A guide for service station operators - under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 - Worksafe QLD

 
A guide for service station operators - under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 - Worksafe QLD
A guide for service station operators

under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011
A guide for service station operators - under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 - Worksafe QLD
© The State of Queensland 2018
Copyright protects this document. The State of Queensland has no objection to this material being reproduced, but
asserts its right to be recognised as author of the original material and the right to have the material unaltered.
The material presented in this publication is distributed by the Queensland Government as an information source only.
The State of Queensland makes no statements, representations, or warranties about the accuracy or completeness of
the information contained in this publication, and the reader should not rely on it. The Queensland Government disclaims
all responsibility and all liability (including, without limitation, liability in negligence) for all expenses, losses, damages and
costs you might incur as a result of the information being inaccurate or incomplete in any way, and for any reason.

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Contents
1. Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 4
2. Information at the site boundary ...................................................................................... 6
3. Maintaining the service station forecourt.......................................................................... 7
   Controlling fire or explosion during tanker filling operations (s.355) ................................. 9
   Abandoned underground tanks (s.366 and s.367) ........................................................... 9
   Abandoned aboveground tanks (s.365) ......................................................................... 10
   Dispensers (s.363) ......................................................................................................... 10
   Placards (s.350) and safety signs (s.353) ...................................................................... 11
   Spill containment and cleanup provisions (s.357) .......................................................... 12
   Portable LPG cylinder exchange facilities ...................................................................... 14
   LPG Tanks ..................................................................................................................... 15
   Controlling potential ignition sources (s.355).................................................................. 15
   Firefighting equipment (s.359) ........................................................................................ 16
   General Housekeeping (s.53) ........................................................................................ 16
4. Inside the shop .............................................................................................................. 17
   What should service station staff know? ........................................................................ 18
   Information the PCBU should keep on site or have available for an inspector ............... 19
5. Further information......................................................................................................... 19

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1. Introduction
The Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (the WHS Act) regulates the safe management of
hazardous chemicals including flammable and combustible substances at Queensland workplaces.
A person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) which uses, handles, stores or generates
hazardous chemicals must comply with specific sections in chapter 3 and chapter 7.1 of the Work
Health and Safety Regulation 2011 (the WHS Regulation).
Fuels found at service stations include commercial grades of petrol (e.g. unleaded, premium
unleaded, ethanol blends), diesel and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). These fuels are classified as
hazardous chemicals under the WHS Regulation. Service station owners and operators have
duties as a PCBU under the WHS Act and WHS Regulation in regard to the safe management of
hazardous chemicals.
The service station industry adopts a range of business arrangements where different parties (i.e.
duty holders) may be responsible for different parts of the business.
Responsibilities range from:
 the supply of liquid and gaseous fuel products
 fuel storage and dispensing systems (infrastructure and its maintenance and repair)
 the retail store
 the land ownership.
Service station owners and operators must note that under s.14 and s.15 of the Act, a duty cannot
be transferred to another person, and that a person can have more than one duty (e.g. duty holder
could be a PCBU and a supplier). Guidance provided here may be relevant to multiple duty-holders
involved in a service station operation.
What is this guide about?
This guide has been developed to assist operators (i.e. PCBU) of fuel retail outlets, such as service
stations, to meet their duties under the WHS Regulation. The guide focuses on hazardous
chemical requirements for the fuel storage and handling issues typically associated with service
stations. This guide will assist with inspection and auditing of service stations under the WHS
Regulation.
It does not address environmental requirements which are regulated under the Environmental
Protection Act 1994, nor does it address the wider range of hazards that might be associated with
a multi-use site, such as workshops and other retail activities. Therefore, there will likely be site
specific issues not addressed in this guide that the PCBU will need to address.
The WHS Regulation requires that the risk from hazardous chemicals be minimised as far as
reasonably practicable. However, with some exceptions, the legislation does not prescribe how this
is to be done. Practical guidance is available in the following technical resources:
 Managing Risks of Hazardous Chemicals in the Workplace Code of Practice 2013
 AS 1940: The storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids
 AS 4897: The design, installation and operation of underground petroleum storage systems
 AS 4977: Petroleum products-Pipeline, road tanker compartment and underground tank
  identification
 AS 4976: The removal and disposal of underground petroleum storage tanks.

