rules when
students are with them and what the students’ roles are when they are with that teacher.

Make a connection with the classroom rules and the specialist rules.

Assessment:
Once all Specialists have visited your classroom, you may want to create a chart that
shows the similarities about school community member roles and rules within your
classroom and the specialists.

Media Connection:
  1. Create SMARTBoard document showing a picture of each school community
      member and job in the school.
  2. Create a power point with pictures of each community member and have student
      voice-overs that tell the audience: the name of the school community member and
      their job and what students roles are with that teacher. “This is Mrs. _____. She
      teaches P.E. She helps us stay healthy and learn to be teammates. We need to be
      safe and good listeners when we are in P.E.”
My School Community

Lesson 6: Roles in the community outside of the school.
	
  
Topic(s): Identifying the roles of people outside of the school community.

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.4 Geographical	
  space	
  and	
  place.	
  
    • 1.4.7	
  Explain	
  the	
  geographical	
  relationships	
  of	
  familiar	
  places	
  in	
  one’s	
  own	
  
       community	
  (e.g.	
  home	
  to	
  school,	
  home	
  to	
  store).	
  
    • 1.4.8	
  Identify	
  and	
  explain	
  the	
  significance	
  of	
  important	
  locations	
  in	
  one’s	
  
       neighborhood.	
  
1.11How	
  different	
  economic	
  systems	
  organize	
  resources.	
  
    • 1.11.19	
  Identify	
  and	
  role-­‐play	
  diverse	
  jobs.	
  
    • 1.11.20	
  Describe	
  basic	
  functions	
  of	
  key	
  community	
  roles	
  (e.g.	
  police	
  officer,	
  
       mail	
  carrier,	
  farmer,	
  merchant).	
  

Objective(s):
Students will identify one job in their neighborhood community and explain what their
role is in the community.

Materials list:
-chart paper
-Community Helper books (i.e. firefighter, police officer, etc.)
-Career Day by Ann Rockwell
Vocabulary: role, job, responsibility, helpers,

Procedure:
Read various books about community workers and discuss their roles within the
community.
Make connections with school community members and community workers.
“A policemen helps us be safe in the community and the principal

Assessment:
You may want to do a quick review of concepts learned so far by asking the class:
What is a community?
What is a role or job in our community?
My School Community

Lesson 7: Modes of transportation in the community

Topic(s): Identifying how each student gets to school.

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.4 Geographical	
  space	
  and	
  place.	
  
    • 1.4.7	
  Explain	
  the	
  geographical	
  relationships	
  of	
  familiar	
  places	
  in	
  one’s	
  own	
  
       community	
  (e.g.	
  home	
  to	
  school,	
  home	
  to	
  store).	
  
    • 1.4.8	
  Identify	
  and	
  explain	
  the	
  significance	
  of	
  important	
  locations	
  in	
  one’s	
  
       neighborhood.	
  

Greenwich Math Curriculum Standard
K.4-­‐-­‐Collect,	
  organize	
  and	
  display	
  data	
  using	
  appropriate	
  statistical	
  and	
  graphical	
  
methods.	
  	
  
    • K.22	
  Pose	
  questions	
  about	
  personal	
  experiences	
  and	
  the	
  environment.	
  
    • K.23	
  Collect	
  data	
  and	
  organize	
  information	
  through	
  counting,	
  sorting,	
  making	
  
           lists,	
  tallies	
  and	
  tables.	
  
    • K.24	
  Construct	
  real	
  graphs	
  and	
  picture	
  graphs	
  and	
  describe	
  the	
  data	
  using	
  
           the	
  terms	
  more,	
  less	
  and	
  same.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will create a graph showing how they got to school that day.

Materials list:
This is the Way We Go to School by Edith Baer
Transportation icons (see next page)

Vocabulary: transportation, graph, data, more, less, equal

Procedure:
Teacher will ask students to share how they get to school. Students can pick the
appropriate and cut and color. Teacher and students will graph how each child gets to
school. Teacher should discuss why students go to school one way verses another.
Assessment:
Students will analyze graph with teacher.
My School Community

	
  
My School Community

	
  
My School Community

Lesson 8: Diverse Community Members
	
  
Topic(s): Identifying the number of letters in students’ names.

