Biennial Review of Purdue University's Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2008-2010

 
Biennial Review of Purdue University's Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2008-2010
Biennial Review of Purdue University’s
Alcohol and Other Drug Programs
2008-2010

Heather Beasley
Director of Programs and Recreation, Purdue Memorial Union

Eric Chin
Captain, Purdue University Police Department

Lisa Heinold
Administrator of Conduct, University Residences

Kasi Jones
Senior Assistant Director, Student Access, Transitions and Success

Mark Kebert
Director of Risk Management

Cheryl Laszynski
Worklife Administrator, Vice President for Human Resources

Kathy Lawhead
Associate Director, Division of Recreational Sports

Tammy Loew (Chair)
Health Advocacy Coordinator, Student Wellness Office

Colleen Maguire
Staff Therapist, Purdue University Student Health Center

Pablo Malavenda
Associate Dean of Students

Sandra Monroe
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs

Jeff Stefancic
Associate Dean of Students

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Biennial Review of Purdue University's Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2008-2010
The Drug Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and
Communities Act (DFSCA) require an institution of higher education (IHE) such as Purdue University to
certify it has adopted and implemented programs to prevent the abuse of alcohol and use or distribution
of illicit drugs both by Purdue students and employees both on its premises and as a part of any of its
activities. At a minimum each institution of higher education must annually distribute the following in
writing to all students and employees:

    •   Standards of conduct that clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit
        drugs and alcohol by students and employees
    •   A description of the legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law for the unlawful possession
        or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol
    •   A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs
        that are available to employees or students
    •   A clear statement that the institution will impose sanctions on students and employees and a
        description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and
        referral for prosecution, for violations of the standards of conduct

The law further requires that the institution conduct a biennial review of its program with the following
objectives: (1) determining the effectiveness of the policy and implementing changes to the Alcohol and
Other Drug (AOD) program if they are needed; and (2) to ensure that the sanctions developed are
enforced consistently.

The biennial review must also include a determination as to: (1) the number of drug- and alcohol-related
violations and fatalities occurring on the campus or as part of their activities that are reported to campus
officials; and (2) the number and type of sanctions the IHEs impose on students or employees as a result
of such violations or fatalities.

Purdue acknowledges its legal obligation to conduct a biennial review of compliance with the Drug-Free
Schools and Communities Act and authorized an administrative review to be conducted to determine if
the University fulfills the requirements of the aforementioned Federal regulations.

Tammy Loew, the Health Advocacy Coordinator in the Student Wellness Office, formed a committee to
participate in the review process. The members of the review committee include:

    •   Heather Beasley, Director of Programs and Recreation, Purdue Memorial Union
    •   Eric Chin, Captain, Purdue University Police Department
    •   Lisa Heinold, Administrator of Conduct, University Residences
    •   Kasi Jones, Senior Assistant Director, Student Access, Transitions and Success
    •   Mark Kebert, Director of Risk Management
    •   Cheryl Laszynski, Worklife Administrator, Vice President for Human Resources
    •   Kathy Lawhead, Associate Director, Division of Recreational Sports
    •   Colleen Maguire, Staff Therapist, Purdue University Student Health Center
    •   Pablo Malavenda, Associate Dean of Students
    •   Sandy Monroe, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs
    •   Jeff Stefancic, Associate Dean of Students

The following campus units provided information for this report:

    •   College of Consumer and Family Sciences, Hotel and Tourism Management
    •   Counseling and Psychological Services
    •   Division of Recreational Sports
    •   Human Resources
    •   Intercollegiate Athletics
    •   Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic and Purdue Cooperative Council
    •   Office of the Provost

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Biennial Review of Purdue University's Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2008-2010
•   Purdue Student Union Board
    •   Purdue University Police Department
    •   ROTC Units (Army ROTC, Air Force ROTC, Naval ROTC)
    •   School of Nursing
    •   School of Pharmacy
    •   School of Veterinary Medicine
    •   Student Activities and Organizations, (ODOS)
    •   Student Wellness Office, (PUSH)
    •   The Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities, (ODOS)
    •   The Office of the Dean of Students
    •   The Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs
    •   University Residences

The intention of this document is to meet the legal requirements of conducting a biennial review and also
summarize the programs and activities related to alcohol and drug prevention on Purdue’s campus during
the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 academic years.

Materials Reviewed

The following materials and programs were examined for the biennial review:

   Complying with The Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (EDGAR Part 86), A Guide for
    University and Campus Regulations prepared by the Higher Education Center
   The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 (P.L. 105-244) and the Drug-Free Schools and
    Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (P.L. 101-226) and related commentary and general provisions
   Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention
   Regulatory changes to the Higher Education Opportunity Act in Section 107, which require future
    reports of the number of drug and alcohol related violations and fatalities that have occurred on the
    institutions campus as a part of the institutions activities that are reported to campus officials
   Executive Memorandum No. C-44 Purdue University Policy, Alcohol and Drug-Free Campus and
    Workplace Policy, revised June 12, 1998
   Previous Biennial Review reports
   Alcohol and Other Drug Policy documents distributed to all faculty, students and staff
   Indiana Alcoholic Beverage Laws
   Environmental Approaches to Alcohol at Purdue University, prepared by Tammy Loew
   Purdue University Police Department drug and alcohol arrest reports
   A report from Counseling and Psychological Services on the Alcohol and Drug Programs offered to
    provide treatment specifically for traditional aged college students
   Annual reports compiled by conduct staff from the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities
   University Residences Guidelines and policies related to alcohol and drugs
   Summaries of conduct case from University Residences
   Purdue Alcohol Awareness
   Purdue Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Guide
   Campus Community Bar Retail Coalition
   Purdue Parents
   Overview of the Grand Alternative, prepared by Carol Ben Davies, assistant dean of students
   Purdue University Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Drug Testing Program
   School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 2010 Student Handbook
    Pages 5 and 6 focus on policies for students regarding drugs and alcohol
   Drug and alcohol policies for Army ROTC, Air Force ROTC, and Naval ROTC
   Summary of AOD Prevention Programs presented by PSUB and the Division of Recreational Sports,
    prepared by Heather Beasley and Kathy Lawhead, program advisors
   Summary of AOD Programs sponsored by Interfraternity Council (IFC), Panhellenic and Purdue
    Cooperative Council (PCC) provided by Kyle Pendleton, assistant dean of students

