Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap July 2011

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 2 A message from the Chairman Welcome to the Regional Development Australia Gold Coast (RDA Gold Coast) Roadmap. This document captures the characteristics of the Gold Coast region, takes a fresh look at the issues facing our region and outlines the opportunities for growth and development. The Roadmap is a result of the review, consultation and analysis activities of RDA Gold Coast in its first year of operation. As a document that responds to the changing economic, social and environmental circumstances of the region, this Roadmap will be reviewed through on-going consultation and engagement with Gold Coast stakeholders and will be updated annually.

This Roadmap is intended to:  Provide guidance for federal and state governments on the needs and priorities for the Gold Coast region so that appropriate policies, programs and initiatives can be put in place to directly address the local needs; and  Focus the activities of local organisations, businesses, institutions and residents on the priorities for growth and development of the Gold Coast region.

This Roadmap supports the research and forward planning of the Gold Coast City Council, the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, the Department of Environment and Resource Management, and other government agencies and organisations in the region. RDA Gold Coast looks forward to engaging with stakeholders in the region around the seven key focus areas highlighted in this Roadmap. I encourage you to read this Roadmap, provide us with your feedback and work with us to facilitate collaboration between stakeholders to achieve growth and development of this region. Craig Devlin Chairman Regional Development Australia Gold Coast

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 3 Table of Contents A message from the Chairman . . 2 What is the Roadmap . . 5 How does this Roadmap relate to other future plans . . 6 The vision for the Gold Coast . . 7 RDA Gold Coast’s Mission . . 7 The Gold Coast region . . 7 Sub-tropical climate, lifestyle and City Character . . 7 Linkages . . 8 Economy . . 8 Community, education & health . . 9 Current situation . . 10 Strategic background . . 11 Regional opportunities . . 12 Strengths . . 12 Challenges . . 13 Opportunities . . 14 What are the priorities .

. 15 Key focus areas to achieve these priorities . . 16 How can you help . . 17 Economic diversity . . 17 Infrastructure . . 17 Town-planning . . 17 Affordable housing . . 18 Community . . 18 Education/Training . . 18 Deregulation . . 18 Projects of cross-regional significance . . 19 Food Supply Chain . . 19 Cross Border Opportunities . . 19 Diversification of Tourism Product . . 20 Workforce Development/Workforce Participation initiatives . . 20 SEQ/NR Regional approach to market . . 20

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 4 Business application of high speed digital networks . . 20 Conclusion . . 21 Contact Us . . 23 Glossary . . 24 Appendix A: Government Strategic Context . . 25 National Level . . 25 State Level . . 29 Local Level . . 36 Summary . . 42 References Documents . . 44 National level documents . . 44 State level documents . . 44 Local level documents . . 46 Appendix B – Regional Profile . . 49 Demographic Overview . . 50 Indigenous Population . . 50 Country of birth and proficiency in English . . 50 Social Characteristics .

. 50 VAMPIRE Index . . 50 SEIFA . . 51 Geography . . 53 Climate . . 53 Transport Infrastructure . . 54 Waterways . . 55 Natural Resources . . 55 National Parks . . 56 History and culture . . 56 Environment . . 57 Beaches and National Parks . . 57 Water supply . . 58 Education . . 58 Education characteristics . . 58 Schools . . 59 Universities . . 59 Post secondary and technical education . . 60 Health . . 61 Queensland Health . . 61 Private Hospitals . . 62

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 5 What is the Roadmap? This Roadmap is a practical, clear plan for the growth and development of the Gold Coast region. The Roadmap outlines RDA’s vision, and the contribution it can make through collaboration across government, business and the community, to assist the region to achieve priority outcomes resulting in growth of a diversified sustainable economy, with increased appeal and liveability. This Roadmap responds to the needs and opportunities identified during consultation with government, business and communities, and research commissioned by RDA Gold Coast, and focuses on enhancing the region in the areas of greatest need and highest priority.

We welcome your feedback and involvement in assisting RDA Gold Coast to drive positive change. “A Gold Coast that supports sustainable growth and offers education, business and lifestyle opportunities unmatched anywhere else in Australia” The Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 6 How does this Roadmap relate to other future plans? This Roadmap builds on the existing local and state government plans for the Gold Coast and South- East Queensland. The RDA Gold Coast Roadmap is a forward looking, long-term plan that identifies short and medium-term projects that support the mutual vision of government, business and community. It responds to the current economic, environmental and social climate, and is a living document, designed to quickly adapt to meet new challenges and priorities. Ongoing review and refinement, and continued engagement and collaboration with a broad range of stakeholders, will ensure its effectiveness.

Although focussed on the needs of the Gold Coast region, this Roadmap is mindful of the wider South-East Queensland and Northern New South Wales priorities and also seeks to provide inter- regional support. This Roadmap aims to provide all stakeholders with an informative and accurate overview of the current and future trends, needs and priorities for ongoing growth and development of the region. It aims to assist in the tailoring of initiatives and resources to address regional priorities and needs, and to further enhance the region’s appeal to investors and business migrants, thus ensuring continued sustainable economic growth.

RDA Gold Coast aims to engage with all levels of government, business and local communities to identify practical projects and to influence the implementation of such projects to achieve sustainability for the City. A clear vision supported by practical projects

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 7 The vision for the Gold Coast “Come for the lifestyle, stay for the opportunities” RDA Gold Coast’s Mission “To create a Gold Coast that offers education, business and lifestyle opportunities that are second to none” The Gold Coast region The Gold Coast is located in South-East Queensland, 80km south of the state capital Brisbane.

Unlike other RDA regions in Australia, where a single RDA region may cover multiple local government areas, the RDA Gold Coast region covers a single local government area – Gold Coast City. Sub‐tropical climate, lifestyle and City Character The region enjoys a warm sub-tropical climate with an average 287 days of sunshine each year. The Gold Coast is a linear city stretching north/south along the Coral Sea coast and spreading inland to the hinterland ranges. The City centre is characterised by a spine of high rise buildings along the coastal strip, while the suburbs host a large network of waterways, and the hinterland enjoys a rural lifestyle including world heritage listed sub-tropical rainforest.

The waterways include 480km of rivers and streams, and 774 hectares of lakes, dams and canals, and are mainly used for recreational activities. The 70km of coastline offers beach and water-based

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 8 activities, whilst well-maintained parks in almost every suburb offer recreational facilities and Council-run activities to suit all ages and fitness levels. The Gold Coast is a favourite holiday destination, with its theme parks, beaches and hinterland rainforests attracting visitors from intrastate, interstate and overseas.

This world-class lifestyle has also attracted strong interstate and international migration over 30 years. Hence the statement: “Come for the lifestyle, stay for the opportunities.” Linkages The region enjoys a major road and rail network linking it to towns and cities along the eastern seaboard of Australia, an international airport at the southernmost tip of the region and easy road and rail access to Brisbane’s International Airport.

There are 29 state-controlled road networks, including the Pacific Motorway, which connect major urban and rural centres inside and outside the region. Currently under construction, is the “Rapid Transit’” system which will connect the key commercial centres, within the centre of the Gold Coast. Economy Traditionally the region’s strongest industries have been tourism and construction, both contributing significantly to the state’s economy. The north-eastern part of the Gold Coast is known for its agriculture, including sugarcane, plant nurseries and animal production.

In the year to March 2010, over 60% of visitor nights in the Gold Coast region were for leisure purposes, while 5% were for business.

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 9 The region is home to several major international businesses, and a favoured destination for business tourism, major events and elite sports training. It has a number of world-class sporting facilities and a convention centre. The largest employment sectors in Gold Coast City are retail, tourism, hospitality and construction, with recent global economic challenges resulting in an unemployment rate of 7.4% compared to state’s rate of 5.6%.

The majority of occupied commercial floor space is in Southport and Robina, followed by Surfers Paradise and Bundall.

A number of purpose-built light industrial estates throughout the region provide business opportunities for companies looking to relocate for ease of access to freight, logistics and labour force. Current major projects occurring within the region are the Gold Coast University Hospital, Robina Hospital expansion, Gold Coast Rapid Transit system and Gold Coast Highway improvements. Recently completed projects include the construction of Skilled Park Stadium at Robina (NRL) and the redevelopment of Carrara Stadium (AFL).

Community, education & health Gold Coast City’s estimated population as at 30 June 2010 was 527,627 - 13.0 % of the state's population. By 2031 this is expected to reach 788,231 - 12.6% of Queensland's total population. The Gold Coast has over 400 education and training providers, including four universities, several research centres and a number of internationally recognised training institutions. Education and training is recognised as one of the growth sectors of the local economy. A full range of health services is available on the Gold Coast, with additional access to more specialised services in Brisbane.

The development of the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct, adjacent to the new Gold Coast Hospital and Griffith University, will provide opportunities for research and development and make it one of the city’s most significant future growth centres.

Gold Coast Regional Roadmap - July 2011

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 10 Current situation Fuelled by its emergence over the past century as Australia’s premier tourist destination and an increasingly attractive place to live, the twin drivers of tourism and population growth have made the Gold Coast the sixth largest city in Australia.

The Gold Coast’s economic base is weighted heavily on construction and service sector industries such as Retail and Tourism, including Hospitality and Accommodation. The impact of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) and the strengthening of the Australian Dollar has reduced international tourist visitation and spend and increased affordability of overseas destinations, which has adversely affected demand for new homes / investment units.

The immediate effect has been slowing of the economy and increased unemployment in these industries, and the reduction of construction has adversely affected housing availability and affordability, as has the dwindling supply of green-field land and the demand for increased house size. All of these factors have challenged the region’s ability to offer affordable housing. The Gold Coast is experiencing tough economic conditions, but has strong future potential for recovery. The Roadmap’s short-term priorities are determined by the severity and estimated duration of the current economic situation, while identified opportunities have determined the medium and long-term solutions.

RDA Gold Coast participants in discussion about the issues and opportunities for the Gold Coast region.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 11 Strategic background RDA Gold Coast recognises that successful regional planning depends on engagement and collaboration with a wide range of stakeholders to identify the economic, environmental and social factors effecting the region, development and implementation of sustainable solutions. In preparing this Roadmap, RDA Gold Coast has drawn from a range of stakeholder research and strategic documents in support of its own community and industry engagement.

The documents include:  Gold Coast City Council - Bold Future vision  Gold Coast City Council – Planning Scheme  Gold Coast City Council - Economic Development Strategy  State Government SEQ Regional Economic Development Strategy  State Government SEQ Regional Plan 2009 -2031

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 12 Regional opportunities Our review of the strengths of the region, coupled with the challenges it faces in the short, medium and long-term highlights some significant opportunities for the future. Strengths Economic  Well-developed tourism industry and infrastructure  Internationally recognised holiday destination  Well-developed construction industry  A growing small and micro business sector  Large retail sector  Favourable geographical location within SEQ and next to the Northern Rivers region of NSW Social  Good access to medical and GP services  Relaxed lifestyle  Diverse living options – waterfront, beachfront, urban, suburban hinterland, rural  Educational offerings e.g.

range of schools, TAFE, 4 universities Lifestyle/Environment  Favourable year-round climate  High quality natural environment close to the city  International airport  Good road and rail connections to Brisbane  Strong association of the Gold Coast with fun and relaxation

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 13 Challenges Economic  Ageing tourist attractions and infrastructure  Perception as holiday destination not business centre  Global competition for tourists  Narrow industry base with heavy reliance on tourism/retail/construction  High unemployment and underemployment  Shortages of highly skilled labour  Low job security  Comparatively low levels of participation in higher education  Perceived over-regulated city planning system  Proportion of workforce employed outside the region Social  Congested access to Brisbane by road and rail.

