Specialized classes & unique settings Student Profiles & Placement Process - September, 2016 - Autism Calgary

 
Specialized classes & unique settings Student Profiles & Placement Process - September, 2016 - Autism Calgary
specialized classes & unique settings

              Student Profiles &
              Placement Process
              September, 2016

                                        0
Document Background and Rationale

The Calgary Board of Education (CBE) believes that learning experiences must be as unique as every
student and that in an inclusive educational system an array of programming is available to ensure that
each student is taught in the way that they learn best. Personalization of learning for all students requires
that we ensure the CBE has educational programs and settings that attend to each student’s unique
needs, abilities, interests and learning goals. Personalizing learning for most students occurs within their
community school where universal, targeted and specialized instructional strategies, resources, supports
and services ensure student success. For some students the personalization of learning is best met in a
specialized classes or unique setting which allows for specific strategies, resources, technologies, and
personnel to attend to the individual learning needs of these students. Most of the CBE’s specialized
classes are situated within community school settings. The principal, as the instructional leader, is
responsible for ensuring appropriate staffing; resource allocation, instructional strategies and supports are
in place for all learners in their school, including students in specialized classes.

The goal of this document is to provide school-based administrators and members of Area Learning
Teams with placement process information including: student profile information, placement timelines and
required documentation for students to be considered for placement into specialized classes and unique
settings.

The focus of this document is not on a student’s disabilities, but rather on the specialized classes and
unique settings offered in the CBE and how learning is experienced by students in these classes. A
detailed list of current resources has been compiled for each class and setting. We encourage all CBE
staff to explore these resources as they provide significant and valuable information that supports the
development of effective instructional experiences for students. This document is the first step in the
development of a Standard of Practice for the CBE’s specialized classes and unique settings. We
welcome feedback and/or questions as we further develop resources to support these important and
valued programs within our school division.

As you read through this document you will see that in most cases, placement of students into specialized
classes and/or unique settings is determined through a Placement Meeting. Placement Meetings involve
the sharing of pertinent student information with members of the Placement Committee. Student
information at the placement meeting should be shared by the school staff or ALT member who has the
best knowledge and understanding of the student’s unique learning profile. Members of the Placement
Committee, reviewing candidate information, will differ depending on the specialized class/unique setting,
but may include:

                                                                                                           1
       ALT members (as determined by Area Directors)
           Specialist(s)
           Strategist(s)
           Psychologist or Psychiatrist
           School Administrator or designate
           Partner representative (i.e. Woods, YWCA, Hull Child & Family Services, etc.)

For Unique Setting placements requested during the school year, Learning Services Specialists, in
conjunction with unique setting staff, and ALT members make placement decisions based on the
availability of space, complexity of the potential candidate and unique setting environment, and
appropriateness of the referral.

For Specialized Class placements requested during the school year, ALT members, in conjunction with
Principals of specialized classes, make placement decisions based on the availability of space,
complexity of the potential candidate and specialized class environment, and appropriateness of the
referral.

Placement Letter offers (posted under “staff insite” at “forms & documents”) require parental signatures.

When determining who has the parental authority to sign the placement letters accepting/denying the
placement, consider the following:

           Who does the student live with?
           If the student lives with one or the other, does the school have on file court orders outlining sole
            or joint custody of parental authority to make education decisions for the student?
           If there are concerns, review with Legal Affairs (403-817-7988) for interpretation and
            recommendations regarding court orders.
           More information can be found on the “staff insite” under Legal Affairs

Learning Admin | blh                       Updated: 5 December 2016                               Page 2 of 87
Table of Contents

specialized classes & unique settings ........................................................................................................... 0

Developmental Disabilities ............................................................................................................................ 5
   Communication Sensory and Social Interaction ....................................................................................... 5
   Teaching of Attitude, Social Skills and Communication Class .................................................................. 8
   Placement Process for CSSI and TASC ................................................................................................. 11
   Social Knowledge, Independent Living and Language Class ................................................................. 12
   Attitude, Community Competence, Elements of Academic Curriculum, Social Skills Class .................. 15
   Placement Process for SKILL and ACCESS .......................................................................................... 18
   Christine Meikle School ........................................................................................................................... 19
   Emily Follensbee School ......................................................................................................................... 21
   Placement Process for Emily Follensbee and Christine Meikle School .................................................. 23
   Adapted Learning Class .......................................................................................................................... 24
   Placement Process for Adapted Learning Class .................................................................................... 27
   Placement Process for PLP Divisions II and III ....................................................................................... 30
   Placement Process for PLP Division IV .................................................................................................. 31
   Autism Spectrum Disorder Cluster Class ................................................................................................ 32
   Placement Process for ASD Cluster ....................................................................................................... 35

DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING ............................................................................................................... 36
   Oral/Auditory Program | Elementary ....................................................................................................... 36
   Deaf/Hard of Hearing – Bilingual | Elementary ....................................................................................... 36
   Deaf/Hard of Hearing – Bilingual | Secondary ........................................................................................ 36
   Placement Process for Deaf and Hard of Hearing .................................................................................. 39

EARLY DEVELOPMENT CENTRE ............................................................................................................ 40

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ........................................................................................................... 42
   Literacy, English and Academic Development Class.............................................................................. 42

GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION .................................................................................................... 44
   Placement Process for Gifted and Talented Education .......................................................................... 47

LEARNING DISABILITIES .......................................................................................................................... 48
   Learning and Literacy (L&L) .................................................................................................................... 48
   Placement Process for Learning and Literacy Class .............................................................................. 50
   Dr. Oakley School ................................................................................................................................... 51
   Placement Process for Dr. Oakley School .............................................................................................. 53