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Biennial Review of Purdue University's Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2008-2010
   Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM 49100) Responsible Alcohol Service
    Certification Program
   Purdue University Course Catalogue
   School of Veterinary Medicine Student Handbook
   School of Nursing Student Handbook

Compliance with Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act

Purdue University continues to remain in compliance with the requirements of the Drug-Free Schools and
Communities Act. Purdue has adopted and implemented programs to prevent the abuse of alcohol and
use or distribution of illicit drugs both by Purdue students and employees both on its premises and as a
part of any of its activities, as demonstrated through this biennial review. In addition, Purdue has a written
policy on alcohol and other drugs and has developed a thorough method for distributing this policy to
every student and employee. The written materials annually distributed contain the following information:

   Standards of conduct that prohibit unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol
    on it property or as a part of its activities
   A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and abuse of alcohol
   A description of applicable legal sanctions under local, state or federal law
   A description of counseling or treatment programs
   A clear statement and description of the disciplinary sanctions the institution will impose on students
    and employees.

Purdue utilizes a comprehensive framework to address alcohol and other drug use by implementing the
following environmental strategies: Education, Social Life, Academics, Policy, Enforcement, and
Intervention. An overview of each strategy is described in this document.

                                              Education

                     Social Life                                      Academics

                        Policy                                       Enforcement

                                               Intervention

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Biennial Review of Purdue University's Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2008-2010
Policy
Purdue policies on alcohol and drugs are seen in every area of campus life. Some of the most common
are found in University Residences, various departments in the Office of the Dean of Students, and in
specific University Regulations on possession of alcohol and other drugs on campus. Several of the
policies are listed below:

Federally Mandated Policy:

Distribution

The Federally Mandated Policy about alcohol and other drugs is distributed annually to each staff
member and student.

    In 2008-2009, the faculty and staff Alcohol and Drug-Free Campus and Workplace Policy was
     included in Inside Purdue, a newsletter sent to all 13,500 Purdue employees through campus mail.
     An additional 900 copies were also printed for new employees. The student Alcohol and Other Drug
     Policy Guide was mailed to approximately 40,000 students in November 2008.

    In 2009-2010, the faculty and staff Alcohol and Drug-Free Campus and Workplace Policy was included in
     Purdue Today, an online newsletter sent to all Purdue employees. It included a summary of material
     required by the Department of Education with a link to the entire document (PDF). The student Alcohol
     and Other Drug Policy Guide was e-mailed to 40,000 Purdue students in March 2010. It also included a
     summary of material meeting the requirements of the Department of Education and included a link to a
     website with additional information. Those students who did not have e-mails or whose e-mail messages
     bounced back as undeliverable received the information in a letter which was mailed to their local
     address.

Websites that address Purdue policies:

Staff, students, and visitors can find Purdue policies on several websites:

     •   Alcohol -and Drug-Free Campus Workplace Policy
     •   Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities
     •   Purdue Alcohol Awareness
     •   Purdue Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Guide
     •   Purdue University Housing Guidelines
     •   University Regulations
     •   Vice President for Human Resources

University Regulations Summary:

Purdue University is committed to providing students, faculty, staff, and visitors a safe and healthful
campus and workplace. The University recognizes the health risks associated with controlled substance
use and alcohol misuse and is committed to supporting students and employees who seek treatment for
these conditions. The University also recognizes that controlled substance use and alcohol misuse
diminish workplace and campus safety and undermine the University’s ability to fulfill its missions of
education, research, and service. The University has therefore developed this Alcohol- and Drug-Free
Campus and Workplace Policy. Compliance with this policy is considered a condition of employment and
attendance at the University. All employees and students will be notified of this policy by publication.

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Student Organizations Summary:

Use of Alcoholic Beverages

    1. All Purdue students are responsible for complying with the Indiana state laws. Attention is called
       to the Indiana Alcoholic Beverages Law that states specifically:
       a. No person under 21 years of age may use or be in possession of alcoholic beverages.
       b. Persons 21 or over may not make alcoholic beverages available to minors.
       c. Misrepresentation of age for the purpose of purchasing alcoholic beverages is a violation of
            state law.

    2. In addition to Indiana state laws, the following University regulations apply:
       a. The University prohibits the possession, consumption, distribution, or sale of alcoholic beverages,
           as defined by state law, in or on any University property, with the following exceptions:
           • Personal possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages are permitted in Purdue Village
                (family apartments only), resident rooms in Hawkins Hall occupied exclusively by graduate
                students, and by registered occupants of guest rooms in the Union Club and Hawkins Hall
                subject to compliance with all University regulations and applicable Indiana state laws.
           • Possession, consumption, distribution, and sale of alcoholic beverages are permitted,
                with advance approval by the Executive Vice President and Treasurer or his/her
                designee, in areas designated by the University and under the supervision of the Purdue
                Memorial Union or the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, subject to
                compliance with all University regulations and applicable Indiana state laws.