 Limited public transport linking rural areas to major centres of activity  Funding for infrastructure construction  Specific areas of social disadvantage  Low levels of community care and support  Preferred choice for ageing population Lifestyle/Environment  High housing costs  Demand for acreage / low density housing increasing the need to travel further to services and facilities  Limited available land for housing and industry space without compromising natural environment  Flood plain management

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 14 Opportunities Economic  Renew tourist accommodation  Diversify the tourism product and market  Increase training and education for health and education sector  Encourage new businesses to establish in the region  Capitalise on new information technology opportunities  Strengthen existing small business sector  Develop the airport as a trade hub  Connectivity to global and national markets  Building on the strengths of the local marine Industry  Link the airport with the central activity centres Social  Plan for the future of the region in cooperation with neighbouring regions  Improve public transport  Build strong, inclusive communities  Develop internet based health services  Provide additional aged care and community health services Lifestyle/Environment  Increase the density of the high rise spine to reduce travel and increase sustainability  Infill and Brownfield development opportunities  More affordable homes  Plan for the future of the cane fields land

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 15 What are the priorities? As a result of the review and consultation with stakeholders, RDA Gold Coast has identified three priorities for the short term on which to focus its support: 1. Create jobs 2. Strengthen the community 3. Enhance the lifestyle and environment. RDA is committed to supporting projects that focus on these priorities, and will aim to keep a balance between economic, social and environmental factors. However, without the wealth generated through employment in secure and well-paid jobs it is difficult to build community spirit and to support environmental and lifestyle improvements.

“Jobs are the number one priority.” Chairman Craig Devlin at the RDA Gold Coast Roadmap Workshop with committee members and community participants.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 16 Key focus areas to achieve these priorities Regional Development Australia alone cannot achieve these priorities, it was designed to engage and bring together stakeholders and partners who together can make a difference. The key is engagement, collaboration, and a focus on common goals. Regional Development Australia – Gold Coast plans to focus seven key goals when reviewing projects to support: 1. Economic diversity: Attracting new and emerging industries, and encouraging growth and diversification of existing industries.

2. Infrastructure: Encouraging infrastructure to support growth. 3. Town planning: Encouraging streamlined and improved processes to support new economic activity whilst ensuring a high quality built environment. 4. Affordable housing: Influencing development of innovative and creative housing options that are more affordable. 5. Community: Collaborating to build strong, inclusive and supportive communities; 6. Education/Training: Encouraging increased education and training opportunities especially in the key sectors of health, information technology and environmental management. 7. Deregulation: Facilitating discussions to reduce difficult regulatory processes, and provide incentives to encourage growth and development.

These areas are inter-linked and cannot be viewed in isolation. For example, to achieve greater economic diversity, suitable infrastructure needs to be provided, adjustments made to town planning controls, affordable housing provided, strong communities developed, skills training and education provided and incentives offered to attract new businesses. “Focus activities on 7 key areas”

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 17 How can you help? There are a number of important actions that will enable development of these goals.

RDA Gold Coast has identified a number of projects and invites you to provide us with feedback, contribute your solutions and participate in the development and implementation of these projects. Economic diversity:  Encourage attraction new and emerging industries, and diversification of the tourism and construction sectors  Facilitate delivery of small business support services  Influence building on the strengths of the marine industry  Promote co-branding of local businesses with the Gold Coast. Infrastructure:  Encourage planning for future stages of the light rail infrastructure, connecting with the airport and the heavy rail system  Advocate for improved east-west public transport connections  Assist building the business case for early rollout to the region of the National Broadband Network  Advocate for and promote a new international submarine cable  Assist with ongoing data centre attraction programs  Promote the development of targeted industry training for mining and health care sectors  Advocate investigation of alternative ways of paying for key local infrastructure  Build partnerships to develop world class high-tech low carbon infrastructure projects.

Town-planning:  Apply the experiences of the Urban Land Development Authority and the Queensland Reconstruction Authority in achieving planning approvals in a shorter timeframe  Review and reform the town planning approval process  Investigate the scope for greater private certification of development applications  Establish an affordable and fast means of planning dispute resolution  Integrate the assessment of economic benefits with the social and environmental impacts in the assessment of development applications.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 18 Affordable housing:  Promote the benefits of smaller houses that are more affordable to buy and to run, and which reflect sub-tropical design standards  Develop greater awareness and acceptance of pre-fabricated homes  Encourage development of innovative, adaptable and creative housing options that are more affordable  Encourage provision of digital infrastructure in all new housing. Community:  Work with other agencies in supporting and developing community leaders  In partnership with existing community groups, help develop a Gold Coast Centre for community group infrastructure  Advocate for the development of the Green Heart parklands  Develop partnerships between community, business and institutions to strengthen community bonds and build a strong sense of belonging and acceptance  Develop digital literacy to reduce the digital divide.

Education/Training:  Support existing stakeholders undertake gap analysis to determine skills required by local industries  Promote community, institutional and business connections and collaborations in planning future education and training provision  Support existing networks to develop business opportunities from university research  Digital economy training for business.

Deregulation:  Advocate for reduction in the controls that diminish the use of viable land for urban development  Advocate for a uniform planning code for Queensland  Engage governments to advocate for a framework and culture that supports business. “Together we can achieve great results”

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 19 Projects of cross-regional significance A critical element that has emerged through the consultation process is the issue of inter-regional collaboration. The Gold Coast is strategically located on the Queensland and New South Wales border as well as bordering the Scenic Rim, and the RDA Logan & Redlands and Northern Rivers (NSW) RDA regions.

There are also opportunities and linkages with Brisbane, as well as other RDA areas within South-East Queensland (SEQ).

We welcome collaborative work with other stakeholders in the wider region to support the following initiatives: Food Supply Chain: An opportunity for linkages within the food supply chain from the greater regional areas has been identified by both the RDA network and DEEDI. This would involve supporting the supply of locally and regionally produced food to the retail and restaurant market of the Gold Coast as well as investigating areas of potential local food processing. We will work with GCCC in the development of a local urban agriculture strategy.

A longer term food supply opportunity exists, to export the regional perishable food products out of the Gold Coast international Airport, directly to Southeast Asian markets.

Cross Border Opportunities: The NSW/QLD border at Tweed/Coolangatta represents the highest density of cross-border traffic in Australia. The complexity of conducting business and dealing with different state and local government regulations can stifle investment, productivity and efficiency in the area. Much work has been done to advance seamless border initiatives in the past. RDA Gold Coast recognises the opportunity to facilitate positive change to cross-border issues and is open to supporting cross-border partnerships to tackle the main concerns currently holding back the enormous potential of the region.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 20 Diversification of Tourism Product: The Gold Coast region is renowned for its scenic amenity and world-class beaches. This already attracts over 5 million visitations each year. The vast potential for cross-regional tourism to extend visitors stay an extra 1-2 nights represents a real opportunity for considerably increased yield per visitor. Two significant prospects in this area include the development of world class eco-tourism and indigenous tourism products.

Workforce Development/Workforce Participation initiatives: Opportunities have been identified across the RDA South-East Queensland/Northern Rivers network, and all three levels of government, that focus on the development of workplace planning and labour market training programs.

RDA Gold Coast is seeking to develop partnerships that will span all sectors of the economy to develop projects in this area. SEQ/NR Regional approach to market: Regional connection and accessibility options need to greatly improve for the Gold Coast to capitalise on the liveability advantages it possesses. Opportunities lie within the high speed digital arena, improved transport linkages and co-ordination around the SEQ/NR region and options for businesses to locate with easy access to export markets through the Gold Coast International Airport.

Business application of high speed digital networks: The need to embrace technological opportunities for regional and business development through the uptake of opportunities that will be presented by the application of high speed digital networks is essential. Recognising that a major enabler of new market/service opportunities will be the timely roll out of the National Broadband Network (NBN) infrastructure and the international submarine cable, RDA Gold Coast welcomes partnerships to build the region’s readiness for effective utilisation of the network and will advocate for the Gold Coast to be one of the NBN projects early release sites.

“Unlocking the potential of the region”

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 21 Conclusion Regional Development Australia Committees were formed as a joint initiative of the Commonwealth and State Governments of Australia. They represent a nationally coordinated approach to developing Australia’s regions. This Roadmap is a practical, clear plan for the growth and development of the Gold Coast region. It provides practical solutions to the needs of the region and informs government of the priorities for the region. The Roadmap encourages working together to build upon regional development strengths and opportunities As a result of the review and consultation with stakeholders, RDA Gold Coast has identified three priorities for the short term: 1.

Create jobs 2. Strengthen the community 3. Enhance the lifestyle and environment. Supporting stakeholders through collaboration and coordination across the seven key focus areas outlined in the Roadmap will be the primary focus of RDA Gold Coast. The seven key focus areas outlined in this Roadmap document being:  Economic diversity  Infrastructure  Town Planning  Affordable Housing  Community  Education/Training  De-regulation.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 22 Finally, a critical element that has emerged through the consultation process is the issue of regionalisation. This Roadmap highlights some of the regionally significant opportunities that exist within our region and welcome discussions around initiatives to advance these projects:  Food Supply Chain  Cross Border Opportunities  Diversification of Tourism Product  Workforce Development / Workforce Participation  SEQ/NR Regional Approach to Market  Business Application of High Speed Digital Networks.

“To create a Gold Coast that offers education, business and lifestyle opportunities that are second to none”

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 23 Contact Us Postal: PO Box 3290 Australia Fair Southport QLD 4215 Website: www.rdagoldcoast.org.au Executive Officer - Scott Windus Phone: 07 5583 5094 Mobile: 0413 280 331 Email: scott.windus@rdagoldcoast.org.au Administration - Michelle Walker Phone: 07 5583 5095 Fax: 07 5583 7591 Email: admin@rdagoldcoast.org.au

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 24 Glossary DEEDI: Department of Employment Economic Development and Innovation GCCC: Gold Coast City Council RDA: Regional Development Australia RDA Gold Coast: Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 25 Appendix A: Government Strategic Context This section outlines a number of government policies, strategies and plans that have directly contributed to this document. It provides an overview and a brief analysis of relevant documents and outlines their relevance to the Gold Coast with a comprehensive listing of documents. RDA Gold Coast values informed, knowledge-based decision making and working in partnership with relevant industry bodies and government agencies. The vast literature is a tribute to the hard work and dedication of these bodies; RDA Gold Coast would like to acknowledge their contribution to the Roadmap.

National Level National level documents provide the broadest framework under which state and local activities can be established. Such documents provide the highest level of policy support and guidance for lower level activities across all regions of Australia. A variety of documents that exist at the national level have been reviewed to gain an understanding of the issues identified by stakeholders at this level. The issues identified are listed in the following Figure. 2010: Australian Jobs, 2010 This document provides information to people exploring careers, and education and training options, and those looking for work or wanting assistance to enter or re-enter the labour market.

It Provides a national and state employment context for which Gold Coast employment can be considered against (e.g. performance of particular industries and careers).

At a national level, nearly one quarter of new jobs over the next 5 years (to 2014-15) are expected to come from Health Care and Social Assistance, followed by: Construction, Education and Training; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Retail Trade. Large numbers of new jobs are also projected in: Accommodation and Food Services; Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Public Administration and Safety; Financial and Insurance Services; and Mining. Manufacturing is the only industry expected to decline over this time.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc.

26 State of Australian Cities 2010, 2010 The overall goal of the report is to improve urban policies, in order to improve the productivity, liveability and sustainability of Australia’s cities. The report highlights established and emerging trends and issues to promote discussion and debate on the future directions of development in our urban centres. The report identifies the Gold Coast as a ‘medium city’ as it has a population between 250,000 and 1 million people. Other medium cities are Newcastle, Canberra and Wollongong. In 2008, the Gold Coast was ranked as the 6th highest city based on resident population (behind Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide).

Information in the report can be used to inform actions and policies to address key challenges and take advantage of opportunities to improve the productivity, liveability and sustainability of the Gold Coast. The report sets the context and scope for further federal government involvement in urban policy and planning to help improve the lives of people in major cities. Australia to 2050: Future Challenge – the 2010 Intergenerational Report The Intergenerational Report 2010 provides a comprehensive analysis of the challenges that Australia will face over the next 40 years. It is a timely reminder that the decisions we take over the next four years will be crucial to our future economic prospects and living standards.