Greenwich Math Curriculum Standard
K.4-­‐-­‐Collect,	
  organize	
  and	
  display	
  data	
  using	
  appropriate	
  statistical	
  and	
  graphical	
  
methods.	
  	
  
    • K.22	
  Pose	
  questions	
  about	
  personal	
  experiences	
  and	
  the	
  environment.	
  
    • K.23	
  Collect	
  data	
  and	
  organize	
  information	
  through	
  counting,	
  sorting,	
  making	
  
           lists,	
  tallies	
  and	
  tables.	
  
    • K.24	
  Construct	
  real	
  graphs	
  and	
  picture	
  graphs	
  and	
  describe	
  the	
  data	
  using	
  
           the	
  terms	
  more,	
  less	
  and	
  same.	
  

Health Curriculum Standard
   • Identify	
  themselves	
  as	
  unique	
  and	
  capable	
  individuals,	
  with	
  positive	
  traits	
  and	
  
       qualities,	
  worthy	
  of	
  care	
  and	
  respect.	
  
   • Identify	
  that	
  diverse	
  backgrounds	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  uniqueness	
  of	
  individuals.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will create a graph showing how many letters are in their name.

Materials list:
Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes
boxed strip of paper
Chart/Graph paper
Background sheet of student’s name (Send this home and collect it back before you begin
the lesson.)
Vocabulary: graph, data, more, less, equal

Procedure:
Teacher will read and discuss Chrysanthemum.
Teacher will also have a discussion about where our names came from (if they know) and
encourage students to go home an
Students will write their name in a boxed strip of paper
S a r a h
Strips of paper are graphed to show the various lengths of names.
Assessment:

Students will analyze graph with teacher.
My School Community

Name: __________________________

Dear Parents,
We are learning about each other’s names and the uniqueness among us.
Please complete the sheet with your child below to help your child
participate in this lesson.
	
  
          Child’s	
  Name	
  and	
  Self-­‐portrait	
  
                                                        	
  
                           _________________________________________________________	
  
                    	
  
Where	
  did	
  my	
  name	
  come	
  from?	
  
	
  
	
  
My School Community

Lesson 9: Diverse Community Members

Topic(s): Identifying hair color.

Greenwich Math Curriculum Standard
K.4-­‐-­‐Collect,	
  organize	
  and	
  display	
  data	
  using	
  appropriate	
  statistical	
  and	
  graphical	
  
methods.	
  	
  
    • K.22	
  Pose	
  questions	
  about	
  personal	
  experiences	
  and	
  the	
  environment.	
  
    • K.23	
  Collect	
  data	
  and	
  organize	
  information	
  through	
  counting,	
  sorting,	
  making	
  
           lists,	
  tallies	
  and	
  tables.	
  
    • K.24	
  Construct	
  real	
  graphs	
  and	
  picture	
  graphs	
  and	
  describe	
  the	
  data	
  using	
  
           the	
  terms	
  more,	
  less	
  and	
  same.	
  
           	
  
Health Curriculum Standard
    • Identify	
  themselves	
  as	
  unique	
  and	
  capable	
  individuals,	
  with	
  positive	
  traits	
  and	
  
           qualities,	
  worthy	
  of	
  care	
  and	
  respect.	
  
    • Identify	
  that	
  diverse	
  backgrounds	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  uniqueness	
  of	
  individuals.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will create a graph showing the different hair colors in the classroom.

Materials list:
Mirrors
3x3 drawing paper
sample icons for hair coloring
chart paper
Amanda’s Perfect Hair by Linda Milstein

Vocabulary: graph, data, more, less, equal

Teacher will read and discuss Amanda’s Perfect Hair.
Students can share hair stories.
Students should use mirrors to help figure out their hair color. Then they should do a self
portrait and color in their appropriate hair color.