University Residences:

Each year, University Residences trains about 280 resident assistant staff to enforce the community
standards for a population of up to 12,000 resident students regarding alcohol and drugs. Each resident is
provided a document highlighting the community standards at check-in and also referred to housing
guidelines for more information. The University Residences’ alcohol and drug policies are defined as follows:
    • Students are prohibited from consuming, transporting, and distributing alcohol; possessing or being
        in the presence of alcohol; or exhibiting disruptive behavior influenced by the use of alcohol. Alcohol
        found by staff will be disposed of immediately. Persons found in violation of this policy will be subject
        to University Residences administrative or disciplinary sanctions listed below, as determined
        progressively and proportionately appropriate based on the situation:
        • Warning and/or probationary period
        • Contact with parent/guardian
        • Referral to an alcohol education program. The program required by Purdue University Counseling
             and Psychological Services will cost the resident a fee of up to $125.
        • Other educationally based actions
        • Termination of the housing contract
        • Referral for University sanctioning
        • Possible arrest, imprisonment, or fine according to state alcohol laws
             Hawkins Hall - Hawkins residents and guests under 21 years of age are subject to the alcohol
             policy as defined above for University Residences. However, alcohol consumption is permitted
             for Hawkins residents and guests 21 years of age and older, and then only in private, in the
             areas of the building designated as "over 21." Alcohol is not permitted in public areas of the
             facility or on restricted floors. Kegs of beer are not allowed. Residents are prohibited from
             exhibiting disruptive behavior influenced by the use of alcohol.
             Purdue Village – Residents and guests of Purdue Village single undergraduate housing on
             State Street are subject to the above University Residences alcohol policy no matter their age.
             Residents and guests of Purdue Village single graduate student housing, buildings designated
             for undergraduates age 21 and older, or Purdue Village family housing may have alcohol inside
             their apartment for personal use if they are 21 years of age or older. Alcohol is not permitted in
             any outside area, including parking lots, picnic areas, or the Purdue Village Community Center.

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•    Any type of recreational drug is strictly prohibited from University Residences’ facilities and property.
         Drugs that fall into this category include, but are not limited to, the following: marijuana, hashish,
         hash oil, cocaine, crack, LSD, inhalants, stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, narcotics, designer
         drugs, anabolic steroids, and other substances that alter one's mental state. Students are prohibited
         from possessing, consuming, transporting, dealing, being in the presence of, or exhibiting disruptive
         behavior influenced by the use of the aforementioned substances. Students are also prohibited from
         possessing paraphernalia such as bongs, deseeding trays, roach clips, one-hitters, etc. Anyone
         found in violation of this policy may have his or her housing contract terminated and may be subject
         to University disciplinary action and possible arrest, imprisonment, or fine according to state and
         federal laws. Should an educational program be required, a cost to the student may be incurred.

Fraternity & Sorority Life Social Practice Initiative

Interfraternity Council (IFC) and Panhellenic have worked for the last few years to reform their risk
management policies. The outline of their new policies and initiatives is listed below:

Strategic Objective:

Creating a safer Purdue University fraternity/sorority community through the adherence of the following:

    •    Amount of alcohol present at events
    •    How alcohol gets to the event (access)
    •    Who is at the event (attendance)

Strategic Areas:

    •    Policy Alignment
    •    Required Event Management Practices
    •    Education and Training
    •    Accountability through compliance monitoring
    •    Meaningful discipline

Strategic Initiatives:

    •    TIPS Certification and training
    •    Joint Social Policy: If alcohol is present, chapters are expected to follow Fraternity Information
         Programming Group (FIPG) Guidelines for BYOB/third party vendors
    •    Creation of Caliber, an independent student organization
    •    Punishment must speak to the crime
    •    Create an increased risk of detection

Server Training Policy for Union Employees

Every person holding a liquor license is required to have server training and pass a test. The class, “Indiana
ATC Certified Server Training Program,” gives a general overview of Indiana State laws regarding the
serving and consumption of alcohol, punitive damages both to the server and to the individual, recognizing
inebriation levels, recognizing false (and correct) identification, handling situations with alcohol, etc.

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Education
Many departments on campus are involved in educating students, staff, and parents about alcohol and
other drugs. Below is a summary of Purdue’s initiatives:

Prevention for Parents:

Letter to Parents

Each year, the Vice President for Student Affairs sends a letter to the parents of all first-year students
encouraging them to talk with their sons and daughters about choices regarding alcohol use and the
availability of campus resources.

Parent Video

The parent video site was created for parents of first-year students. Information about the site was
included in the letter to parents and was also linked from the University Residences parent page, Purdue
Police page, the parent fund newsletter, and in some academic department newsletters.

University Residences Parent Association (URPA)

Parents who sign up for the program receive a monthly online newsletter, Hallways Express
and two mailed issues of Hallways.
Both include information pertaining to alcohol and other drug use.

Purdue University Police Department Parent Page

The parent webpage provides parents easy access to information regarding local
healthcare facilities, media outlets, alcohol awareness, security best practices and other
pertinent information.

Student Access Transitions and Success Programs (SATS)

Parents receive a family calendar which includes information about alcohol and other drugs.

Prevention for Students:

Purdue Wellness Survey

In order to better understand student behavior, Purdue surveys students to measure alcohol, tobacco, and
other drug use. The Purdue Wellness Survey was sent to all Purdue students during February-March 2009.
Total subjects were 6,499. The results show a decrease in high-risk drinking and many consequences from
the previous 2007-2008 school year. The survey was not administered during 2009-2010.

                                                                                                2008    2009
 Key findings: Alcohol use among undergraduates
 Binge drinking in the previous two weeks (Consuming 5 or more drinks in one sitting.)          42.8%   37.3%
 First-year students binge drinking in the previous 2 weeks                                     34.8%   31.6%
 Key findings: Consequences of alcohol and other drug use by undergraduates
 Have been in trouble with police, residence hall, or other college authorities                  6.9%         4%
 Have driven a car while under the influence                                                    15.1%        10%
 Have been hurt or injured                                                                      14.6%        11%
 Have been taken advantage of sexually                                                             8%         6%
 Have performed poorly on a test or important project                                             23%        15%
 Have done something they later regretted                                                       33.5%        26%
 Have missed a class                                                                            33.5%        22%
 Have had a hangover                                                                            54.7%        45%

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Key findings: Marijuana use
 Used marijuana in the past year                                                             13.1%        13%
 Yearly marijuana users who used marijuana in the past 30 days                               65.2%        71%
 Key findings: Illegal use of prescription drugs
 Used Adderall without a prescription in the past year                                          7%        11%
 Used Ritalin without a prescription in the past year                                         1.2%         1%

Boiler Gold Rush

Student Access Transitions and Success (SATS) conducts an orientation program for over 5,000 first-year
students, which is held the week prior to the start of fall semester. Some highlights:

    •   Alcohol poisoning cards were included in all new student folders.
    •   The Conduct and Choices presentation included Purdue statistics from the Office of the Dean of
        Students, University Residences, Purdue University Police Department, and the Student
        Wellness Office. It also included student testimonies.
    •   Student leaders facilitated break-out sessions after the Conduct and Choices presentation about
        accountability and responsibility.
    •   Student leaders signed a contract on accountability before Boiler Gold Rush. Example below-
        • As a SATS Leader, I understand that once accepting the Team Supervisor position I will
            conduct myself in a professional manner for the duration of my term. I will not drink alcohol
            while wearing any BGR attire, sponsor BGR parties where alcohol or illegal drugs are being
            provided, or in any way conduct myself in a manner that the Professional Staff deem
            unbecoming of a SATS Leader.