The key conclusion is that an ageing and growing population, escalating pressures on the health system and an environment vulnerable to climate change as a major challenge that will place substantial pressure on the economy, living standards and government finances over the next 40 years. Of particular relevance to the Gold Coast is the impact of an ageing population and the challenges presented by climate change. These issues will pose questions around the economic and environmental sustainability, living patterns and lifestyle of the Gold Coast. National Broadband Network Policy The Australian Government announced on 7 April 2009 that it would establish a new company to build and operate a new high speed National Broadband Network (NBN).

This new super-fast National Broadband Network, built in partnership with the private sector, will be the single largest nation-building infrastructure project in Australian history. The NBN will have substantial impacts for the Gold Coast. It is critical to future productivity and maintaining or building competitive advantage. It brings together a broad range of educational, social, physical and economic enablers that will drive the future prosperity of the region. To create innovative, knowledge-based industries and drive a dynamic, prosperous future economy, the NBN must be a priority for the Gold Coast.

Key regional agendas of sustainability, prosperity and innovation are all accelerated through creative connectivity. The way forward: A new disability policy framework for Australia, 2009 To provide innovative funding ideas from the private sector that will help people with disabilities and their families access greater support and plan for the future. The report attempts to introduce a new

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 27 approach so government investments will no longer focus on just the care and support that people with disabilities need, and instead focus on assisting people with disabilities to manage their own lives, to maximise their independence and contribute more tho the community. Sustainable Population Strategy This strategy outlines the Government’s framework for a sustainable Australia. It seeks to ensure that future population change is compatible with the economic, environmental and social wellbeing of the nation.

Achieving a sustainable region means maintaining and improving the wellbeing and opportunities of current and future generations. The Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities Strategy recognises that population change is not only about the growth and overall size of our population; it is also about the needs and skills of our population, how we live, and importantly, where we live. It recognises that population change impacts different communities in different ways.

National Urban Policy Framework This Framework recognises that to secure the ongoing prosperity and wellbeing of our communities, we must ensure that our region meets the needs of current and future generations. We must ensure that economic growth can be sustained and increased without compromising the natural environment or our quality of life. RDA Gold Coast has a role in supporting existing local frameworks to deliver a region that that is more productive, sustainable and liveable. The development and management of our region affects the prosperity and the wellbeing of all members of the community, no matter where they live.

Figure 1: Issues identified at the National level Issues Identified at the National level Issues Economic  Concerns about future fiscal burdens of an ageing population  Encouraging more Australians to pursue careers through education and training  Improving opportunities for, and empowering, people with disabilities  Enhancing the global competitiveness of major cities Environment  Improving the sustainability of major cities  Improving the productivity of major cities (better integration of land use, transport and infrastructure provision) Social  Concerns about adequately catering for the needs of an ageing population  Increasing the level of participation in active and healthy lifestyles  Improving opportunities for, and empowering, people with disabilities  Improving the liveability of major cities  Addressing social exclusion and inequality There is concern about future fiscal burdens that an ageing population may place on communities.

A generally accepted strategy to address this concern is to strengthen and skill the workforce and invest in health infrastructure now, so communities in the future can meet the needs of the older population.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 28 The major environmental issue at that National level is sustainability, particularly how our major cities can become more sustainable and productive. Strategic management of skills development and private/public investment can enhance regions and assist in integrating land use, transport and infrastructure provision. There is concern over the growing rate of childhood and adult obesity. This has highlighted the importance of increasing the level of participation and developing an active and healthy lifestyle through easy choice enablers.

Particular attention is given to improving opportunities for people with disabilities, and their support network (families, friends and carers). There are currently many barriers to the full participation of people with disabilities in the economic and social life of the community. At the heart of the issue is the need for greater education and awareness to change social attitudes which will encourage people with disabilities to participate more broadly within the community, thus combating current trends towards isolation and loneliness. There is renewed focus on empowering people with disabilities to manage their own lives, to maximise their independence and contribute more to the community.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 29 State Level An extensive amount of reference material exists at the State level to address issues affecting Queensland, and particularly South East Queensland. A total of 34 documents have been reviewed to gain an understanding of the issues identified by stakeholders at this level, including:  State planning policies  regional plans – planning and infrastructure  funded works programs  strategies and management plans  State agency’s strategic or business plans  discussion papers The issues identified are listed in the following Figure.

The overarching State document ‘Toward Q2: Tomorrow’s Queensland’ which sets targets for the State to address major challenges by 2020 – for climate change, unhealthy lifestyles, preventable diseases, growing population, ageing population, global competition, and entrenched disadvantage. Various State agencies are identified as the lead agency responsible for achieving these targets, and have subsequently published their own policy positions or strategies.

Towards Q2: Tomorrow’s Queensland This report sets out the Queensland government’s 2020 vision for the State. The Q2 plan has been framed around five ambitions for Queensland covering; economy, environment and lifestyle, education and skills, health and community. Within each area are long-term targets for 2020. This document presents a number of challenges and opportunities for the Gold Coast including climate change, unhealthy lifestyles, preventable disease, growing population, ageing state, global competition, create a diverse economy with infrastructure that anticipates growth, increase businesses undertaking research, innovation or development, increase access to education, reduce public hospital waiting times.

SPP 2/07: Protection of Extractive Resources, 2007 The SPP lists policy outcomes that are to be achieved when making or amending a planning scheme; and through development assessment. These outcomes seek to protect extractive resources from development that might prevent or severely constrain current or future extraction when the need for the resource arises.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 30 Extractive resources include sand, gravel, quarry rock, clay and soil and are used in concrete, asphalt, road bases and a range of other products.

They provide the raw materials for life essentials (e.g. buildings, roads etc). The Gold Coast region contains 9 key resource areas (KRAs) located across Blue Rock, Staplyton, Oxenford, Jacobs Well, Yatala, Nerang, West Burleigh, Reedy Creek. These areas are of either State or regional significance.

SEQ Regional Plan 2009-2031, 2009 This plan sets to manage regional growth and change in the most sustainable way and to protect and enhance the quality of life in the SEQ region. The report applies to the SEQ region, of which the Gold Coast region is a part. The provisions of the report, including the associated regulatory provisions, are required to be taken into account in planning and development decision-making processes (e.g. State government plans and policies; local government planning schemes and other plans and policies; planning and development processes under the Sustainable Planning Act 2009; and development applications made assessable under the Integrated Development Assessment System (IDAS)).

SEQ Infrastructure Plan and Program 2010-2031, 2010 To establish priorities for regionally significant infrastructure over the next 4 years and outlines the longer-term planning horizon to 2031. The report applies to the SEQ region, of which the Gold Coast region is a part. SEQIPP investment for the SEQ region through to 2031 is estimated to reach $134 billion. This investment will fund regionally significant projects across the transport, water, energy, social and community infrastructure sectors. These projects are estimated to support up to 930,000 jobs through to 2031. Major job generating infrastructure in the Gold Coast region is:  Stage 1 of the Gold Coast Rapid Transit project linking Griffith University to Broadbeach via the key activity centres of Southport and Surfers Paradise.

Expected to generate 6,300 direct and indirect jobs over the life of the project; and  Construction of the 750 bed Gold Coast University Hospital. Will generate 9,847 direct and indirect jobs over the life of the project.

It is estimated that 59 projects will occur within the Gold Coast region by 2031, requiring an investment of $14.2 billion. Key project occurring within the Gold Coast are:  Gold Coast University Hospital;  Gold Coast Stadium at Carrara;  Gold Coast Rapid Transit;  Robina Hospital Expansion and Robina Health Precinct;  Pacific Motorway Upgrade: Nerang to Stewart Road; and  Gold Coast Highway Upgrade: Government Road to Stevens Street.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 31 Delivering the Queensland Housing Affordability Strategy: Greenfield land supply in SEQ, 2008 To ensure the State’s land and housing is on the market quickly and at the lowest cost.

There are a number of greenfield areas identified in the Gold Coast by the SEQ Regional Plan 2009-2031. The SEQ Regional Plan now superseded this 2008 report. The greenfield areas of Coomera, Hope Island, Pimpama, Ormeau, Maudsland and Reedy Creek support the aim of this strategy by providing land for future residential development.

Queensland Health Strategic Plan 2007 – 2012 The Strategic Plan outlines Queensland Health’s mission, values, operating principles, strategic challenges and priorities between 2007 and 2012. In general, the growing and ageing population, economic and workforce challenges, and an increase in preventable diseases caused by unhealthy lifestyles continues to impact Queensland Health’s ability to deliver and sustain quality and safe health services. The strategic priorities set at the State level will filter down to the local service level in the form of district operational plans, partnership agreements, divisional operational plans, business unit/project plans and individual staff development plans.

The strategic priorities will benefit all parts of the Gold Coast.

Queensland Health Population Health Plan 2007–2012 Queensland Health aims to deliver the best population health services nationally, improving the health and wellbeing of the population and reducing the health status gap between the most and least advantaged in the community. This will require increased funding allocated to the Prevention, Promotion and Protection Program, the introduction of new and enhanced services and additional workforce and infrastructure. This Plan identifies the major change agenda and key investment priorities for Queensland Health’s population health function over the next five years (2007–2012) which are critical to the achievement of this ambitious aim.

This Plan for Queensland Health’s population health function directly responds to the strategic service reforms contained in the Queensland Statewide Health Services Plan 2007–2012 and the direction articulated in the Queensland Health Strategic Plan 2007–2012.

The Queensland Tourism Strategy 2006 – 2016 The Queensland Tourism Strategy (QTS) identified key themes and strategic actions to pave the way for the development of a sustainable tourism industry in Queensland until 2016. For sustained growth, it is important that the tourism industry is able to encourage the provision of tourism-related infrastructure by governments and the private sector, as well as supporting investment for the development of tourism products and services. The QTS identifies that regional investment and infrastructure are integral to driving long-term growth across the tourism sector.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 32 Queensland Telecommunications Strategic Framework 2009-12, 2008 This framework is a State government initiative aimed at providing the necessary telecommunications services for all areas within Queensland in line with State government’s Smart State Agenda which aims at strengthening the economy through knowledge-intensive, value-adding industries. The provision of quality telecommunications and internet service levels is an important issue for all communities. No specific measures are outlined for the Gold Coast.

Draft Connecting SEQ 2031: An Integrated Regional Transport Plan (IRTP) for SEQ , 2010 This draft plan has been developed as the guiding transport planning and policy document to support the desired outcomes of the SEQ Regional Plan. The vision of the draft IRTP is a transport system that supports the lifestyle enjoyed by residents and visitors, enhances the State’s economy vitality and protects the natural environment. The 6 priorities support the policies of the SEQ Regional Plan. The draft IRTP identifies the following about the Gold Coast region:  the Gold Coast Rapid Transit project provides an important catalyst to support sustainable urban lifestyles  Southport business centre is the regional hub, Robina and Helensvale will be the sub-regional hubs, and Coomera is an emerging major centre with potential for transit oriented development  land use density and mix is supported within 400-800m of all stations/stops along the existing rail network and the proposed light rail network (Helensvale to Coolangatta)  By 2031, the transport network will be reoriented away from heavy reliance on the Pacific Motorway and Gold Coast Highway, to be organised around major public transport spines of the Gold Coast light rail, strategic high-frequency bus corridors and the Gold Coast rail line SEQ Natural Resource Management Plan 2009-31, 2009 This plan complements and informs preparation and review of the SEQ state of the Region Report and the SEQ Regional Plan.

The plan does specifically acknowledge the Gold Coast region. However as the Gold Coast region is located within SEQ the provisions of the plan apply to the Gold Coast region. The plan is an overarching document that will assist in guiding other strategies and actions at a local level.

