MA Interior Design SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING AND ENGINEERING - Student Handbook Academic Year 2018-19 - UEL

 
MA Interior Design SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING AND ENGINEERING - Student Handbook Academic Year 2018-19 - UEL
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING AND ENGINEERING

            MA Interior Design

                Student Handbook

               Academic Year 2018-19

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Contents

1      WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION TO THE SCHOOL

2      KEY STAFF; CONTACT DETAILS AND STAFF ROLES

3      INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAMME

4      PROGRAMME OPERATION AND STUDENT REGISTRATION

5      TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

6      MODULE SPECIFICATIONS

7      PLACEMENT REQUIREMENTS (WHERE APPLICABLE)

8      PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT

9      STUDENT SUPPORT
10     RESOURCES AND GENERAL INFORMATION

11     ACADEMIC APPEALS

12     COMPLAINTS

13     EXTENUATION

APPENDIX A                Campus Map

APPENDIX B                     Academic Calendar

APPENDIX C                     List of useful web pages

APPENDIX D                     Student Attendance and Engagement Policy –           Guidance for students

APPENDIX E                     Terms of Reference for Programme Committee

APPENDIX F                     Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism

APPENDIX G                     Health and Safety

APPENDIX H                     Support offered by Student Life

1      WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION TO THE SCHOOL

Welcome to the School of Architecture, Computing and Engineering (ACE) at the University of East London.
We are dedicated to supporting our students in their studies and offer a wealth of knowledge, innovation and
experience that provides students with the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and understanding of their
chosen field.

The School provides a dynamic and stimulating environment in which to study inspiring and creative subjects.
ACE aims to be the leading provider of employable graduates in the country through introducing the latest
pedagogical concepts, novel learning and teaching methods, and practice-based research of relevance to the
local and regional cultural community.

The rich diversity of cultures, life experience and backgrounds of East London is reflected in those of our
London-based students who have chosen to study at UEL. They are together on campus with many

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international students from around the World. In order to respond appropriately and sensitively to any issues
relating to diversity, UEL has an Equality and Diversity Strategy which can be found at:
http://dl-cfs 01.uel.ac.uk/hrservices/documents/emhandbook/generalpolicies.pdf

We want you to be able to make the most of your time with us here at UEL, properly and fully supported at
every step.

In January 2015, we launched two brand new Student Centres, at our Docklands and Stratford campuses, with
state-of-the-art technology and a new ‘One Stop Shop’ for all your queries. We will be able to offer you the full
range of services, including helpdesk services, a dedicated telephone service and webmail facility. These will
be delivered by fully trained Student Support staff, able to help you quickly and effectively with any general
questions and provide you with support and guidance immediately.

The new Student Centres will have better social spaces too, for you to meet friends, eat, drink, study and relax,
so you’ll be able to spend your time doing the things you really want to do. The new Centres will be your place
at UEL, the heart of your student life.

2       INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAMME

This handbook is intended for all students taking the MA Interior Design. You will find it a useful source of
information at the start of your programme but you should also keep it for reference purposes throughout your
time here. It is, however, not intended to provide all you need to know, so you should also read the ‘Essential
Guide For Students’ booklet, ‘The Student Charter’, and the School of Architecture, Computing & Engineering
Guide For Students handbook.

The University is staffed by a team of enthusiastic and caring professionals, both teaching and support staff,
and we will work hard to make your educational experience a successful one. If you can match this by
participating fully and giving your best, then I am sure that your time at the University of East London and within
the School of Architecture, Computing & Engineering will be both enjoyable and rewarding.

A Postgraduate Masters course differs from undergraduate studies in that you are expected to work much more
independently. We will meet two or three times a week. In between the scheduled teaching activities,
however, you need to work intensely and research independently. We will not spoon-feed you, but we will
guide you and support you. We will issue regular briefs and requests for coursework to help you meet the final
learning outcomes and aims required in order to be awarded your MA degree. It is therefore important that you
undertake the tasks we ask of you, even if you find them difficult and may have never done them before. You
learn by doing.

3. STRUCTURE OF THE PROGRAMME

The MA Interior Design is a full-time programme. This means that is expected from you to devote the equivalent
amount of time that you would devote to a full-time job.

This programme is designed to give you the opportunity to:

•   Enhance your ability to grasp complex design ideas and to engage in creative and experimental processes.
•   Develop an in-depth understanding of the contemporary discourse on Interior Design.
•   Engage in advanced design abilities.
•   Represent and communicate ideas.
•   Develop a professional ethos and attitude.
•   Contextualise design; develop the ability to understand the links between design and other cultural and
    everyday phenomena.

The 12-month programme is organised into three terms: (1) Sept – Dec., (2) Jan. – May, (3) June – Sept.
Module AR7030 is taught over term 1 and 2.
Module AR7031 is taught over term 3.
Module AR7032 is taught over term 1.
Module AR7033 is taught over term 2.

The main aim of Module 1 is to allow students to experiment through a number of different brief exercises, and
then consolidate their skills through an advanced design project.

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The main aim of Module 2 is to allow the students to specialise on a topic of their choice. The coursework that
they complete may have the form of a research thesis, a design-driven thesis, or a professional practice
advanced thesis.

Module        Module Name                             Component    Percentage   Word count / Duration
Code                                                  of           Weighting
                                                      Assessment
AR7030        XSXL - Interior Design Project: From    Portfolio1   100%         Equivalent to 420 hours of
              Context to Detail (60 Credits)                                    study.
                                                                                Term 1 and 2
AR7031        Thesis: Into the real (60 Credits)      Portfolio    100%         Equivalent to 420 hours of
                                                                                study.
                                                                                Term 3
AR7032        Interior Design Theory 1 (30 credits)   Portfolio    100%         Portfolio including reports and
                                                                                visual material. Equivalent to
                                                                                210 hours of study.
                                                                                Term 1
AR7033        Interior Design Theory 2 (30 credits)   Portfolio    100%         Portfolio including reports and
                                                                                visual material. Equivalent to
                                                                                210 hours of study.
                                                                                Term 2

Intermediate Awards
If you are unable to complete your studies, you will not leave UEL without a qualification. The following awards
can be made on successful completion credits as follows:

MA Interior Design: 180 credits
PG Diploma in Interior Design: 120 credits
PG Cert in Interior Design: 60 credits

Attendance Modes

This is a full-time one-year programme and attendance is obligatory. Students cannot study remotely.
All students will participate in the common UEL induction week activities (dates can be found on the academic
calendar). During the induction week, as well as during the first week of your studies, you will meet the
programme tutors and you will be briefed about the programme content in detail.

