Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech

 
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
2019-2020
                                  Official School Catalog
                                             Volume X
                                      Revised, January 2019
                 At the time of publication, ever y effort was made to assure that this catalog
                 contains accurate information. Please refer to the catalog addendum for any
                   changes or revisions that have occurred since the catalog was published.

               NEW BRITAIN                                    SHELTON

                    Main Campus                             Branch Campus Of New Britain
           LINCOLN TECHNICAL INSTITUTE                    LINCOLN TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
              200 JOHN DOWNEY DRIVE                              8 PROGRESS DRIVE
               NEW BRITAIN, CT 06051                             SHELTON, CT 06484
                   (860) 225‑8641                                  (203) 929‑0592

                                  www.lincolntech.edu

                                “An Equal Opportunity Facility”

                 This catalog is certified as true and correct in content and policy.

Karla Dzwonkowski                                                             Dr. Susan G. Naples
 CA MPUS PR ESIDEN T                                                           CA MPUS PR ESIDEN T
N E W BR I TA I N C A M P U S                                                    S H E LT O N C A M P U S

         Unless other wise captioned, the photographs contained in this catalog were purchased from
          any of several reputable stock photo companies with which we have a license agreement.
               A ll photos containing equipment depict the k inds and t y pes found in industr y.
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
2019-2020
    Official School Catalog
    Volume X
    Revised, January 2019

                                                          Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  3
Our Mission .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
History  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
Educational Philosophy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
A Letter from the President & CEO  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 5
CAREER PROGRAMS .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 6
Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating Technology  .  .  . 7
Culinary Arts & Food Services .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 8
Electrical & Renewable Energy Technology  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 9
International Baking and Pastry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 10
Medical Assistant  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 11
Patient Care Associate .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 12
Practical Nursing .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
Course Descriptions  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 14
GENERAL INFORMATION .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 21
Accreditation .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22
Approvals .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22
Veterans . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22
Statement of Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Notice to Students  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22
Compliance with City, State, and Federal Regulations  .  .  .  .  . 22                                       Consultation and Tutoring . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35
Harassment Policy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22               Student Advising .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35
ADMISSIONS POLICIES .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 24             Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35
Admission Requirements  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 25                     Course and Academic Measurement  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 36
Admission Requirements – Practical Nursing .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 25                                   Grading .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 36
 Important Disclosures Regarding the                                                                         Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 36
  Practical Nursing Program .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 25                          Introduction .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 36
Orientation .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 26               Satisfactory Academic Progress – Practical Nursing .  .  .  .  . 37
Introductory Period of Enrollment  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 26                               Qualitative Measure of Progress
FINANCIAL INFORMATION .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 27                      (Grade Point Average) .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 37
Financial Aid Programs . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 28                       Quantitative Measures of Progress
Scholarships . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 28                 (Pace of Progression and Maximum Time Frame)  .  .  .  .  . 37
Tuition and Fees .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 28                Evaluation Period  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 37
Educational Equipment .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 28                       Failure to Meet Standards  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 37
Connecticut Cancellation & Refund Policy  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 28                                    Appeals and Probation  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 38
The Refund Process  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 29                   Notification of Status and Appeal Results .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 38
GENERAL STUDENT INFORMATION  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 30                               Reinstatement .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 38
Office Hours  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31             Treatment of Grades and Credits  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 38
Career Services .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31              Transcripts (Progress Records) .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 39
Student Services .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31             Transfer Credits .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 39
School Calendar  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31             Externship Requirements .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 40
School Closing .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31            Withdrawals and Incomplete Grades .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 40
Student Complaint/Grievance Procedure .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31                                  Course Repeats .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 40
Visitor Policy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31         Grade Appeal Policy  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 40
Student Dress Code  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31                Leave of Absence .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 40
Official Student Communication  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 32                            Re-entrance .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 40
ACADEMIC INFORMATION .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 33                  Graduation Requirements .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 41
Class Schedules .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34              CAMPUSES .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 42
Certificate and Diploma Programs .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34                           Campus Information – New Britain .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 43
Student Conduct .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34                 Campus Information – Shelton .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 43
Attendance (Non-Nursing)  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35                      Administration and Faculty  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . Addendum
Attendance Policy – Practical Nursing .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35                            Schedule of Fees  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . Addendum
Make-Up .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35          Academic Calendar .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . Addendum

                                                                                                         2
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Introduction

Our Mission .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
History  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
Educational Philosophy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
A Letter from the President & CEO  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 5

                       3
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Introduction
At LTI, you can get on the path                  of quality service and commitment. LTI          strategic plan for our institute(s) and its
to a great career quickly.                       offers graduates viable career options by       parent corporation, Lincoln Educational
   Lincoln Technical Institute training          providing quality educational programs          Services (LESC), and the perception of
begins on a level the students can               based on employer driven requirements.          the institute(s) to prospective students and
confidently handle.                              Our goal is to provide a skilled and            employers in Connecticut.
   All of our programs begin with the            knowledgeable faculty dedicated to the             Lincoln Educational Services Corporation
basics, allowing any person not previously       professional development of each student.       is a leading provider of diversified career-
exposed to the area of study to confidently         Through these efforts, our students
                                                                                                 oriented postsecondary education. Lincoln
enroll and begin training. Each course           will achieve the knowledge and
                                                                                                 offers recent high school graduates and
provides students with theory and                experience needed for their future
                                                 working environment.                            working adults degree and diploma
procedures for proper diagnosis and service                                                      programs in five principal areas of study:
in their field of study. Our comprehensive          At LTI our goal is to remain on the
                                                 forefront of emerging technology. This is       health sciences, automotive technology,
training is the next natural step for the
                                                 accomplished by supporting continuing           skilled trades, hospitality services and
student graduating from high school. Stated
simply, teaching skills to the unskilled,        education and training for graduates, staff     business and information technology.
refining skills of the semi-skilled, and         and faculty; thereby providing skilled          Lincoln has provided the workforce with
helping them find employment in the              professionals to meet the needs of the          skilled technicians since its inception in
industry is the overall objective of LTI.        technologically changing world and fostering    1946. Lincoln currently operates over 20
   This LTI preparation, which includes          the desire for life-long learning.              campuses in 14 states under 3 brands:
career workshops, as well as technical                                                           Lincoln College of Technology, Lincoln
instruction, assists our students to find jobs    History                                        Technical Institute, and Euphoria Institute
in their chosen career.                             New England Technical Institute of           of Beauty Arts and Sciences.
   Although LTI offers no guarantee of           Connecticut was established in 1940. The
employment, considerable effort is put           school was originally located in Hartford       Educational Philosophy
forth to give students the interpersonal         until September 1968, when it relocated to         Lincoln Technical Institute prepares each
skills needed to secure positions in today’s     New Britain. Several additional training
                                                                                                 student to meet the day-to-day challenges
challenging fields. In addition, our Career      programs have been added since that time.
Services office works with our students                                                          of an ever-changing world. At LTI, this is
                                                 Electrical training programs were added in
in making industry contacts as well as           1990. In 1996, Medical Assistant training       achieved through a series of lectures and
periodically bringing employers into the         programs were added. In 1997 the School         demonstrations, providing the student with
school for published career days.                established the Hamden Campus (which            the knowledge to perform each task. A
   LTI is constantly in contact with             has since then merged with our Shelton and      comprehensive hands-on laboratory exercise
industry to advise them of students and          New Britain campuses in July 2014), and         on technical trainers allows the student to
graduates available for employment.              1998 marked the addition of our Practical       practice newly learned skills. Hands-on
Our instructors and staff assist our             Nursing program. In 2003, the Shelton           practical exercises on real-world equipment
graduates in obtaining successful careers        campus was established and now offers           allows the student to experience tasks
by helping them acquire and prepare for          Culinary Arts, Electrical, Medical Assistant    performed in the workplace. Although
employment interviews.                           and Practical Nursing programs.                 not all classes will have the same amount
                                                    In January 2005, New England                 of hands-on exercises, each class has the
 Our Mission                                     Technical Institute was purchased by            appropriate amount for the skills taught.
   Lincoln Technical Institute is dedicated      Lincoln Technical Institute, Inc., a wholly     Classroom instruction will lead to “hands-
to educating and training students to            owned subsidiary of Lincoln Educational         on” teaching and learning to apply the
achieve proficiency through a skills first       Services Corporation.
                                                                                                 knowledge learned in the classroom.
curriculum. The mission of this institution         In 2006, New England Technical
                                                                                                    Lincoln Technical Institute is proud of
is to offer the best educational and training    Institute started the application process
programs to enable graduates to take to          to change their name to more accurately         its many graduates who have taken their
the marketplace the highest possible level       reflect the corporation name, Lincoln           place in the industry for which they were
of job knowledge and skills enabling them        Technical Institute, Inc., and received         trained, and will continue to exercise its
to accomplish worthwhile career goals and        approval to change their name to Lincoln        leadership role in training persons for
realize self-esteem.                             Technical Institute effective January 1,        marketable skills by constantly revising and
   To accomplish these objectives, Lincoln       2007. The reasons for the change are the        updating programs as technological change
Technical Institute upholds a high standard      result of goals established in the long-range   occurs in the industry.

