SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students

 
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR
     SIXTH FORM
   For entry in 2021
For prospective students
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
Contents

Introduction

A Level and BTEC Courses (in alphabetical order):

Art/Design and Photography
Biology
Business and Business (BTEC)
Chemistry
Computer Science
Drama and Theatre Studies
Economics
English Language
English Literature
Geography
History
Mathematics
Mathematics and Further Mathematics
Media Studies and Creative Digital Media Production (BTEC)
Modern Languages: French, German and Spanish
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education and BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport
Physics
Psychology

Destinations of 2020’s Year 13
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
INTRODUCTION

In 2020, our A level and BTEC students received outstanding results. Almost exclusively,
every student gained entry to their first-choice university, joining those who were successful
with their Apprenticeship and Art Foundation applications.

Some of those starting university have taken up places to study PPE at Oxford, Mathematics and
Physics at Durham, English at York, Media Production at Bournemouth, Marketing and
Management at Loughborough, History at Birmingham, Sports and Exercise Science at Bath,
Early Years Development at the Norland College, Computer Science at Royal Holloway and
a full sports scholarship at the University of Houston, Texas. Others have chosen to take up
careers in business, pilot training, the fire service and the Armed Services. The Sixth Form
team fully supports each student in securing their individual post-18 plans.

The students achieve these results through a combination of ability, hard work, superb
teaching and the unstinting support they receive. We look after them, monitor them closely
and offer an array of strategies to help them if they are struggling and to enable them to
achieve the highest possible marks and grades. Many of them do far better than they or their
parents would ever have thought possible.

However good their final results are, A Levels and BTECs are no longer enough. To secure
their post-18 goals, students need a range of skills, achievements and interpersonal skills. The
Sixth Form aims to equip them for the challenges ahead and offers a diversity of experiences
that are fun, stimulating and useful.

This is an exciting time for the Sixth Form at Lingfield. We have introduced several new
initiatives and the details of some of them are in the pages that follow. We hope that the range
of A Levels and BTECs on offer, the quality of the teaching, the standard of the facilities and
the superb post-18 support we offer preclude any need to look elsewhere. However, students
do have to reach certain standards to join us in the Sixth Form, the details of which are set out
on page 3.

Academic Study in the Sixth Form
In Year 12 we have increased our student/teacher contact time. Students will select three
subjects (with a few choosing four). This may be a combination of A Levels and BTECs. Students
should select subjects that they enjoy and want to study to a greater depth. They are advised
to speak to their teachers to see if they have the ability to pursue a subject to a higher standard.
Students will be asked to choose subjects in order of preference, including a reserve subject.
Every effort will be made to offer students as many of their higher preferences as possible.

Homework
The homework set by staff should be regarded as a minimum and the successful Sixth Form
student is one who broadens and deepens their knowledge through extra reading, note making
and exercise completion.
A Sixth Form student should, on average, expect five hours of homework per subject per
week, although this will increase as exams approach. We would therefore expect students
to be doing approximately three hours of effective study each evening, plus a further eight
hours over a weekend.
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
Study Periods
Provision is made for students to study quietly in School when they are not being taught. Students
are supervised in the Study room to ensure a quiet working environment.

Sixth Form Appraisal System
Students are monitored closely by their tutor but are also helped to manage, and be responsible
for, their own studies.

Reports are sent home via iSAMS (our computerised database) at regular intervals throughout
the two years. These give attainment grades based on assessed work, effort and target grades
plus comments from the subject teachers, Tutor and Head of Sixth Form.
Tutors are the first point of contact for parents for queries or clarification. If a student is
underperforming, they are placed on Academic Monitoring; regular targets are set and progress
reports are sent home.

Academic Support

It is important that we maintain a balance between helping the students become independent
thinkers, who are able to manage their own studies, and providing academic support for those
who need it. Tutorials are organised for students needing extra academic support through their
subject areas. We run revision clinics at lunchtimes and after school. These are an opportunity
for students of all abilities to get a little extra help that could just push them up to the next grade.

After School and Saturday study sessions
Supervised study sessions are in place after school every day and on Saturday mornings.
Students can be put into sessions by their teachers or can choose to attend.

Sixth Form Student Welfare Officer

Our students’ mental health and wellbeing is extremely important to us. Our Student Welfare
Officer, Mrs Walton, works closely with the Head of Sixth Form and is available every morning
for the students to talk to.
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
Sixth Form Entry Requirements

Applications for entry into our Sixth Form are warmly welcomed. We recommend that all
prospective students attend our Sixth Form Open Evening to meet subject teachers and Sixth
Form staff.

Students interested in joining Lingfield College for Sixth Form are required to attend a taster day
in January. This includes attending taster lessons in their preferred subjects, an interview with
the Deputy Head of Sixth Form and an assessment to determine their suitability to study A
Levels and BTECs. After the Taster day, if both parties are happy to proceed, we will apply for
copies of Year 11 reports and predicted grades from the student’s current school.

If an offer is made, it may stipulate which subjects the student can choose from to study at
Lingfield. Should the student not get the necessary grades at GCSE level to study the subjects
of his or her choice, then they will need to make an appointment with the Head of Sixth Form
to choose more appropriate subjects to study.

A minimum of an 8 grade is needed to study Mathematics, Science or MFL.

In order to progress from Year 12 to Year 13, students must achieve a minimum standard in
their end of year internal exams (see table below). Students who do not achieve this will have
an interview with the Headmaster and the Head of Sixth Form before returning to Year 13. The
Headmaster may not allow them to return or may ask them to re-sit Year 12.