Social Media Campaigns

There were several media campaigns distributed during 2008-2010 that addressed alcohol poisoning,
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providing alcohol to minors, drunk driving, hosting safe parties (for off-campus students), 21 birthday
cards, adderall and marijuana. A summary of the campaigns is listed below.

    •   Alcohol poisoning cards: Wallet-sized cards were distributed to 13,701 students
        over two years.

    •   Dude – Dude, “Don’t be an Idiot” campaign on alcohol poisoning: included
        posters, door hangers, banners, BTV, City Bus contract

    •   Adderall Abuse: Included posters, banners, BTV, CityBus contract.

        Campaign survey results of 4,000 students in spring 2010:
        • 12% have used Adderall without a prescription this semester
        • 21% said they used less Adderall without a prescription this semester
           because of the campaign
        • 6% have shared or sold Adderall this semester
        • 18% said they shared or sold less Adderall this semester because of the campaign

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            st
        21 Birthday card program: Collaboration between Student Wellness Office,
        Purdue Student Government and President’s Office: Sent 8401 cards during two-
        year period.

        •        Data from 2008-2009: 6% of students said they consumed less alcohol
                 because of receiving the card.

    •   Drunk-Driving: Halloween-themed posters distributed at apartments, residence halls, fraternities
        and sororities, BTV, and cooperative houses

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•   Providing Alcohol to Minors: “Big Mistake” campaign on the change in Indiana law
        regarding the consequences for providing alcohol to minors. Included posters,
        banners, BTV, and CityBus contract. Campaign survey results of 4,000 students:

        •   2008-2009: 35.9% of students that saw the campaign thought it would impact
            students in a positive way.
        •   2009-2010:
            • 5% of students under 21 were less likely to seek alcohol from someone 21 and older
                because of the campaign.
            • 1% of students 21 and older were less likely to purchase alcohol for minors because of
                the campaign.
            • Note: 74% of students who are 21 and older said they do not purchase alcohol for minors.

    •   Marijuana campaign: Included posters, banners, BTV, CityBus contract. Campaign
        survey results of 4,000 students in spring 2010:

        •   24% used marijuana during the semester they took the survey
        •   Of those that used marijuana, one student reported using less marijuana because of the campaign

    •   Hosting a Safe Party: Collaborated with West Lafayette to distribute magnets to 34
        apartment complexes, West Lafayette Police, campus departments. Total two-year
        distribution: 17,522 cards

Boiler Television (BTV) in University Residences:
University Residences has two television channels where they can provide a vehicle for
alcohol and drug-related programs. They do this in a few ways:

    •   Placing ads for student, staff, and facility groups
    •   Running public service announcements (PSA’s) between movies
    •   Playing movies which can be used for educational programming, which may include movie
        discussion guides.

Grand Prix Convocation:

The Office of the Dean of Students, Panhellenic Association, Interfraternity Council, and Purdue
Cooperative Council co-sponsor the Grand Prix Convocation. Held in Elliott Hall of Music before Grand
Prix, it is attended by over 80% of Purdue’s fraternities, sororities, cooperative houses. The event
features a speaker who discusses alcohol use and misuse. In addition to the Grand Prix Convocation, the
Office of the Dean of Students also sponsors the Community Standards Panel. This event features
representatives from local law enforcement, the Tippecanoe County prosecutor’s office and the Office of
Student Rights and Responsibilities. This event is designed specifically for housing unit presidents and
risk managers and allows them to learn more about responsible event management during Grand Prix
and Grand Alternative. Each year, approximately 110 students attend the Community Standards Panel.

Additional Educational Initiatives:

    •   Reality Check Newsletter: Bi-monthly newsletter sent to campus and community
        partners. It addresses substance abuse issues such as lowering the drinking
        age, data, and alcohol and energy drinks.

    •   How Purdue Addresses Alcohol: Environmental examination of the ways Purdue
        addresses alcohol from an academic, social life, educational, policy,
        enforcement, and intervention perspective. The document was distributed to
        several offices, departments and campus partners.

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•   Student Success Guide: Booklet for all first-year students with contact information
    about offices and services on campus. It includes information about alcohol and the
    available resources on campus.

•   Student Organization Officers and Advisors: Attend a mandatory orientation each
    year where alcohol issues and policies are addressed.

•   Drug Awareness Programs in University Residences (Harrison Hall): In 2008-2009 and 2009-2010,
    over 660 students participated in a drug awareness program in University Residences. During both
    years, students heard from a panel, which included representation from Purdue Police, University
    Residences, the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities, and the Prosecutor’s Office.

•   Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Programming: Alcohol and other drug abuse
    presentations were delivered throughout the campus community to 492 students during the 2008-
    2009 academic year, and to 177 students during the 2009–2010 academic year. Further, CAPS
    staff members teach “Life Skills” courses each fall semester to first-year Naval ROTC and student
    athletes. These courses include curriculum focused upon alcohol and other drug concerns. In
    the 2008-2009 academic year, these courses were delivered to 267 students and in the 2009-
    2010 academic year, these courses were delivered to 229 students.

