MADISON HIGH SCHOOL 2019-2020 - COURSE OFFERINGS GUIDE - Madison Public Schools

 
MADISON HIGH SCHOOL 2019-2020 - COURSE OFFERINGS GUIDE - Madison Public Schools
MADISON HIGH SCHOOL
    COURSE OFFERINGS
         GUIDE

        2019-2020
COURSE OFFERINGS GUIDE

This guide is designed to assist students in their selection of courses of study. Madison High School offers a
wide variety of courses in an effort to meet the needs of all students. A description of each course is included
here. Selection of classes is based on recommendations of teachers, study skills, grades, standardized test
scores, advice of parents and counselors, and your particular interests and plans for the future. The Guidance
Department urges you to read this booklet before you schedule your courses.

                                GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The State of New Jersey and Madison High School have recently changed graduation requirements. Please
read this section carefully for the requirements which apply to your child. Each year-long course that meets
three times in a cycle is awarded 5 credits (lab sciences are usually 6 credits). A course that meets one
semester, three times in a cycle is awarded 2.5 credits.

I.​ Students must earn a minimum of 130 credits to graduate, as follows:

        4 years of English                                    20 credits
        3 years of Social Studies (World, US I, US II)        15 credits
        3 years of mathematics [i]                            15 credits
        3 years of laboratory science[ii]                     15 credits
        1 year of world languages [iii]                        5 credits
        1 year of visual and/or performing arts [iv]           5 credits
                     st​
        1 year of 21​ Century Life and Careers [v] (Practical arts) 5 credits
        1 year of PE and health for each year of enrollment 16 credits
        1 semester of financial, economic, business,           2.5 credits
          and entrepreneurial literacy

[i] Including Algebra I, Geometry and 5 credits in a third year of mathematics that builds on the concepts of Algebra
and Geometry.
[ii] Including Biology, Chemistry and/or Physics and/or Environmental Science plus a third laboratory/inquiry based
science.
[iii]​ Students are highly encouraged to exceed these requirements.
[iv]​ Check Appendix A for a list of courses that satisfy these requirements.
[v]​ Check Appendix A for a list of courses that satisfy these requirements.

Keep in mind that these are minimum high school graduation requirements. They do not reflect college
admission requirements. The courses you take in high school and your grades in these classes will affect the
kinds of educational and career opportunities open to you later. Your counselor will help you decide the
program best suited to your goals, needs and abilities. Colleges usually require a minimum of 16 academic
units in the high school program. An academic (Carnegie) unit is a full year of study in one of the following
areas: English, history, mathematics, lab science, or world language.
II.​ Pass graduation exams as per New Jersey State Department of Education.
State testing requirements are subject to change. Graduation testing requirements will be communicated to
students, parents and guardians in a timely manner.

III.​ Students need to complete 7 hours of volunteer service per year. This service
      requirement can be satisfied by participation in the annual Day of Service each
      May.

                                 GENERAL SCHOOL POLICIES

Course Load

Madison High School has eight periods of classes, plus a lunch period. Students must have seven credit
bearing courses on their schedules.

Scheduling and Leveling of Courses

All incoming 9th grade students are scheduled individually with parent, student and counselor participation.
Recommendations concerning class placement are provided by 8th grade teachers. Parents of current 9​th and
10​th grade students will receive notification alerting them of the general time frame of their child’s scheduling
conference. Parents of current 11​th graders are encouraged and invited to attend the scheduling conference, as
the scheduling conference for current 11​th grade students also doubles as a college/post-secondary planning
meeting. All students will receive a list of their proposed classes during their scheduling conference.

Multiple criteria are used when determining course placement recommendations. Criteria used for teacher
recommendations may include ​current ​academic performance, (generally the grade at the semester mark, in
January) writing samples, completion of appropriate prerequisites, completion of summer assignments,
and/or teacher discretion. Teachers make course recommendations for the following year in February.

Students and/or parents are encouraged to discuss any questions they may have about a course
recommendation with the appropriate teacher. At times, during the spring, teachers may change their initial
recommendation.

On occasion, parents/students may want to “override” a teacher’s recommendation. Overriding a
teacher’s recommendation can only be done after consulting with the departmental supervisor.
Information, including deadline dates, and other “override” stipulations can be found on the override
form. Overriding a teacher’s recommendation is a decision that should be done only after the student
and parent are fully aware of all the stipulations.

Overrides must be completed and processed during the override window. The override window is
Monday, May 6, 2019 - Thursday, June 6, 2019. After June 6th, override requests will not be honored.
Override forms may be picked up from your counselor.
Students will receive next year’s schedule in June. If a correction is needed in the schedule, ​students must
see their high school counselor before end of school day, Wednesday, June 19, 2019.

Changes in your schedule after the new school year has begun are very difficult to make and can not be
guaranteed. ​Therefore it is vital that students review their schedule, when they receive it in June, and
request any schedule change in June.

Higher level courses focus on in-depth analysis, set high expectations, and move at a quicker pace. To
succeed at this level, the student must make a serious commitment to the course. Please be aware that the
student may earn lower grades in a higher level course than he/she would in the lower level course.

Students are responsible for completing any summer assignments. Summer assignments will be posted in
June​.

Please note the following grading procedure that will apply if a student changes levels once the school
year has begun​:

Please note the following grading procedure that will apply if a student changes levels once the school year has begun:

1. If a student changes level prior to the midpoint of the first marking period, the “new” teacher will use only the grades
from the remaining assessments to determine the first marking period grade.

2. If the student changes to a lower level after the midpoint of the first marking period and has received a score on at
least one major assessment, the grades earned in the higher level course will follow the student to the new placement. If
no major assessment had been given by the time the student changes levels, the grades do not follow the student to the
new placement. No weighted grade credit will be given if a weighted course is dropped and a regular course is added.

3. No level changes will be permitted after the first 10 days of the second marking period unless there are extenuating
circumstances and administrative approval is granted.