 A Level, BTEC combination               Minimum Standard
 3 A Levels                              B,C,D
 2 A Levels + 1 BTEC                     C,C, Merit
 1 A Level + 2 BTEC                      C, Merit, Merit
 3 BTEC                                  Merit, Merit, Merit

Sixth Form Scholarships
Sixth Form Academic scholarships are awarded for 60 points from 7 subjects, granting a 15%
discount. Additional Maths, which is only offered to our most able Mathematicians, does not
carry a point tariff.

       GCSE Grade             Lingfield Points
           9                          9
           8                          8
           7                          7
           6                          6
           5                          5
           4                          4

All Sixth Form Scholarship holders take part in a weekly Scholars session and work towards
an Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). The EPQ is open to other Sixth Form students if
they wish to do it.

Students may gain Scholarships in more than one discipline; however, there is a cap on the
discount available and combined Scholarships may not exceed 20% remission of fees.
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
WHAT ELSE IS ON OFFER?

Outside Speakers
As part of the students’ broader educational experience we host a series of specialist lunchtime
talks in our Lecture Theatre. Students are encouraged to attend those of interest. Recent talks
included:

   •   Engineering
   •   Law
   •   Gap years
   •   Medical school applications
   •   Apprenticeships
   •   Finance
   •   Aerospace, communications and transport
These are carefully selected to stimulate, enthuse, motivate and raise aspirations amongst our
students.

Enrichment Week
At the end of Year 12, we run an overseas volunteering trip. Previous destinations include
Kenya, Ghana and Sri Lanka. For students not involved in the overseas trip, we run an
Enrichment Week, giving them the opportunity to engage in a range of activities such as a TEFL
course (Teaching English as a Foreign Language), first aid, self-defence, food hygiene, car
maintenance and the very popular chocolate workshop. Activities such as the food hygiene and
first aid courses provide a certificated skill that students can add to their CVs.

Volunteering
Volunteering is an important part of the Sixth Form curriculum and an increasingly essential
addition to the students’ CVs. Some go to the NCYPE (National Centre for Young People with
Epilepsy) and help through reading, sport and art. Our Prep School Links team is attached to
Prep School classes, visiting on a weekly basis to help with lessons and clubs.
Students also find volunteering work through Worldwide Volunteering and this organisation
gives a presentation to students each year. Students doing Duke of Edinburgh awards carry out
a wide range of volunteering; for example, working in care homes, leisure centres and hospices.
Year 13 students who wish to be mentors to our younger students receive mentoring training
from the School Counsellor and meet with their mentee each week to offer advice and a
friendly face.

Sport
Games forms a part of the Sixth Form timetable. Students will have access to all major team
sports such as football, hockey, netball and rugby sevens in the winter and spring terms.
Cricket, tennis, athletics and rounders are on offer in the summer. The expanding fixture list
against other local independent schools gives plenty of opportunity to represent the School
at all levels of ability. There is also a broad range of other sports and activities, both on and
off campus, offered for students to try throughout the year. Climbing, squash, racketball and
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
gym facilities are used at K2. Pilates and Springfit (gymnastic trampolining) classes are held at
the School.

Badminton, table tennis and the use of the fully equipped fitness suite and sports hall are also
options on offer for all members of the Sixth Form.

Extended Project Qualification

The Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) is an opportunity for students to develop their own
interests through independent research under the guidance of a supervisor. The EPQ gives
students control over their area of investigation. It is compulsory for scholarship holders.

The EPQ has four parts. Firstly, students attend a 30-hour taught course, which covers the
skills necessary to conduct an independent investigation or research project. Students then
produce a ‘log’ which charts the origins, progress and setbacks of their investigation, and
reflects, critically, upon what they have achieved over the course of completing the EPQ.
There is also a ‘product’ which usually takes the form of a 5,000-word essay, but it can also
be an event which is managed by the student, or an artefact created by the student. Finally,
students make a ten-minute presentation on their work to a live audience.

Previous projects have included:

    •   What material and design challenges stand in the way of the creation of an elevator to
        the moon?
    •   Can you keep yourself safe using body language?
    •   To what extent with ethical issues render head transplants unfeasible?
    •   Does bilingualism have a positive impact on educational development?

Discursive Writing Competition

The Discursive Writing Competition is open to all Sixth Form students and is an opportunity
to produce a project exploring and expressing their opinions on current affairs and issues that
matter to them. They can devise their own question and are encouraged to undertake wide
ranging research to inform their final presentation that can take the form of a speech, editorial
article, formal essay or short documentary.

The most recent winning title was “Are the Health Risks Surrounding Vaping Merely Smoke and
Mirrors?”.

Careers Guidance

Careers guidance at Lingfield has expanded significantly. Students currently at Lingfield are
likely to have several career changes during their working life and it is important for them to
identify specific areas of interest and transferable skills which will prepare them for the future.
The development programme already underway includes the on-going training of tutors and
the setting up of a work experience database. Much of the careers guidance students receive is
aimed at choosing suitable university courses. We have a well-established pathway for advising
students about UK university applications through UCAS and are developing further links to
advise students about studying abroad, in particular supporting students with their USA
applications.
SUBJECT CHOICES FOR SIXTH FORM - For entry in 2021 For prospective students
Our Careers Advisor, Maggie Mortleman, who has twenty years’ experience working in the
Recruitment industry, is in school two days a week. She runs a programme of careers
workshops, which include CV writing skills, networking and research skills using LinkedIn, the
importance of work experience and how to find it, degree apprenticeships and how to prepare
and research for interviews.

Mrs Mortleman provides additional support and training for students to deal with new
emerging recruitment practises. For example artificial intelligence interview techniques,
assessment centre days and skills based interviews and holds one-to-one meetings with all
students to provide them with the guidance to develop an action plan to help with their
decisions after A Levels, particularly those that want to prepare for degree apprenticeships.