While compliance with these standards is not mandated by the legislation, they are valuable in
providing good industry practice and known ways1 to control the associated risks.
This guide is based on a combination of specific WHS Regulation requirements and relevant
sections from Australian Standards where practical guidance is available.

1   Refer to Safe Work Australia’s Interpretive Guideline for the meaning of ‘reasonably practicable’ under the
    Model Work Health and Safety Act available at www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au.
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A service station will typically store in excess of the prescribed manifest quantity of 2500 litres for
commercial grades of petrol (based on a Flammable Liquid Category 2 GHS classification2), as
well as quantities of combustible liquids (e.g. diesel) and LP gas for retail sale and refuelling of
vehicles. Therefore, a service station is referred to as a manifest quantity workplace (MQW),
requiring the workplace to:
 have a site manifest (includes a site plan with specific information to be included)
 notify3 Workplace Health and Safety Queensland (WHSQ) of their location and quantities of
   hazardous chemicals
 provide to the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES)4, a copy of the workplace’s
   emergency plan which addresses relevant chemical emergencies such as a large fuel spill, gas
   leak or fire.

2 Always confirm the product’s hazardous chemical classification using the manufacturer’s safety data sheet.
3 Under WHS Regulation s.348, a manifest quantity workplace must notify WHSQ of the types and quantities
  of hazardous chemicals and provide a copy of a Schedule 12 compliant manifest. This can be done using
  Form 73 available at www.worksafe.qld.gov.au.
4 Under the WHS Regulation s.361, a copy of the emergency plan must be provided to QFES for review.

  This can be done by emailing the plan to qfes.EMPlanning@psba.qld.gov.au.
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2. Information at the site boundary
A service station (which is an MQW) must have the following located at the main entrance (most
used) to the site:
Manifest in a weatherproof container (s5.347)

                                                                    The manifest and site plan must be kept in a place that
                                                                    is in agreement with QFES. QFES recommend that the
                                                                    manifest and site plan be kept in a red waterproof
                                                                    container kept as close as possible to the main
                                                                    entrance. While it is not mandatory to include the word
                                                                    HAZMAT, it is recommended as a useful inclusion.
                                                                    Refer to QFES guidance on what to do about storing
                                                                    the manifest.

Information to be contained in the site manifest is listed in schedule 12 of the WHS Regulation. Such
information is mandated to assist QFES manage an incident at the workplace.

The manifest must have the following:                                       A site plan that must include the following:
 Name and address of workplace.                                             Main entry and other entry and exit points
 Date manifest prepared.                                                       to the site.
 24/7 contact numbers of two persons.                                       Location and identification of tanks and
 For tanks – tank ID, Type: U/G or A/G and                                     package stores.
   capacity (L).                                                             Location of manifest, site drains, fuel and
 Proper shipping name (e.g. Petrol), UN                                        power isolation points.
   Number, DG Class and Packing Group for                                    Essential fire services and gas supply
   dangerous goods.                                                          nature of the occupancies of the adjacent
 For diesel the words ‘Combustible Liquid’.                                    sites.
 For package storage areas – ID Code and                                    Legend of symbols and codes used in the
   largest quantity of each Class of DG likely to                               plan.
   be stored in the area.                                                    Identification of true north.
 Site plan.                                                                 Be to scale.

Outer warning placard (s.349)

                                                                    For retail fuel outlets only, this outer warning placard
                                                                    is no longer required.

For non-retail sites, that is, fuel not-for-retail-sale such as a works depot or fuel distributor facility,
the HAZCHEM outer warning placard is required at the entrance of the site if placard quantity is
exceeded.

5   (s) Refers to the section in the WHS Regulation. For example, s.347 refers to section 347 in the WHS
    Regulation.
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3. Maintaining the service station forecourt
                                                                                         Impact protection (s.358)
                                                                                         Bollards, high curbing or other barriers with
                                                                                         sufficient clearance to that being protected such
                                                                                         as dispensers and vent pipes is required to
                                                                                         protect them from impact damage.

                                                                                         Spill containment (s.357)
                                                                                         Spill containment systems (e.g. curbing, graded
                                                                                         surfaces, inlets to underground interceptors) in
                                                                                         place for the dispensing area on the concrete
                                                                                         forecourt, must be maintained (should be
                                                                                         undamaged). Older installations may not have
                                                                                         incorporated such systems into their design and
                                                                                         must rely on spill kits and emergency response
                                                                                         actions that consider the direction of flow of any
                                                                                         spilled liquids.
       Prevent damage to underground tanks and
       pipework (s.358)
       If the concrete is damaged, vehicles could
       damage buried tanks or pipework.