SEQ Water Strategy, 2010 To ensure that water in SEQ is managed on a sustainable and integrated basis to provide secure and reliable supplies of acceptable quality for all uses for the long term. The report is SEQ’s blueprint for a sustainable, efficient and secure water supply. In 2005 in SEQ 75% of water was consumed for urban purposes and power generation, with the remainder used for rural purposes. This is reflective of SEQ’s rapidly growing urban areas. Existing bulk water supplies on the Gold Coast include the Hinze Dam, Little Nerang Dam and the SEQ (Gold Coast) Desalination Facility.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc.

33 Queensland’s Recreational Marine Industry: Annual Report, 2009 This is a report on the size and performance of the recreational and light commercial marine industry in Queensland. It compares growth with other states of Australia and takes an in-depth look at the various sectors that make up this industry. The recreational and light commercial marine industry is a significant contributor to regional, State and National economies. Queensland is at the forefront of the industry in Australia. The Financial Year 2008-09 saw the industry contract in Queensland’s largest market, Gold Coast City.

This period saw 30.8% of marine industry businesses reduce staff or expect to reduce staff and median annual revenue per business decline by 33.3% from $1.5 million in 2007-08 to $1.0 million in 2008-09.

As at the national level, there is concern about future fiscal burdens that an ageing population may place on communities. So the State is now planning to strengthen and skill the workforce and investing in health infrastructure. Emphasis is also placed on the provision of transport and educational infrastructure for the State. Infrastructure provision is of considerable relevance to South East Queensland as rapidly a growing region. Documents such as the South East Queensland Regional Plan SEQIPP identify the Gold Coast as a place undergoing significant growth and requiring investment for future infrastructure.

All aspects of environmental protection are addressed at the State level, whether it is through a broad sustainability framework set out for the entire South East Queensland region, or a specific State Planning Policy to address a particular matter like development in the vicinity of airports or protecting strategic cropping land. The overall focus is on protecting more land for nature conservation and public recreation. These documents support strategies and initiatives at the local level, which are designed to suit the specific needs of the Gold Coast. The need to establish land use density and mix within 400m-800m of heavy passenger rail and future light rail stations was highlighted.

This will support a more sustainable form of development, focused around transit oriented communities. Forward land use planning around future light rail stations is a way of promoting the light rail network and establishing community and business support before the light rail network comes on-line.

The major social issues identified at this level are the lack of affordable housing, particularly for disadvantaged persons, and the need for greater volunteering of our community. These issues continue to be important issues at the local level, with a number of documents investigating these matters specifically on the Gold Coast.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 34 Issues Identified at the State level Issues Economic  Concerns about future fiscal burdens of an ageing population  Investing in infrastructure to create new jobs  Creating a strong economy through infrastructure that anticipates growth  Encouraging more research, development and innovation in business  Increasing employment for diversity groups (e.g.

older people, people with disabilities or from cultural and linguistically diverse backgrounds)  Protecting State significant extractive resources  Protecting strategic cropping land  Supporting the recreational marine industry Environment  Sustainably managing growth  Investing in projects to improve public transport and road networks and reduce congestion  Protecting more land for nature conservation and recreation  Protecting the landscape values of rural areas  Sustainably managing water supplies  Investigating new water supply options  Reducing the carbon footprint by reducing car and electricity usage  Protecting air quality  Supporting appropriate land uses in the north-eastern part of the Gold Coast  Supporting appropriate marine infrastructure in southern Moreton Bay  Supporting land use density and mix around heavy passenger rail stations and future light rail stations  Appropriately managing the coastal zone (e.g.

maintaining public access to foreshore, mitigating the impacts of beach erosion)  Mitigating impacts of flood, bushfire and landslide hazards on development  Reducing marine wildlife stranding and morality  Protecting koalas and their habitat  Managing development involving acid sulphate soils Social  Concerns about adequately catering for the needs of an ageing population  Expanding healthcare services to

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 35 Figure 2: Issues identified at the State level meet community needs  Creating a healthy and active community  Creating and promoting quality open space and recreational areas for the community  Providing quality early childhood education facilities  Increasing the level of trade, training and tertiary qualifications in the community  Investing in road projects to improve road safety  Changing attitudes and behaviour toward public transport  Supplying land and housing to the market in a timely and cost effective manner  Concerns about a lack of housing supply for disadvantaged persons  Focusing on prevention and early intervention strategies  Supporting community volunteers  Regulating development near State significant airports and aviation facilities  Establishing quality telecommunications and internet services

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 36 Local Level An extensive list of reference material exists at the local level. A total of 40 documents have been reviewed to gain an understanding of the issues identified by stakeholders at this level, including:  Council corporate and operational plans;  Council planning scheme, policies and master plans;  Council strategies and management plans; and  Annual reports from industry and community groups. Corporate Plan 2009-14, 2009 To guide the delivery on the Council’s and the community’s shared vision for a truly sustainable city that delivers world-class services and amenities while preserving its precious natural environment and quality of life.

Corporate planning ensures that the organisation has a clear direction which guides the allocation of resources over the long, medium and short-term. The Corporate Plan is the key strategic plan which builds on the community consultation undertaken through the Bold Future project and delivers the first five years of the Bold Future Vision. The actions identified in the Corporate Plan will form the basis of the Operational Plan and budget for each year and it will be periodically reviewed to ensure it remains focused on the Bold Future Vision (refer to summary below).

Operational Plan 2009-10, 2009 To identify the detailed initiatives and activities, and their budget allocation and timeframes, which will be pursued by Council in order to achieve the 6 key focus areas as listed in the Corporate Plan. The Operational Plan supports the Corporate Plan in the delivery of the Bold Future Vision and provides the details of the planned activity and budget for 2009-10. The Operational Plan is delivered ahead of the annual budget and contributes to its development by being considered during budget discussions.

Bold Future Vision ‘How we got there…’, 2009 In 2007-08, the community helped draft a blueprint for the city’s next 30 years – this was the ‘Our Bold Future’ initiative.

As part of the development of the city’s Bold Future a city vision and a set of principles were developed to guide planning and decision-making for the city. These have been adopted by Gold Coast City Council. Bold Future is now being implemented through key mechanisms such as Gold Coast City Council’s Corporate and Operational Plans, the Gold Coast Planning Scheme and a range of supporting strategies and policies. Bold Future also represents a continued

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 37 commitment form Gold Coast City Council to engage with its community in a meaningful way to help shape the future of the city. Draft Local Growth Management Strategy and Planning Report, 2007 To provide detailed guidance on the preferred nature and timing of development within the Gold Coast Urban Footprint. To identify enhancements to the city’s planning scheme and other key policy documents to ensure appropriate integration at the local level of the SEQ Regional Plan. This document is relevant to the entire Gold Coast region.

It was prepared before the 2008 local government amalgamations so contains information relating to parts of the Gold Coast City which are now located in Logan City (e.g. the Beenleigh area).

Gold Coast Planning Scheme, 2003 To coordinate and integrate planning dimensions at the State, regional and local levels; effectively manage the development process; and manage the impacts of development on the environment. The planning scheme is the principal document guiding land use planning and development application decisions on the Gold Coast. It is relevant to the entire Gold Coast region. The planning scheme also includes a Priority Infrastructure Plan and planning scheme maps. Business Gold Coast 2020: Gold Coast City Economic Development Strategy, 2010 The overall strategy is to realise our vision of being a location of choice for businesses and residents who can be proud of a world-class city that is recognised internationally for its liveability, its innovation, its entrepreneurship and its talented people.

The Economic Development Strategy integrates with a number of key focus areas of the Corporate Plan, namely ‘a city with a thriving economy’. The headline target for this key focus area is ‘By 2020, we are the employment destination of choice with the most diverse and rewarding local employment’.

The report is relevant to the entire Gold Coast region. The report is Gold Coast City Council’s plan of action to promote and facilitate the Gold Coast’s sustainable economic development over the long- term, achieving high levels of growth without compromising the social, cultural and environmental attributes which are inextricably linked with the city’s economic success. The Gold Coast has historically depended on the success of the tourism and construction industries to drive its local economy. This reliance has exposed the city to vulnerabilities of a narrow economic base, being open to the vagaries of boom and bust cycles and to global impacts.

Through Council’s commitment to an Economic Development program, the Gold Coast has made significant strides over the past decade in diversifying its regional economy. However for the Gold Coast to compete effectively in a global marketplace there is no option but to embrace diversity across knowledge-based and export-oriented industries. Only with this type of diversity and balance will the city be capable of realising a competitive and sustainable economic vision for the future.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 38 Gold Coast City Events Strategy 2009-11, 2009 To provide the strategic framework to guide the Council’s efforts in gaining optimal benefits for the city through events and events attraction. Events that provide effective promotion of the city’s image and brand, economic return to a larger number of venues or localities (through attracting visitor spending), and/or have wide public participation or benefit, are generally preferred to those of more limited impact or narrow focus (e.g. trade shows, displays, concerts, conferences etc), for which funds are not usually provided from the Events Support Budget.

The strategy recognises that a series of events provides a sense of vibrancy to the city and offers opportunities to enhance the experience of visitors. North East Gold Coast land use, economic and infrastructure strategy, 2009. The purpose of the report was to identify the optimum balance between competing land uses, values and constraints in the NE Gold Coast area, and includes an infrastructure strategy to support the preferred land use pattern. The NE Gold Coast area is approximately 17,250 ha of land bound by the Logan River to the north, the Pacific Motorway to the west, Yawalpah Road and the Urban Footprint boundary to the south, and southern Moreton Bay to the east.

The NE Gold Coast area is approximately 17,250 ha of land bound by the Logan River to the north, the Pacific Motorway to the west, Yawalpah Road and the Urban Footprint boundary to the south, and southern Moreton Bay to the east.

Central Southport Master Plan, 2009 This strategic planning document identifies and responds to key issues for Southport through individual strategies for the built, social, economic, natural environment, heritage, transport and urban infrastructure. The Central Southport Master Plan is the first stage of an integrated planning project being undertaken by GCCC to revitalise central Southport. Southport is a principal regional activity centre within SEQ and forms part of a network of centres in Gold Coast City. As a major centre for employment, Southport is a key focus for government administration functions and is supported by significant retail, commercial, health care, education, community, recreation and personal services together with residential development.

Southport is connected to other parts of the city by an arterial road, public transport and modes of active travel. Gold Coast City Local Disaster Management Plan, 2010 To detail the arrangements for coordination and management of resources, and ensure and maintain safety in the Gold Coast community prior to, during and after a disaster. The plan ensures there is a consistent approach to disaster management for the region. The plan identifies potential hazards and risks in the Gold Coast area, identifies steps to mitigate these risks, and presents strategies to enact should a hazard impact and cause a disaster.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 39 Bicycle Network Operational Plan, 2008 The overall objective is to provide a comprehensive bicycle network throughout the city in order to offer a feasible and safe transport alternative and improve recreational opportunities. A proposed budget of a total capital expenditure of $18.4 Million over a 5 year works program, with the potential to increase match funding from SEQ Principal Cycle Network Plan with an additional $18.1 Million. Combining the GCCC Revenue and the SEQ Principal Cycle Network Plan funding provides a substantial total 5 year budget of $36.5 Million for the bikeway projects.

Opportunities for bicycle network integration coinciding with the implementation of other transport infrastructure projects, including DTMR projects, are to be continually identified to maximise the benefits for the community and avoid the need for Council to construct bicycle facilities retrospectively (at additional cost). Climate Change Strategy 2009-2014, 2009 Sets out Council’s approach to managing climate change on the Gold Coast – setting direction and enabling action. The nature of the Gold Coast – its location, growth, development and demand for services – makes its exposure to climate change particularly unique.

Protection of natural assets, strengthening the economy, population growth and building sustainable communities are some of the city’s biggest challenges. These challenges are all affected by the potential impact of climate change. The document identifies how the region can contribute toward addressing climate change at the local level.

Natural Area Management Plans (7 Reports) Various dates To provide a framework that governs the development and delivery of all management programs and actions affecting particular natural areas on the Gold Coast. Natural areas are important environmental assets for the Gold Coast and provide opportunities for nature-based recreation. Council seeks to protect and manage these areas sustainability through natural area management plans. Nature Conservation Strategy 2009-19, 2009 To set out the overarching vision for nature conservation planning, management and its implementation throughout the Gold Coast.