Work Experience Database
Recent work experience has included Thales, Meridian Radio, PWC, Mace Group, Close
Brothers, John Lewis, Nestlé, Atkins and the Queen Victoria Hospital.

Parents of all Lingfield students are invited to contact Mrs Mortleman if they are able to offer
work experience for students in Years 11-13. Suitable work experience strengthens
applications to many university courses and is essential for disciplines such as Medicine and
Teaching. The career ambitions of Lingfield students are wide-ranging and we welcome the
opportunity for them to gain some insight into the workplace in their proposed discipline.
We are particularly interested to hear from parents involved in business, finance, law, media
and advertising, engineering and all healthcare professionals.

Careers Fair
The Lingfield Careers Fair takes place every two years in the Spring term, the next being in
2022. The organising team includes Sixth Form volunteers who help by communicating the
event to students beforehand and ensuring the smooth running of the day. The Fair includes
a broad selection of careers and has included specialists in the apprenticeships field, such as
Nestlé and John Lewis. Lingfield alumni are invited to give short talks throughout the day, not
just about their experience of higher education and getting into the world of work, but also
those who have chosen a different path towards their career choice. Students prepare for the
Fair through their PSE programme.

Lingfield Alumni
We are keen to involve former Lingfield students who are always willing to give something
back to the School. We keep in contact with former students once they leave us as we
continue to take an interest in their career development long after they leave School. We
welcome visits from former students who are able to give an insight into their university
courses and subsequent experiences in the job market, as the information they can pass on
to existing students is invaluable.

Privileges and New Responsibilities

The Sixth Form operates on a system of trust. It recognises the need for young adults to
develop in an atmosphere of freedom, but also one which encourages responsibility. The Sixth
Formers enjoy a different working relationship with staff and their own space within the
School. They have greater control over their use of their time but they are also the leaders
in our community, serving as School Officials, House Captains, Subject Captains and Prefects.
They show enthusiasm and support for School events and are often responsible for developing
new initiatives. They are expected to help with the organisation and running of the Lower
School.

Alison Folkard
Head of Sixth Form
ART AND DESIGN
                          Fine Art and Photography
Who are we looking for?
Fine Art and Photography are both academic and creative subjects. Students will need to have
the ability to carry out extensive research, experiment, develop ideas and present well-
informed concepts and outcomes. Time management on these courses is essential.

Art students will:

   -   Students opting to study Fine Art at A Level will require a GCSE in Art
   -   They will need to have achieved a level 9-6 but a 9-7 is preferable
   -   Need to be organised, focused and passionate about Art
   -   Need excellent drawing and visual language skills
   -   Be able to take risks and experiment with processes and ideas
   -   Be creative, imaginative and forward thinking
   -   Be able to generate your own concepts and develop outcomes
   -   Need to be able to work independently and be willing to act on feedback

Photography students will:

   -   Ideally have studied GCSE Art or Media and have achieved a level 9-6
       (although this is not essential, potential students MUST demonstrate a
       proven passion for the subject)
   -   Need to have a genuine interest in Photography, as it is a very demanding subject and
       is highly time consuming
   -   Be able to generate exciting concepts with real meaning behind outcomes
   -   Be able to write analytically about the work of a range of traditional and contemporary
       photographers
   -   Need to be organised, self-motivated and able to present work to a high quality
   -   Be keen to learn about the technical aspects of photography
   -   Be creative, imaginative and forward thinking

The Specification:

Our Edexcel A Level in Art and Design has been designed to ensure that students not only
develop practical artistic skills and abilities, but also study Art and Design and its various
contexts. So, in addition to making artefacts, students will be encouraged to reflect on their
own work and on the work of others and will develop aesthetic understanding and critical
judgement.

Students will also develop intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive powers, as well as
investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills.

The Four Assessment Objectives include:

A01: Develop ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and
other sources demonstrating analytical and critical understanding.

A02: Experiment with and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and
processes, reviewing and refining ideas as work develops.
A03: Record in visual and other forms ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions,
demonstrating an ability to reflect on work and progress.

A04: Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating critical
understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between
visual, oral or other elements.

Studying Art/Photography at A Level

Studying Fine Art/Photography at A Level is very rewarding and students will have the
opportunity to explore their own ideas and develop exciting outcomes. Lessons are divided
up between whole class workshops to help develop skills, personal tutorials, group critiques
and independent study. Students receive personal weekly feedback and targets and this allows
them to develop concepts that are individual to them. In Year 13, students complete a
personal investigation and, as part of this project, they produce a written essay that explores
their concept. This research essay supports students’ practical work and allows them to
demonstrate a deeper understanding of their theme and influences.

The Externally Set Assignment is released on 1st February and contains a theme and suggested
starting points. Students have from 1st February until the commencement of the final 15-hour
period of sustained focus to develop preparatory studies. The 15-hour period of sustained
focus under examination conditions may take place over multiple sessions (usually held at the
beginning of May).

What else do we offer?

    -   We offer two dark room days, life drawing opportunities and a two-day exam
        preparation open studio during the Easter holidays

    -   A Level students have their own studio to work in outside of lessons

    -   Open studio runs Tuesday to Thursday from 4-6pm

    -   All Art and Photography students are expected to visit galleries in their own time

Housekeeping

Students will incur a cost of approximately £60 for a starter pack which includes
Art: Sketchbook, portfolio, top up materials pack.
Photography: Sketchbook, film, photographic paper, darkroom paper

NB. Students must ensure they wear protective clothing. The school does not accept responsibility for
damage to clothing. Students must accept responsibility for the storage of their artwork in their plan
chests and subsequent collection of their artwork.

Victoria Lewis
Head of Art
BIOLOGY
To study Biology at AS or A Level, students are expected to have achieved a grade 8 or 9 in
GCSE Biology. Separate GCSE Biology is highly recommended as a precursor to studying A Level
Biology.