KEY STAFF; CONTACT DETAILS AND STAFF ROLES

Support While You Study
Following a higher education programme inevitably takes a number of years and many things will happen to you
during the time you are studying. Some events are predictable, but others are unexpected. Some are relatively
insignificant, but others can seriously affect your studies.

The School of Architecture, Computing and Engineering strives for excellence in student support. You will
always be able to find a sympathetic person who will try to help you if at all possible.

Obviously it would take a very special kind of person to be able to sort out every different type of problem that
might arise. The most important thing is to find the RIGHT person to help you. The first person to contact in
many cases will be your Programme Leader. Even if they are not the “best” person to solve your problem they
will know someone who is!

Programme Leader: Dr Anastasia Karandinou

Your Programme Leader will be able to advise you on general matters about the programme you are following.
If you have a problem with a particular module, and have not been able to resolve it by talking to the Module
Leader, you should bring the matter to the Programme Leader.

Programme Leaders are responsible for liaison with Programme Representatives for the year. They also have
other duties, which vary from year-to-year and are often connected with quality improvement projects.

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Module Leaders and personal tutors:

Module Leaders are responsible for the delivery of their module. They co-ordinate the team of tutors who are
available to you during tutorials and practical sessions.

As far as possible any problems or questions concerning individual modules should be addressed to the Module
Leader. In most cases this can be done within seminars, workshops or practical sessions. Occasionally, it may
be necessary to speak to the tutor outside these times. General academic advice can also be obtained from
Personal Tutors.

UEL ensures the pastoral care of its students through a system of Personal Tutors. Therefore, if you have a
problem of any kind your Personal Tutor is the person to whom you should go in the first instance. Your
Personal Tutor may be able to help you or will be able to point you in the right direction.

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor within the first two weeks of their arrival at the University. This is a
member of academic staff who you can go to, individually, for general guidance and advice. Personal Tutors
may discuss key choices (e.g. subject choices or research paths) and review your progress. If you are unsure
as to who your personal tutor is, please contact the programme leader.

Personal Tutors will arrange meetings with their tutees; no less than four meetings should be scheduled during
the year.

CONTACTS:

General Enquiries
School of Architecture, Computing & Engineering, University of East London,
4-6 University Way, London E16 2RD

School Reception/Helpdesk
EB
      +44 (0)20 9223 2041

Website
www.uel.ac.uk/ace

Dean of School
Dr. Hassan Abdalla

Programme Leader
Dr Anastasia Karandinou         a.karandinou@uel.ac.uk
      + 44 (0)20 8223 7033

Programme Administrator
Mark James  M.James2@uel.ac.uk
      + 44 (0)20 8223 2511

Technician/Technical Staff AVA Building
David Ring – Technical Resource Manager          d.ring@uel.ac.uk
      + 44 (0)20 8223 3445

Module Leaders and personal tutors

The team of tutors will be introduced to you in the beginning of the year. The programme leader will email you
the contact details of all tutors of the programme. The core tutors for this academic year are the following:

Dr Anastasia Karandinou (MA programme leader)  a.karandinou@uel.ac.uk
Luisa Alpalhao (MA tutor and BA programme leader)  luisa@atelierurbannomads.org
Sabina Andron  sabinaandron@gmail.com
Kyriaki Nasioula  kyriaki@nasioulas.gr
Giovanni Petrolito  gi.petrolito@gmail.com

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4       PROGRAMME OPERATION AND STUDENT REGISTRATION

Student Module registration is handled through the Student Hub, located on the Ground Floor of the East
Building at Docklands Campus.

Programme Delivery

Knowledge is developed through
• Seminars, lectures and guided workshops
• Knowledge-based activities with feedback;
• Studio-based discussions and activities.

Thinking skills are developed through
• Reflective activities with feedback;

Practical skills are developed through
• Studio discussions, hands-on workshops and activities.
• Research skills-based activities with feedback.

Skills for life and work (general skills) are developed through
• Planning activities with feedback;
• Project work.

POLITE REQUEST

As a matter of common courtesy, during all lectures and other classes, please:

Attend all timetabled sessions including lectures, tutorials and practical
Arrive on time
Have your own materials and all equipment required for the class
Turn off your mobile phone
Remove Bluetooth and other ear pieces
Remove your hat or baseball cap
Do not chat
Do not wander around or in and out of the room
Speak English at all times

Supporting you now and in the future

There are a range of ways in which you can access support for your studies, which are outlined through this
handbook. For example, each School has introduced Learning Achievement Assistants (LAAs)
and Learning Achievement Mentors (LAMs) to help you achieve your full potential by developing your
academic skills. Our Stay on Track campaign is a new initiative to help you stay on top of your studies as well
as access the right support when you need it. Details of other sources of advice and support can be found
elsewhere in this handbook.

New regulations

The University’s academic regulations are available at:
Academic Framework Regulations
http://www.uel.ac.uk/wwwmedia/internal/qa/policies/Academic-Framework---Assessment-Regulations-
Section-3-updated-June-2014.doc

The Importance of Attendance

You have made a commitment to work towards achieving academic success by enrolling on your programme
and registering on your modules. We know, as you do, that in order to achieve ultimate success in your studies
it is important that you participate in, and engage fully with, all your scheduled activities such as lectures,
workshops and seminars. We therefore regard attendance as essential, as we are sure you will.

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Punctuality is also crucial (if you turn up late you may find you will not be allowed to enter – late attendance
causes disruption for others). Other aspects of behaviour are important as well – for instance, no food or drink
should be consumed in lectures or classes and all mobile phones should be turned off.

Recording Attendance
We are obliged to keep records of your attendance. For all teaching activities specified by your School
(lectures, tutorials, workshops, seminars, etc.) a record will be kept. You must ensure that you can demonstrate
your attendance through this recording process by swiping in to booked venues. It is your responsibility to
ensure that your presence at each seminar/tutorial/workshop is noted.

If you cannot attend
If you cannot attend you should let us know, either beforehand or as soon as possible afterwards. You should
notify your Programme Administrator. You should give your name, student number and the class for which you
were unable to attend.

If you do not attend regularly
If you do not attend regularly or do not keep us informed of occasional non-attendance you will find that the
School will contact you to discuss the matter with you. It is important that you take this communication seriously
and make contact immediately.