Withdrawal from Courses

If you withdraw from a course that has been in session an extended period of time, you will receive a grade of WP
(Withdrawn/Pass) or WF (Withdrawn/Fail). The time limit for withdrawal without mention on the transcript is December
3, 2019 for first semester and full year courses and March 25, 2020 for second semester courses.

Remediation

Students will be automatically reviewed for remediation on the basis of their performance on their annual standardized
tests. Remedial classes are available in literacy and mathematics.

Classified Students

Students with special needs will follow a prescribed Individualized Education Program determined by the Child Study
Team after consultation with student, teachers, parents, and counselor.
Selective Service

All male students, when they reach the age of 18, must register for the United States Selective Service. Information
about this can be found online, from Mr. Levine, or at any post office.

AP Courses

Because the AP exam is an integral part of the AP experience all students enrolled in AP
courses are required to take the AP exam. Students must pay the AP exam fee which is
approximately $97 per exam. Students who meet The College Board income guidelines may be
eligible for a fee reduction for the exam.
Students who do not take the AP exam may be subject to the following consequences:
            ● Notifications of such to the colleges in which they have (or will) apply.
            ● A notation on the transcript that the student did not take the AP exam.
            ● A final grade penalty.
            ● Removal of the “AP’’ designation from their transcript.

NCAA Information

Any student who may have an interest in playing college sports at the Division I or Division II level must meet certain
requirements set forth by the NCAA. Students and parents interested in NCAA eligibility must inform their child’s
guidance counselor and coach, in writing, by the start of freshman year. Identifying NCAA interest after this time may
be too late to properly advise the student and parent on the course selections and requirements for eligibility.

For more information, parents and students should go the NCAA Eligibility Center website at ​www.eligibilitycenter.org​,
and speak with Mr. Levine, Supervisor of School Counseling.

Virtual High School (VHS) Courses

MHS contracts with VHS to provide students the opportunity to pursue courses online that are not offered onsite. Out of
200 courses, VHS offers more than 20 AP® options. Registration takes place in early May and students must obtain the
approval of a parent/guardian as well as guidance counselor in order to be considered for the program. Further
information can be obtained from Mary Thomas, Media Specialist, coordinator of VHS at MHS.

Outside Course Work

Students always have the opportunity to take classes above and beyond what is offered at Madison High School at their
own expense. While the GPA that a student receives is only reflective of Madison High School, on some occasions
outside courses can receive Madison High School credit for graduation. Students interested in taking additional classes
through outside avenues (colleges, online high schools, summer programs) should discuss these options with their
counselor.
Honors and Advanced Placement Courses

In Honors and AP courses, an “A” is equal to 5 points as opposed to the usual 4; a “B” is equal to 4 points rather than 3;
a “C” is equal to 3, rather than 2, etc. All AP and Honors classes have mandatory summer assignments, which will be
graded when school starts.

ENGLISH
Honors English 9
Honors English 10
Advanced Placement English Language and Composition
Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

SOCIAL STUDIES
Honors World History
Honors U.S. History I
Advanced Placement United States History
Advanced Placement Psychology
Advanced Placement Modern European History
Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics
Advanced Placement Human Geography
Advanced Placement Macroeconomics

MATHEMATICS
Honors Geometry
Honors Algebra II
Honors Precalculus
Advanced Placement Calculus AB
Advanced Placement Calculus BC
Advanced Placement Statistics

SCIENCE
Honors Biology
Honors Physics
Honors Chemistry
Advanced Placement Chemistry
Advanced Placement Biology
Advanced Placement Physics
Advanced Placement Environmental Science

WORLD LANGUAGES
Honors French IV, V
Honors Italian IV, V
Honors Spanish IV, V
Honors Chinese IV, V
Advanced Placement Italian Language
Advanced Placement French Language
Advanced Placement Spanish Language
Advanced Placement Chinese Language

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS/TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND DESIGN
Honors Chorus, Band, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, Guitar
Advanced Placement Music Theory
Pre-Advanced Placement Honors Studio Art
Advanced Placement Studio Art
Advanced Placement Computer Science
COMPLETE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

                                                      English
                                 English Department Course Offerings

                                                                                GRADE                  ENGLISH
                                 SUBJECT                                  9      10      11     12     CREDITS
        Honors English 9                                                  X                                 5.0
        Enriched English 9                                                X                                 5.0
        English 9                                                         X                                 5.0
        Honors English 10                                                         X                         5.0
        Enriched English 10                                                       X                         5.0
        English 10                                                                X                         5.0
        Enriched English 11                                                              X                  5.0
        English 11                                                                       X                  5.0
        Advanced Placement English Language & Composition                                X                  5.0
        Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition                                      X          5.0
        English 12: Senior Seminar                                                               X          5.0
        Contemporary Humanities                                                                  X          2.5
        Creative Writing                                                                         X          2.5
        Science Fiction and Fantasy                                                              X          2.5
        Public Speaking                                                                          X          2.5

HONORS ENGLISH 9​ (110) 5 credits - 1 year                                                            Grade 9
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, placement diagnostic, average grade of B+ in Honors Language Arts 8,
or A- in regular Language Arts 8, and completion of the summer reading project.

This course is the first in a sequence of three college-bound honors courses, including the opportunity for Advanced
Placement courses in both junior and senior year. Honors students are challenged in every aspect of language arts:
reading, writing, speaking, and listening. They are required to read difficult works of literature, develop a higher level of
thinking skills, expand their vocabulary, improve their grammar and use of language, deliver both formal and informal
speeches, and write in a variety of forms. Students recommended for placement in Honors English 9 should demonstrate
superior performance in language skills in class performance and on standardized tests, as well as self-motivation and
strong study skills. The course covers a variety of genres - the short story, poetry, drama, and the novel - while focusing
on four universal themes: Innocence and Experience, Coming of Age, Choices, and Stereotypes and Gender Bias.

ENRICHED ENGLISH 9​ (111) 5 credits - 1 year                                                                   Grade 9
Prerequisites: Language Arts 8, writing samples, teacher recommendation.