                                                                     4
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Introduction
 A Letter from the President & CEO
   We believe education and training increase      In addition to careful and detailed
your self-esteem and enable you to work in a    instruction, faculty, staff and administration
rewarding and satisfying career. In order to    provide ongoing support and encouragement.
achieve our high educational standards, we      You gain skills and confidence at LTI, so you
carefully select qualified instructors that     can achieve success here and in other areas
offer competency and experience, as well as a   of your life.
caring commitment to each student’s success.       It is our desire to provide you with the
   In the development of curricula, we          ability and awareness to be of value in
continuously monitor the current industry       a technologically changing world. Your
standards and update our courses regularly      education and training here will be enriching,
to reflect change in the employment trends.     relevant and empowering. In a very short time,
Our classrooms offer industry standard          you can become a well-rounded, capable
equipment that simulates the workplace as       employee in the professional or technical field
closely as possible.                            you choose.

 Sincerely,

 Scott M. Shaw
 President & Chief Executive Officer

                                                                     5
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Career Programs

                                   Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating Technology  .  .  . 7
                                   Culinary Arts & Food Services .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 8
                                   Electrical & Renewable Energy Technology  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 9
                                   International Baking and Pastry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 10
                                   Medical Assistant  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 11
                                   Patient Care Associate .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 12
                                   Practical Nursing .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
                                   Course Descriptions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 14

Programs vary by campus. Consult
the individual program listings
beginning on page 7.
N    NEW BRITAIN CAMPUS
 S   SHELTON CAMPUS

                                               6
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Career Programs Course Descriptions begin on page 14.
Air Conditioning, Refrigeration & Heating Technology
 HVACR410D – DIPLOMA PROGRAM
 DAY AND EVENING PROGR AMS
  N   NEW BRITAIN CAMPUS
 total semester credit hours*  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 55.5
 total instructional hours .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 1320
 approximate weeks to complete – day  .  .  .  .  . 52.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
 approximate weeks to complete – eve  .  .  .  .  . 80.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
   *The listing of credit hours is not meant to imply that credits can be transferred into college or other
    private career school programs. Transfer credits are at the sole discretion of the receiving school.

 program objective

 Our collective concerns about the future health of the environment are at              HVAC technician. With additional experience graduates may pursue
the heart of today’s dynamic Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning                 opportunities allowing them to work independently, without direct
Technology industry, driving progressive changes through planning and                   supervision, supervise crews or teams of other technicians, or start their
implementation. The shift away from some of the more conventional HVAC                  own business. Graduates may also choose to specialize in one or more
systems still used in older residences and commercial buildings has been                specific areas of the HVAC market including refrigeration, air conditioning,
dramatic and continues to evolve. Newer systems focus on renewable energy               and heating.
sources, energy efficiency, and creating comfortable indoor environments.                 Students will also be trained on OSHA 30 standards and given the
 One of the primary objectives of the HVAC curriculum is to introduce                   opportunity to take and pass the exam. OSHA 30 certification is mandated
students to Green Technology concepts as they apply to HVAC systems.                    by the State licensing board for all apprentices. An apprentice needs to have
Students are prepared to confidently enter this vibrant field possessing                his or her OSHA 30 certification in order to seek qualification for future
fundamental skills required to service, troubleshoot, and repair commercial             licensure. In addition, students are also prepared to take the following
and residential indoor HVAC air management systems. Students also learn                 exams: EPA 608 exam, 410a universal, heat load analyst, certified energy
proper refrigerant recovery and recycling techniques, and are encouraged                auditor, and green awareness exams.
to complete Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certification testing.                  Students will be required to complete out-of-class assignments in each
 Upon successful completion of this program, graduates will meet the                    course in this program.
essential skills and knowledge required for employment as an entry-level
			                                                                       lecture   lab/shop         total     total
number course                                                               hours      hours        hours    credits                                         prerequisites

 HV101D       Introduction to Climate Control Systems                       70           50          120      5.0

 HV102D       Electricity                                                   60           60          120      5.0

 HV103D       Heating Systems (Controls)                                    60           60          120      5.0                                             HV102D

 HV104D       Heating Systems (Mechanical)                                  60           60          120      5.0                                             HV101D

 HV105D       Basic Refrigeration Systems                                   60           60          120      5.0
                                                                                                                       HV101D, HV102D, HV104D, HV105D, HV107D,
 SP101A       System Performance Verification                               75           45          120      5.0
                                                                                                                                                       HV108D
 HV107D       Air Conditioning Systems                                      75           45          120      5.0                                 HV102D, HV105D

 HV108D       Air Conditioning Design and Layout                           105           15          120      5.5

 HV109D       Commercial Refrigeration Control                              75           45          120      5.0                                 HV102D, HV105D

 TB101A       Testing Adjusting and Balancing Verification                  60           60          120      5.0      HV101D, HV104D, HV105D, HV107D, HV108D

                                                                                                                               HV101D, HV102D, HV103D, HV104D,
 HV120D       Energy Efficiency and Green Technology Systems                70           50          120      5.0
                                                                                                                                       HV105D, HV107D, HV108D
                                                           TOTALS          770          550         1320     55.5

    MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) = 83.0 CREDITS
                                                          Course numbers and sequences are listed here for reference only. The actual delivery sequence of
       CIP CODE–51.0501 • SOC CODE–49-9021                courses contained in this program may vary depending on individual campus scheduling.