MENTAL HEALTH | WELLNESS ................................................................................................................ 54
   Transitions ............................................................................................................................................... 56
   Placement Process for The Class ........................................................................................................... 59
   Alberta Health Services Classes that Include School Components Staffed by CBE .............................. 60
   Young Adult Program (YAP) ................................................................................................................... 61
   AADAC Action Program .......................................................................................................................... 62
Learning Admin | blh                                    Updated: 5 December 2016                                                        Page 3 of 87
SOCIAL EMOTIONAL ................................................................................................................................. 63
   Bridges .................................................................................................................................................... 63
   Placement Process for Bridges ............................................................................................................... 65
   Children Village School ........................................................................................................................... 66
   Nexus ...................................................................................................................................................... 68
   William Roper Hull School (WRHS) ........................................................................................................ 70
   William Taylor Learning Centre (WTLC) ................................................................................................. 72
   High School Integration Class)................................................................................................................ 72
   Placement process for Children’s Village School, Nexus, William Roper Hull School, William Taylor
   Learning Centre, and HIP ....................................................................................................................... 74
   George Wood Learning Centre ............................................................................................................... 75
   Hera ......................................................................................................................................................... 76
   Placement Process for HERA ................................................................................................................. 76

VISION ........................................................................................................................................................ 78
   Short-Term Classes at Vision Resource Centre ..................................................................................... 78
   Placement Process for Short Term Class at Vision Resource Centre .................................................... 79
   Appendix A: Which schools have specialized classes? .......................................................................... 80
   Appendix B: Which schools have unique settings? ................................................................................ 83

Learning Admin | blh                                     Updated: 5 December 2016                                                         Page 4 of 87
Developmental Disabilities

Communication Sensory and Social Interaction

What is the Communication Sensory, Social Interaction Class?

Communication, Sensory and Social Interaction (CSSI) classes offer unique learning environments
which provide intensive supports and services to students in grades 1 – 12 who have been diagnosed
with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and who have moderate to severe cognitive (intellectual)
developmental disabilities. The purpose of CSSI is to develop students’ abilities to be as independent as
possible in their home, school, and community environments. CSSI teachers recognize students’ unique
sensory and learning needs. They work with their students on functional academic and living skills,
including communication, and appropriate social interactions. A modified curriculum is used. Teachers
base their instruction on the individual needs of each student, with a specific focus on sensory regulation.
Instructional techniques may include individual and small group instruction and the use of assistive
technology and augmentative communication systems. Inclusion in activities and events within the school
community is provided where appropriate. CSSI classes typically have six students. Program staff
includes one full time teacher and two full time education assistants, depending upon the complexity of
the needs of the individual students.

What is the profile of students in the CSSI classes?
Students who are eligible for placement in CSSI have highly specialized and complex learning needs
based on the following criteria:

       Diagnosed with an Autism spectrum disorder
       Standardized assessments indicate severe to profound language delays (i.e. scores < 1st
        percentile)
            o    Limited FUNCTIONAL language
                         Less than 10 functional requests (verbal/sign/picture exchange) for items or
                          activities present in the environment
            o    Limited receptive language
                         Limited ability to follow receptive instructions in routine situations (equal to or
                          greater than 3 instructions with prompting)
                         Identifies less than 50 common objects
                         Identifies less than 10 body parts
       Standardized assessments indicate students’ adaptive skills are severely delayed
            o    Requires supervision and support with toileting routines
            o    Requires supervision and support when eating
            o    Requires supervision and support with dressing (putting on coat, boots, etc.)

                                                                                                            5
    Students often show significant sensory processing differences as identified by a sensory profile
         developed by an Occupational Therapist

        Students frequently demonstrate challenging behaviours
              o    Aggression toward others (hitting, biting)
              o    Self-injurious behaviour (hitting, biting self)
              o    Destructive behaviour (throwing, breaking)
              o    Disruptive behaviour (crying, screaming)
              o    Unsafe behaviour (running, limited awareness of surroundings and personal safety)
        Students are in the early stages of developing learner behaviour (i.e. sitting for group time,
         attending to stimuli)

What documentation is required for placement consideration?

Copies of the most current assessment information, including:

        Updated IPP, including:

              o    Current level of achievement and functioning
              o    Strategies and accommodations in place
              o    Class modifications
              o    Supports and services in place (in school, home, the community)

        Medical diagnosis or multi-disciplinary team assessment reports (if available)
        Psycho-educational assessment results

              o    Indicating a moderate to severe cognitive delay
              o    Reflecting a moderate to severe delay in adaptive functioning

        Speech-language assessment results

              o    Indicating a severe delay in expressive and receptive language abilities

        Occupational therapy assessment results

              o    Describing the student’s sensory profile

        Behaviour Support Plan (if available)
        Placement Consideration Summary Sheet is completed.

Learning Admin | blh                      Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 6 of 87
What resources are recommended for CSSI classes?