This is the first in a four year sequence of college bound courses intended to help students develop the skills necessary to
achieve success in high school and college English studies. The Enriched level student works at a faster pace with more
complex works than his/her counterpart in English 9. The course covers a variety of genres - the short story, poetry,
drama, and the novel - while focusing on four universal themes: Innocence and Experience, Coming of Age, Choices,
and Stereotypes and Gender Bias.
ENGLISH 9​ (112) 5 credits - 1 year                                                                           Grade 9
Prerequisites: Language Arts 8, teacher recommendation.

This is the first in a four year sequence of college bound courses intended to help students develop the skills necessary to
achieve success in high school, and ultimately in their post-graduate pursuits. The course covers a variety of genres - the
short story, poetry, drama, and the novel - while focusing on four universal themes: Innocence and Experience, Coming
of Age and Identity, Choices, and Stereotypes and Gender Bias. Through personal reflection, small-group, and
whole-class discussion, formal compositions (narrative, argumentative and explanatory with periodic emphasis on
prewriting, organizing and revising), and assessments using multiple modalities, students process the content through the
lens of each unit’s theme.

HONORS ENGLISH 10​ (120) 5 credits - 1 year                                                                   Grade 10
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, placement diagnostic, final grade of B in Honors English 9
or an A in Enriched English 9.

Honors English 10 is the second course in a sequence designed to link traditional English classes to Advanced Placement
classes. Strong motivation, independent study, and responsibility in meeting deadlines, and ability to read and digest
challenging works are keys to success in this course. Students recommended for placement in Honors English 10 should
demonstrate superior performance in language skills in class performance and on standardized tests, as well as
self-motivation and strong study skills. The course is organized chronologically beginning with the Romantics and
culminating in contemporary works of fiction and nonfiction. The diversity and unity of the American experience is
reflected in the works studied. Students are required to read difficult works of literature and informational texts, develop
a higher level of thinking skills, expand their vocabulary, improve their grammar and use of language,do research, create
a multimedia presentation, and learn to write in a variety of forms, including narrative, argumentative, and explanatory,
with periodic emphasis on prewriting, organizing, and revising. Students in all levels of English 10 will study both
classic and contemporary American works in a variety of genres - novels, memoirs, short stories, poetry, films, including
documentary - to broaden and refine the language and communication tools they need to navigate 21st century discourse.
Language and literature study at the honors level provides a bridge from the experience of freshman year, an
introduction to scholarship at the secondary level, to the experience of junior year, where students prepare for
college-level reading comprehension, analysis and synthesis.

ENRICHED ENGLISH 10​ (121) 5 credits - 1 year                                                                 Grade 10
Prerequisites: English 9, writing samples, teacher recommendation.

English 10 is an American Literature course. The course is organized chronologically beginning with the Romantics and
culminating in contemporary works of fiction and nonfiction. The diversity and unity of the American experience is
reflected in the works studied. Students are required to read difficult works of literature and informational texts, develop
a higher level of thinking skills, expand their vocabulary, improve their grammar and use of language, do research,
create a multimedia presentation, and learn to write in a variety of forms, including narrative, argumentative, and
explanatory, with periodic emphasis on prewriting, organizing, and revising. Students in all levels of English 10 will
study both classic and contemporary American works in a variety of genres - novels, memoirs, short stories, poetry,
films, including documentary - to broaden and refine the language and communication tools they need to navigate 21st
century discourse. Language and literature study at this level provides a bridge from the experience of freshman year, an
introduction to scholarship at the secondary level, to the experience of junior year, where students prepare for
college-level reading comprehension, analysis and synthesis.

ENGLISH 10​ (122) 5 credits - 1 year                                                                          Grade 10
Prerequisites: English 9, teacher recommendation.

English 10 is an American Literature course. The course is organized chronologically beginning with the Romantics and
culminating in contemporary works of fiction and nonfiction. The diversity and unity of the American experience is
reflected in the works studied. Students are required to read difficult works of literature and informational texts, develop
a higher level of thinking skills, expand their vocabulary, improve their grammar and use of language, do research,
create a multimedia presentation, and learn to write in a variety of forms, including narrative, argumentative, and
explanatory, with periodic emphasis on prewriting, organizing, and revising. Students in all levels of English 10 will
study both classic and contemporary American works in a variety of genres - novels, memoirs, short stories, poetry,
films, including documentary - to broaden and refine the language and communication tools they need to navigate 21st
century discourse. Language and literature study at this level provides a bridge from the experience of freshman year, an
introduction to scholarship at the secondary level, to the experience of junior year, where students prepare for
college-level reading comprehension, analysis and synthesis.

ENRICHED ENGLISH 11 ​(131) 5 credits – 1 year                                                                Grade 11
Prerequisites: English 10, Teacher recommendation, writing samples.

Junior year English is designed to give students a sense of how British literature captures (through both comedy and
tragedy) human reaction to social injustice, the pleasures and pains of love, and man’s enduring struggle to remain true
to himself despite the overwhelming pressures of society. Works of classic authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Swift,
and Austen, as well as contemporary authors will be among those explored. In composition, students are asked to
solidify the process of prewriting, composing, revising and editing begun during the freshman and sophomore years.
This course provides reinforcement of reading, writing, vocabulary, and grammar skills that will aid students in
preparing for the NJ state required standardized testing, the SAT/ACT, and entry level college composition courses.

ENGLISH 11​ (132) 5 credits – 1 year                                                                         Grade 11
Prerequisites: English 10, Teacher recommendation.