The Subject and its Potential
Biology provides access to a wide range of career and education opportunities, such as a degree
course in Biology, Zoology, Botany, Biochemistry, Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, Psychology,
Pharmacy, Environmental Science, Microbiology or Biotechnology and many others.

Aims of the Course
   •   to build on concepts and skills that will have been developed in the GCSE Science
       specifications, presenting Biology as exciting, relevant and challenging.
   •   to present essential principles in contexts that students find interesting and stimulating.
   •   to develop practical skills alongside understanding of concepts and principles.
   •   to foster the application of knowledge.

Course Structure
At Lingfield College we will be offering the AQA specification in Biology for AS and A Level
to provide a seamless progression from the AQA GCSE in Biology. Students will be expected
to attend a weekend day trip during each year of the course and a residential field course in
the summer term.

The Assessment Objectives Examined in the AS and A Level Biology
Course are:
   •   AO1 knowledge and understanding
   •   AO2 application and analysis
   •   AO3 analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information, ideas and evidence

Subject Content
Sections 1–4 are designed to be covered in the first year of the A Level and are also the AS
subject content.
    1. Biological Molecules
    2. Cells
    3. Organisms Exchange Substances with their Environment
    4. Genetic Information, Variation and Relationships Between Organisms

Sections 5-8 are designed to be covered in the second year of the A Level.
   5. Energy Transfers in and Between Organisms (A Level only)
   6. Organisms Respond to Changes in their Internal and External Environments (A Level
       only)
   7. Genetics, Populations, Evolution and Ecosystems (A Level only)
The Control of Gene Expression (A Level only).
AS Level Assessment
At AS Level, sections 1-4 are assessed by two papers, each weighted to 50% of the course.
Assessment of practical skills in the AQA AS specification will be by written exams only and 15%
of the marks in the papers will relate to practical work.

A Level Assessment
At A Level sections 1-8 are assessed by three papers weighted as follows: Paper 1 and 2 will have
a weighting of 35% of the course each and Paper 3 will have a weighting of 30% of the course.
At A Level, practical assessments have been divided into those that can be assessed in written
exams and those that can only be directly assessed whilst students are carrying out experiments.

A Level grades will be based only on marks from written exams. Overall, at least 15% of the total
marks for the A Level will be awarded by the assessment of practical skills.

A separate endorsement of practical skills will be taken alongside the A Level. This will be
assessed by teachers and will be based on direct observation of students’ competency in a range
of skills that are not assessable in written exams. Teachers will assess students against Common
Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) issued by the awarding organisations. Students who
demonstrate the required standard across all the requirements of the CPAC will receive a ‘pass’
grade.

Further Information about the AS and A Level Biology Assessments
Additionally, at least 10% of the marks in assessments for Biology will require the use of
mathematical skills. These skills will be applied in the context of Biology A Level and will be at
least the standard of higher tier GCSE Mathematics.

Textbooks
The course will be supported by text books. These are purchased by the students.

Jonathan Grant
Head of Biology
Head of Science
BUSINESS A Level

The Subject and its Potential
A Level Business provides students with access to a wide range of possible career and higher
education opportunities through learning about different types of businesses, their objectives,
how they operate, how they are organised, how they market themselves and the strategies
they put in place for success. Students develop skills that they can use in either planning their
own business start-up or for working within a variety of organisations.

A Level Business combines well with a range of Social Science, Humanities and Mathematics
subjects, leading to university courses in areas such as Management, Marketing, Human
Resources, Law, Accountancy and Economics.

Aims of the Course
   •   to develop students’ understanding of organisations and the markets they serve and
       the processes of adding value and decision-making in a dynamic external environment
   •   to make students aware of the economic, environmental, ethical, legal, governmental,
       social and technological issues associated with business activity.
   •   To enable students to gain the sort of analytical skills that will enable them to work
       successfully in management roles, or to pursue higher qualifications.

Course Structure – Content and Assessment
The course followed is Edexcel Business and all assessment is at the end of Year 13.

The course is structured around 4 key themes:

Theme 1 – Marketing and People
  • Meeting customer needs
  • The market
  • Marketing mix and strategy
  • Managing people
  • Entrepreneurs and leaders

Theme 2 – Managing Business
  • Raising finance
  • Financial planning
  • Managing finance
  • Resource management
  • External influences

Theme 3 – Business Decisions and Strategy
  • Business objectives and strategy
  • Business growth
  • Decision-making techniques
  • Analysing competitiveness
  • Managing change
Theme 4 – Global Business
  • Globalisation
  • Global markets and business expansion
  • Global marketing
  • Global industries and companies (multinational corporations)

Assessment

At A Level, all the exams are at the end of Year 13 and comprise three two hour papers as
follows:

Paper 1 – Marketing, People and Global Business (testing topics in themes 1 and 4)

Paper 2 – Business Activities, Decisions and Strategy (testing topics in themes 2 and 3)

Paper 3 – Investigating Business in a competitive environment (testing topics across all 4
themes and based upon a pre-release case study)

Students sit an internal exam at the end of Year 12, not the external AS exam.

For more information about the qualification see the Edexcel website below:

http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gce/gce15/business/Pages/default.aspx

Joss Bolton
Head of Economics & Business
BUSINESS BTEC Level 3 Nationals Qualification
The Subject and its Potential
BTEC Business provides students with a vocational alternative to A Level Business, with
assessments spread across the two years of Sixth Form and with a mixture of internal
coursework, external exam and controlled assessment units. The course provides access to
a wide range of possible career and higher education opportunities through practical-based
learning about different types of businesses, their objectives, how they operate, how they are
organised, how they market themselves and aspects of finance. Students develop skills that
they can use in either planning their own business start-up or for working within a small,
medium, large organisation. The emphasis is on practical knowledge and skills.