                                                                                    7
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Career Programs Course Descriptions begin on page 14.
Culinary Arts & Food Services
CUL120D – DIPLOMA PROGRAM
 DAY AND EVENING PROGR AMS
  S    SHELTON CAMPUS
 total semester credit hours*  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 39
 total instructional hours .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .1080
 approximate weeks to complete – day/eve .  .  . 66 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
   *The listing of credit hours is not meant to imply that credits can be transferred into college or other
    private career school programs. Transfer credits are at the sole discretion of the receiving school.

 program objective
  The Culinary Arts and Food Services program will provide students                    Upon completion of this program, students will be trained for entry level
 with a strong foundation on which to build a successful career in the food           positions in the culinary and food services industry as Line Cook, Prep
 service industry. Students will be exposed to the core theory and practical          Cook, Sous Chef, Chef ’s Assistant, and Pantry Cook as well as other
 application of the culinary arts and food services industry. Students will           employment opportunities in the Food Industry.
 be exposed to a variety of topics including but not limited to: Classical
 and Modern food preparation and cooking techniques, food and beverage                 Students will be required to complete out-of-class assignments in each
 management, foodservice operations, food science, menu planning and                  course, except externship.
 nutrition, international cuisine and culture and baking and pastry
 techniques.
 		                                                                 lecture     lab     externship     total     total
 number course                                                       hours    hours          hours    hours    credits                               prerequisites

 CUL140SA        Introduction to Culinary Arts                          45      45            0        90       3.5

 FBM100SA        Food and Beverage Management                           45      45            0        90       3.5

 IBP140SA        Baking and Pastry Techniques                           45      45            0        90       3.5

 CUL240SA        Foodservice Operations                                 45      45            0        90       3.5

 CUL165SA        Advanced Skills I – Meats, Seafood and Poultry         45      45            0        90       3.5

 CUL175SA        Advanced Skills II – Meats, Seafood and Poultry        45      45            0        90       3.5                                   CUL165SA

 CUL155SA        Principles of Food Science                             45      45            0        90       3.5

 NTR101SA        Menu Planning and Nutrition                            45      45            0        90       3.5

 PER101SA        Personal/Private Chef                                  45      45            0        90       3.5             CUL140SA, CUL165SA, CUL175SA

 CUL195SA        International Cuisine and Culture                      45      45            0        90       3.5

 CUL280SA        Externship                                              0       0         180        180       4.0           Students must complete all course
                                                                                                                                work prior to taking externship.

                                                       TOTALS         450      450         180       1080      39.0

      MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) = 58.5 CREDITS

        CIP CODE–12.0500 • SOC CODE–35-1012

  Course numbers and sequences are listed here for reference only. The actual delivery sequence of courses
  contained in this program may vary depending on individual campus scheduling.

  Externship course is ten weeks with a minimum of 180 hours of training at an approved externship
  site, working under the direction of a Chef and/or Manager, following all internal rules and
  regulations. Most externship assignments are scheduled during daytime hours for both day and
  evening programs. All weeks exclude holidays, course change days and make-up hours for absences
  during externship. Actual times are set by the externship sites. Students are responsible for
  transportation to and from the extern site, as well as meals.

                                                                                 8
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Career Programs Course Descriptions begin on page 14.
Electrical & Renewable Energy Technology
 ERET401D – DIPLOMA PROGRAM
 DAY AND EVENING PROGR AMS
  N      S   NEW BRITAIN AND SHELTON CAMPUSES
 total semester credit hours*  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 48.0
 total instructional hours .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .1200
 approximate weeks to complete – day  .  .  .  .  . 51.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
 approximate weeks to complete – eve  .  .  .  .  . 81.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
   *The listing of credit hours is not meant to imply that credits can be transferred into college or other
    private career school programs. Transfer credits are at the sole discretion of the receiving school.

 program objective
 This is a comprehensive program that prepares a student to enter the                   for Electricians prepares the student for new complex technologies that are
Electrical field. A foundation of Basic Math and Electrical trade Algebra               being developed and implanted at faster and faster rates.
and Trigonometry prepare the student for Electrical theory and concepts.                 The Lab portions of our program train the student on basic but essential
The program continues with Blue Print reading, an essential skill required              hands on skills that are needed upon entrance in the Electrical Field. These
of a licensed Electrician. Each course in the program is an important                   hands on skills combined with our extensive classroom courses prepare the
component of knowledge needed in the Electrical Industry. The National                  Graduate for a successful and rewarding career in the Electrical Industry.
Electrical Code is covered thoroughly in four separate courses in which                 Students will also be trained on OSHA 30 standards and given the
each article in the NEC is reviewed. Courses such as Motor Control, Power               opportunity to take and pass the exam. OSHA 30 certification is mandated
Distribution, PLC’s 1 and 2 and Motor Generator Theory prepare the student              by the State licensing board for all apprentices. An apprentice needs to
for Commercial and Industrial installations. Basic Telecommunications and               have his or her OSHA 30 certification in order to seek qualification for
Cabling include voice, data, wireless, network and broadband technologies.              future licensure. Upon successful completion of the program the State of
Our program includes green energy technologies such as Solar, Wind and                  Connecticut mandated 720 hours of classroom study is satisfied. Students
Hydrogen Fuel Cell with an emphases on Solar Energy. Semi-Conductors                    will be required to complete out-of-class assignments in each course

			                                                                                lecture    lab/shop    total      total
number course                                                                        hours       hours   hours     credits                                prerequisites