Junior year English is designed to give students a sense of how British literature captures (through both comedy and
tragedy) human reaction to social injustice, the pleasures and pains of love, and man’s enduring struggle to remain true
to himself despite the overwhelming pressures of society. Works of classic authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Swift,
and Austen, as well as contemporary authors will be among those explored. In composition, students are asked to
solidify the process of prewriting, composing, revising and editing begun during the freshman and sophomore years.
This course provides reinforcement of reading, writing, vocabulary, and grammar skills that will aid students in
preparing for the NJ state required standardized testing, the SAT/ACT, and entry level college composition courses.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION​ ​(141) 5 credits - 1 year Grade 11
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, B- in Honors English 10 or an A- in Enriched English 10, and completion of the
summer reading project.
(Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a college-level rhetoric and writing course for juniors. In
prerequisite English courses, the focus of study is on the elements of fiction and literary devices, and thus, ​literary
analysis. AP Language and Composition builds upon these analytical skills, drawing upon both classic texts from the
British literary canon, as well a variety of classic and contemporary nonfiction texts. The primary focus of this course is
to conduct ​rhetorical a​ nalysis with the goal of understanding the writer’s craft. Students read, annotate, write, and
discuss as a routine, honing their skills and ability to interpret the rhetorical elements used in a variety of texts.

Throughout the year, students are expected to demonstrate a high level of skill in analytical, narrative, expository, and
argumentative writing, both with and without research. Writing moves beyond the five paragraph essay; students imitate
the classical argument, but they consider structure more organically, and as a rhetorical choice. Topics for student
writing are primarily student generated. The course begins with a focus on analysis of fundamental rhetorical features
and style, progresses to a more specific study of argument, and ends with a focus on writing the synthesis essay and a
multimedia project. A lengthy researched essay is submitted in the fourth marking period, the culmination of a year-long
project.

Students admitted into the course have demonstrated a high level of writing competence. In addition to having a firm
grasp of grammar, syntax and basic structure, students have a strong interest in reading closely and developing their own
writing through regular revision and with feedback from both the teacher and peers. Student engagement in a wide range
of issues in a variety of subjects - historical, scientific, political, etc. - is critical to success in the course.
On the exam, students will demonstrate their abilities to read and write analytically, and write cohesive and convincing
arguments, synthesizing sources where required. Integrated into the course are regular opportunities to practice for the
exam by completing timed essays and multiple choice practice tests.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION ​(140) ​5 credits-1 year Grade 12
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, writing samples, B- in AP Language & Composition or an A in Enriched
English 11, and completion of the summer reading project. ​(Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to
take the AP exam.)

AP Literature and Composition is designed to meet the course descriptions and guidelines outlined by the College Board.
The larger goals of the course are those of an advanced literature and writing course aimed at exposing students to a
broad range of literary works, enhancing both expository and expressive writing skills, nurturing insight and perception
through regular class sessions. The study of literature and poetry will address the historical and literary context of each
work, how each work is representative of its genre, and include a close reading and analysis of the literary elements such
as tone, diction, syntax, figures of speech, irony, themes, and motifs. Students will also be responsible to read and
discuss literary criticism and theory in conjunction with selected primary works. Students will also apply reading of
collateral poetry, essays, and nonfiction to their analysis of each work. Vocabulary skills will be developed through the
literature and through a deliberate study of literary terminology. Assessment will consist of frequent journal writings,
reading quizzes, free response writings, and both prose and poetry response pieces derived from the works studied but
patterned after previous AP questions. Journal entry prompts will focus on literary analysis, asking students to respond to
style, meaning or both of a previously read story or of a passage presented to them in class that day. Quizzes will
primarily focus on literary analysis as well.

The AP-style essay questions for the unit and the course will all be patterned after the following template: How does the
style and structure of the passage convey the meaning of the passage as a whole? This course will be writing intensive,
with the students writing a new piece every other week in order to develop both their powers of interpretation and
articulation. Students will write a mixture of journal response, timed in-class prose and poetry analysis, timed free
response essays, process papers (that incorporate multiple drafts and revisions), and an extended length poetry-based
research paper. Writing is assessed at times by the teacher, at times by the student and peers, and at times by both. Range
finder exercises and discussions will allow students to gain feedback and revise their own writing. Grammar will be
studied as the need arises and connected directly to individual student needs.

ENGLISH 12: SENIOR SEMINAR​ (146) 5 credits - 1 year                                                          Grade 12
Prerequisites: English 11, teacher recommendation.

Senior Seminar is a year-long course designed to help students improve their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills
for college or the workplace. This course will be divided into three units, with each unit exploring the myths and reality
of the following themes: war, identity, and love. The texts students read in each unit have been selected because they
promise to be meaningful, accessible, and engaging to students. In addition, the selected texts will provide both
traditional and modern views of the themes in question, as well as a diverse array of perspectives regarding the themes.
The units are divided and sequenced so that there is a purposeful build of both critical vocabulary and reading and
writing skills to help the students best meet the demands of the Common Core State Standards. Through reading and
discussion, research and analysis, the student will become aware of major literary themes, will gain insight about the
works, and will develop an understanding of the components of literature and the techniques used by prominent authors.
Additionally, the study and practice of various forms of written communication will emphasize appropriate vocabulary,
grammar usage, spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. Students enrolled in the course
must pass the course in order to graduate as this class serves as the 4th required year of English.

CREATIVE WRITING​ (156) 2.5 credits - 1 semester                                                              Grade 12
Prerequisites: Enriched English 11, writing sample, teacher recommendation.

This course can be taken in conjunction with Contemporary Humanities (for 12th grade students) as a year of English or
may be taken independently as an elective (for 11th or 12th grade students). Creative Writing teaches the students to turn
the events of their lives into poetry, personal narratives, short stories and a one-act script. Students will study specific
techniques of these four types of writings, completing practice writings. They must generate their own ideas, based on
their lives and experiences, but they will also be given professional models as well as models from other student
publications, such as Glyphs. Students will move through four stages in their writing: prewriting, drafting,
revising/editing and publishing. All major assignments will be shared in small peer groups and/or with the entire class.
Students will maintain a writer’s portfolio. Creative Writing is a class for students who are both inner-directed and
outwardly-observant, or for those who wish to develop these qualities.