Physical Environment

        Distinct learning spaces (i.e. independent work stations, group instruction areas)
        Retreat space (i.e. quiet, comfortable space with bean bag chairs or other comforting seating)
        Sensory space
        Secure storage spaces (i.e. cupboards or storage lockers that can be locked)
        Kitchen space (if possible)
        Barrier-free washroom with a change table (if possible)
        Access to spaces where gross motor skills can be developed (indoor & outdoor, if possible)
        Reduce sensory stimulus wherever possible (i.e. low lighting, volume, clutter)

Learning Materials

        Manipulatives (i.e. blocks, lacing cards, sorting materials)
        Developmentally appropriate AND age appropriate materials (i.e. picture cards, puzzles,
         vocational)
        Extensive selection of reinforcers
        Safety materials (i.e. child proof door handles, locks for cupboards, door alarms, rubber gloves)
        Sensory equipment (i.e. therapy balls, beanbag chairs, headphones, theraband, body socks,
         music player, lap weights, beads, scarves, lighting

Recommended technology may include:

        I-Pads equipped with Apps for communication, reinforcement/rewards, social stories, etc.
        Computers
        Wall mounted SMART board with backlit projector
        AlphaSmart Neos
        Video camera
        Nintendo Wii
        iPod Nano with docking station
        Headphones
        Digital camera

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                              Page 7 of 87
Teaching of Attitude, Social Skills and Communication Class
What is the Teaching of Attitude, Social Skills and Communication Class?

Teaching of Attitude, Social Skills, and Communication (TASC) classes are designed to provide
intensive supports and services for students in Grades 1-12 who have moderate to severe cognitive
(intellectual) and developmental disabilities. TASC programming teaches students functional living skills.
There is focus on communication, appropriate social interactions, and the students’ unique sensory
needs. The program works to assist students to be as independent as possible in their home, school, and
community environments. This is done by helping the student to develop their skills for communication,
functional academics, play and leisure, work, and functional living, as well as their health and safety
awareness. Individual student needs are identified through the use of an assessment tool that helps to
determine learning priorities. A modified curriculum is then implemented based on the individual needs of
each student. Students in the TASC class are included in whole school activities (assemblies) as well as
age-appropriate learning such as music, art, library, and gym when appropriate. A TASC class is a small
group setting within a community school. It typically has up to 6 students and is staffed with one teacher
and two full time educational assistants as well as a lunch room assistant.

What is the profile of students in the TASC classes?

Students who are eligible for placement in TASC are identified with:

        Severe cognitive and developmental disabilities often associated with a medical diagnosis. These
         students are eligible to be coded 41 as described by Alberta Education:

              o    FSIQ of 30 (plus or minus 5) or less.
                          Functional assessments by a qualified professional can be considered in cases
                           where the disabilities of the child preclude standardized assessment.
              o    Severe delays in all areas of functioning (
What documentation is required for placement consideration?

Copies of the most current assessment information, including:

        Updated IPP, including:

              o    Current level of achievement and functioning
              o    Strategies and accommodations in place
              o    Class modifications
              o    Supports and services in place (in school, home, the community)

        Medical diagnosis or multi-disciplinary team assessment reports (if available)
        Psycho-educational assessment results

              o    Indicating a moderate to severe cognitive delay
              o    Reflecting a moderate to severe delay in adaptive functioning

        Speech-language assessment results indicating a severe delay in expressive and receptive
         language abilities
        Occupational therapy assessment results describing the student’s sensory profile
        Physical therapy assessment results
        Behaviour Support Plan (if available)
        Placement Consideration Summary Sheet is completed.

What resources are recommended for TASC classes?

Physical Environment

        Learning spaces (comfortable spaces and furniture which allow opportunities for students to work
         independently, in small groups, and as part of a larger group)
        Calming space (comfortable space and furniture for students to self-regulate and relax within)
        Secure space (for the safe storage of personal information, various items, and food, where
         appropriate)
        Reduced sensory stimulus (i.e. low lighting, volume).
        Sensory spaces and opportunities for calming and proactive planning
        Kitchen space (if possible)
        Sink and microwave if kitchen space not possible
        Barrier free washroom
        Access to spaces where gross motor skills can be developed (indoor and outdoor)

Learning Admin | blh                     Updated: 5 December 2016                           Page 9 of 87
Learning Materials

        Developmentally and age appropriate learning materials/manipulatives
        Developmentally and age appropriate materials which support coping strategies and skills
        Visuals (i.e. schedules, rule cards, task analysis)
        Safety materials as required (i.e. child proof door handles, locks for cupboards, door alarms,
         rubber gloves, etc.)
        Reinforcers as required
        Sensory equipment (therapy balls, beanbag chairs, headphones, theraband, body socks, music
         player, lap weights, beads, scarves, lighting)
        Inclusive technology to support student learning and independence to include a variety of
         hardware and software

Recommended technology may include:

        Smart-boards
        Laptops/notebooks
        Portable media devices such as i-touch, i-pod, digital voice recorders, video recording devices.
        Speech to text software
        Reinforcement software (games, activities, etc.)
        Digital textbooks
        Online resources
        Sound FM Field System

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 10 of 87
Placement Process for CSSI and TASC

      Timelines                                 Placement Process for CSSI and TASC

                                Schools work through the SLT process to identify and implement different
                                 strategies for supporting student success across all domains (i.e. academic,
                                 social, social/emotional, coping, etc.).
   September - June             Schools with concerns about students who may require additional supports
       (Ongoing)                 contact their ALT.
                                ALT members respond to school requests for support via Area specific
                                 processes.
                                ALT members work with schools through the SLT process to ensure ongoing
                                 appropriate programming and transition planning are implemented for students
                                 already in specialized classes and/or unique settings.
                                Complex Needs Specialists work with school to do IPP reviews for students
        January                  already in these specialized classes.
                                Complex Needs Strategists and Specialists work with schools to determine
   (Available spaces
                                 which students in specialized classes or unique settings may graduate or
       tabulated)                transition to new placements in the fall.
                                Complex Needs Strategists and/or Specialists, in consultation with school
                                 Principals, determine the number of placement openings that are predicted in
                                 specialized classes or unique settings.
                                Schools work with Strategist/Specialist to identify potential candidates and
                                 prepare required documentation.
February (Consideration         In the case that students are determined NOT to be appropriate candidates,
of potential candidates          Strategists/Specialists will provide feedback (i.e. suggestions for programming
                                 and supports) to SLTs.
                                Strategists/Specialists identify students transitioning into the CBE from other
                                 school systems or Community Agencies who may be potential candidates, and
                                 gather required documentation.