 ET101A      Basic Math                                                             36          14        50        2.0
 ET102A      Electrical Theory I                                                    36          14        50        2.0
 ET103A      Electrical Theory II                                                   36          14        50        2.0                                     ET102A
 ET104A      Electrical Code I                                                      36          14        50        2.0
 ET105A Algebra and Trigonometry                                                    36          14        50        2.0                                     ET101A
 ET106A      Electrical Code II                                                     36          14        50        2.0                                     ET104A
 ET107A      Basic Telecommunication                                                36          14        50        2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET108A      Blueprint Reading                                                      36          14         50       2.0
 ET109A      Basic Alarm Systems                                                    36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET110A      Fire Access, CCTV systems                                              36          14         50       2.0                  ET102A, ET103A, ET109A
 ET111A      Electrical Code III                                                    36          14         50       2.0                           ET104A, ET106A
 ET112A      Telecommunication and Cable Installation                               36          14         50       2.0                   ET102A, ET103A, ET107A
 ET113A      Power Distribution and Load Calculations                               36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET114A      Electrical Code IV                                                     36          14         50       2.0                   ET104A, ET106A, ET111A
 ET115A      Motor and Generator Theory                                             36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET116A      OSHA 30                                                                36          14         50       2.0
 ET117A      Semi-Conductors and Electronics                                        36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET118       Residential Wiring                                                     36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET119A      Industrial Motor Control                                               36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET120A      Programmatic Logic Controllers I                                       36          14         50       2.0                   ET102A, ET103A, ET119A
 ET121A      Programmatic Logic Controllers II                                      36          14         50       2.0          ET102A, ET103A, ET119A, ET120A
 ET122A      Photovoltaic I                                                         36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
 ET123A      Photovoltaic II                                                        36          14         50       2.0                  ET102A, ET103A, ET122A
 ET124       Commercial Wiring                                                      36          14         50       2.0                            ET102A, ET103A
                                                                   TOTALS          864         336       1200        48

      MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) = 72.0 CREDITS
                                                          Course numbers and sequences are listed here for reference only. The actual delivery sequence
         CIP CODE–46.0302 • SOC CODE–47-2111              of courses contained in this program may vary depending on individual campus scheduling.

                                                                                    9
Official School Catalog - Lincoln Tech
Career Programs Course Descriptions begin on page 14.
International Baking and Pastry
 IBP101D – DIPLOMA PROGRAM
 DAY AND EVENING PROGR AMS
   S    SHELTON CAMPUS
 total semester credit hours*  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 37.5
 total instructional hours .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .1080
 approximate weeks to complete – day/eve .  .  . 66
   *The listing of credit hours is not meant to imply that credits can be transferred into college or other
    private career school programs. Transfer credits are at the sole discretion of the receiving school.

 program objective
  The program’s objective is to develop graduates who are “Industry Ready”;                  • Provide students with an opportunity to participate in community
 confident, competent and with a sense of urgency. Graduates are prepared                      events and services.
 to enter the foodservice industry in a variety of entry level positions. The            This approach to education not only produces technically-skilled students,
 program’s educational approach to this objective includes the following:               but also well-rounded graduates who are prepared to be professional
      • Provide students with the proper balance of theory and practical                members of the communities in which they live and work.
        application of the baking and pastry arts.                                       Students will be required to complete out-of-class assignments in each course,
                                                                                        except externship.
        • Provide students with a qualified, meaningful, well-managed
          experiential learning opportunity.
 		                                                                          lecture          lab   externship    total     total
 number course                                                                hours         hours        hours   hours    credits                           prerequisites

 CUL140SA         Introduction to Culinary Arts                                 45           45            0       90       3.5

 CUL240SA         Foodservice Operations                                        45           45            0       90       3.5

 FBM100SA         Food and Beverage Management                                  45           45            0       90       3.5

 IBP150SA         Artisan Breads and Viennoiserie                               45           45            0       90       3.5

 IBP160SA         American and European Pastry and Baked Goods                  45           45            0       90       3.5

 IBP170SA         Contemporary and Classical Cakes                              45           45            0       90       3.5

 IBP140SA         Baking and Pastry Techniques                                  45           45            0       90       3.5

 IBP180SA         Techniques and Artistry in Sugar                              45           45            0       90       3.5

 IBP190SA         Techniques and Artistry in Chocolate                          45           45            0       90       3.5

 CUL250S          Experiential Learning – Externship A                           0             0          90       90       2.0     † Students must complete all course
                                                                                                                                       work prior to taking externship.

 CUL260S          Experiential Learning – Externship B                           0             0          90       90       2.0     † Students must complete all course
                                                                                                                                       work prior to taking externship.

 CUL270S          Experiential Learning – Externship C                           0             0          90       90       2.0     † Students must complete all course
                                                                                                                                       work prior to taking externship.

                                                                    TOTALS    405           405          270     1080      37.5

       MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) = 56.0 CREDITS

         CIP CODE–12.0501 • SOC CODE–51-3011

  Course numbers and sequences are listed here for reference only. The actual delivery sequence
  of courses contained in this program may vary depending on individual campus scheduling.

  Each externship course is five weeks with a minimum of 90 hours; total Experiential
  Learning period is 15 weeks with a minimum of 270 hours of training at an approved
  externship site, working under the direction of a Chef and/or Manager, following all
  internal rules and regulations. Most externship assignments are scheduled during
  daytime hours for both day and evening programs. All weeks exclude holidays,
  course change days and make-up hours for absences during externship. Actual times
  are set by the externship sites. Students are responsible for transportation to and
  from the extern site, as well as meals.

 † Note: Externships must be taken in sequence.

                                                                                       10
Career Programs Course Descriptions begin on page 14.
Medical Assistant
 MA521D – DIPLOMA PROGRAM
 DAY AND EVENING PROGR AMS
  N          S   NEW BRITAIN AND SHELTON CAMPUSES
 total semester credit hours*  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34.0
 total instructional hours .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  900
 approximate weeks to complete – day  .  .  .  .  . 40.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
 approximate weeks to complete – eve  .  .  .  .  . 71.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
   *The listing of credit hours is not meant to imply that credits can be transferred into college or other
    private career school programs. Transfer credits are at the sole discretion of the receiving school.

 program objective
  The Medical Assistant program prepares students to be multi-functional              This program delivers practical preparation in the healthcare environment.
 practitioners, thoroughly prepared to perform front office and clinical               Graduates of this program may find entry-level positions as Office Medical
 patient care duties, as well as, basic urgent care procedures. Topics covered        Assistants, or Unit/Ward Clerks (in a hospital setting). It also provides
 include anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, insurance billing               the diversity of other job options in the hospital or laboratory environment.
 and coding, electronic health records, ethics, clinical procedures, aseptic          Students will be required to complete out-of-class assignments in each course,
 technique, minor surgical procedures, universal precautions, general skills          except externship.
 in document formatting, basic accounting, EKG, and pathophysiology.