CONTEMPORARY HUMANITIES​ (157) 2.5 credits - 1 semester                                                          Grade 12
Prerequisites: Enriched English 11, writing samples, teacher recommendation.

This course can be taken in conjunction with Creative Writing, Public Speaking or Science Fiction and Fantasy (for 12th
grade students) as a year of English or may be taken independently as an elective (for 11th or 12th grade students). The
course of study uses American and European literature as it has evolved in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries in
conjunction with the visual arts to reflect the culture and to relate the dramatic changes in these artistic forms to shifts in
Western artists. Its thesis is that the arts reflect the culture, and an attempt is made to relate the dramatic changes in these
artistic forms to shifts in Western artists’ perceptions of the world and themselves. Exercises in writing, note-taking,
discussion, recognition and analysis of paintings and sculpture are all drawn from representative examples of the arts.
Independent research skills are strengthened and re-emphasized through assignments and field trips to local museums
and other cultural destinations. The completion of four major assessments analyzing significant intellectual, literary and
artistic movements are required in addition to a final research paper or presentation analyzing a work of art of the
student’s choosing applying the artistic lenses studied in the course.

SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY​ (160) 2.5 credits - 1 semester                                                      Grade 12
Prerequisites: Enriched English 11, writing samples, teacher recommendation.

This course can be taken in conjunction with Contemporary Humanities (for 12th grade students) as a year of English or
may be taken independently as an elective (for 11th or 12th grade students). Science Fiction & Fantasy is a genre study
examining a variety of contemporary science fiction and fantasy works, not as mere escapist entertainment, but as
prophetic social commentary. The class will identify and explore common themes and techniques, evaluating the literary
and cultural significance of each work studied. Students will exercise their writing, note-taking, discussion, presentation,
and reading skills. Works by Čapek, Asimov, Adams, Tolkien, and Rowling are studied, in addition to research and
nonfiction of emerging technologies and literary criticism. Students are expected to complete a major assessment for
each work studied in addition to a final research paper or presentation of a science fiction or fantasy work chosen by
student, applying concepts studied in class, and submitted as a final examination grade.

PUBLIC SPEAKING ​(176) 2.5 credits - 1 semester                                                         Grade 12
Prerequisites: Enriched English 11, writing samples, teacher recommendation.

This course can be taken in conjunction with Contemporary Humanities (for 12th grade students) as a year of English or
may be taken independently as an elective (for 11th or 12th grade students). In Public Speaking, students will analyze
and evaluate speeches delivered in a variety of time periods and contexts by figures such as Abraham Lincoln, John F.
Kennedy, Queen Elizabeth, Anna Quindlan, and Steve Jobs, as well as write, prepare, deliver, and evaluate three types of
speeches: persuasive, informative and special occasion. They will learn how to effectively employ a wide range of
rhetorical strategies, including researched information and visuals such as PowerPoint, to fulfill varied purposes and to
address audiences with differing attitudes toward the subject matter. Students will write and deliver their own formal
speeches. They will generate their own topics, write several drafts, practice, and finally deliver polished speeches for an
audience.
Social Studies
                           Social Studies Department Course Offerings

                                                                               GRADE                   SOCIAL
                                                                                                      STUDIES
                                SUBJECT                                   9      10     11     12     CREDITS
      Honors World History                                                X                                5.0
      Enriched World History                                              X                                5.0
      World History                                                       X                                5.0
      Honors United States History I                                             X                         5.0
      Enriched United States History I                                           X                         5.0
      United States History I                                                    X                         5.0
      Advanced Placement United States History                                          X                  5.0
      Enriched United States History II                                                 X                  5.0
      United States History II                                                          X                  5.0
      Advanced Placement Modern European History                                 X      X       X          5.0
      Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics                                  X          5.0
      Advanced Placement Psychology                                              X      X       X          5.0
      Advanced Placement Human Geography                                         X      X       X          5.0
      Advanced Placement Macroeconomics                                                 X       X          5.0
      History & The Hollywood Cinema                                                    X       X          2.5
      Economics                                                                         X       X          2.5
      Current Affairs/Debate                                              X      X      X       X          2.5
      Holocaust/Genocide Studies                                                        X       X          2.5

WORLD HISTORY​ ​ 5 credits - 1 year                                                                 Grade 9

Honors World History​ (200)
Prerequisites: Requires a B+ average or higher in 8th grade Honors Language Arts or an A- average in regular Language
Arts class ​combined with​ an A- average or higher in 8th grade Social Studies and completion of summer project.
Enriched World History​ (201)
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation.
World History​ (202)
Prerequisites: Social Studies 8, teacher recommendation.

This ninth grade World History course teaches students to master factual data and critical thinking skills, while applying
the science of historiography to each unit of study. The course covers three areas of the world: Europe, Latin America,
and the Middle East. Within each of these regions, students learn about political, economic, social and religious
developments. Honors level students will be expected to work more quickly and more independently. The amount of
assigned reading and writing work increases from World History to Enriched World History to Honors World History.
U.S. HISTORY I​ ​5 credits - 1 year                                                                    Grade 10

Honors U.S. History I​ (210)
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- in Honors World History or an A in Enriched World History,
and completion of a summer project.
Enriched U.S. History I​ (211)
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation.
U.S. History I​ (212)
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation.

This tenth grade United States History course teaches students to master factual data and critical thinking skills, while
applying the science of historiography to each unit of study. The course covers the late colonial era starting with the
Columbian Exchange, the American Revolution and creation of the U.S. Constitution to the Civil War, the settlement of
the western frontier and the birth of an industrial nation. The amount of assigned reading and writing increases from U.S.
History I to Enriched U.S. History I to Honors U.S. History I.

U.S. HISTORY II​ ​ 5 credits - 1 year                                                                  Grade 11

Advanced Placement​ (220)
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- in Honors U.S. 1 or an A in Enriched U.S. 1, and completion
of summer project. ​(Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)
Enriched U.S. History II​ (221)
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation.
U.S. History II​ (222)
Prerequisites: U.S. History I, teacher recommendation.