If you attend regularly
If you attend regularly you will get the most out of your studies, you will maximise your chances of success, and
you will find the relationships you build up in classes support you in your achievements. If you need to inform
UEL about any changes to your address or contact details, please visit the Student Hub on the Ground Floor of
the East Building, or go online to UEL Direct.

5       TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

How we monitor the quality of this programme

The quality of this programme is monitored each year through evaluating:

        external examiner reports (considering quality and standards);
        statistical information (considering issues such as the pass rate);
        student feedback.

Drawing on this and other information, course teams undertake the annual Review and Enhancement Process
which is coordinated at School level and includes student participation. The process is monitored by the Quality
Committee.

Once every six years an in-depth review of the whole field is undertaken by a panel that includes at least two
external subject specialists. The panel considers documents, looks at student work, speaks to current and
former students and speaks to staff before drawing its conclusions. The result is a report highlighting good
practice and identifying areas where action is needed.

Assessment Regulations

The assessment of each module will be based on a portfolio submission. Through the portfolio the student will
provide evidence that the learning outcomes have been met.

By the term portfolio here we mean a body of work, which includes a range of different elements, such as visual
material, short essays, evidence of the student’s involvement in learning activities, etc.

The portfolio will present both the process and the final outcome of the students’ work, and will include
drawings, visualisations, photos of models and other visual and written material. The portfolio will also include
visual evidence of the student’s participation in the required learning activities, such as presentations, making
workshops, field trips, online discussions/platforms, etc. In this way, the portfolio will offer the tutors the
possibility to assess the student’s progress and effort at different stages of the project.
Students will be expected to complete specific exercises/coursework by given deadlines throughout the year.
Formative assessment will take place at the end of each exercise, and students will be given formative

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feedback. These distinct exercises or stages of a project will be included in the portfolio of the relevant module,
which will be assessed in a summative manner.

Students with disabilities and/or particular learning needs should discuss assessments with the Programme
Leader to ensure they are able to fully engage with all assessment within the programme.

Intellectual skills are assessed by
student performance in seminars, essays and the Thesis. Each of these is a learning, as well as an assessment
tool.

Practical skills are assessed by
workshop and design exercises.

Transferable skills are assessed through
student performance in essays and the dissertation, as well as in individual tutorials and dissertation seminars.

http://www.uel.ac.uk/lls/index.htm (also detailed in Appendix C) provides full information on referencing and
the avoidance of plagiarism, reference and web link to Academic Integrity Policy. Please refer to Appendix F
containing information on Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism.

The electronic version of “Cite Them Right: the essential referencing guide” 9th edition, can be accessed whilst
on or off campus, via UEL Direct. The book can only be read online and no part of it can be printed nor
downloaded.

Feedback from the double marking will follow usually within two weeks of submission, the external examiner
may then amend marks before the marks go to the Assessment and Award Boards.

Assessment and feedback are fundamental parts of the student learning experience, The UEL Assessment and
Feedback Policy can be found at: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/policies/assessmentpolicy

Details of the assessment criteria used for the modules can be found within the module specifications included
further down in this handbook.

Our Skills Curriculum is an entitlement for our students. It has been designed to ensure that students are
taught, have the opportunity to practice, and are assessed in Skills for: Academic Learning, Employability
(Professional Practice) and Research. Details can be found at: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/policies/skills/

The UEL Skills Portal has been designed to act as a single gateway to a whole range of skills support that will
help you progress through your studies. Details can be found at: http://www.uel.ac.uk/skills/introduction.htm

Research Integrity

The University of East London conducts high quality, innovative research and is guided by the principles and
standards outlined in The Concordat to Support Research Integrity 2012; the University’s Code of Practice for
Research policy; Code of Practice for Research Ethics; Procedure for the Investigation of Misconduct in
Research, for staff and students, and the UEL Research Strategy 2014-2017. The Concordat seeks to provide
a national framework for good research governance and its conduct. The Concordat applies to all fields of
research supporting a research environment that is underpinned by ethical values. The University adheres to its
responsibility to support and promote the highest standards of rigour and integrity and embed a culture of
honesty, transparency, care and respect for all participants and subjects of research. The University is
committed to ensuring that research is conducted with integrity and good research practices are upheld.

Research Ethics

The University through its researchers will ensure that any research involving human participants, human
material, or personal or sensitive data complies with all legal and ethical requirements and other applicable
guidelines. The University has established Research Ethics Committees at University and School level to
ensure appropriate ethical review of research projects involving human participation or personal data. The

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research study will require ethical approval from the University Research Ethics Committee (UREC), one of the
School Research Ethics Committees (SRECs) or where applicable, Collaborative Partner Research Ethics
Committees (CRECs). UREC reviews ethics applications from staff, MPhil, PhD, Post and Professional
Doctorates and Masters by research students. SRECs and CRECs consider applications from taught Masters
and undergraduate students.

All research involving human participation or human material will require formal approval from UREC, SREC or
CREC before the research commences. Students should submit research projects involving human
participants, human material or personal data for ethical review, by the appropriate University Research Ethics
Committee, and abide by the outcome of the review. The Ethics Committees ensure that appropriate
procedures for obtaining informed consent are observed, having particular regard to the needs and capacity of
the subjects involved. The dignity, rights, safety and well-being of participants must be the primary
consideration in any research study. Appropriate care must be taken when research projects involve:
vulnerable groups, such as elderly people, children or people with mental ill-health; and covert studies or other
forms of research which do not involve full disclosure to participants. The Research Ethics Committees also
ensure that such research projects have been submitted for approval to all applicable external bodies, ethical,
regulatory or otherwise.

Students who wish to conduct research in the NHS or Health and Social Care must apply to the NHS through
the Integrated Research Application System (IRAS). The on-line application for ethical approval will be
reviewed by a NHS or Social Care Research Ethics Committee. Students conducting studies under the
auspices of any of the UK Departments of Health and/or the NHS are required to submit copies of their NHS or
Social Care ethics approval letter and IRAS application form to the UREC Committee. UREC will grant consent
for the study and issue an approval and sponsorship letter for the research, on behalf of the University. The
University acts as a sponsor for NHS or Social Care approved research projects. Students should conduct their
studies in accordance with the conditions specified in the NHS or Social Care ethics approval letter.