Business (BTEC) combines well with other BTECs and a range of Social Science, and
Humanities subjects. It can lead to entry onto school leaver programmes, such as
apprenticeships, or to university courses in areas such as Management, Marketing, Human
Resources, Law and Accounting.

Aims of the Course
   •   to develop students’ understanding of organisations and the markets they serve
   •   to make students aware of personal financial decisions they will make in their lifetime,
       and the importance of finance to business success
   •   to allow students to appreciate what is required to develop a marketing campaign for
       a small or medium sized business
   •   to study aspects of our Criminal Justice system though the Law unit (23 below)

Course Structure – Content and Assessment
The course followed is Pearson BTEC Level 3 Business (Extended Certificate).

Students study Units 1 & 3 in Year 1, and Units 2 & 23 in Year 2.

External Assessment

58% of the course is externally assessed while the remainder of the course is assessed through
coursework internally. The external assessments are as follows:
For more information see the Pearson website below:

http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-nationals/business-2016.html

Joss Bolton
Head of Economics and Business
CHEMISTRY
To study Chemistry A Level, students are expected to have achieved a grade 8 or 9 in GCSE
Chemistry. Separate GCSE Chemistry is highly recommended as a precursor to studying A
Level Chemistry. We also recommend sitting A Level Mathematics in conjunction, although
this is not a prerequisite.

The Subject and its Potential
What can I do with Chemistry A Level? Almost anything! However, Chemistry A Level is
particularly important for medicine, pharmacy, veterinary science, and careers in chemical
engineering, the chemical industry and agriculture.

Aims of the Course
The qualification aims to:
stimulate and sustain your interest in, and enjoyment of, Chemistry
show the relationship between the development of the subject and its application and to
recognise the value of Chemistry to society and how it may be used responsibly
develop skills in laboratory procedures and techniques.

Course Structure
We will be offering the new AQA specification in Chemistry for A Level to provide a
seamless progression from GCSE Level Chemistry. Students will be expected to attend day
trip during each year of the course.

Assessment Objectives
The Assessment Objectives examined in the A Level Chemistry course are:
•    AO1 knowledge and understanding
•    AO2 application and analysis
•    AO3 analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information, ideas and evidence

Subject Content
Sections 1-4 are designed to be covered in the first year of the A Level.
1.   Atomic structure and Bonding
2.   Energetics, Kinetics and Redox
3.   Groups 2 and 7 Chemistry
4.   Organic Functional Group Chemistry

Sections 5-9 are designed to be covered in the second year of the A Level.
5. Thermodynamics and Equilibrium
6. Acids and Bases
7. Period 3 and Transition Metal Chemistry
8. Functional Group Chemistry
9. Organic synthesis and analysis
A Level Assessment
At A Level, sections 1-9 are assessed by three papers weighted as follows: Paper 1 and 2 will
have a weighting of 35% of the course each and Paper 3 will have a weighting of 30% of the
course. At A Level, practical assessments have been divided into those that can be assessed
in written exams and those that can only be directly assessed whilst students are carrying out
experiments.

A Level grades will be based only on marks from written exams. Overall, at least 15% of the
total marks for the A Level will be awarded by the assessment of practical skills.

A separate endorsement of practical skills will be taken alongside the A Level. This will be
assessed by teachers and will be based on direct observation of students’ competency in a
range of skills that are not assessable in written exams. Teachers will assess students against
Common Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) issued by the awarding organisations.
Students who demonstrate the required standard across all the requirements of the CPAC
will receive a “pass” grade.

Further information about the A Level Chemistry Assessments
Additionally, at least 20% of the marks in assessments for Chemistry will require the use of
mathematical skills. These skills will be applied in the context of Chemistry A Level and will
be at least the standard of higher tier GCSE Mathematics.

Textbooks
The course will be supported by text books. These are purchased by the students.

Paul Rickard
Head of Chemistry
COMPUTER SCIENCE

The Subject and its Potential

Computer Science is a practical subject where you can apply the academic principles learned
in the classroom to real-world systems. It’s an intensely creative subject that combines
invention and excitement, that can look at the natural world through a digital prism. The
course will give you the opportunity to learn computational thinking, helping you to develop
the skills to solve problems, design systems and understand the power and limits of human
and machine intelligence.

What will I study?

The qualification will be focused on programming and emphasise the importance of
computational thinking as a discipline. There’ll be an expanded maths focus, much of which
will be embedded within the course.

Aims of the Course

The aims of Computer Science are to enable learners to develop:

An understanding of and ability to apply the fundamental principles and concepts of Computer
Science including:
    • The ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience
       of solving problems.
    • The capacity for thinking creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically.
    • The capacity to see relationships between different aspects of Computer Science.

Course Structure

Component 01 - Computer Systems: Software and its development, Types of
programming languages, Data types, representation and structures, Exchanging data and web
technologies, Following algorithms, Using Boolean algebra, Legal, moral and ethical issues.

Component 02 - Algorithms and Programming: Elements of computational thinking,
Programming and problem solving, Pattern recognition, abstraction and decomposition,
Algorithm design and efficiency, Standard algorithms, there’ll be a short scenario/task in the
exam paper, which could be an algorithm. You will be required to analyse it and provide a
suitable solution.

Component 03 Programming project: You, with the guidance of your teacher, will select
your own user-driven problem of an appropriate size and complexity to solve. This will enable
you to demonstrate the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the Assessment Objectives.
You will need to analyse the problem, design & implement the solution and give a thorough
evaluation.
Assessments:

Computer Science A Level will be fully linear so assessment of your knowledge and
understanding of the whole course takes place at the end of two years of study.