    March - April 15            Complex Needs Specialists schedule cross-Area placement meetings and send
                                 out invitations.
(Pre-decision activities)       Strategists collect placement packages from schools and prepare Placement
                                 Consideration Summary Sheets for all potential candidates and forward them to
                                 the System Complex Needs Specialists.

                                Cross-Area placement meetings are held, and placement decisions are made.
      April - May
                                Placement decisions are communicated by Specialists to SLTs and/or parents.
    (Decision Point)            Schools send Placement Letters to parents of CBE students, and document
                                 placement outcome in students' IPPs.
                                Specialists prepare Placement Letters relating to students transitioning from
                                 Community Agencies or other school jurisdictions.

                            Current CBE Students:

                                Schools begin transition planning. Transition activities, including parent
      May - June                 communication, tours, open houses, intake meetings, etc. are undertaken.
                                 Sending and receiving school personnel are responsible for planning and
    (Post-decision
                                 coordinating these activities with the support of Specialists as needed.
       activities)            Schools document transition plans for current CBE students in students' IPPs.
                             Students new to CBE:

                                Specialists work with schools to begin transition planning. Transition activities,
                                 including parent communication, tours, open houses, intake meetings, etc. are
                                 undertaken.

  Learning Admin | blh                   Updated: 5 December 2016                               Page 11 of 87
Social Knowledge, Independent Living and Language Class
What is the Social Knowledge, Independent Living and Language Class?

Social Knowledge, Independent Living and Language (SKILL) classes offer intensive supports and
services to students in Grades 1-6 who have been diagnosed with moderate cognitive (intellectual)
developmental disabilities. The goal of the SKILL class is to teach students to be able to function as
independently as possible in their home and community. SKILL teachers recognize their students’ unique
sensory and learning needs. They work with them on functional living skills, including communication,
appropriate social interactions, and being as independent as possible in their home, school, and
community environments. A modified curriculum is implemented based on the individual needs of each
student. Instructional accommodations may include the use of assistive technology, augmentative
communication systems, and individual and small group instruction. Opportunities for inclusion with the
rest of the school community are provided wherever appropriate. There are typically up to 8 students in
each class. The staff includes one teacher and one or two education assistants, depending on the needs
of the students.

What is the profile of students in the SKILL classes?

Students who are eligible for placement in SKILL are elementary aged students who:

        Have identified moderate cognitive disabilities which are often associated with a medical
         diagnosis. These students are eligible to be coded 52 (as a primary or secondary code) as
         described by Alberta Education:

              o    FSIQ in the range of 30 to 50 (plus or minus five) as measured on an individual
                   intelligence test
              o    Moderate to severe delays in adaptive functioning, as measured by an adaptive
                   behaviour scale
              o    For preschool children coming into Grade 1, if a cognitive assessment is not available
                   then there must be evidence that students are not meeting age-appropriate
                   developmental milestones despite intensive community programming supports and other
                   standardized assessments must indicate functioning in the moderate to severe range in
                   the following areas:
                          Expressive and receptive language skills
                          Fine and gross motor skills
                          Adaptive skills
        Have significant documented evidence that the student is not achieving to his or her learning
         potential despite intensive support from the community school, Area Learning Team and
         community service providers.

Learning Admin | blh                      Updated: 5 December 2016                       Page 12 of 87
What documentation is required for placement consideration?

Copies of the most current assessment information, including:

        Updated IPP, including:

              o    Current level of achievement and functioning
              o    Strategies and accommodations in place
              o    Class modifications
              o    Supports and services in place (in school, home, the community)

        Medical diagnosis or multi-disciplinary team assessment reports (if available)
        Psycho-educational assessment results

              o    Indicating a moderate to severe cognitive delay
              o    Reflecting a moderate to severe delay in adaptive functioning

        Speech-language assessment results indicating a severe delay in expressive and receptive
         language abilities
        Occupational therapy assessment results
        Physical therapy assessment results
        Behaviour Support Plan (if available)
        Placement Consideration Summary Sheet is completed.

What resources are recommended for SKILL classes?

Physical Environment

        Learning spaces (comfortable spaces and furniture which allow opportunities for students to work
         independently, in small groups, and as part of a larger group)
        Calming space (comfortable space and furniture for students to self-regulate and relax within)
        Secure space (for the safe storage of personal information, various items, and food, where
         appropriate)
        Reduced sensory stimulus (i.e. low lighting, volume).
        Sensory spaces and opportunities for calming and proactive planning
        Kitchen space (if possible)
        Sink and microwave if kitchen space not possible
        Barrier free washroom
        Access to spaces where gross motor skills can be developed (indoor and outdoor)

Learning Admin | blh                     Updated: 5 December 2016                          Page 13 of 87
Learning Materials

        Developmentally and age appropriate learning materials/manipulatives
        Developmentally and age appropriate materials which support coping strategies and skills
        Visuals (i.e. schedules, rule cards, task analysis)
        Safety materials as required (i.e. child proof door handles, locks for cupboards, door alarms,
         rubber gloves, etc.)
        Reinforcers as required
        Sensory equipment (therapy balls, beanbag chairs, headphones, theraband, body socks, music
         player, lap weights, beads, scarves, lighting)
        Inclusive technology to support student learning and independence to include a variety of
         hardware and software

Recommended technology may include:

        Smart-boards
        Laptops/notebooks
        Portable media devices such as i-touch, i-pod, digital voice recorders, video recording devices.
        Speech to text software
        Reinforcement software (games, activities, etc.)
        Digital textbooks
        Online resources
        Sound FM Field System

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 14 of 87
Attitude, Community Competence, Elements of Academic
Curriculum, Social Skills Class
What Is Attitude, Community Competence, Elements of Academic Curriculum, Social Skills Class?