This eleventh grade United States History course teaches students to master factual data and critical thinking skills, while
applying the science historiography to each unit of study. In addition to certain themes in American history and
consideration of current events, the course includes major domestic and global developments since the late 19​th century,
such as the Progressive and Civil Rights movements, the rise of totalitarian states, Third World movements, and
international conflicts and their resolution. The amount of assigned reading and writing work increases from U.S.
History 2 to Enriched U.S. History 2 to AP History. All students will complete a major research assignment in which
they will develop and defend a thesis using primary and secondary source materials via a written paper and/or
multimedia presentation.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY​ (260) 5 credits - 1 year                                     Grades 10 - 12

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, B- in Honors World History, Honors U.S. History I, AP U.S. History or an A in
previous enriched level course, or permission of instructor and summer project. ​(Note: Students enrolled in AP courses
are required to take the AP exam.)

This elective course offers a survey of European history from 1400 to 1980. Students use a college-level text, read both
primary and secondary sources, do considerable writing, and make oral presentations. In addition to familiarity with
major events, students develop their critical thinking skills, finding in each European history unit the significance of an
individual, group or event. They must read critically, weigh evidence, and draw valid conclusions.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT U. S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS​ (262) 5 credits - 1 year                            Grade 12
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation. B- in AP U.S. History or an A in enriched level U.S. History II, or permission
of instructor and summer project. Students must complete US History I and II prior to taking this course. ​(Note:
Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)

This elective course provides students with an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.
The course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. policies and the analysis of specific
examples. It also requires familiarity with the voices, groups, institutions, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.
All students will complete a major research assignment in which they will develop and defend a thesis using primary and
secondary source materials via a written paper and/or multimedia presentation.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY​ (264) 5 credits - 1 year                                      Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation: B- in Honors World History, Honors US History I, AP U.S. History, AP Human
Geography or AP Modern European History or an A- in previous enriched level course, or permission of instructor and
summer project. ​(Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)

This elective course provides an in depth survey of basic psychological theory and concepts, drawing upon the various
fields of psychology—learning, personality, behavior, heredity, statistics, mental illness, and social psychology. Students
examine authoritative research on the behavior of both humans and animals in an attempt to improve their understanding
of human behavior.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY ​(265) 5 credits - 1 year                                  Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation: B- in Honors World History, Honors U.S. History I, AP US History, or AP
Modern European History or an A- in previous enriched level course, or permission of instructor and summer project.
(Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)

This elective course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human
understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine
human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers
use in their science and practice.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MACROECONOMICS (263)​ 5 Credits - 1 year                                          Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation
Students in this course will get a full understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a
whole with particular emphasis on the study of national income and price level determination. Other concepts that may
be covered include measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, the financial
sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international trade and finance. ​(Students enrolled in AP courses are
required to take the AP exam)

HISTORY & THE HOLLYWOOD CINEMA ​(258) 2.5 credits – 1 semester                                      Grades 11 – 12
Prerequisites: None.

How accurate is the history filmed by the Hollywood movie makers? This course examines “historical” commercial
films as they are presented to modern moviegoers. Students will learn to question what they see on the screen. Sorting
through the hype for the accurate historical content and assessing the value of a film will be done through critical movie
viewing, and research and analysis of primary and secondary sources.

ECONOMICS​ (255) 2.5 credits - 1 semester                                                           Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisites: None.

In this course students learn how our market economy deals with the basic conflict between unlimited wants and limited
resources. Attention is given to such topics as inflation and deflation, business cycles, supply and demand, our monetary
system, and ways in which other types of economies deal with economic problems. Students learn basic economic laws
and examine different types of economic behavior.

CURRENT AFFAIRS/DEBATE​ (259) 2.5 credits - 1 semester                                              Grades 9 - 12
Prerequisites: None.

In this course, students will learn about a broad range of contemporary issues which impact American lives today. Social
issues, the economy, foreign policy, and government decisions and actions will make up the categories of current affairs
to be studied. Students will form research teams to examine these issues. The semester will culminate in a formal debate
of one issue which the students select as most significant.

HOLOCAUST/GENOCIDE STUDIES​ (261) 2.5 credits - 1 semester                                          Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisites​: None.

This course will explore the psychological, socio-economic, political and historical forces that allow the occurrence of
genocide in contemporary and historical contexts. Study of the Holocaust as propagated by the Nazis in Germany
(1933-1945) will be central to the course, as well as (but not limited to) more recent genocidal episodes in the Middle
East, Darfur, the Balkan Peninsula, Rwanda, and Cambodia. The course will also explore historical antecedents to the
Nazi reign of terror, such as the Armenian Genocide of 1915. Topics such as religious/ethnic divisions in the Balkan
region, ethnic diversity in Africa, pre-war European anti-Semitism, and communist ethnic cleansing will be explored. In
addition, students will study the behavior of ordinary citizens who either helped people to escape, stood by and did
nothing, or feigned ignorance despite clear evidence of genocide in their midst.

                                                Mathematics
                            Mathematics Department Course Offerings

                                                                               GRADE                 MATHEMATICS

                             SUBJECT                                     9      10      11     12       CREDITS
  Algebra I                                                              X      X                           5.0
  Algebra 1 Lab                                                          X      X                           5.0
  Geometry                                                               X      X       X                   5.0
  Geometry Lab                                                                  X       X                   5.0
  Honors Geometry                                                        X      X                           5.0
  Algebra II Essentials                                                                 X      X            5.0
  Algebra II                                                                     X      X      X            5.0
  Honors Algebra II                                                              X      X                   5.0
  Precalculus                                                                           X      X            5.0
  Honors Precalculus                                                                    X      X            5.0
  Calculus                                                                                     X            5.0
  Advanced Placement Calculus AB                                                               X            5.0
  Advanced Placement Calculus BC                                                               X            5.0
  Applied Mathematics                                                                   X      X            5.0
  Statistics                                                                            X      X            5.0
  Advanced Placement Statistics                                                         X      X            5.0

ALGEBRA I​ (311) 5 Credits – 1 year
Prerequisites: Placement criteria, successful completion of Math 8, and completion of summer assignment.