 		                                                                        lecture          lab   externship    total     total
 number course                                                              hours         hours        hours   hours    credits                         prerequisites

 BIO101A          Anatomy and Physiology I                                    60           30            0       90       4.0

 BIO102A          Anatomy and Physiology II                                   60           30            0       90       4.0                             BIO101A

 SSS150           Student Success Strategies                                  25           20            0       45       2.0

 MCB100A          Health Administration and Records Management                45           45            0       90       3.5

 IT105A           Computer & Information Literacy                             15           30            0       45       1.5

 MST105A          Phlebotomy                                                  30           60            0       90       3.5

 MST103A          Clinical Procedures                                         45           45            0       90       4.0

 MST130A          Pharmacology                                                45           45             0      90       4.0                   BIO101A, BIO102A

 MED120A          The Virtual Medical Office                                  45           45             0      90       3.5

 EX201   †
                  Clinical Externship                                          0             0         180     180        4.0                                      §
                                                           TOTALS            370          350          180     900      34.0

      MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) = 51.0 CREDITS

        CIP CODE–51.0801 • SOC CODE–31-9092

  Course numbers and sequences are listed here for reference only. The actual delivery sequence
  of courses contained in this program may vary depending on individual campus scheduling.

 † The Clinical Externship is a full-time commitment of 180 hours at 30 hours per
  week for 6 weeks. Externship hours are daytime hours for both day and evening
  programs. All weeks exclude holidays, course change days and make-up hours for
  absences during externship. Actual times are set by the externship sites. Students
  are responsible for transportation to and from the extern site, as well as meals.

 § Successful completion of all in school course work must be completed prior to clinical externship.

                                                                                     11
Career Programs Course Descriptions begin on page 13.
Patient Care Associate
 PCA150C – CERTIFICATE PROGRAM
 DAY/AF TERNOON/EVENING PROGR AMS
  N      S   NEW BRITAIN AND SHELTON CAMPUSES
 total semester credit hours*  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 24.5
 total instructional hours .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  630
 approximate weeks to complete – day  .  .  .  .  . 31.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
 approximate weeks to complete – aft/eve .  .  .  . 44.0 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
   *The listing of credit hours is not meant to imply that credits can be transferred into college or other
    private career school programs. Transfer credits are at the sole discretion of the receiving school.

 program objective
  The Patient Care Associate program provides students with the entry-                 This program prepares students for certification testing, although there is
 level knowledge and clinical skills necessary to enter the healthcare field          no guarantee of passing the certification test and passing the test is not a
 as a Patient Care Associate in a variety of healthcare settings. Patient Care        graduation requirement.
 Associates are integral members of the healthcare team and perform a full             Graduates of this programs are eligible to take the following certification
 range of patient care duties or services under nursing or medical direction          exams: CNA, EKG Technician*, Phlebotomy Technician*, AHA Basic Life
 to oversee and monitor patients. As a vital member of the healthcare                 support for Healthcare provider, and Certified Patient Care Technician.
 team, they are qualified to provide care by taking vital signs, obtaining lab         Students will be required to complete out-of-class assignment in each
 specimens, assisting with activities of daily living, observing and charting         course.
 patient information, and reporting appropriate information to supervisors.
 In addition, the Patient Care Associate program prepares students in                    * These certifications have added requirements for eligibility.
 phlebotomy, electrocardiography, and nursing assistant skills.

 		                                                                               lecture         lab    clinical    total       total
 number course                                                                     hours        hours     hours     hours      credits                     prerequisites

 PCA111A        Anatomy and Physiology I                                            90            0          0        90         4.0

 PCA112A        Anatomy and Physiology II                                           90            0          0        90         4.0                          PCA111A

 CET102         ECG                                                                 45           45          0        90         3.5                PCA111A, PCA112A

 MST105A        Phlebotomy                                                          30           60          0        90         3.5                PCA111A, PCA112A

 NA101A         Nurse Aide Training and BLS for Healthcare Provider                 45           45        90        180         6.0

 PCA123A        Patient Care Associate                                              45           45          0        90         3.5      PCA111A, PCA112A, NA101A

                                                                 TOTALS           345          195         90        630       24.5

      MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) = 36.5 CREDITS

        CIP CODE– 51.3902 • SOC CODE–31-1014
  Course numbers and sequences are listed here for reference only. The actual delivery sequence
  of courses contained in this program may vary depending on individual campus scheduling.

  The Clinical practicum is a full-time commitment of 90 hours at 24 hours per week
  for 4 weeks for the day program and 16 hours per week for 6 weeks for the evening
  program. All weeks exclude holidays, course change days and make-up hours for
  absences during clinical practicum. Actual times are set by the clinical sites. Students
  are responsible for transportation to and from the clinical site, as well as meals.

                                                                                  12
Career Programs Course Descriptions begin on page 13.
Practical Nursing
 LPN101D – DIPLOMA PROGRAM
 DAY AND EVENING PROGR AMS
      N      S    NEW BRITAIN AND SHELTON CAMPUSES
 total semester credit hours*  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 61.0
 total instructional hours .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 1591
 approximate weeks to complete – day  .  .  .  .  . 52 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
 approximate weeks to complete – eve  .  .  .  .  . 92 (includes scheduled breaks and holidays)
       *The listing of credit hours is not meant to imply that credits can be transferred into college or other
        private career school programs. Transfer credits are at the sole discretion of the receiving school.

 program objective
 The Practical Nursing program prepares the individuals to become entry-level               this program are eligible to sit for the State of Connecticut, Practical Nursing
Practical Nurses. Practical Nurses provide nursing to clients of all ages with              Licensing exam. The classrooms and labs are equipped with the necessary
common health problems in a variety of health care settings under the direction             medical equipment and materials essential for training Practical Nurses.
of a Registered Nurse; participate in the nursing process to promote, maintain,             Major equipment includes Anatomical Manikins, VitalSim, Wheelchair,
and restore health or administer care to dying patients; practice within the legal          Stethoscopes, Electronic Thermometers, Personal Computers and Pumps.
and ethical framework of the nursing profession; and function as a member of                Students will be required to complete out-of-class assignments in each course.
the health care team in a variety of health care environments. Graduates of
 			                                                                      lecture     lab   clinical    total     total
 semester number course                                                     hours   hours    hours     hours    credits                                                               prerequisites

 I               PN103A   Nursing I – Fundamentals of Nursing               116      40         0      156        6.5

                                                                                                                          Successfully attain competence in designated lab skills prior to practicing
 I               PN105A   Clinical Experience/Nursing I                       0        0     180       180        6.5                                                     skills in the clinical area.