Attitude, Community Competence, Elements (of Academic Curriculum), Social Skills (ACCESS)
classes offer intensive supports and services to students in grades 7-12 who are diagnosed with
moderate cognitive (intellectual) or developmental disabilities. The goal of the ACCESS program is to
prepare students for transition to adult life in the community. ACCESS teachers recognize students’
unique sensory and learning needs. They work with their students on functional academic and living
skills. These include communication, community awareness and appropriate social interaction, pre-
vocational (work) skills, and assisting students to be as independent as possible in their home, school,
and community environment. A modified curriculum is implemented based on the individual needs of
each student. Instruction may be individual or in small groups and includes the use of assistive
technology and augmentative communication systems. Inclusion within community school classes and
activities occurs as appropriate. Typically, there are 10 students in each class along with two to three
program staff. Program staff includes one teacher and one or two education assistants, depending upon
the complexity of the needs of the individual students.

What is the profile of students in the ACCESS classes?

Students who are eligible for placement in ACCESS are junior and senior high school aged students who:

        Are identified with moderate cognitive disabilities which are often associated with a medical
         diagnosis. These students are eligible to be coded 52 (as a primary or secondary code) as
         described by Alberta Education:

              o    FSIQ in the range of 30 to 50 (plus or minus five) as measured on an individual
                   intelligence test
              o    Moderate to severe delays in adaptive functioning, as measured by an adaptive
                   behaviour scale
        Have significant documented evidence that the student is not achieving to his or her learning
         potential despite intensive support from the community school, Area Learning Team and
         community service providers.

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 15 of 87
What documentation is required for placement consideration?

Copies of the most current assessment information, including:

        Updated IPP, including:

              o    Current level of achievement and functioning
              o    Strategies and accommodations in place
              o    Class modifications
              o    Supports and services in place (in school, home, the community)

        Medical diagnosis or multi-disciplinary team assessment reports (if available)
        Psycho-educational assessment results

              o    Indicating a moderate to severe cognitive delay
              o    Reflecting a moderate to severe delay in adaptive functioning

        Speech-language assessment results

              o    Indicating a severe delay in expressive and receptive language abilities

        Occupational therapy assessment results
        Physical therapy assessment results
        Behaviour Support Plan (if available)
        Placement Consideration Summary Sheet is completed.

What resources are recommended for ACCESS classes?

Physical Environment

        Learning spaces (comfortable spaces and furniture which allow opportunities for students to work
         independently, in small groups, and as part of a larger group)
        Calming space (comfortable space and furniture for students to self-regulate and relax within)
        Secure space (for the safe storage of personal information, various items, and food, where
         appropriate)
        Reduced sensory stimulus (i.e. low lighting, volume).
        Sensory spaces and opportunities for calming and proactive planning
        Kitchen space (if possible)
        Sink and microwave if kitchen space not possible
        Barrier free washroom
        Access to spaces where gross motor skills can be developed (indoor and outdoor)

Learning Admin | blh                     Updated: 5 December 2016                             Page 16 of 87
Learning Materials

        Developmentally and age appropriate learning materials/manipulatives
        Developmentally and age appropriate materials which support coping strategies and skills
        Visuals (i.e. schedules, rule cards, task analysis)
        Safety materials as required (i.e. child proof door handles, locks for cupboards, door alarms,
         rubber gloves, etc.)
        Reinforcers as required
        Sensory equipment (therapy balls, beanbag chairs, headphones, theraband, body socks, music
         player, lap weights, beads, scarves, lighting)
        Inclusive technology to support student learning and independence to include a variety of
         hardware and software

Recommended technology may include:

        Smart-boards
        Laptops/notebooks
        Portable media devices such as i-touch, i-pod, digital voice recorders, video recording devices.
        Speech to text software
        Reinforcement software (games, activities, etc.)
        Digital textbooks
        Online resources
        Sound FM Field System

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 17 of 87
Placement Process for SKILL and ACCESS

    Timelines                             Placement Process for SKILL and ACCESS

                           Schools work through the SLT process to identify and implement different strategies
                            for supporting student success across all domains (i.e. academic, social,
September - June            social/emotional, coping, etc.).
                           Schools with concerns about students who may require additional supports contact
     (Ongoing)              their ALT.
                           ALT members respond to school requests for support via Area specific processes.
                           ALT members work with schools through the SLT process to ensure ongoing
                            appropriate programming and transition planning are implemented for students
                            already in specialized classes and/or unique settings.
                           Complex Needs Strategists and Specialists work with school to do IPP reviews for
      January               students already in these specialized classes and unique settings.
(Available spaces          Complex Needs Strategists and Specialists work with schools to determine which
                            students in specialized classes or unique settings may graduate or transition to new
     tabulated)             placements in the fall.
                           Complex Needs Strategists and/or Specialists, in consultation with school
                            Principals, determine the number of placement openings that are predicted in
                            specialized classes or unique settings.