•   Prevention programming Coordinated through Intercollegiate Athletics:

    •   Hired Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) to talk with coaches and teams about alcohol
        and sexual assaults
    •   Athletic Training staff and coaches discuss alcohol and drugs with every team
    •   Issues are addressed with Boilermaker Athletic Council and the Emerging Leaders Meetings
    •   Community Service… Athletes visit schools during Red Ribbon Week

•   Purdue websites that focus on alcohol and other drug education:

    •   Campus Community Bar Retail Coalition
    •   One-Stop Health Shop: Information for student projects on alcohol and other drugs as well as
        downloadable bulletin boards
    •   Purdue Alcohol Awareness
    •   Purdue Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Guide
    •   Purdue Parents
    •   Purdue University Fire Department
    •   Purdue University Police Department
    •   21st birthday

•   Purdue University Police Department Programming on Alcohol and Other Drug Issues:

    •   Alcohol Program (General Informational Discussion)
    •   Alcohol Student Awareness Program (ASAP)
    •   Campus Safety
    •   Citizens Police Academy
    •   Counselor Orientation/Training
    •   Crime Prevention
    •   Drug Recognition
    •   Gang Prevention – Safety
    •   International Student Programs
    •   Air Force ROTC Presentation
    •   Personal Safety
    •   Purdue Counseling Round Table

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•    Rape Aggression Defense (RAD)
        •    Rape Prevention
        •    Residence Hall Facilities Manager Orientation
        •    Robbery Training
        •    Society, Policy, and Drugs Class
        •    Strategic Planning

Campus-based organizations:

Campus-based organizations collaborate on education, policy, and enforcement.

    •   Campus Community Bar Retail Coalition: This group was formed in 2001. In 2008, the West Lafayette
        Police Chief joined Student Wellness Office staff member as co-facilitator. There were four meetings
        during 2008-2009 and three in 2009-2010. Combined two-year attendance: 318

    •   Alcohol Task Force: This group met during 2009-2010 year to address alcohol issues on campus.
        Meeting topics included investigating AlcoholEdu for the Purdue campus, addressing high BAC
        levels, and football tailgating. In addition, over 60 campus partners attended an Alcohol Summit to
        discuss high BAC levels and brainstorm ideas to pursue in fall 2010. Suggestions included:

        •    Developing social marketing campaigns that address high blood alcohol concentration levels,
             pregaming, and alcohol and energy drinks
        •    Exploring medical amnesty
        •    Considering AlcoholEdu for our campus
        •    Increasing education, including expanding peer education opportunities on campus
        •    Engaging faculty and partnering with religious organizations

    •   Community Partnership Team: The Community Partnership Team consists of university and West
        Lafayette Community members. Alcohol issues have been addressed at team meetings. In 2008 and
        2009, members of the teams joined with students and neighborhood volunteers to go door-to-door to
        visit the near-campus houses and rental properties. Included in their packet of literature was
        information on responsible entertaining and magnets with “How to host a party without getting busted.”

Certifications and Affiliations:

Several Staff members are certified in the following:

    •   Choices (ODOS/SAO, UR, OSRR, CAPS, SWO)
    •   Ladder of Risk (ODOS/SAO)
    •   TiPS Certified Trainers (ODOS/SAO/OSRR, UR, SWO)

Involvement in community/state organizations and coalitions that address alcohol and other drug issues:

Campus members are represented on several outside organizations that address alcohol and other drug
issues. They include:

    •   Drug-Free Coalition of Tippecanoe County (ODOS, PUPD, OSRR, SWO)
    •   Governor’s Advisory Council for the Strategic Prevention Framework/State Incentive Grant,
        overseeing a $14,500,000 grant to address substance abuse (SWO)
    •   Indiana Coalition to Reduce Underage Drinking (ICRUD), setting alcohol policy initiatives for the state (SWO)
    •   Indiana Collegiate Action Network (SWO)
    •   Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws (EUDL), providing input on statewide agency direction on
        underage drinking (SWO)

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Social Life
Many Purdue areas have made a strong commitment to ensuring that Purdue students have access to
substance-free events. Here are some websites that offer information on what’s available for students:

•    Purdue Calendar: Lists all events on campus.
•    Purdue Athletics: Check out the schedules for all athletic sporting events.
•    Purdue Convocations: Catch 30-40 entertainment events each year.
•    Grand Alternative: Held each spring, Grand Alternative is substance-free fun during Grand Prix Week,
     with over 50 events occurring throughout the week.
•    Purdue Student Union Board: The Purdue Student Union Board (PSUB) provides a variety of
     programs and services that enrich and entertain.
•    Purdue Theater: Purdue’s Theater department presents several plays throughout the year.
•    Recreational Sports Center (RSC): Over 5,000 people pass through the doors of the Recreational
     Sports Center each day.
•    Student Activities and Organizations (SAO) Flyerboard: Find out what student organizations have
     scheduled by checking out the flyerboard.

In addition, several organizations, departments, and student groups plan special events throughout the
year. Here are some of them:

Grand Alternative:

Grand Alternative is sponsored by Student Activities and Organizations, a division of the Office of the
Dean of Students. This is a collaborative effort among the Student Wellness Office, Purdue Student
Union Board, and Division of Recreational Sports. Mini-grants for student organizations are made
possible by a grant from the Drug-Free Coalition of Tippecanoe County.

The Coalition awarded the Office of the Dean of Students $5483.50 for Grand Alternative 2008-2009 and
$10,000 for 2009-2010. During each of those two years, over 40 events were sponsored by 50
organizations. Approximately 17,000 Purdue students participated in one or more Grand Alternative events.
Activities included inflatable games, root beer keg parties, and carnivals, barbeques, and athletics events.

Purdue Student Union Board (PSUB) and the Recreational Sports Center (RSC)

The Purdue Student Union Board (PSUB), the all campus student programming board, plans events
throughout the school year, of which some fall into the category of Late Night Programming occurring on
Wednesday–Saturday evenings. Events range from Poetry Slams, Purdue After Darks (held in
conjunction with RSC), Open Mic Nights, Flicks at Fowler (free movies), Crafts, etc. All of these events are
held for free to students or at a much discounted price. While PSUB puts on numerous events throughout
the school year, the ones that fall in the realm of this report had the following results:

2008-2009: 45 Events with over 12,300 people in attendance.
2009-2010: 73 Events with over 20,453 people in attendance.