Students in Algebra 1 continue their study of patterns and relationships, formalizing their knowledge, learning to use
symbolic notation and connecting their understandings to the real world. Units of study will include linear equations and
inequalities, linear, absolute value, quadratic and exponential functions, systems of equations and inequalities,
polynomials, radicals, and data analysis. The curriculum is aligned to the New Jersey Student Learning Standards for
Mathematics and encourages all learners to take an active part in meeting the course goals as outlined in the curriculum
document.

ALGEBRA I LAB ​(385)​ ​5 Credits - 1 year
Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation. Corequisite: Algebra I.

Algebra I Lab is a full-year course designed to remediate and support the mathematical needs of students enrolled in
Algebra I. B​alancing depth of understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application, this course will support
those students who are identified as in need of an additional course as they ​meet the demands of the New Jersey Student
Learning Standards for Mathematics in Algebra I. ​This course is individualized according to the needs of the students
and parallels the co-requisite Algebra I course. Most important this course allows students additional time to develop a
conceptual understanding of the content. This course does not fulfill the mathematics requirement for graduation.

GEOMETRY​ (321) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Algebra I.
Geometry is a college preparatory course that is primarily approached from a Euclidean point of view. Coordinate
geometry, solid geometry, and transformational geometry are explored. In the course, the primary emphasis is on
inductive and deductive reasoning and logical problem-solving techniques. Geometry offers opportunities for students to
develop as active problem solvers, critical thinkers and effective communicators. Consistent practice of algebraic skills
enables students to make conjectures while working through challenging problems. Geometry requires students to
explain their thinking and analyze diverse problems, while also providing students with the chance to develop
mathematical reasoning to work through everyday mathematical challenges. Each unit provides students occasions to
develop deeper understanding of mathematics coupled with gaining procedural skill and fluency and application as
outlined in the New Jersey Student Learning Standards. Major topics include congruence, similarity, right triangles and
trigonometry, and circles. The curriculum is aligned the the New Jersey Student Learning Standards for Mathematics
and encourages all learners to take an active part in meeting the course goals as outlined in the curriculum document.

GEOMETRY LAB​ (388) 5 Credits - 1 year
Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation. Corequisite: Geometry.

Geometry Lab is a full-year course designed to remediate and support the mathematical needs of students enrolled in
Geometry. B​alancing depth of understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application, this course will support
those students who are identified as in need of an additional course as they ​meet the demands of the New Jersey Student
Learning Standards for Mathematics in Geometry. ​This course is individualized according to the needs of the students
and parallels the co-requisite Geometry course. Most important this course allows students additional time to develop a
conceptual understanding of the content. This course does not fulfill the mathematics requirement for graduation.

HONORS GEOMETRY​ (322) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Placement criteria, final grade of A- or better in Algebra I and completion of summer assignment.

Honors Geometry is an accelerated geometry course that is primarily approached from a Euclidean point of view.
Coordinate geometry, solid geometry, and transformational geometry are explored. In the course, the primary emphasis
is on inductive and deductive reasoning and logical problem-solving techniques. Geometry offers opportunities for
students to develop as active problem solvers, critical thinkers and effective communicators. Consistent practice of
algebraic skills enables students to make conjectures while working through challenging problems. Geometry requires
students to explain their thinking and analyze diverse problems, while also providing students with the chance to develop
mathematical reasoning to work through everyday mathematical challenges. Each unit provides students occasions to
develop deeper understanding of mathematics coupled with gaining procedural skill and fluency and application as
outlined in the New Jersey Student Learning Standards. Major topics include congruence, similarity, right triangles and
trigonometry, and circles. The curriculum is aligned the the New Jersey Student Learning Standards for Mathematics
and encourages all learners to take an active part in meeting the course goals as outlined in the curriculum document.

Algebra II Essentials ​ (348) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry.

Algebra 2 Essentials is a course that builds on concepts mastered in Algebra 1 and Geometry. This course offers
opportunities for students to develop as active problem solvers, critical thinkers and effective communicators. Consistent
practice of algebraic skills enables students to make conjectures while working through challenging problems. Algebra
2 Essentials requires students to explain their thinking and analyze diverse problems, while also providing students with
the chance to develop mathematical reasoning to work through everyday mathematical challenges. Each unit provides
students occasions to develop deeper understanding of mathematics coupled with gaining procedural skill and fluency
and application as outlined in the New Jersey Student Learning Standards. Major topics include polynomial functions,
radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, sequences and series, trigonometric ratios
and functions, probability, and data analysis and statistics. This course will provide qualified students with a third year of
mathematics to meet graduation requirements. This class is not intended for students who wish to study Precalculus or
Calculus in subsequent years.

ALGEBRA II​ (313) 5 Credits – 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, successful completion of Algebra 1 and completion of summer assignment.

Algebra 2 is a college preparatory course that builds on concepts mastered in Algebra 1 and Geometry. This course
offers opportunities for students to develop as active problem solvers, critical thinkers and effective communicators.
Consistent practice of algebraic skills enables students to make conjectures while working through challenging
problems. Algebra 2 requires students to explain their thinking and analyze diverse problems, while also providing
students with the chance to develop mathematical reasoning to work through everyday mathematical challenges. Each
unit provides students occasions to develop deeper understanding of mathematics coupled with gaining procedural skill
and fluency and application as outlined in the New Jersey Student Learning Standards. Major topics include polynomial
functions, radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, sequences and series,
trigonometric ratios and functions, probability, and data analysis and statistics.

HONORS ALGEBRA II​ (312) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- or better in Honors geometry, final grade of A- or better in
eighth grade Honors Algebra I and completion of summer assignment.