     February              Schools work with ALT members to identify potential candidates and prepare
                            required documentation.
 (Consideration of         In the case that students are determined NOT to be appropriate candidates, ALT
                            members will provide feedback (i.e. suggestions for programming and supports) to
      potential
                            SLTs.
    candidates             ALT members and/or Specialists identify students transitioning into the CBE from
                            other school systems or Community Agencies who may be potential candidates,
                            and gather required documentation.

  March - April 15         ALT members collect placement packages from schools and prepare Placement
                            Consideration Summary Sheets for all potential candidates and forward them to the
   (Pre-decision            System Complex Needs Specialists.
                           Complex Needs Specialists schedule cross-Area placement meetings and send out
     activities)            invitations.

                           Cross-Area placement meetings are held, and placement decisions are made.
    April - May            Placement decisions are communicated by ALT members and/or Specialists to
                            SLTs and/or parents.
 (Decision Point)          Schools send Placement Letters are sent to parents of CBE students, and
                            document placement outcome in students' IPPs.
                           ALT members and/or Specialists send Placement Letters to parents of students
                            transitioning from Community Agencies or other school jurisdictions.

                       Current CBE Students:

                           Schools begin transition planning. Transition activities including parent
    May - June              communication, tours, open houses, intake meetings, etc. are undertaken. Sending
                            and receiving school personnel are responsible for planning and coordinating these
  (Post-decision
                            activities with the support of ALT members as needed.
     activities)         Schools document transition plans for current CBE students in students' IPPs.
                        Students new to CBE:

                           ALT members and/or Specialists work with schools to begin transition planning.
                            Transition activities including parent communication, tours, open houses, intake
                            meetings, etc. are undertaken.
Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 18 of 87
Christine Meikle School

What is Christine Meikle School?

Christine Meikle School is a unique setting offering programming for secondary school-age students
(Grades 7-12) who have been diagnosed with moderate to severe cognitive (intellectual) developmental
disabilities. Students at Christine Meikle School have complex learning, medical, and emotional needs.
Students require medical procedures administered by a Licensed Practical Nurse or they have a high
frequency of demonstrating behaviours that are harmful to themselves or to others. The goal of
programming is to develop the functional daily living skills that students will need to transition to adult life
in the community. The curriculum includes communication skills, sensory motor skills, functional
academics, pre-vocational and vocational (work) skills, travel training, fine arts and adaptive physical
education. A modified curriculum is implemented based on the individual needs of each student.
Instructional techniques may include individual and small group instruction and the use of assistive
technology and augmentative communication systems. There is a low student to staff ratio within the
school.

What is the profile of students in Christine Meikle?

Students who qualify for placement at Christine Meikle School are secondary-age students who have a
combination of the following:

         Have identified moderate to severe cognitive disability. These students may be eligible to be
          coded 41 or 44 (or a combination) as described by Alberta Education.

              o    FSIQ at or below 40 (plus or minus 5) as measured on an individual intelligence test
              o    Multiple disabilities
              o    Require medical procedures administered by an LPN
              o    Have severe to profound delays in BOTH expressive and receptive language
              o    Have severe to profound delays in fine and gross motor skills
              o    Require extensive personal care (toileting, feeding, etc.)

         Display severe maladaptive behaviour that cannot be supported in a community school
          environment.

Learning Admin | blh                       Updated: 5 December 2016                           Page 19 of 87
What documentation is required for placement consideration?

Copies of the most current information including:

        Updated IPP, including:

              o    Current level of achievement and functioning
              o    Strategies and accommodations in place
              o    Program modifications
              o    Supports and services in place (in school, home, the community)

        Medical diagnosis or multi-disciplinary team assessment reports (if available)
        Psycho-educational assessment results (if available)

              o    Indicating moderate to severe cognitive delay
              o    Reflecting a moderate to severe delay in cognitive functioning

        Speech-language assessment results indicating a severe delay in expressive and receptive
         language abilities
        Occupational therapy assessment results describing the student’s sensory profile
        Physical therapy assessment results
        Behaviour support plan (if available)
        Placement consideration summary sheet is completed .

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 20 of 87
Emily Follensbee School

What is Emily Follensbee School?

Emily Follensbee School is a unique setting offering programming for students aged 2 ½ to 15 years
who have been diagnosed with moderate to severe cognitive (intellectual) developmental disabilities.
Students at Emily Follensbee School have complex learning, medical, and emotional needs. The goal of
programming is to develop student’s communication skills, self-help skills, knowledge of their
environment, basic concepts and community awareness. Curriculum focuses upon communication skills,
the use of technology, sensory integration, motor skill development, music therapy, recreation therapy,
and community involvement. This modified curriculum is implemented based on the individual needs of
each student. Instructional techniques may include individual and small group instruction and the use of
assistive technology and augmentative communication systems. There is a low student to staff ratio
within the school.

What is the profile of students in Emily Follensbee?