Students should understand their responsibilities to conduct research to high ethical standards and be aware of
policies and procedures on good research practice. The University has established guidelines to preserve the
confidentiality and security of personal data, relating to human participants and human material involved in
research projects. Students must comply with the regulations of appropriate regulatory or statutory bodies and
any legal obligations when conducting or collaborating in, research in other countries. Students should also
observe the legal and ethical requirements existing in the UK and in the countries where the research will take
place. Students should ensure that they have fully prepared for their planned research, allowing enough time to
submit an application for ethical approval and obtain appropriate consent. It is advisable to seek guidance from
supervisors on proposed research projects.

No data collection or recruitment of human participants for the research study may commence until ethical
approval from UREC; SREC; CREC; or a NHS or Social Care Research Ethics Committee is confirmed.
Students may only use data where ethical approval has been obtained, and in accordance with the conditions
specified on the approval letter throughout the length of the study. Amendments to an approved research study
must be submitted to the relevant Research Ethics Committee and obtain ethical approval before any changes
to the project may be implemented. Ethical approval for research projects cannot be granted retrospectively.
Research conducted with human participants or human material, without ethical approval, is considered
misconduct in research and as such students may be subject to disciplinary proceedings.

If students consider that human participants in theirs, or others, research are subject to unreasonable risk or
harm, they must report the concerns to their supervisor and, where required, to the appropriate regulatory
authority. Similarly, concerns relating to the improper and/or unlicensed use or storage of human material, or
the improper use or storage of personal data, should also be reported.

More information can be found on the following documents:
Code of Practice for Research policy:
http://www.uel.ac.uk/gradschool/ethics/

Code of Practice for Research Ethics:
http://www.uel.ac.uk/gradschool/ethics/

Research Integrity and Ethics website:
http://www.uel.ac.uk/gradschool/research/
Procedure for the Investigation of Misconduct in Research - Students:
http://www.uel.ac.uk/gradschool/currentstudents/library/

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The Concordat to Support Research Integrity, 2012:
http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/highereducation/Documents/2012/TheConcordatToSupportResearchInt
egrity.pdf

UEL Research Strategy, 2014-2017:
http://www.uel.ac.uk/wwwmedia/uelwebsite/contentassets/images/research/REDS453---UEL-Research-
Strategy-Document-V.3.pdf

6        MODULE SPECIFICATIONS

Module specifications are available to view electronically, and can be found at www.uel.ac.uk/ace

                                                    Module Specification
Module Title:                        Module Code: AR7030            Module Leader:
XSXL - Interior Design Project:                                     Dr Anastasia Karandinou
From Context to Detail               Level: 7

                                     Credit: 60

                                     ECTS credit: 30
Pre-requisite:                                           Pre-cursor:
Co-requisite:                                            Excluded combinations :
Location of delivery: UEL
                                                    Main aim(s) of the module:
    -    To develop an in-depth understanding of the contemporary discourse on Interior Design.
    -    To develop advanced design skills.
    -    To develop the ability to design processes which will lead to innovative design.
    -    To develop a range of representational skills.
    -    To develop a professional ethos and attitude.
    -    To develop the ability to contextualise design; to develop the ability to understand the links between design and other
         cultural and everyday phenomena.

                                                         Main topics of study:
    -    Advanced design principles and methods.
    -    Contemporary Interior Design.
    -    Representational methods and techniques.
    -    Specialised design projects. (For example: retail design/ home interiors design/ furniture design/ stage set design.)
    -    Through this module, students will engage in shorter projects in order to examine a concept or skill in depth, and in longer
         projects, in order to combine and consolidate the knowledge and the skills developed. For some projects, the process will
         simulate some of the key-stages of a ‘life’ professional interior design project. For parts of the project, the students will
         work in groups and will address a brief as if it was a life project.

Specific themes of study may include:

              -    The new market era; from local to high-street, to e-commerce, and back to (g)local. The market place has always
                   been a place for social and cultural interaction. What is the role of the interior designer in the current changing
                   market-scene?
              -    The working environment of the future. How is the office space changing in the 21st century? How do new
                   technologies and media influence the way in which people work, meet and collaborate? People sometimes work
                   on trains, while commuting, at cafes, in communal hot-desking studios; how does design both inspire new modes
                   of working environments and respond to the current needs?
              -    Light design. Analysis of precedents, critical analysis of the design concept and of the relevant technical
                   specifications.
              -    New materials and technologies; how do they influence design?
              -    Interdisciplinary projects; why are they increasingly popular and what challenges do they entail?
              -    Art and Interior Design; how is one influencing the other and how art processes can lead to the generation of
                   innovative design concepts?
              -    Stage Set design. Interior Design in the theatre world.

Learning Outcomes for the module

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Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a
range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete any headings
that are not relevant. You should number the LOs sequentially to enable mapping of assessment tasks.

At the end of this module, students will be able to:
Knowledge
            1. Analyse, understand in depth, interpret and critically present a range of contemporary design precedents
            2. Critically evaluate the ethical/ social/economical/ political implications of design processes
            3. Translate concepts into engaging design proposals
            4. Propose and create interior design projects
Subject-based practical skills
            5. Create advance drawings at different scales.
            6. Create models at the expected professional standards, at different scales.
            7. Compose presentations for design-related projects.
Skills for life and work (general skills)
            8. Work both independently and in groups in a professional and collegiate manner; exchange knowledge and skills with
                 their peers.

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes:

     •    Studio - Seminars: The seminars will include presentations delivered by the tutors, reflective critical discussions, and
          hands-on exercises.
     •    Presentations and Crits: The students will present their work-in-progress and their final projects to the rest of the group and
          to their tutors, at several moments throughout the year; Interim crits and final crits. Constructive feedback and discussion
          will enhance their learning experience.

Feedback:
Constructive feedback will be offered at a weekly basis verbally in small groups or individually.
Constructive feedback will be also offered at the interim and final crits.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the            Weighting:               Learning Outcomes demonstrated:
learning outcomes for the module; please define as necessary:
                                                                       100%                     1-8
Portfolio (equivalent of approximately 420 hours of study)

[By the term ‘Portfolio’, we mean a body of work, which may
include: drawings, photos of models, analysis of spaces and
concepts with the use of diagrams, short reports, longer essays,
evidence of analytical and critical exploration and thinking. The
portfolio may include both individual and group work. When
group work is included, each student is expected to identify their
own contribution to the specific exercise.]