The strategic objective of the strategy is to conserve the city’s biodiversity and natural assets through Council’s overarching and strong commitment to protecting, managing and restoring a diverse, connected and viable conservation network across public and private lands. The strategy demonstrates GCCC’s ongoing and increasing commitment to conserving the city’s natural values. It is a revision of the benchmark 1998 strategy which mapped the city’s natural values for the first time and established Council’s conservation initiatives.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 40 GCCC Youth Plan 2007-09, 2007 To provide an overarching framework for an effective response to the needs and aspirations of young people on the Gold Coast, within the scope of the roles and responsibilities of local government. The plan incorporates a detailed implementation plan. The implementation specifies action to be taken by various Council directorates, branches and officers. Budget and timeframes are also identified in the implementation plan.

Gold Coast Tourism Annual Report 2008/09, 2009 To report on Gold Coast Tourism’s operations for the year of 2008/09.

Tourism directly contributes $4.2 billion into the Gold Coast economy annually and accounts for 19,000 full time equivalent jobs in the city. Their strategies and activities are developed in consultation with the local industry, local council, state and national tourism bodies, national and international travel trade and other industry partners. Gold Coast Tourism delivers a united approach to destination marketing when it facilitates member participation on missions to overseas source markets. The objective of the collaborative approach is to showcase the Gold Coast as a destination and its individual assets to business and leisure tourism influencers in target markets.

Participating members gain face to face contact with travel trade, retail and wholesale product managers, media and associated tourism industry personnel allowing ongoing marketing and sales activities in key cities in the elected countries. The economic priority at this level is to diversify the economy so it is not so wholly reliant on the tourist and construction industries. Diversification will ensure a strong economy in the long-term that would be less susceptible to impacts caused by fluctuating tourist and construction industries. Job creation is now to be focused in the knowledge-based and export-oriented industries, as a way of improving the region’s the global competiveness and image as serious place to do business.

There is a clear direction to protect more land for nature conservation and recreation for the community. Multiple documents highlighted the goal of doubling the amount of native vegetation cover in the region and expanding the network of open space and parklands. This is not only beneficial in an environmental sense but also in a social sense. The creation and promotion of open space and parklands encourages the community to adopt a more active and healthy lifestyle. There is a need for the community to change its attitudes and behaviours toward public transport. For the region to become more sustainable, alternatives to car dependent travel need to be embraced.

These alternatives already exists (e.g. the bus, heavy passenger rail and bicycle network) and there are plans to further enhance these services. The future light rail (Stage 1 between Southport and Broadbeach) will be completed in 2014. These alternatives require support by the local community if the region is to achieve sustainability goals adopted by the State and local governments. Community wellbeing is an important issue at the local level. There is a need for greater resources at the local level to assist people with disabilities and disadvantaged persons, particularly the young and homeless.

There is also a desire to encourage more volunteering amongst the community, which would benefit work in the social and environmental spheres.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 41 Issues Identified at the Local level Issues Economic  Achieving long-term economic security through diversification  Focusing job creation in the knowledge-based and export-oriented industries  Improving integration between business and residential activities  Ensuring efficient sequencing of development and infrastructure  Increasing the number of visitors to, and expenditure in the city – with particular focus on attracting residents from a 350km catchment  Ensuring the Gold Coast continues to host major events  Recognising the value of good design and innovation Environment  Sustainably managing growth  Protecting more land for nature conservation and recreation  Protecting important environmental assets through natural asset management plans  Improving and expanding the network of open space and parklands  Doubling the amount of native vegetation cover  The need to improve biodiversity protection  Investing in projects to improve public transport and road networks and reduce congestion  Incorporating water saving features and water sensitive urban design into new developments  Undertaking research into climate change, specific to the Gold Coast  Ensuring that the city’s waste management strategy is prepared to accommodate ageing infrastructure  Addressing the unsustainable nature of the current landfill practices  Mitigating impacts of flood, bushfire and landslide hazards on development  Managing development involving acid sulphate soils  Protecting air quality Social  Promoting sustainable lifestyles and living choices  Increasing public transport usage (including changing attitudes and behaviours toward public transport)  Investing in the expansion of the cycle network  Reducing car dependency  Investing in road projects to improve road safety  Creating and promoting quality open space and recreational areas for the community  Creating a healthy and active community  Increasing community participation in sports and recreation  Increasing awareness about climate change on the Gold Coast  Kerbing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions  Concerns about a lack of housing supply for disadvantaged persons  Improving access to community facilities and employment  Ensuring the supply of skilled labour meets local business requirements  Increasing the level of volunteering in the community  Focusing on prevention and early intervention strategies  Supporting youth on the Gold Coast (e.g.

youth programs and youth accommodation)  Supporting actions to reduce homelessness  Meeting regional population and dwelling targets  Addressing car parking needs across the city  Supporting the revitalisation of central Southport  Supporting the establishment of the Coomera Town Centre  Ensuring that the community is prepared for disaster events  Protecting cultural heritage values in the north east Gold Coast associated with sugarcane land  Protecting cultural heritage values associated with the former Coolangatta School  Corporate governance (e.g. ensuring responsible decision-making and leadership, collaborating with the community, quality customer service, supporting cultural development and public art) Figure 3: Issues identified at the Local level

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 42 Summary Figure 4 graphically presents the key issues identified above.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region – Appendix A Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc. 43 ENVIRONMENT  Investing in expanding the cycling network  Improving opportunities for, and empowering, people with disabilities  Concerns about adequately catering for the needs of an ageing population  Creating and promoting quality open space and recreational areas  Providing quality early childhood education facilities  Increasing the level of trade, training and tertiary qualifications in the community  Investing in road projects to improve road safety  Supplying land and housing to the market in a timely and cost effective manner  Concerns about a lack of housing supply for youth and disadvantaged persons  Focusing on prevention and early intervention strategies  Regulating development near State significant airports and aviation facilities  Establishing quality telecommunications and internet services  Ensuring the community is prepared for disaster events  Supporting establishment of Coomera Town Centre  Supporting revitalisation of central Southport  Ensuring the supply of skilled labour meets local business requirements  Protecting the landscape values of rural areas  Sustainably managing water supplies  Investigating new water supply options  Reducing marine wildlife stranding and mortality  Managing development involving acid sulphate soils  Addressing the unsustainable nature of current landfill practices  Improving and expanding network of open space and parklands  Protecting more land for nature conservation and recreation  Reducing the carbon footprint by reducing car and electricity usage  Supporting appropriate land uses in the north-eastern part of the Gold Coast  Supporting appropriate marine infrastructure in southern Moreton Bay  Supporting land use density and mix around heavy and light rail stations  Ensuring waste management system can accommodate ageing infrastructure  Supporting appropriate management of the coastal zone  Mitigating impacts of flood, bushfire and landslide hazards on development  Investing in projects to improve public transport and road networks and reduce congestion  Protecting environmental assets through natural asset management plans Figure 4: Summary  Encouraging more Australians to pursue careers through education and training  Focusing job creation in the knowledge-based and export oriented industries  Creating a strong economy through infrastructure that anticipates growth  Diversifying the Gold Coast economy  Encouraging more research, development and innovation in business  Increasing employment for diversity groups  Protecting State significant extractive resources  Protecting strategic cropping land  Concerns about the fiscal burdens of an ageing population  Improving opportunities for, and empowering, people with disabilities  Improving the integration between business and residential activities  Ensuring efficient sequencing of development and infrastructure  Enhancing the global competitiveness of major cities  Recognising the value of good design and innovation  Ensuring the Gold Coast continues to host major events  Increasing visitor numbers and expenditure in the city  Supporting the recreational marine industry  Investing in infrastructure to create new jobs  Supporting community volunteers  Expanding healthcare services  Increasing participation in medium to high physical activities  Improving the liveability of major cities  Addressing social exclusion and inequality  Changing attitudes and behaviours toward public transport  Corporate governance (Gold Coast City Council)  Addressing car parking needs across the city  Creating a healthy and active community  Meeting regional population and dwelling target  Protecting cultural heritage values  Increasing awareness about climate change  Supporting actions to reduce homelessness  Improving the sustainability of major cities  Improving the productivity of major cities  Sustainably managing growth  Protecting air quality  Protecting koalas and their habitat  Supporting research into climate change impacts on Gold Coast  Doubling the amount of vegetation cover  Improving biodiversity protection ECONOMIC SOCIAL

References Documents National level documents Author/owner Title Date Links Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 2010: Australian jobs 2010 http://www.deewr.gov.au/Employment/Re searchStatistics/Documents/AustralianJobs .pdf Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Shut out: The experience of people with disabilities and their families in Australia 2009 http://www.fahcsia.gov.au/sa/disability/pu bs/policy/community_consult/Documents/ NDS_report.pdf Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs The way forward: A new disability policy framework for Australia 2009 http://www.fahcsia.gov.au/sa/disability/pu bs/policy/way_forward/Documents/dig_re port_19oct09.pdf Department of Health and Ageing Australian sport: The pathway to success 2010 http://www.ausport.gov.au/__data/assets /pdf_file/0011/368597/Australian_Sport_t he_pathway_to_success.pdf Infrastructure Australia State of Australian Cities 2010 2010 http://www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/ files/MCU_SOAC.pdf The Treasury Australia to 2050: Future challenges 2010 http://www.treasury.gov.au/igr/igr2010/re port/pdf/IGR_2010.pdf State level documents Author/owner Title Date Links Queensland Council of Social Service Regional QCOSS Forum Report: Gold Coast 2010 http://www.qcoss.org.au/upload/7101__2 010%20Gold%20Coast%20Report.pdf Queensland Council of Social Service QCOSS Social Policy Forum Report 2009 2009 http://www.qcoss.org.au/upload/4949__S ocial%20Policy%20Forum%20Report%2020 09.pdf Department of Education and Training Strategic Plan 2010-2014 2010 http://deta.qld.gov.au/publications/strateg ic/pdf/strategic-plan-10-14.pdf Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation SPP 2/07: Protection of extractive resources 2007 http://www.dme.qld.gov.au/mines/state_ planning_policy.cfm Department of Infrastructure and Planning SEQ Regional Plan 2009- 2031 2009 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/regional- planning/regional-plan-2009-2031.html Department of Infrastructure and Planning SEQ Infrastructure Plan and Program 2010-2031 2010 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/seqipp Department of Infrastructure and Planning Delivering the Queensland Housing Affordability Strategy: Greenfield land supply in SEQ 2008 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/resources/tem p/housing_affordability_greenfield_land_s upply.pdf Department of Infrastructure and Planning North East Gold Coast land use, economic and infrastructure strategy 2009 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/regional- planning/north-east-gold-coast-study.html Department of Infrastructure and Planning SPP 1/02: Development in the vicinity of certain airports and aviation facilities 2002 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/docs/ipa/spp1_ 02.pdf Department of Infrastructure and Planning SPP 1/03: Mitigating the adverse impacts of flood, bushfire and landslide 2003 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/docs/ipa/SPP_I FBL.pdf Source: RDA Gold Coast Context and Appraisal Report.