The Recreational Sports Center (RSC) encourages a healthy lifestyle by promoting, supporting, and
hosting healthy activities throughout the year. Over 5,000 students access the RSC every day,
participating in club sports, classes, work out on the equipment, basketball, etc. In addition, they host
several special social events on weekend nights. Events included:

2008-2009: 3,375 in attendance

     •   80’s Flash Dance (Collaboration with PSUB)
     •   Stress-Free Friday
     •   Boilermaker Blastoff
     •   Fun Around the World
     •   Friday Night Field Day
     •   Carnival Night (Collaboration with PSUB)

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2009-2010: 3,800 in attendance

    •   Beat the Fighting Irish
    •   Fright Fest
    •   Stress-Free Friday
    •   Cabin Fever (Collaboration with PSUB)
    •   Fun Around the World
    •   Carnival Night (Collaboration with PSUB)

Substance Free Tailgating:

BoilerZone is an alcohol and substance-free tailgating experience for Purdue students during home
football games and includes games, food and other entertainment. BoilerZone is sponsored by Purdue
Student Government (PSG), Purdue Student Union Board (PSUB) Student Wellness Office (SWO),
Residential Life and the Recreational Sports Center (RSC). It is funded through a grant from the Coalition
for a Drug-Free Tippecanoe County and with funding from PSG, RSC, SWO and Residential Life.

This event provides a structured substance free event on campus for students. Student leaders are involved with
every aspect of the programming providing programming and leadership development for the students involved.

Thursday at the Theater:

Thursday at the Theatre is a late night initiative showing the latest movies at Hillenbrand Dining Hall.
Thursday at the Theatre is sponsored by Purdue Student Government (PSG), Purdue Student Union
Board (PSUB) Student Wellness Office (SWO), Residential Life and the Recreational Sports Center
(RSC); and funded through a grant from the Coalition for a Drug-Free Tippecanoe County and funding
from PSG, RSC, SWO and Residential Life.

This event provides a structured substance free event on campus for students. Student leaders are involved with
every aspect of the programming providing programming and leadership development for the students involved.

Academics
Many academic units address alcohol and other drugs through policies in the classrooms, curriculum
infusion, and research. An overview of the programs and classes offered during 2008-2009 and 2009-
2010 is listed below, as well as links to some websites that address alcohol in the classroom:

    •   Websites:
           o Managing Classroom Behavior:
           o School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 2010 Student Handbook:
           o School of Veterinary Medicine Student Handbook:
           o School of Nursing Student Handbook:

    •   Data Document for Faculty and Staff: In 2008, this document was sent to 2,020 campus faculty and
        staff members with data, recommendations on addressing alcohol in the classroom, and education
        about the campus climate. The document included comments from two academic deans, a faculty
        member, academic advisor, Purdue Police, and the president of Purdue Student Government.

    •   Excerpt from “Managing Classroom Behavior,” a document for faculty and teaching assistants:
        The odor of alcohol impurities emitting from a student may lead one to believe the student is
        intoxicated. This may be more annoying than disruptive. The focus should be on the behavior,
        whether alcohol-induced or from some other cause, and be treated in a like manner as discussed
        in this document. Informing the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities about the alcohol
        observation is useful in addressing potential problems. Most likely the student is clueless about the
        social signals being conveyed. The odor of alcohol can linger from consumption the night before
        the class. Such an odor can be distracting to other students in the vicinity. The Office of Student
        Rights and Responsibilities would like to be advised of the situation to help take corrective action.

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•   EDPS class for first-year students in Intercollegiate Athletics: Two sessions deal with drugs,
       alcohol, and sexual responsibility.

   •   Engineering 104: In 2008, CAPS, Student Wellness Office, Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities
       collaborated to speak about alcohol issues to 400 students in 16 sections of Engineering 104.

   •   Purdue Promise: A program that helps eligible Twenty-First Century Scholars be successful at
       Purdue. Students receive a combination of support services and financial aid. During class, they
       address accountability and responsibility with a section on alcohol. The class covers Indiana laws
       and understanding BAC levels. It includes educational games on alcohol awareness. The new
                                                                        th th
       students in program are reminded of their signed contract from 6 -8 grades regarding conduct
       and choices. This signed pledge carries on through college.

   •   School of Engineering Education: E-letter for first-year engineering program students—addresses
       relevant issues for student success, including alcohol and other drug misuse and abuse.

   •   HK 231 – Substance Abuse and Health—semester-long class addresses alcohol and other drug issues.

   •   MCMP 316 - (PHPR 316) Drug Abuse Education: Students learn about chemical dependencies/
       addictions and are taught and present a drug abuse education program to middle school students.

   •   HTM 49100: Taught by Professor Bill Jaffe, each student must pass a Responsible Alcohol Service
       Certification program. The program covers: How alcohol affects the Body; Laws and regulations
       applying to the service of alcohol; Understanding, supporting and applying the fundamentals of
       Responsible Service of Beverage Alcohol. In January 2010, the course content changed from
       Serv-Safe to the State of Indiana Responsible Server Program. Purdue- West Lafayette and HTM
       are one of the few University programs requiring its students to take and pass a Responsible
       Alcohol Service program as a requirement to receive their degree. Many, while offering similar
       programs, do so on an elective basis. About 150 students are certified yearly in this program.

   •   Soc 35200 – (ANTH 35200) Drugs, Culture, and Society: The course provides an overview of the social
       and cultural underpinnings of drug use across societies. Students engage with various topics, including
       addiction, global markets, drug epidemics, public policy, and cross-cultural differences in drug use.

   •   School of Pharmacy Outreach: Prof. Krause’s Drug Abuse/Addiction Education course furthers the
       education of 32 Doctor of Pharmacy students by increasing his/her communication abilities and drug
       abuse/addiction knowledge, and allowing students to deliver that knowledge as community outreach.