Reading and resources for the module:

Core
Brooker, G. and L. Weinthal, Eds. (2013). The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design. London; New York, Bloomsbury
Academic.
Brown, R. and L. Farrelly (2012). Materials and Interior Design, Laurence King.
Brownell, B. (2013). Material Strategies: Innovative Applications in Architecture, Princeton Architectural Press.
Dal Co, F. & Mazzariol, G. (1984). Carlo Scarpa: The Complete Works. Electra / Architectural Press.
Eames, C., et al. (2001). Ray and Charles Eames: Eames Design, APT International.
Harries, K. (1997). The Ethical Function of Architecture. Cambridge, Mass., The MIT Press.
Hauptmann, D. (2006). The body in architecture. Rotterdam, 010 Publishers.
Kronenburgh, R. (1998). Ephemeral/ portable architecture, John Wiley & Sons.
Mallgrave, H. F. (ed.). (2006). Architectural Theory: Anthology from Vitruvius to 1870. Oxford: Blackwell.
Mesher, L. (2010). Retail Design Lausanne, AVA Publishing.
Murray, S. (2013). Translucent Building Skins: Material Innovations in Modern and Contemporary Architecture, Taylor & Francis.
Ockman, J. (1993). Architectural Culture 1943-1968: A Documentary Anthology. New York: Columbia University Press/Rizzoli.
Postell, J. and N. Gesimondo (2011). Materiality and Interior Construction, Wiley.
Schittich, C. (2008). Interior Surfaces and Materials: Aesthetics, Technology, Implementation, Birkhäuser.
Serota, N. (1996). Experience Or Interpretation: The Dilemma of Museums of Modern Art. London, Thames & Hudson.

Journals:
ARQ (Architectural Research Quarterly)
Journal of Architectural Education
The Journal of Architecture
Volume
Grey Room
Journal of Interior Design

                                                                                                                                            11
Recommended
Raizman, D. (2003). History of Modern Design: Graphics and Products Since the Industrial Revolution, Laurence King.Haydn, F. and
           R. Temel, Eds. (2006). Temporary Urban Spaces. Basel, Boston, Berlin, Birkhauser.
Bouman, O. and R. van Toorn (1994). The invisible in architecture. London, Wiley.
Corbusier, L., et al. (2012). Le Corbusier: Furniture and Interiors 1905-1965, University of Chicago Press.
Corner, J. (2002). The agency of mapping. Mappings. D. Cosgrove. London, Reaktion: 213-252.
Di Benedetto, S. (2013). An Introduction to Theatre Design, Taylor & Francis.
Farrelly, L. and N. Crowson (2015). Representational Techniques for Architecture, Bloomsbury Publishing.
1     Locker, P. (2010). Basics Interior Design 02: Exhibition Design, AVA Academia.
Media, S. C. (2012). On Show: Temporary Design for Fairs, Special Events, and Art Exhibitions, Gingko Press.
Sparke, P., et al. (2009). Designing the modern interior: from the Victorians to today, Berg.
Temple, N. (2006). Disclosing Horizons: Architecture, Perspective and Redemptive Space, Taylor & Francis.
Thompson, J. A. A. and N. Blossom (2015). The Handbook of Interior Design, Wiley.
Wolf, R. C. and D. Block (2013). Scene Design and Stage Lighting, Cengage Learning.

Indicative learning      Activity
and teaching time
(10 hrs per credit):
1. Student/tutor         This module spreads over Term 1 and Term 2.
interaction:             Students will attend studio sessions on a weekly basis.
                         The studio sessions will include: Presentations, specialised seminars, workshop activities, group and one-to-
144 hours                one tutorials, visits to galleries and exhibitions, directed design exercises, reviews and interim crits of the
                         student work, short presentations delivered by students.
                         The contact time will be 144 hours (6h of contact time in average per week x 24 weeks = 144h)

2. Student learning      The students are expected to devote a minimum of two additional day per week for preparation. Preparation
time:                    will include:
456                            -   Reading relevant material in the Library.
                              -     Visiting relevant museums and galleries and keeping up to date with the design world.
                              -     Developing their design projects.
                              -     Working in groups to discuss and evolve their design concepts, and progress on their design
                                    exercises.
                              -     Prepare short presentations of their work, and assemble their portfolios.
Total hours (1 and       60 Credits.
2):                      60 credits: 600 hours of study in total.
600

                                                      Module Specification
Module Title:                          Module Code: AR7031            Module Leader:
Thesis: Into the real                                                 Dr Anastasia Karandinou
                                       Level: 7

                                       Credit: 60

                                       ECTS credit: 30
Pre-requisite:                                             Pre-cursor:
Co-requisite:                                              Excluded combinations :
Location of delivery: UEL
                                                       Main aim(s) of the module:

      -     To research in depth on a concept or theme relevant to interior design, and gain in-depth knowledge and expertise.
      -     To develop a professional ethos and attitude.
      -     To develop the ability to liaise with other professionals and develop links and collaborations.
      -     To consolidate a body of work and communicate it successfully in different contexts and to different audiences.
      -     To develop the ability to reflect critically, discuss, represent visually and in writing complex design ideas and transform
            them into design proposals.
      -     To present a concept or project in a professional manner.
      -     To develop the ability to contextualise design; to develop the ability to understand the links between design and other
            cultural and everyday phenomena.

                                                        Main topics of study:
      -     The relationship between the contemporary social, cultural, technological phenomena and their impact upon design
            practices.

                                                                                                                                           12
-    Research methods.
     -    Relationship between theory and practice; research and design.
     -    Professional processes and presentations.
     -    Specialised design/ research projects. (For example: retail design/ home interiors design/ furniture design/ stage set design/
          the body in space/ the political implications of design/ the relationship between the cultural discourse and the design
          practices).

     Through this module, students will select a topic that they wish to research on and specialise in. Their thesis can acquire a
     number of different forms: For example, it can have the form of an essay, a design-driven research project, an advance
     experimental design project. The output will be presented in a professional manner through a portfolio. The portfolio can be a
     visual portfolio, a booklet, or a website (accompanied by a printed report).

Learning Outcomes for the module

At the end of this module, students will be able to:
Knowledge
     1. Interrelate conceptual, theoretical and practical tools and methods.
     2. Understand the relationship between theory, strategy and design and communicate this in a professional and rigorous way.
     3. Demonstrate critical reflection on social/cultural/economic/technical knowledge and its integration into design processes
           and professional life
Thinking skills
     4. Synthesise the ideas presented within studies, texts or other learning materials
Subject-Based Practical skills
     5. Construct and demonstrate clear, well defended argument using a range of media and approaches
Skills for life and work (general skills)
     6. Work both individually and/ or as part of a team, following strategies that are critically selected and appropriate for the
           specific project.