Parsons Brinkerhoff

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 45 Department of Infrastructure and Planning SPP 1/07: Housing and residential development 2007 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/docs/ipa/Form s/Policies/StatePlanPolicyDocV5.pdf Department of Infrastructure and Planning Active Trails: A strategy for regional trails in SEQ 2007 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/resources/plan /SEQ/Active_Trails_Strategy.pdf Department of Infrastructure and Planning SEQ Regional Outdoor Recreation Strategy: Discussion paper for public comment 2007 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/resources/plan /SEQ/SEQRORS_Discussion_Paper_07.pdf Department of Infrastructure and Planning Strategic cropping land: Policy and planning discussion paper 2010 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/resources/plan ning/planning/strategic-cropping-land- discussion-paper.pdf Department of Infrastructure and Planning Draft Queensland Greenspace Strategy for public comments 2010 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/resources/plan /greenspace/draft-greenspace-strategy.pdf Department of Infrastructure and Planning Southern Moreton Bay Marine Infrastructure Master Plan Study Under devel op- ment http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/news-media- and-events/study-to-look-at- infrastructure-needs-of-boaties-and- marine-industries.html Department of Public Works Queensland Telecommunications Strategic Framework 2009-12 2008 http://qgcio.qld.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocu ments/Strategies/Queensland_Telecommu nications_Strategic_Framework.pdf Department of Transport and Main Roads Roads Implementation Plan 2009/10-2013/14 2009 http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/About- us/Corporate- information/Publications/Roads- Implementation-Program.aspx Department of Transport and Main Roads Integrated Regional Transport Plan for SEQ 1997 http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Projects/Name /S/South-East-Queensland-Integrated- Regional-Transport-Plan-1997.aspx Department of Transport and Main Roads Draft Connecting SEQ 2031: An Integrated Regional Transport Plan for SEQ 2010 http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Projects/Name /C/Connecting-SEQ-2031.aspx Queensland Health Strategic Plan 2007-2012 2007 http://www.health.qld.gov.au/publications /corporate/QHstratplan2007_2012/QHStra tPlan07_12.pdf Department of Environment and Resource Management SEQ Natural Resource Management Plan 2009- 31 2009 http://www.seqcatchments.com.au/_weba pp_145854/SEQ_NRM_plan Department of Environment and Resource Management Marine wildlife stranding and mortality database: Annual Report 2007 (Dugong) 2007 http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/register/p02 634aa.pdf Department of Environment and Resource Management Marine wildlife stranding and mortality database: Annual Report 2007 (Cetacean & Pinniped) 2007 http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/register/p02 635aa.pdf Department of Environment and Resource Management Concept paper: Great walks of Queensland: Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk 2002 http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/register/p01 284aa.pdf Department of Environment and Resource Management SPP 2/10: Koala Conservation in SEQ 2010 http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/wildlife- ecosystems/wildlife/koalas/koala_crisis_re sponse_strategy/state_planning_policy.ht ml Department of Environment and Resource Management SPP 1/92: Development and the conservation of agricultural land 1992 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/docs/ipa/spp1_ 92.pdf Department of Environment and Resource Management SPP 2/02: Planning and managing development 2002 http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/docs/ipa/ass_s

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 46 involving acid sulphate soils pp_oct_02.pdf Department of Environment and Resource Management State Coastal Management Plan 2002 http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/environment al_management/coast_and_oceans/coasta l_management/state_coastal_managemen t_plan/ Department of Environment and Resource Management Draft State Coast Management Plan 2009 http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/coastalplan/i ndex.html Department of Environment and Resource Management SEQ Regional Coastal Management Plan 2006 http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/environment al_management/coast_and_oceans/coasta l_management/regional_coastal_manage ment_plans/southeast_queensland_coast/ southeast_queensland_regional_coastal_m anagement_plan.html Queensland Water Commission SEQ Water Strategy 2010 http://www.qwc.qld.gov.au/myfiles/uploa ds/SEQWS%20-%20July%2010/SEQWS%20- %20full.pdf Marine Queensland Queensland’s Recreational Marine Industry: Annual Report 2009 http://businessgc.com.au/uploads/file/Mar ine/Queensland%20Marine%20Industry_A nnual%20Report_2009.pdf Department of Premier and Cabinet Toward Q2: Tomorrow’s Queensland 2008 http://www.thepremier.qld.gov.au/library/ pdf/tomorrow/Towards_Q2_Tomorrows_ Queensland.pdf Local level documents Author/owner Title Date Links Gold Coast City Council Corporate Plan 2009-14 2009 http://www.boldfuture.com.au/corporate- plan/index.html Gold Coast City Council Operational Plan 2009-10 2009 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/opplancommbudget09.pd f Gold Coast City Council Bold Future Vision ‘How we got there…’ 2009 http://www.boldfuture.com.au/ Gold Coast City Council Draft Local Agenda 21 Undat ed http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/environment/20020120_la21.pdf Gold Coast City Council Draft Local Growth Management Strategy and Planning Report 2007 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd2.aspx?pid=6789 Gold Coast City Council Gold Coast Planning Scheme 2003 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd.aspx?pid=1395 Gold Coast City Council Our Living City Report 2005-06 2007 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd2.aspx?pid=2267 Gold Coast City Council Business Gold Coast 2020: Gold Coast City Economic Development Strategy 2010 Not available to the public Gold Coast City Council Gold Coast City Events Strategy 2009-11 2009 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/events_strategy _2009-11.pdf Gold Coast City Council Central Southport Master Plan 2009 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd.aspx?pid=8829 Gold Coast City Council Draft Amendment – Coomera Town Centre Structure Plan (Draft for Second State Interest Check) 2010 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd2.aspx?pid=7362 Gold Coast City Council Gold Coast City Local Disaster Management 2010 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/disaster_management_pl

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 47 Plan an.pdf Gold Coast City Council Bicycle Network Operational Plan 2008 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd.aspx?pid=8007 Gold Coast City Council Whole of City Vehicle Parking Strategy 2004 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd.aspx?pid=3994#strategy Gold Coast City Council Gold Coast City Transport Plan 1999-2030 1998 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/t_standa rd.aspx?pid=7644 Gold Coast City Council Solid Waste Management Strategy: 2020 Vision on Waste 2002 http://www.greengc.com.au/uploads/2020 %20Vision%20on%20Waste%20Strategy.p df Gold Coast City Council Gold Coast Water Future Strategy 2006-56 (now part of Allconnex) 2006 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/goldcoastwater/GCWF_strategy_overv iew_Sep07.pdf Gold Coast City Council Pimpama Coomera Waterfuture Master Plan (now part of Allconnex) 2005 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/enewslet ters/gcw_pimpama_coomera/200804_gcw _pc_online.html Gold Coast City Council Information & Communication Technology Strategy 2005-10 2006 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/ict_strategy_200 5-10.pdf Gold Coast City Council Climate Change Strategy 2009-2014 2009 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/climate_change_ strategy.pdf Gold Coast City Council Natural Area Management Plans (7 Reports) Variou s dates http://www.gcparks.com.au/parks.aspx?pa ge=97 Gold Coast City Council Nature Conservation Strategy 2009-19 2009 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/nature_conservation_stra tegy_.pdf Gold Coast City Council Our Natural Playground Parks Strategy 2007 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/our_natural_playground07_full.pdf Gold Coast City Council Beenleigh and Sugarcane Land: Heritage and Character Study 2007 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent%5Ccultural%5Cbeenleigh_and_sugarca ne_land_study.pdf Gold Coast City Council Conservation Management Plan: Former Coolangatta State & Special School, Kirra Hill 2007 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/cultural/coolangatta_chapter1-2.pdf Gold Coast City Council Gold Coast Cultural Development Policy and Strategy 2008 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/cultural/gccc_cultural_policy_strategy.

pdf Gold Coast City Council Gold Coast Public Art Policy 2007 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/public_art_policy.pdf Gold Coast City Council Language Services Policy 2005 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/people_and_communities/language_s ervices_policy.pdf Gold Coast City Council GCCC Youth Plan 2007-09 2007 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/forms/2007_youth_plan.pdf Gold Coast City Council Advocacy Strategy 2006: Building a Sustainable City 2006 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/advocacy_strate gy_2006.pdf Gold Coast City Council People Management Strategy 2006 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/people_manage ment_strategy.pdf Gold Coast City Council Asset Management Strategy (Infrastructure & Land) 2010-15 2010 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/asset- management-strategy.pdf Gold Coast City Council Housing for All of Us: A Strategy for GCCC 2005 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/strategy_housin gforallofus.pdf Gold Coast City Council Young People’s Housing in Gold Coast City 2001 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/pb346_housing_young_p

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 48 eople.pdf Gold Coast City Council A background study for the GCCC Housing Policy and Strategy 2001 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/pb347_housing_gold_coa st.pdf Gold Coast City Council Our invisible community: People homeless in Gold Coast City 2004 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/socialresearch/social_res earch_studies_17_peoplehomeless.pdf Gold Coast City Council Customer Contact Strategy 2010-2020 2010 http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/attachm ent/publications/strategy/customer- contact-strategy.pdf Gold Coast Airport QAL Annual Report 2009 2009 http://www.qldairports.com.au/pdf/QAL_ Annual_Report_2009.pdf Gold Coast Tourism Gold Coast Tourism Annual Report 2008/09 2009 http://www.verygoldcoast.com.au/Portals/ 0/assets/PDF/GCT%20AR%200809.pdf Volunteering Services Gold Coast Annual Report 2009 2009 http://www.volunteeringgc.com.au/annual -reports.html

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 49 Appendix B – Regional Profile The Gold Coast is located in South East Queensland, 80km south of the State capital Brisbane. Unlike other RDA regions in Australia where a single RDA region may cover multiple local government areas, the RDA Gold Coast region covers a single local government area – Gold Coast City. The region is shown the following Figure. Figure 1. South East Queensland: Regional Development Australia Regions Source: Regional Development Australia, 2010

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 50 Demographic Overview Indigenous Population The 2006 census recorded 4,563 indigenous people within the city, which comprised 1.1% of the city’s total population.

This proportion was considerably lower that the State proportion at that time, which was 3.3%. Country of birth and proficiency in English At the time of the 2006 census, there were 109,260 persons in Gold Coast City who stated they were born overseas. This accounted for just over one quarter of the population. Of those overseas-born residents 72.6% speak English as their only language. This is compared to the State where 17.9% of the population stated they were born overseas, with 68.2% speaking English only. This is shown below.

Figure 2. Mean Annual Climate Data for Gold Coast Region Born in Australia Born overseas English speaking only Speaks other languages at home Gold Coast 66.0% 25.5% 72.6% 26.9% Queensland 75.2% 17.9% 68.2% 31.3% Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (reproduced by Office of Economic and Statistical Research, 2011) The top 8 non-English languages spoken at home on the Gold Coast are Japanese (highest), Mandarin, Italian, Cantonese, German, Korean, French and Spanish. Social Characteristics The following social characteristics of the Gold Coast are based on data sourced from the Vulnerability Assessment for Mortgage, Petrol and Inflation Risks Expenditure Index (VAMPIRE Index) and the Socio-economic Indexes for Australia (SEIFA).

VAMPIRE Index The Vulnerability Assessment for Mortgage, Petrol and Inflation Risks Expenditure Index (VAMPIRE Index) is a composite measure that identifies areas that would be socio- economically most affected by rising fuel prices and general price inflation. The index includes the following variables:  car dependence – the proportion of households that have 2 or more cars; and the proportion of those working who undertook a journey to work by car, either as a driver or passenger;

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 51  income level – median gross weekly household income; and  mortgages – proportion of dwellings that are being purchased, either through a mortgage or a rent/buy scheme.

The areas of analysis receive a score between 0 and 5 for each variable depending upon their percentile. The scores are then weighted to reflect the variable’s relative importance, with income and mortgages receiving a 33.3% weight each and the two variables reflecting car dependence sharing a 33.3% weighting. The product of this weighting is a maximum VAMPIRE score of up to 30. In general a score of below 15 is considered as ‘low vulnerability’, while a score of above 17 is considered ‘high vulnerability’.

It is understood that originally VAMPIRE was used to calculate vulnerability for areas within Australian cities only. However for the purposes of this exercise, the analysis was extended to the entire country to provide a score for hinterland (and rural/remote) areas that are located on the western fringe of the Gold Coast local government area. Results of the analysis show two key patterns: 1. Low vulnerability – The narrow coastal strip from Main Beach in the north to Palm Beach and even as far as Coolangatta in the south show low levels of vulnerability. This is principally driven by fewer households having 2 or more cars and a comparatively small proportion of dwellings that are mortgaged (e.g.

the residents are likely to be renters). In areas along this coastal strip where greater proportions of households have 2 or more cars and have mortgaged dwellings (as owner occupiers), income levels are generally higher to offset this increased vulnerability.