     Fill and dip point markers for underground tanks (AS4977)

                                                                          Remote fill points located in a fill box

    Underground tanks must have colour-coded fill and dip point markers according to the AS4977:

                                                                      Fill point marker colors

                                                                           Unleaded petrol (ULP) – violet outer, white inner
                                                                           Premium unleaded (PULP) – yellow outer, white inner
                                                                           Lead replacement petrol (LRP) – red outer, white inner
                                                                           High octane fuel – blue outer, white inner
                                                                           Diesel – olive outer, black inner
                                                                           Ethanol ULP blend – violet outer, orange inner
                                                                           Ethanol PULP blend – yellow outer, orange inner

                                                                      Note: Number on inner circle indicates tank number.

Fill/dip containment or spill containment boxes must be free of fuel. Any tank overfill should be
cleaned up or drained into an underground tank. If fuel is present, it presents a fire risk and would
indicate unacceptable tank filling procedures. If there is any water present, the seals could be
faulty and may need replacing.

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Vent pipes (AS 1940)

                                                                                                        Example vent cap
                                                                                                        designed to prevent
                                                                                                        ingress of rain water

Vent pipes should be located away from trafficable areas to avoid impacts. Wherever there is a risk
of impact and damage they should be protected with suitable bollards or barriers. Curbing can
provide protection from impact from slow moving vehicles provided vent pipes are set back and not
in the direct line of traffic flow.
Vent pipes positioned against a wall should be secured to the wall and protected against damage
when directly adjacent to a vehicle parking space or vehicle manoeuvring area.
Vents should be fitted with ‘up-flow’ type vent caps which prevent the ingress of rainwater as
shown above.
Vent termination point must be located at least four metres above the ground and at least four
metres laterally for flammable liquids and two metres laterally for combustible liquids from any
building opening. This may include a window, door, air-conditioner or mechanical vent intake to
reduce possibility of the entry of vapour.
Cathodic protection
At some service stations, cathodic protection may have been installed on underground storage
tanks (UST) and piping (e.g. steel construction) to help protect against corrosion and maintain
system integrity. According to AS1940, any buried tank must be provided with corrosion protection.
This can be in the form of non-corrosive materials such as fibreglass or fibreglass coatings. For
steel tanks, corrosion protection can be provided with protective coatings and wrappings or
cathodic protection (CP) according to AS 2832.1 or AS 2832.2 for pipework and buried structures
respectively. In some sites with bad corrosion history, both coatings and cathodic protection are
used in conjunction to protect steel tanks and pipes.
There are two types of cathodic protection systems for UST facilities:
 sacrificial (galvanic) anodes
 impressed current systems.
Both types do exactly the same thing—deliver current to the steel tanks and piping that are in
contact with the soil and/or water. In both cases it is necessary to conduct periodic inspections of
the cathodic protection systems. Current must be provided continually to the tank system. Should
the CP system be interrupted, the tanks will continue to corrode.
If a cathodic protection system has been installed, then it must be maintained in accordance with
AS 2832 Cathodic Protection of Metals Part 1 - Pipes and Cables and Part 2 - Compact Buried
Structures. The standard requires surveys to be carried out every 12 months for underground
petrol or diesel tanks and every six months for buried LPG tanks. Survey reports should be
available as well as design documentation for the cathodic protection system. It is also
recommended that regular monitoring (at least every two months) of voltage and current should be
maintained on impressed current systems.
The PCBU should be able to provide documentary records that the appropriate levels of
monitoring, inspection and testing is being done on the CP system, the minimum requirement
being the AS 2832 test criteria.
These systems are regulated by Part 13 of the Electrical Safety Regulation 2013, where all
cathodic protection systems capable of delivering a current greater of 0.25A must be registered.

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This would apply to all induced current cathodic protection systems and where there are a number
of tanks connected together to sacrificial anodes.
These systems must be periodically tested and test results kept. Further information on cathodic
protection requirements under the Electrical Safety Regulation 2013 is available at
worksafe.qld.gov.au/electricalsafety or contact the Electrical Safety Office via 1300 362 128.