   •   Purdue Police Classroom Programs: During the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school years, Purdue
       University Police presented information on substance abuse in the following classes:
           o English 101,102,102,409
           o BS 199R, Strategies for a Successful First Year
           o Communications 114
           o Women’s Contemporary Health

Enforcement
The three primary venues on campus that enforce policies and laws regarding alcohol and other drug use
are the Purdue Police, University Residences and the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities
(OSRR). In addition, the Office of the Dean of Students assesses sanctions to student organizations in
violations of University Regulations. Data from those offices are listed below.

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University Residences

The following data summarizes University Residences conduct stats regarding alcohol and other drug incidents.

                     University Residences Alcohol Policy                 2008-09           2009-10
                   Residents sanctioned for policy violations               586               511

           Educational Sanctions applied for Alcohol Policy violations    2008-09           2009-10
                  Choices Program (90 min. in-residence prgm)               492               429
             Early Intervention Alcohol Program (CAPS 4-8hr prgm)            10                5

          University Residences Suspensions by AOD Policy violations      2008-09           2009-10
                                   Alcohol                                   6                16
                                    Drugs                                   66                47

Purdue University Statistics as Reported by the Purdue University Police Department

Note: There was one student death reported on campus during the 2008-2009 school year that was
alcohol/drug related.

                                               LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS                  DRUG LAW VIOLATIONS
                                                  CAMPUS                               CAMPUS
                                           DISCIPLINATRY ACTION ARRESTS          DISCIPLINARY ACTION ARRESTS
2008 STUDENT RESIDENTIAL FACILITY          327                   47              0                    49
TOTAL ON CAMPUS                            327                   228             0                    88
NON-CAMPUS BUILDING/PROPERTY               0                     0               0                    0
PUBLIC PROPERTY                            0                     28              0                    10
2009 STUDENT RESIDENTIAL FACILITY          302                   75              0                    37
TOTAL ON CAMPUS                            302                   230             0                    94
NON-CAMPUS BUILDING/PROPERTY               0                     4               0                    1
PUBLIC PROPERTY                            0                     19              0                    27

**CRIMES REPORTED IN THE RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES COLUMN ARE INCLUDED IN THE ON
CAMPUS CATEGORY.

These statistics indicate cases as initially reported to the police. Further investigation may reveal the case was
unfounded or lacked sufficient evidence to result in the filing of criminal charges by the Prosecutor’s Office.

Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (OSRR)

The staff in the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities review incident reports submitted from various
campus and community agencies and determining if there has been a violation of the Code of Student Conduct as
outlined in the University Regulations. A student who is found to be violation of the Code of Student Conduct may
be subject to sanctions as described in the University Regulations. These sanctions may include Administrative
Action (AA) which is the issuance of an oral or written warning or Disciplinary Procedures (DP) which may include
a sanction of disciplinary probation, probated suspension, suspension, or expulsion from the university. In all
student conduct cases, additional educational sanctions may also be assigned to assist the student in learning
from the incident that they were involved with. These educational sanctions may include referrals to campus
counseling offices for assessments on substance abuse issues, alcohol and/or drug education workshops,
reflective papers, community service, or on-going follow up meetings with staff in the OSRR office.

Listed below is a summary of the number of alcohol and drug related student conduct cases which have
been adjudicated by the OSRR Office.
                  Student Conduct Cases          Administrative Action    Disciplinary Probation
             2008-2009 (903   2009-2010 (946     2008-2009 2009-2010     2008-2009     2009-2010
               total cases)     total cases)
Drug        133               95                 2              0        131          95
Alcohol     439               392                152            110      287          282

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In addition to the standard case resolution process, the OSRR has worked the past two years to continue
to strengthen partnerships around campus and in the community to address student behavior as it relates
to alcohol and other drug incidents. OSRR staff have partnered with the University’s Counseling and
Psychological Services (CAPS) area to formalize a referral process for at risk students who may be in
need of more formal assessments and counseling due to alcohol related behavior. In addition, staff has
worked with Academic Advisors, as well as minority and international student advisors, University
athletics staff and coaches, and professional programs to present information to students regarding the
university’s standards for conduct and the policies on alcohol and drugs for the campus.

Student Activities and Organizations (SAO)

The Student Activities and Organizations area of the Office of the Dean of Students is responsible for
student rights and responsibilities for recognized student organizations. SAO follows up on all allegations
of violations of the University regulations and state laws concerning alcohol. In 2008-2009, three student
organizations were sanctioned for alcohol violations. In 2009-2010, four student organizations were
sanctioned for alcohol violations. The sanctions always include educational requirements such as
requiring members to participate in alcohol awareness training and programs.

Intervention
Purdue has several options available for students and staff members who need to address alcohol and
other drug abuse issues. A summary is listed below:

Purdue’s Treatment Programs:

For Staff

Purdue HR WorkLife Programs’ Employee Assistance offers assessment, counseling and referral
services that are confidential and professional. Services are available to benefits-eligible faculty and staff,
official retirees, dependent family members, same-sex domestic partners, and families of deceased
employees. WorkLife Programs’ Employee Assistance’s primary objective is to provide a safe harbor
where one can address personal, family, or work-related issues.

Employee Assistance Program on-site data: Includes assessment and referrals for employees and families.

                 2008-09       2009-10
  Alcohol          49            39
  Drugs            10             3

Additionally, as of January 2010, employee assistance services became available 24 hours a day, seven
days a week through CIGNA’s Choose Well, Live Well Personal Health Team.

Cigna Data: January 2010 through September 2010: Includes Employees and families.

 Alcohol     3
  Drugs      1
Human Resources Employee Relations Data Base: Information from all departments who may have had an incident.

                2008-09       2009-10
  Alcohol          2             1
  Drugs            1             2

Transportation: Commercial Drivers License: 2009-10: One pre-employment positive test resulting in no
hire. Random drug testing performed:

                                                                                                            17
For Students:

Counseling and Psychological Services

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) provides an alcohol and other drug program which is
available to all students at the Purdue West Lafayette campus. These services include Alcohol and Other
Drug (AOD) evaluations, counseling, outreach programming, and educational classes which have been
designed to meet the specific developmental needs of college students. The mission of the program is to
provide brief motivational interventions which form the basis of cognitive-behavioral skill building and risk-
reduction with the aim toward behavior change.