The A Level will consist of three components, two of which will be externally marked question
papers making up 80% of the qualification. The other 20% will be the coursework project, which
will have an emphasis on coding and programming.

The assessment structure for the course is as follows:
01 Computer Systems: Marks: 140; Duration: 2 hr 30 mins; Weighting: 40%
02 Algorithms and Programming: Marks: 140; Duration: 2 hr 30 mins; Weighting: 40%
03 Programming project: Marks: 70 marks; Weighting: 20%

What other subjects go well with Computer Science?
Traditionally Computing has often been combined very successfully with a Science or
Mathematics. However in the modern computer industry people come from all sorts of
backgrounds very often not remotely mathematical. Communication skills are often as important
as a logical mind.

After the course?
You can, based on your results, apply for Computer Science/Software Engineering related
disciplines at university or take an apprenticeship route to gain experience and qualifications as
a software engineer/software developer etc.

Benjamin Monk
Head of Computer Science
DRAMA AND THEATRE STUDIES

The Subject and its Potential

Employment in the creative industries is growing at twice the national rate, and now
accounts for more than 6% of all jobs in the UK according to 2019 data from The UK
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

Drama and Theatre Studies is accepted by all universities and colleges in line with all other
academic subjects. Beyond that, employers increasingly favour the creativity, problem solving,
and communication skills covered in Theatre Studies through working both practically and
academically in a collaborative environment.

“Many jobs require additional and very human qualities like communication, empathy, creativity,
strategic thinking, questioning, and dreaming. Collectively, we often refer to these qualities as “soft
skills,” but don’t let the name fool you; these soft skills are going to be hard currency in the job market
as AI and technology take over some of the jobs that can be performed without people.”
(Bernard Marr, internationally best-selling author, popular keynote speaker, futurist, and a
strategic business & technology advisor to governments and companies).

Qualifications
It is not necessary to have taken GCSE Drama but an interest and some experience in the
subject is essential. A willingness and enthusiasm to participate within a group and sound literary
skills are needed. There is a minimum number of three students needed for the course to run.

Course Structure
Pearson Edexcel Drama and Theatre (Course code 9DR0)
A Level comprises Components 1, 2, 3.
The A Level course consists of two coursework components and one externally examined paper.

 Component 1: Devising (code: 9DR0/01)
 Coursework
 40% of the qualification
 80 marks
 Content overview
    • Devise an original performance piece
    • Use one key extract from a performance text and a theatre practitioner as stimuli
    • Centre choice of text and practitioner
    • Performer or designer routes available
 Assessment overview
    • Internally assessed and externally moderated
    • There are two parts to the assessment:
           1) A portfolio (60 marks): (30% of qualification)
 Written evidence of between 2500-3000 words or recorded/verbal evidence between 12-14
 minutes or combination.
           2) The devised performance /design realisation (20 marks): (10% of qualification).
Component 2: Text in Performance (code: 9DR0/ 02)
 Coursework
 20% of the qualification
 60 marks
 Content overview
    • A group performance / design realisation of one key extract from a performance
       text.
    • A monologue or duologue performance design realisation from one key extract
       from a different text.
    • Centre choice of performance texts
 Assessment overview
    • Externally assessed by a visiting examiner
    • Group performance / design realisation: worth 36 marks (12% of qualification)
    • Monologue or duologue/ design realisation: worth 24 marks (8% of qualification)

 Component 3: Theatre Makers in Practice (code: 9DR0 / 03)
 Written examination: 2hrs 30 mins
 40% of the qualification
 80 marks
 Content overview
    • Live theatre evaluation – choice of performance.
    • Practical exploration and study of a complete text – focusing on how this can be
       realised for performance.
    • Practical exploration and interpretation of another complete performance text, in
       light of a chosen practitioner – focusing on how this text could be reimagined for a
       contemporary audience.
    • Centre choice of 15 performance texts.
    • Choice of 8 practitioners

Drama and Theatre and transferable skills

Cognitive skills: Non-routine problem solving, systems thinking, critical thinking, ICT literacy
Interpersonal skills: Communication, relationship-building, collaborative problem solving
Intrapersonal skills: Adaptability, self-management and self-development

Drama and Theatre beyond School

Drama is a popular subject at degree level and many universities offer single and joint honours
courses. Drama schools offer an alternative training for the exceptionally gifted, but these are
highly competitive and do not always offer a degree course. Drama and Theatre Studies
develops transferable skills well suited to careers in any of the following areas:

  Creative Arts              Law
  Teaching/coaching          Management/Leadership
  Journalism                 Entrepreneurship
  Police                     Social care/nursing
  Psychology                 Event Planning

Josh McEwan
Director of Drama
ECONOMICS
The Subject and its Potential
Economics is broadly divided into two main areas – microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Microeconomics deals with the actions of individual firms or markets. Economic theory and
concepts are studied then applied to reality, through contemporary issues such as:

Government policy to reduce household waste; intervening in markets where firms are able to exploit
consumers through monopoly powers; how to tackle rising obesity levels; how to alleviate inequality,
resolving issues around the supply of adequate housing.

Macroeconomics deals with the economy as a whole. Students analyse changes to the
economy through understanding the impact of policy on inflation, unemployment, the balance
of payments and international trade. Students will apply economic theory to current problems
and issues, such as:

How the government should stimulate sustainable growth in the UK economy; the impact of growing
protectionism for developed and developing economies; the effectiveness of policy to overcome such
issues as unemployment caused by the development of AI.

Aims of the Course
Many students study Economics with a view to continuing to university level or starting
careers in government, financial and corporate roles. The course also prepares students to
understand what goes on in the economy that will affect them at different stages of their own
personal life. The course strongly emphasises development of critical thinking skills.