Controlling fire or explosion during tanker filling operations (s.355)
The PCBU must identify areas where an explosive gas atmosphere may exist from time to time to
control ignition sources, such that a fire or explosion cannot occur. This requires the classification
of hazardous areas by a suitably qualified person. Site plans detailing hazardous areas applicable
to the service station such as those around tank fill and dip points and during tanker filling
operations should be kept by the PCBU. Such site plans should be made available to workers and
contractors that may need to perform construction, maintenance and repair work in or near a
hazardous area.
Note: The tanker driver must comply with the Transport Operations (Road Use Management –
Dangerous Goods) Regulation 2008 which stipulates specific distances for exclusion zones from
the tanker’s hose connection point.
The tanker vehicle should be parked wholly within the property during discharge process. The
tanker driver should be in view of the discharge and fill points and able to stop all tank filling in an
emergency situation and flexible hoses should not run under the tanker vehicle.
If the exclusion zone extends over the service station driveway or a fuel dispensing area, vehicles
must be prohibited from entering that area. The service station may need to be shut down for the
duration of the tank filling operation or the tank filling operation carried out outside of normal
operating hours.
The tanker delivery driver and site operator must have a clear understanding of where the
exclusion zone extends to and provide adequate barriers (e.g. witches hats) and warning signs for
the duration that transfer hoses are connected.

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Abandoned underground tanks (s.366 and s.367)
An underground fuel storage system (i.e., underground fuel tank) not in use must be removed, or if
not reasonably practical to do so, then made safe. It may not be reasonably practical to remove
due to significant pipe work associated with other tanks and services existing in the subsurface
above the tank, or the tank’s removal will impact on surrounding structures (e.g. adjacent in-service
tanks).
If an underground or mounded tank used to store flammable and combustible liquids has not been
used for two years it must be considered abandoned and WHSQ must be notified using Form 72:
Notification of an abandoned tank.
All disused underground tanks should be dealt with in accordance with Australian Standard AS
4976.

                                                                              Wherever possible the underground tank should
                                                                              be removed from site.
                                                                              However, if decommissioning in-situ is
                                                                              undertaken (i.e. removal of residual liquid and
                                                                              vapours and filling with inert material) the vent
                                                                              pipe and other associated fittings must be
                                                                              removed.

                                                                              Ensure records of decommissioning are kept and
                                                                              documents such as the emergency plan,
                                                                              manifest and relevant notifications are amended.

Abandoned aboveground tanks (s.365)
All aboveground storage system not in use must be free of the hazardous chemicals and placard
removed. If not free of the hazardous chemical (e.g. residual liquid and/or vapour), the storage and
handling system must maintain the relevant labels for the system such as a tank placard.

Dispensers (s.363)

                                                   Hosepipes
                                                   lying on the
                                                   ground can be
                                                   easily
                                                   damaged by
                                                   vehicles.

                                                                                                                             A better option
                                                   Evidence of                                                               to reduce wear
                                                   leak shown at                                                             for longer
                                                   hose                                                                      hose lengths.
                                                   connection.

     Note: No latching device allowed on petrol dispensing nozzle.

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Placards (s.350) and safety signs (s.353)

     Warning placards (s.350)
                                                                    Any aboveground LP gas tank (container with a water
                                                                    capacity greater than 500 litres) requires an information
        Liquefied Petroleum Gas                                     placard as shown.

       UN No.                                                       The cylinders used for decanting are generally
Spill containment and clean-up provisions (s.357)
Section 357 of the WHS Regulation provides specific duties for PCBUs regarding spill containment
and recovery systems for hazardous chemicals (e.g. unleaded and diesel fuels). To summarise this
duty as it applies to service stations, PCBUs must contain fuel leaks (including any resultant effluent)
within their workplace so far as is reasonably practicable. For newly-constructed service stations,
this is commonly achieved by the use of double-walled corrosion-resistant underground tanks fitted
with automatic tank gauging (ATG) and double-walled corrosion-resistant pipelines connecting tanks
to dispensers. Older installations (e.g. those installed before the 1990s) typically consist of single-
walled steel tanks with single-walled steel pipelines connecting tanks to dispensers.