 I               PN109A   Anatomy and Physiology I                           70        0        0        70       3.0

                                                  SEMESTER I SUBTOTALS      186      40      180       406       16.0

 II              PN115A   Nursing II – Advanced Fundamentals of Nursing      30      30         0        60       2.5                                                  PN103A, PN105A, PN109A

 II              PN117A   Clinical Experience/Geriatrics                      0        0     185       185        6.5                                                  PN103A, PN105A, PN109A

 II              PN121A   Anatomy and Physiology II                          50        0        0        50       2.0                                                  PN103A, PN105A, PN109A

 II              PN122A   Principles of Pharmacology                         35      10         0        45       2.0                                                  PN103A, PN105A, PN109A

 II              PN124A   Clinical Experience/Well Child                      0        0       27        27       0.5                                                  PN103A, PN105A, PN109A

 II              PN125A   Human Growth and Development                       30        0        0        30       1.0                                                  PN103A, PN105A, PN109A

                                                 SEMESTER II SUBTOTALS      145      40      212        397      14.5

 III             PN130A   Nursing IV – Mental Health Nursing                 45        0        0        45       2.0         PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                                                              PN125A

 III             PN131A   Nursing III – Concepts of Maternal-Child           45        3        0        48       2.0         PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                                                              PN125A

 III             PN132A   Nursing V – Nursing Across the Lifespan I          81      10         0        91       4.0         PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                                                              PN125A

 III             PN134A   Clinical Experience/Sub Acute I                     0        0     216       216         7.5        PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                                                              PN125A

                                                SEMESTER III SUBTOTALS      171       13     216       400       15.5

 IV              PN136A   Clinical Experience/Mental Health                   0        0       18        18         .5        PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                              PN125A, PN130A, PN131A, PN132A, PN134A

 IV              PN138A   Clinical Experience/Maternal-Child                  0        0       18        18         .5        PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                              PN125A, PN130A, PN131A, PN132A, PN134A

 IV              PN140A   Nursing VI – Nursing Across the Lifespan II       143       11        0      154        7.0         PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                              PN125A, PN130A, PN131A, PN132A, PN134A

 IV              PN142A   Clinical Experience/Sub Acute II                    0        0     162       162        5.5         PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                              PN125A, PN130A, PN131A, PN132A, PN134A

 IV              PN144A   Professional Development                           36        0        0        36       1.5         PN103A, PN105A, PN109A, PN115A, PN117A, PN121A, PN122A,
                                                                                                                                              PN125A, PN130A, PN131A, PN132A, PN134A

                                                SEMESTER IV SUBTOTALS       179       11     198       388       15.0

                                                       PROGRAM TOTALS       681     104      806       1591      61.0

          MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) = 91.5 CREDITS

            CIP CODE–51.3901 • SOC CODE–29-2061

                                                                                       13
Course Descriptions Career Programs begin on page 7.
    Course Numbering                                         Students practice correct procedures to wire, test, calculation of those loads. A duct project is completed
                                                             troubleshoot, and replace, if needed, heating system and tested during this course.
    System                                                   control devices. Student will also learn about OSHA Students will learn the sources of indoor air pollution,
                                                             30 standards and International Mechanical Code the procedures for eliminating contamination sources,
                                                             guidelines as it applies to the course.                   how molds reproduce, reasons for cleaning air ducts,
   100 LEVEL COURSES                                         Prerequisite(s): HV102D                                   reasons for providing humidification in winter months,
   These are courses that may or may not have                                                                          and factors used when sizing humidifiers.
   prerequisites defined and normally are                    HV104D – HEATING SYSTEMS (MECHANICAL)
   offered to the student during the learning
                                                             120 Contact Hrs (60 Lecture, 60 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits    Students will also learn to determine factors for
   process in the first academic year.                       This course is designed to introduce students to the evaporation requirements, plot airflow conditions
                                                             various types of heating systems to include hot water, on the air-friction chart, determine requirements
                                                             steam, and warm air. Students learn how electricity, for filtration systems, perform service inspections
   200 LEVEL COURSES                                         gas, and oil sources are used to power these systems. on humidifier units, perform load calculations, plot
   These are courses that may or may not have                They also learn the principles of combustion and wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures, and calculate
   prerequisites defined and normally are                    methods for testing combustion efficiency. Students winter heat loss. Student will also learn about OSHA
   offered to the student during the learning                learn how air handling equipment is used to distribute 30 standards and International Mechanical Code
   process in the second academic year.                      heated air throughout a structure. Students also learn guidelines as it applies to the course.
                                                             methods to troubleshoot and service both the heating Prerequisite(s): None
                                                             electrical and mechanical systems. Student will also
                                                             learn about OSHA 30 standards and International HV109D – COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION CONTROL
    ACRHT Courses                                            Mechanical Code guidelines as it applies to the course. 120 Contact Hrs (75 Lecture, 45 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits
                                                             Prerequisite(s): HV101D                                   This course is designed to provide the student
HV101D – INTRODUCTION TO CLIMATE CONTROL                                                                               with necessary information about the theory and
SYSTEMS                                                      HV105D – BASIC REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS
120 Contact Hrs (70 Lecture,50 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits
                                                                                                                       application of control for commercial refrigeration.
                                                             120 Contact Hrs (60 Lecture, 60 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits    Electro-mechanical or electronic controls include low
This course is designed to present the learner with          This course is designed to present the student with pressure; high pressure; ambient head pressure; oil
an understanding of the principles of energy, heat,          the principles governing the operation of refrigeration pressure; current and thermal overload; temperature;
and combustion; basic refrigeration and the effects          systems and the refrigeration cycle. They will flow, freeze and short cycle control are emphasized.