Course Structure
The course followed is AQA Economics 7136 which has all assessment at the end of Year 13.

The course is structured around 2 key themes:

Theme 1- Individuals, Firms, Markets and Market Failure

   •   Economic methodology and the economic problem
   •   Individual economic decision making
   •   Price determination in a competitive market
   •   Production, costs and revenue
   •   Perfect competition, imperfectly competitive markets and monopoly
   •   The labour market
   •   The distribution of income and wealth: poverty and inequality
   •   The market mechanism, market failure and government intervention in markets
Theme 2 - Macroeconomics

   •   The measurement of macroeconomic performance
   •   How the macro economy works: the circular flow of income, AD/AS analysis and
       related concepts
   •   Economic performance
   •   Financial markets and monetary policy
   •   Fiscal policy and supply-side policies
   •   The international economy

Assessment

At A Level, all the exams are at the end of Year 13 and comprise three two hour papers as
follows:

Paper 1 – Markets and Market Failure (testing topics in Theme 1)

Paper 2 – National and International Economy (testing topics in Theme 2)

Paper 3 – Economic Principles and Issues (testing topics across both Themes 1 and 2)

Students sit an internal exam at the end of Year 12, not the external AS exam.

For more information, see the AQA website below:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/business-subjects/as-and-A Level/economics-7135-7136

Joss Bolton
Head of Economics & Business
ENGLISH LANGUAGE

The Subject and its Potential
Students of AS or A Level English Language have a wide range of skills open to them as many
of the skills learned are transferable. These include writing for a variety of audiences and
purposes, responding to written and spoken texts and expressing informed and independent
opinions.

English Language (or Linguistics) can be studied in Higher Education as a single subject or in
combination with many other subjects such as History, Media, Law, Politics and Foreign
Languages.

Aims of the Course
This course is suitable for those who have an interest in how and why the English language
has developed in the way that it has. It is studied as a living entity from earliest times right up
to the changes which are taking place because of the technology of today. It reflects English
both spoken and written in the real world and students are taught to be discriminating in their
reading and aware of the manipulation apparent in many kinds of speech.

Course Structure and Assessment
We follow the syllabus offered by the AQA board. Students are able to gain either an AS
Level or an A Level in English Language. The two can be co-taught but we strongly
encourage students to consider the A Level option.

Assessments
Paper 1: Language and the individual
What’s assessed:
  • Textual variations and representations

   •   Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities
Written exam (1 hour 30 minutes), 70 marks

Questions:
Textual variations and representations
Two texts, linked by topic or theme.
   • A question requiring analysis of one text (25 marks)

   •   A question requiring analysis of a second text (25 marks)

   •   A question requiring the comparison of the two texts (20 marks)

Paper 2: Language varieties
What’s assessed:
  • Language diversity

   •   Writing Skills

   •   Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities
Written exam (1 hour 30 minutes), 70 marks

Questions:
Section A – Language Diversity: A discursive essay on language diversity, with a choice of
two questions (30 marks)
Section B – Language discourses: A directed writing task on attitudes to language (40 marks)

A Level Subject Content
   •   Textual variations and representations
   •   Children’s language development
   •   Language diversity and change
   •   Language discourses
   •   Writing skills
   •   Language investigation
   •   Original writing
   •   Methods of language analysis underpin each component.

Assessments
Paper 1: Language, the individual and society
What’s assessed:
  • Textual variations and representations

   •   Children’s language development

   •   Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities

Written exam (2 hours 30 minutes), 100 marks, 40% of A Level

Questions:
Section A: Textual variations and representations
Two texts (one contemporary and one older text) linked by topic or theme.
   • A question requiring analysis of one text (25 marks)

   •   A question requiring analysis of a second text (25 marks)

   •   A question requiring the comparison of the two texts (20 marks)
Section B – Children’s language development
A discursive essay on children’s language development, with a choice of two questions
where the data provided will focus on spoken, written or multimodal language (30 marks)

Paper 2: Language diversity and change
What’s assessed:
  • Language diversity and change

   •   Language discourses
•   Writing skills

   •   Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities

Written exam (2 hours 30 minutes), 100 marks, 40% of A Level

Questions:
Section A: Diversity and change
   • One question from a choice of two:

   •   Either: an evaluative essay on language diversity (30 marks)

   •   Or: and evaluative essay on language change (30 marks)

Section B – Language discourses
Two texts about a topic linked to the study of diversity and change.
   • A question requiring analysis of how the texts use language to present ideas,
       attitudes and opinions (40 marks)

   •   A directed writing task linked to the same topic and the ideas in the texts (30 marks)

Non-exam assessment: Language in action
What’s assessed:
  • Language investigation

   •   Original writing

   •   Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities

Assessed: word count 3,500, 100 marks, 20% of A Level. Assessed by teachers, moderated
by AQA.
Tasks:
Students produce:
   • A language investigation (2,000 words excluding data)

   •   A piece of original writing and commentary (1,500 words total)

Alex Sweetlove
Head of English
ENGLISH LITERATURE

The Subject and its Potential
English Literature offers students a wide range of possible higher education and career paths.
The skills developed are in high demand from employers and universities. The subject
develops independent and critical thought, research skills and the power to express ideas
effectively and succinctly in both spoken and written forms.

Aims of the course
Anyone studying for an A Level in Literature must be an avid reader, confident and able to
discuss the various issues that Literature presents. Analytical responses to poetry, prose and
drama texts nurture independent and collaborative thinking together with a critical and
philosophical open mindedness.

Course Structure
We follow the Edexcel Exam Board syllabus and students all study the full A Level.