Assessment:

Students will graph hair color and analyze graph with teacher.
My School Community

Sample icons for hair coloring.

                                         	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
     	
  	
  
	
  
                                                                                                      	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  

                                  	
  
My School Community

Lesson 10: Diverse Community Members

Topic(s): Identifying eye color.

Greenwich Math Curriculum Standard
K.4-­‐-­‐Collect,	
  organize	
  and	
  display	
  data	
  using	
  appropriate	
  statistical	
  and	
  graphical	
  
methods.	
  	
  
    • K.22	
  Pose	
  questions	
  about	
  personal	
  experiences	
  and	
  the	
  environment.	
  
    • K.23	
  Collect	
  data	
  and	
  organize	
  information	
  through	
  counting,	
  sorting,	
  making	
  
           lists,	
  tallies	
  and	
  tables.	
  
    • K.24	
  Construct	
  real	
  graphs	
  and	
  picture	
  graphs	
  and	
  describe	
  the	
  data	
  using	
  
           the	
  terms	
  more,	
  less	
  and	
  same.	
  

Health Curriculum Standard
   • Identify	
  themselves	
  as	
  unique	
  and	
  capable	
  individuals,	
  with	
  positive	
  traits	
  and	
  
       qualities,	
  worthy	
  of	
  care	
  and	
  respect.	
  
   • Identify	
  that	
  diverse	
  backgrounds	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  uniqueness	
  of	
  individuals.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will create a graph showing the different eye colors in the classroom.

Materials list:
Mirrors
The Eye Book by Theo LeSieg
3x3 drawing paper
chart paper

Vocabulary: graph, data, more, less, equal

Procedure:
Teacher will read and discuss The Eye Book.
Students use mirrors to help figure out their eye color. Then they should draw an eye and
color in the appropriate eye color.

Assessment:
Students will graph eye color and analyze graph with teacher.
My School Community

Lesson 11: Diverse Community Members

Topic(s): Identifying the number of boys and girls within the class.

Greenwich Math Curriculum Standard
K.4-­‐-­‐Collect,	
  organize	
  and	
  display	
  data	
  using	
  appropriate	
  statistical	
  and	
  graphical	
  
methods.	
  	
  
    • K.22	
  Pose	
  questions	
  about	
  personal	
  experiences	
  and	
  the	
  environment.	
  
    • K.23	
  Collect	
  data	
  and	
  organize	
  information	
  through	
  counting,	
  sorting,	
  making	
  
           lists,	
  tallies	
  and	
  tables.	
  
    • K.24	
  Construct	
  real	
  graphs	
  and	
  picture	
  graphs	
  and	
  describe	
  the	
  data	
  using	
  
           the	
  terms	
  more,	
  less	
  and	
  same.	
  
           	
  
Health Curriculum Standard
    • Identify	
  themselves	
  as	
  unique	
  and	
  capable	
  individuals,	
  with	
  positive	
  traits	
  and	
  
           qualities,	
  worthy	
  of	
  care	
  and	
  respect.	
  
    • Identify	
  that	
  diverse	
  backgrounds	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  uniqueness	
  of	
  individuals.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will create a graph showing the number of boys and girls in the classroom.

Materials list:
Chart paper
3x3 drawing paper
Ms. Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten by Joseph Slate and Ashley Wolff

Vocabulary: graph, data, more, less, equal

Procedure:
Teacher will read and discuss Ms. Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten.
Assessment:
Students will graph number of boys and girls and analyze graph with teacher.
My School Community

Sample Icons for boys and girls
	
  
Sample Icons for boys and girls
	
  
	
  
My School Community

Lesson 12: The Culture of a Community
Topic: Identify family cultures, traditions and family groups.

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
1.13 The	
  characteristics	
  of	
  and	
  interactions	
  among	
  culture,	
  social	
  systems	
  and	
  
institutions.	
  