2. High vulnerability – The hinterland areas, from Ormeau-Yatala to Currumbin display high levels of vulnerability. In these areas there are a large proportion of dwellings that are mortgaged and a very high level of car dependence with many households owning 2 or more cars and using them to drive to work. In essence this pattern highlights the spatial separation of the ‘dormitory’ areas in the western hinterland from the economic hubs such as Surfers Paradise, Southport and Robina (which also showed low vulnerability) in the coastal east of the city. SEIFA The Socio-economic Indexes for Australia (SEIFA) is a suite of 4 summary measures that have been created from 2006 Census information.

The indexes can be used to explore different aspects of socio-economic conditions by geographic areas. Of the four indexes, the Index of Relative Socio-economic Advantage and Disadvantage (IRSAD) is used for this discussion. IRSAD provides a continuum of advantage (high values) to disadvantage (low values) which is derived from Census variables such as household with low income and people with a tertiary education. A value of 1000 represents the national average.

The spatial pattern of the IRSAD is almost paradoxical to that of VAMPIRE, reflecting each index’s inherent variables, assumptions and the uses for which they have been developed. Under the IRSAD, the hinterland areas of the Gold Coast such as Kingsholme-Upper Coomera, Worongary and Mudgeeraba all display relatively high levels of affluence, which is likely to be

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 52 connected to higher levels of household income, higher proportions of dwellings being purchased and lower levels of unemployment.

Similar to its more favourable VAMPIRE Index scores, the area surrounding Robina was also identified as an area of relative affluence as was the coastal strip around Broadbeach. In contrast, areas such as Palm Beach, Southport and Surfers Paradise, which were identified as having low vulnerability, were also relatively less affluent. This is a reflection of the variables used in the 2 indexes. Although lower household income is considered as a negative in both indexes, high levels of renting, which characterises these areas, are considered as ‘favourable’ under the VAMPIRE Index, however they are negatives under IRSAD.

Equally, higher levels of unemployment in these areas also serve to lower their relative affluence. In comparison to the rest of the State, the Gold Coast has a relatively good socio-economic profile. For this comparison the Australian Bureau of Statistics establishes 5 quintiles. Quintile 1 represents those most disadvantaged and Quintile 5 represents those least disadvantaged. By definition, Queensland has 20% of the population in each quintile. The following Figure shows that within the Gold Coast, only 9.8% of the population are within the most disadvantaged quintile, and 29.3% and 18.6% of the population are within the two least disadvantaged quintiles.

Figure 3. Socio-Economic Index of Disadvantage (2006) Quintile 1 Most disadvanta ge 2 3 4 Quintile 5 Least disadvantage G C 9.8% 19.9% 22.4% 29.3% 18.6% Q L D 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (reproduced by Office of Economic and Statistical Research, 2011) Industry and Occupation Typical of a service-based economy, the largest employment sectors in Gold Coast City are retail trade, construction, and accommodation and food services. Figure 4. Employment by Industry as a % of Labour Force, 2006 Gold Coast City Queensl and Retail trade 13.9 12.0 Construction 12.4 9.3 Accommodation and food services 10.4 7.2 Manufacturing 9.4 10.1 Health care and social assistance 9.3 10.5 Education and training 6.4 7.8

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 53 Professional, scientific and technical services 5.7 5.8 Wholesale trade 4.1 4.1 Other services 4.1 3.8 Public administration and safety 4.0 6.9 Administrative and support services 3.8 3.1 Transport, postal and warehousing 3.8 5.2 Rental, hiring and real estate services 3.4 2.1 Financial and insurance services 3.1 2.9 Arts and recreation services 3.0 1.4 Information media and telecommunications 2.0 1.5 Electricity, gas, water and waste services 0.5 1.0 Agriculture, forestry and fishing 0.5 3.5 Mining 0.3 1.7 Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (reproduced by Office of Economic and Statistical Research, 2011) The top three occupations for workers in Gold Coast City are technicians and trade workers, professionals, and clerical and administrative workers.

Figure 5. Employment by Occupation, 2006 (%) Gold Coast City Queensland Technicians and trades workers 16.5 15.4 Professionals 15.3 17.1 Clerical and administrative workers 14.7 14.8 Sales workers 13.5 10.4 Managers 12.5 12.4 Labourers 10.7 11.9 Community and personal service workers 9.8 9.1 Machinery operators and drivers 5.0 7.2 Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (reproduced by Office of Economic and Statistical Research, 2011) Geography Climate The Gold Coast enjoys a sub-tropical climate with an average of 287 days of sunshine each year. Typically the warmest months of the year are January and February and the coolest is July.

The maximum rainfall months are February and March and the driest run from July

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 54 through to September. The average summer temperatures are 19 to 29°C and the average winter temperatures are 9 to 21°C. Transport Infrastructure Roads The Gold Coast is located 80 km south of Brisbane, and is approximately a 50 minute drive from Brisbane on the Pacific Motorway. The Pacific Motorway is a national highway and continues south into New South Wales. The Gold Coast region is serviced by 29 State- controlled road networks which connect major urban and rural centres inside and outside the region, including the Pacific Motorway.

State-controlled roads are managed by the Department of Transport and Main Road (DTMR). An extensive local road network exists within the region, managed by Gold Coast City Council.

Public Transport Surfside Buslines provides the principal public transport for the Gold Coast and Tweed Shire. These buses service operates between Coomera in Queensland to Pottsville in New South Wales. The bus network traditionally serviced established urban areas and the ‘coastal tourist strip’ between Southport and Coolangatta. However the network has been expanding to reach growing outer-lying urban areas such as Coomera. Heavy rail passenger trains run at regular intervals from Brisbane to the Gold Coast, with local bus connections available at all stations. Bus connections to Surfers Paradise are available from Helensvale, Nerang and Robina stations.

The heavy rail passenger line has recently been extended to Varsity Lakes and will ultimately connect south to Coolangatta. The Varsity Lakes to Elanora southern extension is planned for completion by 2026 and the Elanora to Coolangatta southern extension by 2031. The public transport network is managed by TransLink.

The Gold Coast Rapid Transit project is currently under construction and this light rail project aims to reduce congestion and improve public transport services for the region. The first stage of the project will be delivered in 2014, and will link the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct at Southport, to Broadbeach via the centres of Southport and Surfers Paradise. The light rail will be integrated with the other public transport modes in terms of scheduling and ticketing system. Achieving connectivity throughout the region, and into its neighbours, is a priority. The east-west axis of the region connects the major residential areas of the region, on its western edge, with the majority of the commercial employment floorspace located within Bundall, Southport, Surfers Paradise and Robina.

Investment in public transport is needed to link where people live with where they work, reducing reliance on private transport and delivering positive social and environmental outcomes.

Improved east west connectivity also has the potential to open access to tourism opportunities within the region’s hinterland – expanding the sea experience to include a green experience. The Gold Coast hinterland potential as a tourist attractor needs to be better understood and explored.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 55 The north-south axis connects the region with neighbouring Brisbane and northern NSW, as well as linking the multiple commercial and tourist destinations and the eastern fringe of the region.

Investments such as extending the railway line to the Airport at Coolangatta will reduce reliance on private vehicles, while imaginative initiatives such as bicycle and pedestrian path linking the region’s eastern seaboard would not only offer improved residential amenity, but could also be used to attract the fast growing market of cycling related tourism. Airports and airfields The region is serviced by the Gold Coast International Airport at Coolangatta, owned and managed by Queensland Airports Ltd. The airport has frequent domestic services to/from Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Hobart, and international services to/from New Zealand, Japan and Asia.

Brisbane’s domestic and international airports are also accessible from the Gold Coast via the Pacific Motorway and heavy passenger rail line.

The Southport Aerodrome (Mason Field) at Arundel and Heck Airfield at Jacobs cater for the recreational flying and gliding community. A number of heliports also exist in the region. Waterways The Gold Coast is well known for its extensive waterway network of rivers, creeks, lakes and canals. These waterways are used for recreational purposes and enjoyed for their aesthetic value. Some 480 km of rivers and streams as well as 774 hectares of lakes, dams and canals wind their way through the region’s landscape. The major waterways within the region are described in the following Figure.

Figure 6.

Gold Coast Waterways Waterway Total Catchment Area Stream Network Length Local Government Area(s) Logan River 3,076 km 2 5,486 km Ipswich, Scenic Rim, Logan, Brisbane, Gold Coast Albert River 786 km 2 1,691 km Scenic Rim, Gold Coast Pimpama River 171 km 2 389 km Gold Coast Coomera River 489 km 2 928 km Scenic Rim, Gold Coast Nerang River 498 km 2 928 km Scenic Rim, Gold Coast Tallebudgera Creek 110 km 2 219 km Gold Coast Currumbin Creek 48 km 2 126 km Gold Coast Source: Healthy Waterways, 2010 Natural Resources The north-eastern part of the Gold Coast is particularly known for its contribution towards agriculture.

Despite this part of the region containing other uses such as rural and urban residential, extractive and marine industry, the agriculture in this area is worth approximately

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 56 $25 million annually. This is distributed across the three main industry sectors of sugarcane, plant nurseries and animal production. National Parks Lamington National Park Part of the Lamington National Park falls within the Gold Coast region near Binna Burra, with the balance contained within Scenic Rim immediately west of the Gold Coast region. Declared in 1915, Lamington National Park covers 20,590 hectares of densely forested valleys and ranges rising to more than 1,100 m on the crest of the McPherson Range, which marks the Queensland/New South Wales border.

The park is part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area, which includes the most extensive areas of subtropical rainforest in the world, most of the world's warm temperate rainforest and nearly all of the Antarctic beech (Nothofagus moorei) cool temperate rainforest.

Springbrook National Park Springbrook National Park covers 6,197 hectares and comprises of 4 sections – Springbrook plateau, Mount Cougal to the east and Natural Bridge and Numinbah to the west. The park contains subtropical and temperate rainforest, open eucalypt forest and montane heath. It is also within the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Burleigh Heads National Park Burleigh Heads National Park covers 27 hectares and is located at Burleigh Heads, immediately north of Tallebudgera Creek. The park contains rainforest, eucalypt forest, pandanus groves, tussock grassland, coastal heath, mangroves, creeks, rocky foreshore and beaches, and is described as a living museum and habitat for many rare species.

Nerang National Park Nerang National Park covers approximately 1,700 hectares and is located to the north-west of Nerang. The park is a popular bush retreat, containing dry rainforest and open eucalypt forests. Facilities are provided for bushwalking, mountain biking and horse riding. The park is largely undeveloped and provides a green backdrop to the township of Nerang. History and culture The Gold Coast was first inhabited by Indigenous people more than 6,000 years ago. Indigenous, cultural and archaeological sites are only partially documented for the region. Known sites include a bora ring at Burleigh Heads and middens on South Stradbroke Island.

European settlement on the Gold Coast is relatively recent and many of the original landmarks and buildings have been replaced or altered. However there are 17 buildings and 15 sites/items listed as having heritage value by either the National Trust or the State Heritage Register, and 33 local heritage places identified by Gold Coast City Council. The first Europeans visiting the area for any extended period were timber getters. Cattle stations were later established in the 1860s, which gradually changed into small sugar, cotton and dairy farms. The following 100 years saw timber milling out of the hinterland and

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 57 successful produce farming in avocado and bananas. The benefits of sea bathing were recognised by Brisbane residents and the fabric of Gold Coast living began to evolve. Today the Gold Coast hosts many cultural and sporting events. The Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre at Broadbeach is the largest regional convention centre in Australia. The centre holds exhibitions, trade shows, conventions, concerts and sporting events. Skilled Park located at Robina is a 27,400 seat sports stadium and is the home ground of NRL club Gold Coast Titans and new football (soccer) club Gold Coast United.