of temperature and pressure on liquids and gasses.           learn about refrigerants, compressors, evaporators, Circuits for pump down; off cycle, electric and hot gas
Procedures used in the fabrication of tubing assemblies,     condensers, metering and control devices as well as defrost are wired. Evaporation pressure, head pressure,
cutting, bending, flaring, swaging and soldering             service procedures, such as evacuating refrigerants and crankcase pressure, and metering valves are studied.
are also taught. Pressure testing and leak detection         oil charging, leak detection and mechanical checks.
procedures are also emphasized. Student will also                                                                      Students will learn how commercial evaporators are
learn how to thread pipe and properly join PVC pipe.         Students will learn how to plot a refrigeration cycle for controlled, the various types of controls used in a
                                                             refrigerants on a pressure/enthalpy diagram, choose commercial system, and the different applications of
Students will learn to apply the basic theory of heat        a leak detector for a particular type of leak, perform refrigeration control systems for commercial uses.
transfer, basic principles of energy and matter, and         two different types of evacuation, and perform a high Students will also learn to identify and select the
the application of safe work practices. They will learn      side and triple evacuation. They will learn to charge a various types of expansion devices used in commercial
to use the tools and equipment used by the HVAC-R            system using various methods. Students will also learn systems; apply refrigeration control systems for
technician and the proper selection of fasteners for         to diagnose and troubleshoot various problems within commercial uses, and the service and troubleshooting
particular tasks. Students will also learn the different     the refrigeration system. Student will also learn about of commercial refrigeration control systems. Student
types of tubing used in the HVAC-R industry and the          OSHA 30 standards and International Mechanical will also learn about OSHA 30 standards and
types of jointing processes for different types of tubing.   Code guidelines as it applies to the course.
Student will also learn about OSHA 30 standards and                                                                    International Mechanical Code guidelines as it applies
International Mechanical Code guidelines as it applies       Prerequisite(s): None                                     to the course.
to the course.                                               HV107D – AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS                        Prerequisite(s): HV102D, HV105D
Prerequisite(s): None                                        120 Contact Hrs (75 Lecture, 45 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits   HV120D – ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND GREEN
HV102D – ELECTRICITY                                         This course is designed to provide the student with      TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS
                                                             the necessary information about the various types        120 Contact Hrs (70 Lecture, 50 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits
120 Contact Hrs (60 Lecture, 60 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits
                                                             of air conditioning systems, their characteristics and   This course introduces HVAC students to Green
This course is designed to explore the sources and           applications as well as combination systems. This
principles of electrical energy and its generation and                                                                Technology and its impact on the HVAC industry.
                                                             course also explores the various components e.g.:        They will be provided with an overview about green
control. Conductors, insulators, thermal and magnetic        compressors, motors, controls, and air handlers as
switching are discussed. Types and application of                                                                     alternatives to comfort heating and cooling systems.
                                                             well as servicing and troubleshooting of systems and     Specific additional topics include learning methods
electric motors are emphasized. Procedures used in           controls.
wiring panels and switching devices as well as single                                                                 for evaluating energy efficiency in any building
and poly-phase electrical systems are also discussed.        Students will learn the parameters associated with       structure and Solar Thermal and Geothermal Green
                                                             psychometrics, how refrigeration applies to air          Technologies. Students learn the fundamentals of
Students will learn how to apply safety procedures           conditioning, the process involved in installing an      Energy Auditing and the methods for conducting a
while working with electricity and electrical devices        air conditioning system, the various types of controls   mechanical and envelope evaluation, pressure analysis,
and equipment. They will learn to distinguish the            used on air conditioning equipment, the conditions       and performing infrared imaging (Thermography).
difference between series and parallel circuits and how      that affect air conditioning equipment and the proper    Students are encouraged to complete certification
to apply principles of electricity to electrical formulas    troubleshooting and servicing techniques for air         testing conducted either by GreenMech (Green
as they relate to basic circuits and equipment. Students     conditioning units.                                      Mechanical Council), BPI (Building Performance
will also learn to apply automatic controls used in                                                                   Institute) or RESNET (Residential Energy Services
the Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and              Students will also learn to recognize the four factors   Network).
Refrigeration industry. They will learn the application      involved in comfort and plot air conditions using a
of various types of electric motors and controls used        psychometric chart. They will learn to select the correct Students also learn the fundamentals of Solar Thermal
in the industry. In addition students will learn to          instruments for checking an air conditioning unit with and Geothermal energy systems. They learn the
diagnosis and troubleshoot electric motors and motor         a mechanical problem. Students will also learn to basic theory about each system and the functional
controls. In the process they will learn to use various      calculate the correct operating suction pressures for components of each system. They learn to calculate
types of test equipment. Student will also learn about       both standard and high efficiency air conditioning to proper sizing for these systems and use trainers/
OSHA 30 standards and International Mechanical               equipment under various conditions. Student will also simulators to visually reinforce concepts learned in
Code guidelines as it applies to the course.                 learn about OSHA 30 standards and International the classroom. Student will also learn about OSHA
Prerequisite(s): None                                        Mechanical Code guidelines as it applies to the course. 30 standards and International Mechanical Code
                                                             Prerequisite(s): HV102D, HV105D
                                                                                                                       guidelines as it applies to the course.
HV103D – HEATING SYSTEMS (CONTROL)                                                                                    Prerequisite(s): HV101D, HV102D, HV103D, HV104D,
120 Contact Hrs (60 Lecture, 60 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits       HV108D – AIR CONDITIONING DESIGN AND LAYOUT              HV105D, HV107D, HV108D
This course presents the types, characteristics, 120 Contact Hrs (105 Lecture, 15 Lab/Shop); 5.5 Credits              SP101A – SYSTEM PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION
application, installation, and servicing of control This course is designed to provide the student with the           120 Contact Hrs (75 Lecture, 45 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits
devices used to operate various types of heating necessary information about theory of heat exchange                  This course is designed to provide the student with the
equipment. Students also learn about safety devices as applied to heat and cooling loads as well as the               necessary information to maximize operating efficiency
that monitor proper operation of heating units.                                                                       using the various means to verify performance of