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes:

     •   Studio - Seminars: The seminars will include presentations delivered by the tutors and reflective critical discussions.
     •   Presentations and Crits: The students will present their work-in-progress and their final research/ projects to the rest of the
         group and to their tutors, at several moments throughout the year; Interim crits and final crits. Constructive feedback and
         discussion will enhance their learning experience.
Feedback:
Constructive feedback will be offered at a weekly basis verbally in small groups or individually.
Constructive feedback will be also offered at the interim and final crits.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the            Weighting:                Learning Outcomes demonstrated:
learning outcomes for the module; please define as necessary:
                                                                       100%                      1-6
Portfolio (equivalent of approximately 420 hours of study)

[By the term ‘Portfolio’, we mean a body of work, which may
include: drawings, photos of models, analysis of spaces and
concepts with the use of diagrams, short reports, longer essays,
evidence of analytical and critical exploration and thinking. The
portfolio may include both individual and group work. When
group work is included, each student is expected to identify their
own contribution to the specific exercise.]

The assessment will be based on a portfolio submission which will
include reports and visual material.

Reading and resources for the module:
These must be up to date and presented in correct Harvard format unless a Professional Body specifically requires a
different format

Core
Bloomer, K. C. (1977). Body, Memory, and Architecture. New Haven, Yale University Press.
Carmel-Arthur, J. (1999). Philippe Starck, Carlton.
Haydn, F. and R. Temel, Eds. (2006). Temporary Urban Spaces. Basel, Boston, Berlin, Birkhauser.
Hays, K. M., Ed. (1998). Architecture Theory Since 1968. Cambridge, Mass.; London, The MIT Press.
Kahn, L. I. and D. Ngo (1998). Louis Kahn: Conversations with Students, Princeton Architectural Press.
Kepes, G. (1995). Language of vision. New York, Dover Publications.
Kirkham, P. (1995). Charles and Ray Eames: designers of the twentieth century. Cambridge, Mass. ; London, MIT Press.
Kronenburgh, R. (1998). Ephemeral/ portable architecture, John Wiley & Sons.
Marcus, G. H. and W. Whitaker (2013). The Houses of Louis Kahn, Yale University Press.

                                                                                                                                           13
Hoboken, New Jersey, Wiley.
Postell, J. and N. Gesimondo (2011). Materiality and Interior Construction, Wiley.
Preece, Roy. (1994). Starting Research: a New Post-graduate's Guide to Researching and Writing Up. Continuum International
Publishing.
Raizman, D. (2003). History of Modern Design: Graphics and Products Since the Industrial Revolution, Laurence King.
Rendell, Jane. Architectural research and disciplinarity. ARQ vol 8, no.2, 2004/p. 141-147
Schildt, G. and A. Aalto (1994). Alvar Aalto: the complete catalogue of architecture, design, and art, Rizzoli.
Scott Brown, D., et.al (2006). Contemporary public space: Un-volumetric architecture. Milano, Skira.

Recommended
Benjamin, A. (2000). Architectural philosophy. London, Athlone Press.
Coyne, R. (2010). Derrida for Architects.
Corbusier, L. (1987). The decorative art of today, MIT Press.
Hill, J. (2001). Architecture : the subject is matter. London, Routledge.
Pallasmaa, J. and P. B. MacKeith (2006). Archipelago. Essays on architecture: for Juhani Pallasmaa. Helsinki, Rakennustieto.
Simmel, G. (1997). Bridge and door. Rethinking architecture. N. Leach. London, Taylor & Francis, Routledge.
Sparke, P., et al. (2009). Designing the modern interior: from the Victorians to today, Berg.
Temple, N. (2006). Disclosing Horizons: Architecture, Perspective and Redemptive Space, Taylor & Francis.
Till, J. (2009). Architecture depends. Cambridge Mass.; London, The MIT Press.
Tschumi, B. (1994). Architecture and disjunction. Cambridge, Mass.; London, The MIT Press.

Indicative learning       Activity
and teaching time
(10 hrs per credit):
1. Student/tutor          This module is taught over Term 3.
interaction:
          36 hours        6 studio sessions x 6 hours = 36 hours

2. Student learning       The students are expected to devote a minimum of two additional day per week for preparation. Preparation
time:                     will include:
564 hours                       -   Reading relevant material in the Library.
                               -     Visiting relevant museums and galleries and keeping up to date with the design world.
                               -     Developing their research/ design thesis.
                               -     Prepare short presentations of their work, write an essay/ report and assemble their portfolios.
Total hours (1 and        60 Credits.
2): 600

Module Title:                           Module Code: AR7032                      Module Leader:
                                        Level: 7
                                                                                 Dr Anastasia Karandinou
Interior Design Theory 1                Credit: 30

                                        ECTS credit: 15
Pre-requisite: None                                         Pre-cursor: None
Co-requisite:    None                                       Excluded combinations : None
Location of delivery: UEL

                                                        Main aim(s) of the module:

     •      Gain a good understanding of a number of interior design precedents and of the relevant underpinning design principles.
     •      Develop the ability to read, research, analyse, understand and communicate a thorough understanding of a design-related
            literature and design precedents.

                                                           Main topics of study:
     -      Study of precedents.
     -      Study of the relationship between design precedents and the social/ political/ cultural context.
     -      Study of the links between strategies, specific design concepts and outputs.

            Each year, the team of tutors will choose and work with the students on a specific theme. Students will research the topic
            through readings and analysis of precedents. Indicative topics are the following.

                                                                                                                                         14
Analysis of the evolution of the shopping experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. What is the relationship between
          commercial activities and social interaction? How does the emergence of the online commerce influence the design and use
          of the commercial environments, the ‘store window’, and the public space?

          Meeting places. How does the design of a café relates to the subtle changes taking place in society over time? How does the
          design of a café relates to its locality? What does the proximity of people sharing a table tells us about the relevant social
          conventions? How is the use of coffee places changing over time and how does this relate to their interior design?