The Carrara Sporting Complex is the second largest sporting venue in the region with a capacity for 18,000 people across both indoor and outdoor facilities. The Carrara Stadium has recently been redeveloped to accommodate 25,000 seats and is the home to the new Gold Coast Suns AFL team. The Gold Coast Arts Centre is the region’s premier cultural facility, focusing on visual and performing arts. The centre houses a theatre, gallery, 2 cinemas, function rooms and small performing spaces.

Music festivals such as Big Day Out, Blues on Broadbeach, Parklife and Good Vibrations occur annually in various parklands across the region. These festivals attract thousands of residents and visitors to event venues and contribute to the local economy. For instance the Big Day Out attracted 55,000 people to the Gold Coast Parklands showground in 2009, who contributed to the local economy by spending on accommodation, travel and retail goods. Environment The region is made up of a variety of ecosystems and landscapes ranging from beaches, riverine and wetland areas, floodplains, bushlands and mountainous areas.

The region contains many National Parks, State Forests and Conservation Parks. Considerable investment is made in conservation and natural resource management at a State and local level to protect the region’s important natural assets.

Beaches and National Parks The region is renowned for its beaches and foreshores, stretching from South Stradbroke Island in the north to Rainbow Bay at the Queensland/New South Wales border. Beaches that are particularly popular for swimming, body surfing and board riding include Surfers Paradise, Kurrawa, Burleigh Heads, Currumbin, Kirra, Greenmount and Rainbow Bay. There are four major national parks located on the Gold Coast including (See Appendix for more detail):  Lamington National Park  Springbrook National Park  Burleigh Heads National Park, and  Nerang National Park

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 58 Water supply Water and wastewater supply Following the South East Queensland water reform, Allconnex Water (owned by Gold Coast, Logan and Redland City Councils) took over from Gold Coast Water in July 2010.

Allconnex is now the region’s water and wastewater service provider. Allconnex services over 850,000 customers throughout the Gold Coast, Logan and Redlands. Hinze Dam The Hinze Dam, also known as Advancetown Lake, supplies most of the region’s water. Some water is drawn from Little Nerang Dam and until recently northern suburbs received water from Wivenhoe Dam (near Ipswich). The Hinze Dam is located about 10 km south-west of Nerang and is also a popular recreational area for the region, particularly for fishing. The dam was completed in 1976 and upgraded in 1989 to a storage capacity of 161,070 million litres covering a surface area of 972 hectares.

Based on average weather and rainfall patterns, the dam provides on average 191 million litres of water each day. The catchment area for the Hinze Dam is 207 km2. The catchment area includes the Numinbah Valley and Springbrook Plateau, with approximately 77% covered by native bushland within State Forests and National Parks.

The dam is currently being upgraded to raise the dam wall from 93.5 to 108.5 metres to increase water supply to 225 million litres per day, reduce flooding in the lower Nerang River catchment, and ensure the dam complies with current safety standards and guidelines. Gold Coast Desalination Plant The Gold Coast Desalination Plant located at Tugun was a $1.2 billion Queensland Government funded initiative to supply the region with an average of 133 mega litres of fresh water per day. It includes a desalination plant, marine intake and outlet tunnels and a 25 km pipeline connecting the plant to the South East Queensland water grid.

The project supplied its first water into the grid in February 2009 (33% production) and reached 100% production in March 2009.

Education The Gold Coast has over 400 education and training providers, including 4 universities, several research centres and a number of internationally recognised training institutions. Education characteristics During the 2006 census, 51.2% of Gold Coast residents (aged 15 years and over) stated their highest level of schooling was Year 11 or 12 or equivalent. This compares to 49.5% in Queensland. Within the region, 53.2% of residents (aged 15 years and over) had a post-school qualification. Of those with a post school qualification, 21% had a bachelor degree or higher. This is shown in the following Figure.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 59 Figure 7. Highest Level of Schooling and Post School Qualification (2006) Qualification Gold Coast (%) Queensland (%) Highest level of schooling (% of total population over 15) Did not go to school, or below year 8 Year 9 or 10 (or equivalent) Year 11 or 12 (or equivalent) 5.0 32.0 51.2 7.9 32.8 49.5 Post-school qualifications Post school qualification (% of total population over 15)  Bachelor degree or higher  Advanced diploma or diploma  Certificate 53.2 21.0 14.0 35.6 50.4 26.0 13.1 35.5 Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (reproduced by Office of Economic and Statistical Research, 2010) Schools The Gold Coast region has a range of private and government education facilities offering a diverse selection of mainstream and specialist curricula.

The type and number of schools are summarised in the following Figure. Boarding is available at St Hilda’s School in Southport (girls, Years 6 to 12) and The Southport School in Southport (boys, Years 5 to 12). Figure 8. Type and Number of Schools in the Gold Coast Region Type of School Total No.

State primary schools 47 State high schools and colleges 17 Other state schools (e.g. special schools 3 Private catholic schools (primary and high schools) 13 Private independent schools (primary and high schools) 20 Source: Education Queensland, 2010 Universities Griffith University The Gold Coast campus of Griffith University, located in Southport, is the largest university campus on the Gold Coast. It offers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses in areas including information technology, health sciences/medicine, education, law, nursing, planning and architecture. The campus also contains the Queensland Academy for Health Sciences.

The campus is located within the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct, which is currently being developed and will ultimately include the Gold Coast University Hospital scheduled to open in 2013. The university has approximately 13,000 enrolled students.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 60 Bond University Bond University is a private, not-for-profit university. It is located at Robina and offers courses in business, humanities and social sciences, information technology, law, and health services. The university has approximately 4,200 enrolled students, of which 47% are international students. Southern Cross University Southern Cross University is a regional university with campuses at Lismore, Coffs Harbour, Gold Coast and Tweed Heads. The Gold Coast campus opened at the Gold Coast Airport Development Park in February 2010 and offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses in business, including a master and doctor of business administration.

Other courses offered include secondary education, social science, business, convention and event management, legal and justice studies and sport management. The University also operates two teaching facilities at nearby Tweed Heads in New South Wales.

Central Queensland University Central Queensland University (CQU) operates a number of campuses throughout Australia including the Gold Coast International Campus at Southport. The CQU Gold Coast campus caters to international students, although there are limited spaces available for full-fee paying Australian citizens and permanent residents. CQU offers a range of information technology and business-focused undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. The university currently has just over 460 enrolled students, with a capacity to reach up to 2,300 students as the university grows in the future.

Post secondary and technical education Gold Coast Institute of TAFE Gold Coast Institute of TAFE operates from 5 campuses on the Gold Coast – Ashmore, Coolangatta, Coomera, Ridgeway (Southport) and Southport.

It offers vocational education and training programs to over 16,000 enrolled students each year. Courses range from certificate to diploma and advance diploma programs, along with apprenticeship and traineeship training. The Australian Industry Trade College The Australian Industry Trade College is an independent senior school with a trade focus. It offers opportunities for young people who are choosing trades as their career to achieve a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) or commence a school based apprenticeship in their trade of choice. The college was set up as a Commonwealth initiative in response to the need for more and better quality trades-people in a growing number of industry sectors across Australia.

The Gold Coast College is one of 24 colleges around Australia. The college offers training in the construction, engineering, automotive and hospitality industries from its current Reedy Creek campus. The college is currently constructing a new Gold Coast campus at Robina and is expected to move in late 2010. The college will cater for 300 students from 2010.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 61 The College of Australian Training The College of Australian Training Pty Ltd is a registered training organisation and provides nationally recognised hospitality and hairdressing training throughout Australia. The Gold Coast campus is located at Burleigh Heads. English language schools The Gold Coast region has a number of private and government English language colleges to meet the needs of international students, visitors and the city's multicultural community. English language classes are offered by specialist language institutes to assist international students to pursue academic studies or to improve their English for work purposes.

Fulltime English classes are offered (ELICOS - English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students) as well as part-time classes in most colleges.

Other registered training institutions A registered training organisation is an organisation that can deliver recognised training and assessment, and issue qualifications and statements of attainment under the Australian Qualifications Framework. There are over 120 registered training organisations in the Gold Coast region offering a range of courses and practical training. They also offer alternate delivery options through the internet, distance education and through modules incorporated into high school curriculum.

Health A full range of health services is available on the Gold Coast, with additional access to more specialised services in Brisbane.

The prominent healthcare providers located in the Gold Coast region are below. Queensland Health Gold Coast Hospital (Southport) The current Gold Coast Hospital is located on Nerang Road in Southport and provides approximately 500 beds and admits over 60,000 patients each year. The hospital is an acute general hospital offering specialties in medical, surgical, emergency, intensive care, cardiology, nephrology, renal dialyses, rehabilitation, geriatrics, oncology, paediatrics, general surgery, urology, ENT, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, neurosurgery, vascular surgery, plastics, paediatric surgery, gynaecology, palliative, obstetrics, anaesthetics and psychiatry.

In 2012, the Gold Coast Hospital will be absorbed into a new 750 bed tertiary facility to create the Gold Coast University Hospital. The $1.76 billion health facility will provide complex care, research and teaching opportunities on the Gold Coast and will play a key role in training the clinical leaders of the future.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 62 Gold Coast University Hospital (under construction) The Gold Coast University Hospital will be a 750 bed teaching hospital. It is being constructed adjacent to Griffith University within the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct at Southport. New services at the hospital will include radiotherapy cancer services, a neonatal intensive care unit, trauma services including a helicopter retrieval service and rooftop helipad, neurosciences and a new cardiac surgery service. It is scheduled for completion in December 2012.

Robina Hospital The Robina Hospital currently provides 210 beds. Robina has an emergency department, 3 operating theatres, a single day procedure room and a combined intensive care unit /coronary care unit. The hospital is also the home of a large integrated mental health service. The hospital is currently being upgraded with an addition 179 beds, scheduled for completion in mid 2011. Proposed Robina Health Precinct Robina is the location of planned health precinct. Scheduled for completion in late 2011, the Robina Health Precinct will be a 3,500m2 multidisciplinary health facility. The precinct will provide chronic disease management, post acute care, and integration between child and youth mental health, child health and midwifery services.

Carrara Health Centre The Carrara Health Centre supports the Gold Coast and Robina Hospitals by providing beds for patients whom have been in hospital but need additional rehabilitation or interim care before returning home or placed in a nursing home. Gold Coast Surgery Centre (Southport) The Gold Coast Surgery Centre (GCSC) supports the Gold Coast and Robina Hospitals by providing facilities for elective day surgery procedures. The centre is located opposite Gold Coast Hospital in Southport. Private Hospitals Six (6) private hospitals exist in the Gold Coast region, as shown in the following Figure.

Figure 9. Private Hospitals in Gold Coast Region Hospital Description John Flynn Private Hospital Tugun Located in Tugun, the hospital provides a comprehensive range of medical, maternity and surgical services, specialising in diagnostic and interventional cardiology plus orthopedic and general surgery. It provides 317 beds. Allamanda Private Hospital Southport Located in Southport, the hospital provides the full range of both surgical and medical services including all cardiac and neurological services. It provides 252 beds.

A Roadmap for the Gold Coast Region Regional Development Australia Gold Coast Inc 63 Pindara Private Hospital Benowa Located in Benowa, the hospital is an acute medical/surgical and maternity hospital serving the north end of the Gold Coast. It offers 219 beds. Palm Beach Currumbin Private Hospital Currumbin Located in Currumbin, the hospital provides 70 beds and psychiatric services. Pacific Private Hospital Southport Located in Southport, the hospital is a specialist day surgery facility with 5 operating theatres. It provides a range of services including plastic and reconstructive; ear, nose and throat; ophthalmology; general Surgery; and endoscopy.

Spendlove House Private Hospital Southport Located in Southport, the hospital is a private post-operative and illness sub-acute facility with 22 private rooms. Source: Regional Roadmap Context and Appraisal Report, Parsons Brinckerhoff A new private hospital is also planned as part of the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct, adjacent to the Gold Coast University Hospital.