Students who qualify for placement at Emily Follensbee School have a combination of the following:

        Have complex needs in the severe to profound range with moderate to severe cognitive disability.
         These students may be eligible to be coded 41, 43 or 44 (or combination with 41 as primary
         code) as described by Alberta Education Special Education criteria.

              o    FSIQ at or below 40 (plus or minus 5) as measured on an individual intelligence test.
                   Functional assessments by a qualified professional will also be considered in cases
                   where the disabilities of the student/ECS child preclude standard assessments.
              o    Require constant assistance and/or supervision in all areas of functioning including daily
                   living skills and may require assistive technology.
              o    Multiple disabilities.
              o    Require specialized medical procedures and/or medication administration during the day
                   that requires constant monitoring and cannot be met in a community school.
              o    Have severe to profound delays in BOTH expressive and receptive language.
              o    Have severe to profound delays in fine and gross motor skills.
              o    Require extensive personal care (toileting, feeding, etc.).

Learning Admin | blh                        Updated: 5 December 2016                        Page 21 of 87
What documentation is required for placement consideration?

Copies of the most current information including:

        Updated IPP, including:

              o    Current level of achievement and functioning
              o    Strategies and accommodations in place
              o    Program modifications
              o    Supports and services in place (in school, home, the community)

        Medical diagnosis or multi-disciplinary team assessment reports and letters (if available)
        Psycho-educational assessment results (if available)

              o    Indicating moderate to severe cognitive delay
              o    Reflecting a moderate to severe delay in cognitive functioning

        Speech-language assessment results indicating a severe delay in expressive and receptive
         language abilities
        Occupational therapy assessment results describing the student’s sensory profile
        Physical therapy assessment results
        Behaviour support plan (if available)
        Placement consideration summary sheet is completed.

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 22 of 87
Placement Process for Emily Follensbee and Christine Meikle School

   Timelines                  Placement Process Emily Follensbee School and Christine Meikle School

                           Schools work through the SLT process to identify and implement different
                            strategies for supporting student success across all domains (i.e. academic,
                            social, social/emotional, coping, etc.).
September - June           Schools with concerns about students who may require additional supports
     (Ongoing)              contact their ALT.
                           ALT members respond to school requests for support via Area specific
                            processes.
                           ALT members work with schools through the SLT process to ensure ongoing
                            appropriate programming and transition planning are implemented for students
                            already in specialized classes and/or unique settings.
                           Complex Needs Specialists work with school to do IPP reviews for students
     January                already in these specialized classes.
                           Complex Needs Strategists and Specialists work with schools to determine which
  (Available spaces
                            students in specialized classes or unique settings may graduate or transition to
     tabulated)             new placements in the fall.
                           Complex Needs Strategists and/or Specialists, in consultation with school
                            Principals, determine the number of placement openings that are predicted in
                            specialized classes or unique settings.
                           Schools work with Strategists/Specialist to identify potential candidates and
     February               prepare required documentation.
  (Consideration of
                           In the case that students are determined NOT to be appropriate candidates,
                            Strategists/Specialists will provide feedback (i.e. suggestions for programming
potential candidates        and supports) to SLTs.
                           Strategists/ Specialists identify students transitioning into the CBE from other
                            school systems or Community Agencies who may be potential candidates, and
                            gather required documentation.

 March - April 15          Specialists schedule cross-Area placement meetings and send out invitations.
                           Strategists collect placement packages from schools and prepare Placement
    (Pre-decision           Consideration Summary Sheets for all potential candidates and forward them to
     activities)            the System Complex Needs Specialists.

                           Cross-Area placement meetings are held, and placement decisions are made.
    April - May
                           Placement decisions are communicated by Specialists to SLTs and/or parents.
  (Decision Point)         Schools send Placement Letters to parents of CBE students, and document
                            placement outcome in students' IPPs.
                           Specialists prepare Placement Letters to parents of students transitioning from
                            Community Agencies or other school jurisdictions.

                       Current CBE Students:

                           Schools begin transition planning. Transition activities including parent
    May - June              communication, tours, open houses, intake meetings, etc. are undertaken.
                            Sending and receiving school personnel are responsible for planning and
   (Post-decision           coordinating these activities with the support of Specialist as needed.
     activities)         Schools document transition plans for current CBE students in students' IPPs.
                        Students new to CBE:

                           Specialists work with schools to begin transition planning. Transition activities
                            including parent communication, tours, open houses, intake meetings, etc. are
                            undertaken.

Learning Admin | blh                      Updated: 5 December 2016                              Page 23 of 87
Adapted Learning Class
What is the Adapted Learning Class?

The Adapted Learning Program (ALP) is for students in grades 7-12 who have moderate cognitive
(intellectual) disabilities. The goal is to enable each student to function as independently as possible in
home, school, and community settings. ALP teachers work with their students to develop communication,
social, functional living, literacy, and numeracy skills. Pre-vocational and vocational opportunities (work
experience) are also supported. A modified curriculum is implemented based on the individual needs of
each student. Instruction includes individual and small group activities and the use of assistive
technologies. ALP provides opportunities to be included in the community school through complementary
courses (options), clubs, sports, and special events. ALP classes typically have a up to 12 students with
one full time teacher, one full time and one part time educational assistant, and a lunch room supervisor.
Vecova is a society providing services to individuals with disabilities. They are contracted to support
students in ALP classes at the high school level with Supported Work Study as part of the vocational
programming.

What is the profile of students in ALP classes?

Students who are eligible for placement in ALP are junior and senior high school aged students who:

        Are identified with mild to moderate cognitive disabilities which are often associated with a
         medical diagnosis. These students are eligible to be coded 51 or 52 (as a primary or secondary
         code) as described by Alberta Education:

              o    FSIQ in the range of 45 to 65 (plus or minus five) as measured on an individual
                   intelligence test
              o    Mild to Moderate delays in adaptive functioning, as measured by an adaptive behaviour
                   scale
        Need for regular opportunities for:

              o    Participation in complementary subjects, clubs, sports, and special events
              o    Supported pre-vocational and/or vocational opportunities
        Have significant documented evidence that the student is not achieving to his or her learning
         potential despite intensive support from the community school, Area Learning Team and
         community service providers.