Paper 1       Drama (30%)
Students will:
   • Study on Shakespeare play and one other drama from either tragedy or comedy- both
     texts may be selected from one or both of these categories. We have chosen to study
     Tragedy: Othello and A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams.
   • Study a collection of critical essays related to their selected Shakespeare play.
     Students’ preparation is supported by: Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology
     provided by the board.

Paper 2       Prose (20%)
Students will:
   • Study two prose texts from a chosen theme. At least one of the prose texts must be
     pre-1900. Our chosen theme is The Supernatural and we compare Dracula by Bram
     Stoker and The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters.

Paper 3       Poetry (30%)
Students will:
   • Study poetic form, meaning, language, style and conventions in a wide range of modern
     poetry including the set texts from the Poems of the Decade: An Anthology of
     the Forward Books of Poetry 2002-2011
   • Study aspects of an established literary canon from the pre-1900 selection set by the
     exam board. We have selected to study the work of John Keats

Non-Examined Assessment (Coursework) 20%
Students will have a free choice of two literary texts to study in comparison. Chosen texts
must:
   • Be different from those studied in the exam components and not in translation.
   • Be complete texts that may be linked by theme, movement, author or period.
   • Be selected from poetry, drama, prose or literary non-fiction…

Alex Sweetlove
Head of English
GEOGRAPHY

The Subject and its Potential
Geography is a subject which aims to understand the nature of the physical and human
environment whilst unravelling the debates surrounding the contemporary challenges facing
the world today. The subject appeals to those who want a greater understanding of the
world we live in from the physical processes that underpin and impact life on Earth to
the growing influence of the human society in which we live. Geography is a hugely
important and relevant subject today due to the growing awareness of environmental
destruction, inequalities and geopolitical conflicts. Geography bridges the Arts/Science
barrier and consequently combines well with many subjects such as Biology, Physics,
Mathematics, English, History, Business Studies and Economics.

Aims of the Course
The course aims to challenge perceptions and stimulate investigative and analytical skills. It
allows students to broaden their knowledge and understanding of places, environments,
concepts, processes, interactions and change at a variety of scales from local to global.
Students will be able to construct arguments and draw conclusions from geographical
information and issues.

Course Structure - Content and Assessment
We will be following the syllabus offered by the AQA Examinations Board. There are two
exam papers and one coursework unit.

A Level

Paper 1: Physical Geography (40% of A Level)

Section A: Water and Carbon Cycles. Students will study the importance of the water and
carbon cycles for life on Earth. It asks students to contemplate the significance of these cycles
within the natural environment and human populations.

Section B: Coastal Systems. Students will create an informed appreciation of the beauty and
diversity of coasts and their importance as human habitats through studying the processes
and landforms that shape the coastline.

Section C: Hazards. Students will be taught to engage with many dimensions of the
relationships between people and the environment through exploring the origin and nature
of a variety of natural hazards and the various ways humans respond to them.

Paper 2: Human Geography (40% of A Level)

Section A: Global Systems and global governance. Students will contemplate the driving forces
behind globalisation, the increased interdependence between people, states and environments
and the complex dimensions of contemporary world affairs.
Section B: Changing Places. The focus for students is on people’s engagement with places,
their experience of them and the factors and processes which impact places causing them to
change and develop over time.

Section C: Contemporary Urban Environments. Students look at urban growth and the
environmental and social challenges facing human populations such as environmental
sustainability and social cohesion.

Geography Fieldwork Investigation (20% of A Level)

Students are required to undertake 4 days fieldwork which begins to inform the independent
investigation. Students will then create their own unique question/hypothesis, decide on the
methods to use, collect and analyse data and finally conclude and evaluate the investigation.
This is written up as a 3000-4000 word report.

Geography and Key Skills
Geography lends itself to the development of a wide range of transferable key skills. Studying
geographical issues requires problem solving and critical thinking, while collecting and
presenting fieldwork data develops digital literacy through the use if Geographical Information
Systems (GIS). The fieldwork investigation fosters independence, self-motivation and how to
manage time effectively. Students are also expected to read widely around the subject which
prepares them for the challenges of university.

Amy Greetham
Head of Geography
HISTORY

The Subject and its Potential

The course will appeal to those students who:
   •   have an interest in the study of the past and its importance
   •   seek an academic challenge
   •   enjoy debate
   •   want an excellent springboard for the challenges of higher education
   •   want a qualification that opens many opportunities both in higher education and in career
       choices.

You will gain many transferable skills, analysis and interpretation of information and the ability to
construct and justify a coherent argument. These skills are much sought after in many areas of
academia as well as in commerce and industry. History combines well with humanities and is an
excellent introduction to many BA Honours courses. History A Level can lead into careers such
as law, the civil service, management and journalism. It is not essential to have studied History at
GCSE to take A Level, but usually advised.

Aims of the Course
   •   to prepare students for degree-level study
   •   to heighten awareness of the complex interrelation between social, political and economic
       factors in the decision-making process
   •   to allow students to make sense of an increasingly complex and confusing world.

Course Structure – Content and Assessment
The course followed will be that of the 2015 Edexcel Board.

A Level
This is a linear qualification, all assessment to take place at the end of 2 years.

Paper 1- Germany and West Germany, 1918-89
(2 hours 15 mins paper, 30%)
A study in breadth, students will learn about key political changes experience in a unified
Germany and then in West Germany after the Second World War, and the impact of these
changes. This option contains a study in depth of historical interpretations on how far Hitler’s
foreign policy was responsible for the Second World War.

Paper 2 – Spain, 1930-78: republicanism, Francoism and the re-establishment of
democracy
(1 hour 30 mins, 20%)
A study in depth of Spain, a dramatic period for Spaniards which spanned years of democracy,
dictatorship and then democracy again, and led to the creation of the modern Spanish state.
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