    • 1.13.22	
  Identify	
  cultural	
  characteristics	
  of	
  self	
  and	
  family	
  (e.g.	
  food,	
  language,	
  
        religion,	
  traditions).	
  
        	
  
Health Curriculum Standard
    • Identify	
  that	
  diverse	
  backgrounds	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  uniqueness	
  of	
  
        individuals.	
  

Objective(s):
Students will understand that each community can be made of many different cultures,
traditions and family groups.

Materials list:
We Are All Alike, We are All Different by Cheltenham Elementary Kindergartners
It’s Ok to be Different by Todd Parr

Vocabulary: culture, traditions, celebrations

Procedure:
Teacher reads and discusses book.
Students draw a picture of their family and a celebration or tradition they do together.
(Or you can have students work with the media specialist/Art teacher to draw this on Kid
Pix)
(Pictures can be put together to form a quilt on butcher paper)
Assessment
Students share their drawings and family tradition with the class.
My School Community

Lesson 13: Feelings in Our Community
Topic: Identify feelings

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
3.1	
  Use	
  evidence	
  to	
  identify,	
  analyze	
  and	
  evaluate	
  historical	
  interpretations.	
  
      • 3.1.1	
  Predict	
  how	
  another	
  person	
  might	
  feel	
  given	
  a	
  simple	
  scenario.	
  
          	
  
3.2	
  Analyze	
  and	
  evaluate	
  human	
  action	
  in	
  historical	
  and/or	
  contemporary	
  contexts	
  
from	
  alternative	
  points	
  of	
  view.	
  
      • 3.2.2	
  Describe	
  similarities	
  and	
  differences	
  of	
  their	
  own	
  feelings	
  compared	
  
          with	
  others.	
  
          	
  
Health Curriculum Standard
      • State	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  acknowledging	
  emotions,	
  and	
  identify	
  the	
  ways	
  of	
  
          appropriately	
  dealing	
  with	
  these	
  emotions.

Objective(s):
Students will understand that each community member has different feelings.

Materials list:
Chart paper
Noisy Nora by Rosemary Wells
When Sophie Gets Angry-Really Really Angry by Molly Bang
I Was So Mad by Mercer Meyer
Today I Feel Silly: And other Moods That Makes My Day. By Jamie Lee Curtis

Vocabulary: feelings, happy, sad, angry, upset, disappointed etc.

Procedure:
The teacher reads one of the suggested books and discusses it with students.
Assign a feeling to a table and students draw things that elicit those feelings.

Assessment
Tables share their feelings posters and add the teacher can add to the posters based on
what the class shares and adds.
My School Community

Lesson 14: Problem Solving in Our Community
Topic: Identify ways to solve problems in our classroom and in our school.

Connecticut Social Studies Curriculum Framework Objectives:
3.3	
  Apply	
  appropriate	
  historical,	
  geographic,	
  political,	
  economic	
  and	
  cultural	
  
concepts	
  and	
  methods	
  in	
  proposing	
  and	
  evaluating	
  solutions	
  to	
  contemporary	
  
problems.	
  
      • 3.3.3	
  Students	
  will	
  solve	
  conflicts	
  and	
  classroom	
  issues	
  using	
  appropriate	
  
          strategies.	
  
          	
  
Health Curriculum Standard
      • State	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  acknowledging	
  emotions,	
  and	
  identify	
  the	
  ways	
  of	
  
          appropriately	
  dealing	
  with	
  these	
  emotions.

Objective(s):
Students will understand how to solve problems within the classroom and the school at
large.

Materials list:
It’s Mine by Leo Lionni
Me First by Helen Lester
Boosty Barker Bites by Barbara Bottner

Vocabulary: problem, solution

Procedure:
The teacher reads one of the suggested books and discusses it with students.
Class role plays various classroom/school problems and discusses possible solutions.

Assessment:
The class creates a chart with a list of problems and possible procedures for solving the
problem.
Teacher observation.

Revised July 23, 2012
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