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Course Descriptions Career Programs begin on page 7.
HVAC systems. Specific emphasis is placed on proper           FBM100SA – FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT                          will be given to understanding the basics of flavors and
refrigerant charging procedures, net cooling capacity         90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits                 flavorings and the factors affecting the perception of
verification, psychrometric fundamentals, combustion          This course teaches the use of restaurant control systems in     flavors, with emphasis on serving correctly seasoned foods.
efficiency, and system airflow testing processes. This        menu development, accounting principles, staff training,         Included will be the proper use and care of culinary tools,
course also explores various tools used in servicing and      table service and wine technology. Students learn to             practical use of culinary math and purchasing practices
verification system operating parameters.                     create and design menus. Students will explore accounting        and procedures. Charcuterie specialties such as sausage
                                                              principles with foodservice industry comparisons. Basic          making, meat smoking and fish curing are all part of this
Students will learn to select and use the correct                                                                              course. Techniques are explored through explanation,
instruments for testing, and the steps for calculating        computer literacy and restaurant-related computer
                                                              applications are introduced. Students study the                  demonstrations and comparison tasting. By the end of
operating parameters associated with efficient                                                                                 this course the student should have the necessary skills
operation of heating and air conditioning systems.            management process, effective communication skills, the
                                                              supervisor’s role in decision-making and problem solving,        and knowledge to plan, prepare and present a variety of
Students will also learn to calculate the processes                                                                            cold specialties, hot foods and hybrid hot-cold preparation
using a psychometric chart which involve the level of         effective use of delegation, conflict resolution, motivational
                                                              techniques, and stress management. Organizational                of foods.
comfort for heating and air conditioning.
                                                              design, line and staff relationships and employee training       Prerequisite(s): CUL165SA
Completion of this course will prepared the student           programs are also presented in this course. Knowledge
with the required knowledge to obtain one or more of          and techniques of table service are explored, guest check        CUL155SA – PRINCIPLES OF FOOD SCIENCE
the four certification levels from the HVAC Excellence        control, federal, state and local control laws and third         90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits
and Green Mechanical Council. Certifications may              party liability. Beverage technology studied includes            This course allows students to learn the basics of heat
be achieved in one or more of the following: Airflow,         distinguishing wines by grape, variety, growing region,          transfer and the affects that heat has on various foods.
Critical charging procedures Psychrometrics, and              production process and proper service.                           The techniques for the making of quality stocks will be
Combustion analysis. Student will also learn about            Prerequisite(s): None                                            covered with emphasis on accurate knife cuts to ensure
OSHA 30 standards and International Mechanical                                                                                 desired results. Students will practice a full range of
Code guidelines as it applies to the course.                  CUL240SA – FOODSERVICE OPERATIONS                                cooking techniques, including dry-heat, moist-heat and
Prerequisite(s): HV101D, HV102D, HV104D, HV105D,              90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits                 combination methods as applied to vegetables, starches,
HV107D, HV108D                                                This course serves as an introduction to the real world of       sandwiches, eggs and breakfast batter products. The
                                                              foodservice operations in which students make use of the         making of salads and dressings will be covered as well
TB101A – TESTING ADJUSTING AND BALANCING                      skills that they have acquired. Making use of the classic        as a focus on the specifications for purchasing, receiving
VERIFICATION                                                                                                                   and storing of common ingredients. Standard weights
120 Contact Hrs (60 Lecture, 60 Lab/Shop); 5.0 Credits        brigade system, individuals will have the opportunity
                                                              to prep and work all stations both in the kitchen and            and measures will be emphasized in all procedures so
This course is designed to provide the student with           dining room. Stations will include, but are not limited          that once the fundamental techniques have been learned;
the necessary information to maximize operating               to Sous Chef, Maître d’, Saucier, Garde Manger, Server,          it is relatively easy to apply those techniques to a full
efficiency using various means to verify performance          Back Waiter, Grillardin. This course will expand upon            repertoire of other recipes.
of HVAC systems. Specific emphasis is placed on               the creation of menus in regards to seasonality and              Prerequisite(s): None
testing procedures for proper airflow and water               demographics, all the while, monitoring food & beverage
distribution. This course also explores the operation         costs and labor cost. The exploration of different types         NTR101SA – MENU PLANNING AND NUTRITION
and use of various tools for balancing and verification       of menus will be a focal point of this course. From the          90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits
of system operating parameters.                               creation of cohesive menus, to proper applications of the        This course offers a comprehensive review of foods,
Students will learn to select and use the correct             products available, to the execution of individual’s job         nutrients and nutrition. Major nutrient classes:
instruments for testing application, and the steps            description, the future foodservice professional will be         carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, minerals and
for calculating operating parameters associated with          a great fit in the modern kitchen. Adherence to proper           water will be investigated. The relationship of foods
efficient operation of heating and air conditioning           safety and sanitation requirements will also be strictly         and nutrients to areas of current interest including diet
systems. Students will use a psychometric chart               monitored. This class will take all knowledge, skills, and       and disease (diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease
to calculate the enthalpy level of outdoor air for            techniques that have been taught, and apply it in such           and cancer, etc.), weight control, diet and exercise,
comfort heating and air conditioning. Completion              a way to link the training to the externship section and         dietary from pregnancy through older adulthood will be
of this course will prepare the student with the              finally to the long successful careers ahead.                    discussed, as well as, gluten free diets. Current dietary
required knowledge to obtain a certification from the         Prerequisite(s): None                                            recommendations including the Food Guide Pyramid,
HVAC Excellence and Green Mechanical Council.                                                                                  U.S. Dietary Guidelines and Recommended Dietary
Students will also learn about OSHA 30 standards CUL165SA – ADVANCED SKILLS I – MEAT, SEAFOOD,                                 Allowances (RDA) will be compared and contrasted.
and International Mechanical Code guidelines as it AND POULTRY                                                                 Prerequisite(s): None
                                                      90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits
applies to the course.
                                                              Advanced Skills: Meats, Seafood and Poultry, is a                PER101SA – PERSONAL/PRIVATE CHEF
Prerequisite(s): HV101D, HV104D, HV105D, HV107D,                                                                               90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits
HV108D                                                        foundation course for the culinary student, emphasizing
                                                              the classic cooking methods, culinary terminology,               Personal/Private Chef examines the intrinsic details
                                                              identification, fabrication and preparation of seafood,          to being a personal or private chef. The course allows
    Culinary/IBP Courses                                      meats, and poultry products. Preparation of sauces               students the opportunity to create a personal business
                                                              and soups will be explored; with the introduction and            strategy, including marketing, menu design, liability,
CUL140SA – INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY ARTS                      refinement of the thickening methods and techniques used         forms of ownership, financing, and customer service
90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits              therein. Consideration will be given to understanding the        with an emphasis on a step-by-step understanding of
This course provides students with an introduction to         basics of flavors and flavorings and the factors affecting the   how students can begin their own personal chef business.
the fundamentals needed to build a successful culinary        perception of flavors, with emphasis on serving correctly        Prerequisite(s): CUL140SA, CUL165SA, CUL175SA
career. It starts with an introduction to culinary history,   seasoned foods. Included will be the proper use and
an orientation to the professional kitchen and an             care of culinary tools, practical use of culinary math           CUL195SA – INTERNATIONAL CUISINE AND CULTURE
overview of the career opportunities available in the         and purchasing practices and procedures. Modern and              90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits
foodservice industry. Students participate in culinary        classical methods are explored in the preparation of pates,      Students in this course will learn to prepare, taste, serve,
product identification and taste exploration, equipment       galantines, mousses, canapés and hors d’oeuvre. Artistry         and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of important
identification, standard measurement, and a thorough          and innovation merge in the creation of fruit and vegetable      regions and cultures of the world. Emphasis will be
examination of knife safety and basic knife skills. The       garnishes and melon sculptures. Charcuterie specialties          placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and
theory and practice of proper foodservice sanitation is       such as sausage making, meat smoking and fish curing are         techniques representative of the cuisines of the Far East,
studied and leads to national certification upon successful   all part of this course.                                         Middle East, Mediterranean, Europe, Africa, North
completion of the examination. Nutrition plays an             Prerequisite(s): None                                            America, and South America.
important role and this course also provides students                                                                          Prerequisite(s): None
with the knowledge of the role of nutrition science in        CUL175SA – ADVANCED SKILLS II – MEATS,
various segments of the food service industry. Students       SEAFOOD, AND POULTRY                                             CUL280SA – EXTERNSHIP
learn how to apply healthy and nutritious food selection      90 Contact Hrs (45 Lecture, 45 Lab); 3.5 Credits                 180 Contact Hrs (180 Externship); 4.0 Credits
and preparation to classical and modern cuisine. The path     This is a continuation of CUL165SA. Advanced Skills:             For students, especially those with little previous
to professional and personal development starts here with     Meats, Seafood and Poultry, is an advanced course for            experience, an experiential learning opportunity offers
the commitment to the highest standards of attitude,          the culinary student, emphasizing the classic cooking            many benefits. This initial externship intends to broaden
attendance, dress, respect and lifelong learning.             methods, culinary terminology, identification, fabrication       the scope of the “new” chef experience not commonly
Prerequisite(s): None                                         and preparation of seafood, meats, and poultry products.         encountered in a student’s resident portion of their
                                                              Preparation of sauces and soups will be explored; with           education or previous workplace environment. The focus
                                                              the introduction and refinement of the thickening                is on training the student in culinary skills through greater
                                                              methods and techniques used therein. Consideration               insight into an actual work environment, developing

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