Learning Outcomes for the module

At the end of this module, students will be able to critically:

Knowledge
     1. Understand the significance of historical/ political/ social/ economic/ ethical/ aesthetic agendas for interior design
           practice.
     2. Assess and discuss a set of conceptual, theoretical and practical tools.
     3. Understand the relationship between theory, study of precedents and design
Thinking skills
     4. Gather, sort and effectively organise and use information needed for the specific topic they study.
     5. Analyse interior design precedents
Subject-Based Practical skills
     6. Demonstrate critical understanding through writing and/or design
     7. Demonstrate a professional ability to edit and present text and images purposefully
Skills for life and work (general skills)
     8. Work both individually and/ or as part of a team

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes:

     •    Seminar – studio sessions:
          Teaching methods: Presentations, group discussions, group research exercises, one to one tutorials and
          feedback, gallery and exhibition visits.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the             Weighting:               Learning Outcomes demonstrated:
learning outcomes for the module; please define as necessary:
                                                                                                 1-8
• Portfolio
(equivalent of approximately 210 hours of study)                        100%

Reading and resources for the module:

Core
Brownell, B. (2013). Material Strategies: Innovative Applications in Architecture, Princeton Architectural Press.
Dodsworth, S. (2009). The fundamentals of Interior Design. Lausanne, AVA Academia.
Frampton, K. (1985). Modern Architecture - A Critical History. Thames & Hudson.
Hauptmann, D. (2006). The body in architecture. Rotterdam, 010 Publishers.
Haydn, F. and R. Temel, Eds. (2006). Temporary Urban Spaces. Basel, Boston, Berlin, Birkhauser.
Ingold, T. (2013) Making. Routledge.
Kepes, G. (1995). Language of vision. New York, Dover Publications.
Kirkham, P. (1995). Charles and Ray Eames: designers of the twentieth century. Cambridge, Mass. ; London, MIT Press.
Kronenburgh, R. (1998). Ephemeral/ portable architecture, John Wiley & Sons.
Marcus, G. H. and W. Whitaker (2013). The Houses of Louis Kahn, Yale University Press.
Mitton, M. (2012). Interior Design Visual Presentation: A Guide to Graphics, Models and Presentation Techniques. Hoboken, New
Jersey, Wiley.
Murray, S. (2013). Translucent Building Skins: Material Innovations in Modern and Contemporary Architecture, Taylor & Francis.
Raizman, D. (2003). History of Modern Design: Graphics and Products Since the Industrial Revolution, Laurence King.
Rendel, J. (2006). Art and Architecture; a place between. I.B.Tauris.
Rendel, J. Et. Al (Eds) (2007) Critical Architecture. Routledge.
Schildt, G. and A. Aalto (1994). Alvar Aalto: the complete catalogue of architecture, design, and art, Rizzoli.

                                                                                                                                           15
Recommended
Barthes, R. (1972). Critical Essays. Evanston, Northwestern University Press.
Benjamin, A. (2000). Architectural philosophy. London, Athlone Press.
Hill, J. (2001). Architecture : the subject is matter. London, Routledge.
Pallasmaa, J. and P. B. MacKeith (2006). Archipelago. Essays on architecture: for Juhani Pallasmaa. Helsinki, Rakennustieto.
Sparke, P., et al. (2009). Designing the modern interior: from the Victorians to today, Berg.
Temple, N. (2006). Disclosing Horizons: Architecture, Perspective and Redemptive Space, Taylor & Francis.
Till, J. (2009). Architecture depends. Cambridge Mass.; London, The MIT Press.
Tschumi, B. (1994). Architecture and disjunction. Cambridge, Mass.; London, The MIT Press.

Indicative learning     Activity
and teaching time
(10 hrs per credit):    Total 300 hours

Student/tutor           Seminars (including: tutorials/ supervised studio/ one to one feedback/ fieldtrips): 12 weeks * 4 hours (in
interaction:            average)
             48 hours

2. Student learning
time:                   Essential and background reading, tutorial preparation, written components, preparation of the final report.

          252 hours

Total hours
(1 and 2): 300 hours

Module Title:                         Module Code: AR7033                     Module Leader:
                                      Level: 7
                                                                              Dr Anastasia Karandinou
Interior Design Theory 2              Credit: 30

                                      ECTS credit: 15
Pre-requisite: None                                       Pre-cursor: None
Co-requisite:    None                                     Excluded combinations : None
Location of delivery: UEL

                                                     Main aim(s) of the module:

     •    Gain a good understanding of a number of interior design precedents and of the relevant underpinning design principles.
     •    Develop the ability to read, research, analyse, understand and communicate a thorough understanding of a design-related
          literature and design precedents.

                                                         Main topics of study:
     -    Study of precedents.
     -    Study of the relationship between design precedents and the social/ political/ cultural context.
     -    Study of the links between strategies, specific design concepts and outputs.

          Each year, the team of tutors will choose and work with the students on a specific theme. Students will research the topic
          through readings and analysis of precedents. Indicative topics are the following:

          Architecture, Interior Design and Neuroscience: How has the cross-over of these disciplines may drive the design
          processes? How has the possibility of mapping the brain-wave activity in everyday environments informed design-related
          research?
          Exhibition spaces: Is the visit to an exhibition an individual experience or a shared one? How does the design of a place

                                                                                                                                       16
encourage social interaction? What is the role of new technologies, new media and social media in this?

Learning Outcomes for the module

At the end of this module, students will be able to critically:
Knowledge
     1. Demonstrate in a critical and professional manner the significance of historical/ political/ social/ economic/
           ethical/ aesthetic agendas for interior design practice.
     2. Develop a refined set of conceptual, theoretical and practical tools for future practice
Thinking skills
     3. Research, understand and critically reflect on literature relevant to their research topic.
Subject-Based Practical skills
     4. Demonstrate critical judgement through writing and/or design
     5. Demonstrate a professional ability to compose, synthesise, edit and present text and images purposefully
Skills for life and work (general skills)
     6. Work both individually and/ or as part of a team

Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes:
    •    Seminar – studio sessions:
         Teaching methods: Presentations, group discussions, group research exercises, one to one tutorials and
         feedback, gallery and exhibition visits.