        ***Students who have been programmed for primarily in their community school are given priority
                                       during ALP placement considerations. ***

Learning Admin | blh                      Updated: 5 December 2016                          Page 24 of 87
What documentation is required for placement consideration?

Copies of the most current assessment information, including:

        Updated IPP, including:

              o    Current level of achievement and functioning
              o    Strategies and accommodations in place
              o    Class modifications
              o    Supports and services in place (in school, home, the community)

        Medical diagnosis or multi-disciplinary team assessment reports (if available)
        Psycho-educational assessment results

              o    Indicating a mild to moderate cognitive delay
              o    Reflecting a moderate delay in adaptive functioning

        Speech-language assessment results

              o    Indicating a severe delay in expressive and receptive language abilities

        Occupational therapy assessment results
        Physical therapy assessment results
        Behaviour Support Plan (if available)
        Placement Consideration Summary Sheet is completed.

What resources are recommended for ALP classes?

Physical Environment

        Learning spaces (comfortable spaces and furniture which allow opportunities for students to work
         independently, in small groups, and as part of a larger group)
        Calming space (comfortable space and furniture for students to self-regulate and relax within)
        Secure space (for the safe storage of personal information, various items, and food, where
         appropriate)
        Reduced sensory stimulus (i.e. low lighting, volume).
        Sensory spaces and opportunities for calming and proactive planning
        Kitchen space (if possible)
        Sink and microwave if kitchen space not possible
        Barrier free washroom
        Access to spaces where gross motor skills can be developed (indoor and outdoor)

Learning Admin | blh                     Updated: 5 December 2016                             Page 25 of 87
Learning Materials

        Developmentally and age appropriate learning materials/manipulatives
        Developmentally and age appropriate materials which support coping strategies and skills
        Visuals (i.e. schedules, rule cards, task analysis)
        Safety materials as required (i.e. child proof door handles, locks for cupboards, door alarms,
         rubber gloves, etc.)
        Reinforcers as required
        Sensory equipment (therapy balls, beanbag chairs, headphones, theraband, body socks, music
         player, lap weights, beads, scarves, lighting)
        Inclusive technology to support student learning and independence to include a variety of
         hardware and software

Recommended technology may include:

        Smart-boards
        Laptops/notebooks
        Portable media devices such as i-touch, i-pod, digital voice recorders, video recording devices.
        Speech to text software
        Reinforcement software (games, activities, etc.)
        Digital textbooks
        Online resources
        Sound FM Field System

Learning Admin | blh                    Updated: 5 December 2016                            Page 26 of 87
Placement Process for Adapted Learning Class

    Timelines           Placement Process for Adapted Learning Class

 September - June          •   Schools work through the SLT process to identify and implement different
                               strategies for supporting student success across all domains (i.e. academic,
     (Ongoing)                 social, social/emotional, coping, etc.).
                           •   Schools with concerns about students diagnosed with mild to moderate
                               cognitive delays who may require additional supports contact their ALT.
                           •   ALT members respond to school requests for support via Area specific
                               processes.
                           •   ALT members work with schools through the SLT process to ensure ongoing
                               appropriate programming and transition planning are implemented for students
                               already in specialized classes and/or unique settings.

      January              •   Complex Needs Strategists work with schools to do IPP reviews for students
                               currently in ALP.
 (Available spaces         •   Complex Needs Strategists and Specialists work with schools to determine
                               which students in specialized classes and unique settings may graduate or
     tabulated)                transition to new placements in the fall.
                           •   Complex Needs Strategists and Specialists, in consultation with school
                               Principals, determine the number of placement openings that are predicted.

     February              •   Schools work with ALT members to identify potential candidates and prepare
                               required documentation.
 (Consideration of         •   In the case that students are determined NOT to be appropriate candidates,
                               ALT members will provide feedback (i.e. suggestions for programming and
potential candidates)          supports) to SLTs.
                           •   ALT members identify students transitioning into the CBE from other school
                               jurisdictions or Community Agencies who may be potential candidates, and
                               gather required documentation.

  March - April 15         •   ALT members collect placement packages from schools and prepare
                               Placement Consideration Summary Sheets for all potential candidates and
   (Pre-decision               forward them to the System Complex Needs Specialists.
                           •   Complex Needs Specialists schedule cross-Area placement meetings and
     activities)               send out invitations.

     April - May           •   Cross-Area placement meetings are held, and placement decisions are made.
                           •   Placement decisions are communicated by ALT members to SLTs and/or
  (Decision Point)             parents.
                           •   Schools send Placement Letters to parents of CBE students, and document
                               placement outcome in students' IPPs.
                           •   ALT members send Placement Letters to parents of students transitioning into
                               CBE.

    May - June          Current CBE Students:

   (Post-decision             Schools begin transition planning. Transition activities including parent
                               communication, tours, open houses, intake meetings, etc. are undertaken.
     activities)               Sending and receiving school personnel are responsible for planning and
                               coordinating these activities with the support of ALT members as needed.
                             Schools document transition plans for current CBE students in students' IPPs.
                        Students new to CBE:

                              ALT members work with schools to begin transition planning. Transition
                               activities including parent communication, tours, open houses, intake
                               meetings, etc. are undertaken.

Learning Admin | blh                     Updated: 5 December 2016                          Page 27 of 87
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