Honors Algebra II is an accelerated course for those students who have successfully completed Algebra I. The course
builds on concepts mastered in Algebra 1 and Geometry and offers opportunities for students to develop as active
problem solvers, critical thinkers and effective communicators. Consistent practice of algebraic skills enables students to
make conjectures while working through challenging problems. Honors Algebra 2 requires students to explain their
thinking and analyze diverse problems, while also providing students with the chance to develop mathematical reasoning
to work through everyday mathematical challenges.          Each unit provides students occasions to develop deeper
understanding of mathematics coupled with gaining procedural skill and fluency and application as outlined in the New
Jersey Student Learning Standards. Major topics include polynomial functions, radical functions, exponential and
logarithmic functions, rational functions, sequences and series, trigonometric ratios and functions, probability, and data
analysis and statistics.

PRECALCULUS​ (343) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Algebra II, and completion of summer assignment.

Precalculus is a course designed for students who have a strong background in Algebra and Geometry. General function
theory is examined with an emphasis on polynomial, logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions. The conic
sections and vector theory may also be included in the curriculum. Much mathematical theory is discussed and practical
applications are emphasized when appropriate. The course provides a solid foundation for continuing the study of
mathematics and prepares students for calculus.

HONORS PRECALCULUS​ (332) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- or better in Honors Algebra II and completion of summer
assignment.

Honors Pre-calculus is a course designed for students with above-average ability in mathematics. Functions are studied
in depth with an emphasis on trigonometric, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. In addition, analytic
geometry, especially the conic sections and vectors, is studied. Because the course is designed for the above-average
student, it is taught with a rigorous approach, and most concepts are derived and/or proved. Much mathematical abstract
theory is discussed, and practical applications are emphasized when appropriate. The course provides a solid foundation
for the continued study of advanced mathematics, particularly AP Calculus.

CALCULUS ​ (345) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Honors Precalculus or Precalculus.

Calculus is a course for seniors who have met the prerequisite requirements. This course will prepare the college-bound
student with a solid background in calculus and is recommended for students who have successfully completed
pre-calculus. The curriculum contains calculus and related topics, but not at the rigorous level of study of the AP
Calculus program. The calculus curriculum focuses on the following three main areas of calculus - the study of limits,
differentiation, and integration. General theory is developed and applications are made to real-world situations. Students
are required to know, occasionally prove, and apply theorems based on the fundamental concepts of calculus. Calculus
topics are presented four ways: geometrically, numerically, algebraically and verbally. Topics include the study of
functions, finding derivatives by definition, finding derivatives by the rules and their application, defining integrals and
their applications, differential equations and approximations.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB​ (340) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- or better in Honors Pre-calculus and completion of summer
assignment.​ (Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)

AP Calculus AB consists of a full academic year of work in Calculus and related topics comparable to a first year
mathematics course in most colleges and universities. The course, as outlined by The College Board, represents
college-level mathematics for which some colleges may grant advanced placement and/or credit following successful
completion of the Advanced Placement Examination administered at the high school in May. AP Calculus AB focuses
on conceptual understanding of limits, derivatives and integrals. This is implemented by presenting topics four different
ways including graphically/visually, numerically, analytically and verbally. AP Calculus AB offers opportunities for
students to develop technical competence and a sense of utility of calculus. The course work encourages students to
become logical thinkers, learning to write the solutions to problems in a connected, step-by-step manner with
explanatory sentences. Consistent practice with using multiple representations of solutions allows students to develop a
comprehensive understanding of each topic studied throughout the year.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC​ (341) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, final grade of A- or better in Honors Pre-calculus and completion of summer
assignment.​ (Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)

AP Calculus BC consists of a full academic year of work in Calculus and related topics comparable to two semester
courses in most colleges and universities. The course, as outlined by The College Board, represents college-level
mathematics for which some colleges may grant advanced placement and/or credit following successful completion of
the Advanced Placement Examination administered at the high school in May. AP Calculus BC covers the content
learned in AP Calculus AB while extending it to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and
series. This course is rigorous and moves at a fast pace. To be successful in this course, students must have a strong
background in Mathematics, a high interest in Math or Math related fields of study, and be willing to make a serious
commitment to work hard throughout the year.

APPLIED MATHEMATICS​ (372) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, successful completion of Algebra II Concepts or Algebra II.

Applied Mathematics is an elective course where students will have the opportunity to explore Mathematical
applications in the real world. The course is project based allowing students to develop their creative problem solving
skills and take ownership of their learning. Students will have the opportunity to explore careers and local and global
issues involving mathematics, as well as interact with experts within the field. The course will cover various New Jersey
Student Learning Standards from each of the six conceptual categories: Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions,
Geometry, Statistics and Probability, and Modeling. In addition, the course will also incorporate 21st Century life and
career skills to ensure students are prepared for what comes beyond high school. This course’s unique design allows for
students of all mathematical levels to be appropriately challenged and engaged without repeating content from other
courses. As a culminating activity, each Applied Mathematics participant will be responsible for a portfolio presentation
to demonstrate her/his learning and growth throughout the year and to set goals for college and/or career readiness.

STATISTICS​ (371) 5 credits - 1 year
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Algebra II, Precalculus, or final grade of B- or
better in Intermediate Algebra or Algebra II Concepts.

“Decisions or predictions are often based on data—numbers in context. These decisions or predictions would be easy if
the data always sent a clear message, but the message is often obscured by variability. Statistics provides tools for
describing variability in data and for making informed decisions that take it into account.” Statistics is designed for the
college bound student who has demonstrated success in Algebra 2 and wishes to continue to explore a large range of
topics with an emphasis on “real world” applications. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring
Data, Planning a Study, Anticipating Patterns, and Statistical Inferences. This course would prepare students for AP
Statistics or the college course equivalent​. ​Technology plays an important role in statistics by making it possible to
generate plots, regression functions, and correlation coefficients, and to simulate many possible outcomes in a short
amount of time. Students will regularly apply the tools of technology including the graphing calculator and computers to
solve problems. They will be challenged through critical thinking exercises and participate in various group and
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