The AOD program has been widely used by students who are referred by the court system (locally, as well as
those in other counties and states) for AOD evaluations, counseling, and educational interventions for both
alcohol and cannabis-related citations. CAPS also received referrals for alcohol and other drug services from
University Residences, the Naval ROTC, and fraternities and sororities during the two years of service
applicable to the current report. Overall, the AOD program served over 600 referrals between 2008-2010.

                                                                2008-2009             2009-2010
Alcohol & other drug related referrals                          345                   273
AOD Evaluations                                                 70                    67
Alcohol Education Classes                                       277                   207
Cannabis Classes                                                16                    6
intensive individual AOD psycho-educational sessions            12                    32

In addition to students who are referred for alcohol and other drug treatment by other entities, CAPS staff
also provides individual therapy to students who seek substance-related treatment on their own accord.
Data for these students are not included here, as this information is intermingled with other clinical data.

Office of the Dean of Students:

Counselors in the Office of the Dean of Students provide confidential assistance for students who need help
in understanding themselves, in making adjustments and decisions based on insight gained in a counseling
relationship, in accepting responsibility for their choices, and in following a course of action to resolve the
smallest or largest of problems. Here are some data from the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school year.

                                          Type                  2008-09     2009-10
                          Academic                                 2123        1688
                          Career                                    233         158
                          Career -- Test Referral                    55          31
                          Career -- Test Interpretation              47          18
                          Groups / Workshops                         57         363
                          Abuse                                      83          52
                          Adjusting to Univ. Environment            165         172
                          Cultural Issues                           174         167
                          Developmental Issues                       83         130
                          Financial Counseling                      676         326
                          Grief Reaction                            191         182
                          Physical Health                            65          21
                          Relationships                             247         230
                          Sad / Depressed                           160         156
                          Sexuality Issues                           73          57
                          Stress Reaction                           256         140
                          Suicide Issues                             18          31
                          Harassment                                 13          13
                          Anxiety                                   160          98

                                                                                                           18
Summary

The appointed review committee conducted a comprehensive study of the alcohol and drug policy,
related programs, services and enforcement practices for academic years 2008-2009 and 2009-2010.
Purdue is in compliance with the Drug Free Schools and Campuses Regulations, has an effective AOD
policy, consistently enforces standards of behavior related to AOD abuse and distributes the policy in
writing to our students.

Purdue uses a comprehensive, environmental approach to address alcohol and other drug use on
campus, focusing on policy, education, social life, academics, enforcement and intervention. At Purdue,
we follow the national, evidence-informed recommendations made by the National Institute on Alcohol
Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the Social Ecological Framework. All components work together to
ensure that Purdue students and staff are in a safe and healthy environment.

In Biennial Review committee discussions, the group discussed that one of the main reasons behind the
strength of the comprehensive approach is the collaborative efforts by our many offices, departments,
and student groups on and off campus. Addressing alcohol and other drug issues together is one of the
hallmarks of our campus.

During our collaborative assessment and meetings during the 2009-2010 school year, Purdue developed a
series of recommendations for the future. While we have taken a strong, comprehensive approach, we
recognize that alcohol and other drug issues are always evolving and changing, and new strategies are needed.

Some of our new initiatives that were discussed during the past school year as well as by our Biennial
Review Committee include:

    •   A collaborative team spent the 2009-2010 school year investigating online education
        programming. As a result, Purdue will implement AlcoholEdu during the 2011-2012 school year.
    •   University Residences is piloting an “in-house” educational component in conjunction with a
        conditional housing status for violations of the department’s drug policy by residents. Assignment
        to the program is based on a case-by-case assessment of individual’s involvement in incidents
        that are resolved through the standard conduct process for University Residences. The program
        entails a series of meetings and assignments to provide participants the opportunity for personal
        growth in a variety of topics.
    •   Purdue Student Government is developing a new Medical Amnesty Policy, which will ensure that
        students who need assistance for alcohol poisoning will receive necessary medical attention.
    •   Boiler Gold Rush alcohol and other drug programming has moved away from a one-time speaker
        to more peer testimony, explanation, and engagement.
    •   Because of a strong push for more alcohol-free programming options, Purdue Student Union
        Board has received increased funding from the University, which is resulting in increased late-
        night activities.
    •   The Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities has begun to implement a Community Standards
        Board process for student discipline cases which may result in the charged student being removed
        from the university due to their conduct. As this process is still in its early stages, it will be more fully
        assessed during the next Biennial cycle, however this process is designed to have an increased
        number of university faculty, staff, and students involved in the decision making process around
        serious discipline cases, many which involve elements of alcohol and/or drug use.
    •   Student Activities and Organizations is taking proactive measures to reduce violations of
        University regulations and state laws concerning alcohol with new initiatives to address changing
        behaviors with student organizations. During the 2010-2011 academic year, new initiatives
        include the following:
        • Fraternity/Sorority Life instituted a Peer Education Model with Prevention Education Adjudication.
        • SAO and Fraternity/Sorority Life also focused more effort on programs like the Ladder of Risk
             and TiPS training.

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•    Since Cooperative Housing host similar social functions, guidelines used for
             fraternities/sororities are being used with cooperative houses as well. Student leaders within
             the cooperative housing community have been intentionally included in more discussion
             about alcohol behavior and social practices.
        • Social Responsibility Committees have also been established in each fraternity/sorority chapter.
    •   A new Recreational Sports Center is being built on campus. While this will result in a temporary
        shifting of alcohol-free social activities, the new facility will provide more opportunities for students.
    •   We have had changes in our upper level administrators and have a new Vice President for
        Student Affairs, Associate Vice President for Housing and Food Services, and a new Provost.
        We believe their new ideas and energy will bring in new perspectives to further develop our
        strategies and efforts on campus.

Purdue has developed a comprehensive, environmental approach to address alcohol and other drug
issues on campus. We will continue to develop, evaluate, assess, and pursue the best practices for our
campus to create a safe and healthy environment for our students.

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