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the           Weighting:              Learning Outcomes demonstrated:
learning outcomes for the module; please define as necessary:
 • Portfolio                                                                                  1-6
(equivalent of approximately 210 hours of study)
                                                                      100%

Reading and resources for the module:

Core
Brownell, B. (2013). Material Strategies: Innovative Applications in Architecture, Princeton Architectural Press.
Dodsworth, S. (2009). The fundamentals of Interior Design. Lausanne, AVA Academia.
Frampton, K. (1985). Modern Architecture - A Critical History. Thames & Hudson.
Hauptmann, D. (2006). The body in architecture. Rotterdam, 010 Publishers.
Haydn, F. and R. Temel, Eds. (2006). Temporary Urban Spaces. Basel, Boston, Berlin, Birkhauser.
Ingold, T. (2013) Making. Routledge.
Kepes, G. (1995). Language of vision. New York, Dover Publications.
Kirkham, P. (1995). Charles and Ray Eames: designers of the twentieth century. Cambridge, Mass. ; London, MIT Press.
Kronenburgh, R. (1998). Ephemeral/ portable architecture, John Wiley & Sons.
Marcus, G. H. and W. Whitaker (2013). The Houses of Louis Kahn, Yale University Press.
Mitton, M. (2012). Interior Design Visual Presentation: A Guide to Graphics, Models and Presentation Techniques. Hoboken, New
Jersey, Wiley.
Murray, S. (2013). Translucent Building Skins: Material Innovations in Modern and Contemporary Architecture, Taylor & Francis.
Raizman, D. (2003). History of Modern Design: Graphics and Products Since the Industrial Revolution, Laurence King.
Rendel, J. (2006). Art and Architecture; a place between. I.B.Tauris.
Rendel, J. Et. Al (Eds) (2007) Critical Architecture. Routledge.
Schildt, G. and A. Aalto (1994). Alvar Aalto: the complete catalogue of architecture, design, and art, Rizzoli.

Recommended
Barthes, R. (1972). Critical Essays. Evanston, Northwestern University Press.
Benjamin, A. (2000). Architectural philosophy. London, Athlone Press.
Hill, J. (2001). Architecture : the subject is matter. London, Routledge.
Pallasmaa, J. and P. B. MacKeith (2006). Archipelago. Essays on architecture: for Juhani Pallasmaa. Helsinki, Rakennustieto.
Sparke, P., et al. (2009). Designing the modern interior: from the Victorians to today, Berg.
Temple, N. (2006). Disclosing Horizons: Architecture, Perspective and Redemptive Space, Taylor & Francis.
Till, J. (2009). Architecture depends. Cambridge Mass.; London, The MIT Press.
Tschumi, B. (1994). Architecture and disjunction. Cambridge, Mass.; London, The MIT Press.

Indicative learning    Activity
and teaching time
(10 hrs per credit):   Total 300 hours

Student/tutor
interaction:           Seminars (including: tutorials/ supervised studio/ one to one feedback/ fieldtrips): 12 weeks * 4 hours (in
                       average)

                                                                                                                                     17
48 hours

2. Student learning
time:                    Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background reading/ on-line
                         activities/group work/portfolio/diary preparation, unsupervised studio work etc):

                         Essential and background reading, tutorial preparation, written components, preparation of the final report.
          252 hours

Total hours              300 hours
(1 and 2):

7         PLACEMENT REQUIREMENTS (WHERE APPLICABLE)

Placements are not part of the MA in Interior Design programme.

8         PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT

The programme is managed on a daily basis through the Programme Leader (details in earlier section).

Any changes to the location of classes, which is given during student induction, or to assessment/submission
dates will be communicated via email direct to students UEL email accounts.

This programme has a programme committee comprising all relevant teaching staff, student representatives
and others who make a contribution towards the effective operation of the programme (e.g. library/technician
staff). The committee has responsibilities for the quality of the programme. It provides input into the operation of
the Review and Enhancement Process and proposes changes to improve quality. The programme committee
plays a critical role in the quality assurance procedures.

The following methods for gaining student feedback are used on this programme:

•   Module evaluations online
•   Student representation on programme committees (meeting 3 times a year)
•   Student/Staff consultative committee (meeting 3 times a year)

Students are notified of the action taken through:

•   circulating the minutes of the programme committee
•   providing details on the online programme notice board
•   Individual responses to students as required
•   Postings on our online discussion forums

9        STUDENT SUPPORT

www.uel.ac.uk/skillzone/

http://www.uel.ac.uk/skillzone/skillzoneguides/

Personal Tutoring - Guidance for Students

                                                                                                                                        18
To help you make the most of your studies, every student undertaking undergraduate or taught masters’
programmes at UEL is assigned a member of academic staff as their Personal Tutor (PT).

Your PT will support you to achieve the degree you want through group or individual meetings throughout the
year.

Why do you need a Personal Tutor?

Your PT is a key academic contact at the university, and is there to guide you so that you have the best possible
chance of succeeding in your studies. In order to do this your PT will invite you to attend a range of tutorials:

•   If you are a new student at UEL, the first tutorial will take place either during induction week or the first week
    of teaching and will be a face to face 1-2-1 or group meeting. You are required to attend this meeting.
•   All students are invited to a meeting within the first 6 weeks of term 1 and then three additional meetings in
    the academic year.
    Your programme of study may be structured in such a way that these meetings take place during core
    module teaching.

What are the benefits of having a Personal Tutor?

Having an academic member of staff oversee your general progress has many benefits, including:

    •   Supporting you to overcome the challenges you face, take advantage of the opportunities at UEL and to
        become a confident learner in your academic subject area
    •   Managing the transition between levels of study
    •   Advising you on relevant academic, pastoral and career-related issues
    •   Encouraging you to play an active part in your academic community, whilst developing a sense of
        belonging to UEL, your School and your programme cohort
    •   Encouraging reflection on your academic progress
    •   Signposting you to the right sources of support available at UEL
    •   Providing written references

What can you expect?

    •   Contact details for your PT as soon as you get here
    •   In term 1, you will be offered and expected to attend an initial meeting with your PT during induction or
        the first week of term. This may be a group or 1-2-1 tutorial
    •   All students are then invited to attend three additional meetings with their PT spread over the academic
        year.
    •   Your PT will be available to meet with you at other times during the academic year if you require further
        support – you can arrange this by booking an individual appointment.
    •   Your PT may refer you to another service at UEL where you will be able to receive specialist support
        e.g. relating to your finances, personal life or wellbeing.

What do we expect from you?

    •   Know the name and contact details of your PT
    •   Attend your scheduled tutorials, on time. If you are unable to do this, make sure you let your PT know in
        advance (at least one day) and re-schedule
    •   Prepare for your tutorials e.g. draw up a list of items that you’d like to discuss
    •   Be thoughtful about how you use your tutorial time. Try to identify the issues you can resolve yourself by
        using other support available to you such as; your handbook, online information and other student
        support services. This way, you can use your tutorial for the things you really need help with
    •   Don’t wait until it’s too late – if you have an issue you can’t resolve yourself, speak to your PT straight
        away. S/He will be able to offer guidance or point you in the right direction
    •   Take charge, take action – after your meeting, make sure you follow up on the action points agreed
        during your tutorial and make full use of the additional support services you are signposted to.
    •   By accessing the support your PT can offer, you’ll have someone to guide you every step of the way, to
        help you achieve success.

                                                                                                                   19
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