Section 4.5 of AS4897: The design, installation and operation of underground petroleum storage
systems provides known-ways for monitoring leaks in underground petroleum storage systems
(UPSS) and the most common types in use today are Statistical inventory analysis (SIA) and ATG.
Due to their age and reduced number of engineering controls, SIA is particularly important for older
installations in order to identify any fuel leaks early and reduce the risk of a leak escaping a PCBU’s
boundaries. SIA may also be known as Statistical inventory reconciliation analysis (SIRA). Newer
installations may also have additional leak monitoring systems such as tank pit and or ground water
monitoring wells where located in environmentally sensitive areas.
All service station operators, including those with ATG, must have adequate oversight of their UPSS
to ensure they are capable of identifying and responding to any leaks as soon as possible. To do this
PCBUs should have:
     Inventory control reconciliation records (Appendix D of AS4897 provides an example procedure
      and calculation form which includes: tank dips, dispenser meter readings, fuel deliveries.
      removals and internal transfers).
     SIA or AIT records.
     Response procedures and equipment for investigating any discrepancies, suspected losses or
      water ingress (Appendix E of AS4897 provides an example discrepancy or loss investigation
      procedure).
AS4897 recommends that records of the above inventory controls shall be kept for at least two
years. Inspection of these records is likely during an inspection, audit or incident investigation.
Single-walled aboveground tanks (excluding LP gas) must have a secondary spill containment
system which may include bunding, graded or sloping surfaces and sumps, drainage to a holding pit,
tank or interceptor or a combination of these. The Managing Risks of Hazardous Chemicals in the
Workplace Code of Practice 2013 states that bunding should be designed and constructed in
accordance with AS 1940: The storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids, which
covers bunds and compounds for tanks.
The service station should have documented procedures on how to contain any spill or leak and
have appropriate equipment to prevent it leaving the site. The required emergency response
resources should be specified and readily available in the event of an incident. Resources and
equipment may include spill absorption material, cleanup equipment, drain plugs or covers and
labelled waste containers as illustrated below.

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Service station fire incident
A fuel tanker was unloading petrol into underground tanks at a suburban service station when a fire
started at the fill point. The fire spread to the tyres of the tanker and later to its rear fuel
compartments. Two of the rear compartments ruptured during the fire. One of the ruptures created
a large fireball (about 60 metres high and 20 metres in diameter) that extensively damaged the
petrol station building and associated infrastructure.
The fire was caused by the ignition of a mixture of fuel vapour and air close to the underground
tank fill box. The source of the fuel vapour was probably within the containment sump which may
not have been drained back to a tank. A definitive ignition source could not be identified.
The accumulation of spilt fuel in the sump can create a hazard that would be constantly present in
the fill box if the sump is not regularly checked and cleaned out. Operators should ensure all seals
are intact and sumps checked to minimise fire risk.
Reference: Incident Investigation report, Fuel tanker fire at Maddington 2009, Department of
Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety, Western Australia, available at www.dmp.wa.gov.au .

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Portable LPG cylinder exchange facilities

AS1596: The storage and handling of LP Gas provides requirements and                                                    GAS CYLINDER
recommendations for the location of cages in which portable exchange LP                                                  EXCHANGE
gas cylinders are kept. Refer to section 4.6 and Appendix G.
For a single cage of 22 litres (9 kilogram size) cylinders, the cage should:
 be sturdy and stable, and shall allow free air movement through it
 be located away from, or be protected from, significant trafficable
   areas
 be kept locked when located in public areas
 have a maximum aggregate capacity of cylinders of 2500 litres.
Cages shall be located outdoors clear on at least two sides from any wall, solid display or other
item that could restrict air flow with minimum clearances as depicted below.

                                                          ignition source
                                                          (vertically)

                                                                   > 0.5 m

                                                                                                            >1 m from any
                                                   FLAMMABLE GAS- NO SMOKING                                opening or the hose
combustible                                                                                                 reach of LP gas
material             > 0.5 m                                                                                decanting cylinder

fuel               >1.5 m
dispensers                                                                                                        ignition source
                                                                                                 >1.5 m           (horizontally)

                     >1.5 m
                                                                                                      >5m
                                                                >3m
     pit or drains

                                                                         other dangerous
                                                                         goods tanks                                            LPG tank

Every cylinder cage shall be provided with signs and notices that are clearly visible and readily
distinguishable from any advertising signs attached to the cage. The red class label or ‘diamond’
for flammable gas (Division 2.1) and a warning notice should be prominently displayed on the front
of the cage, reading:

           FLAMMABLE GAS–NO SMOKING

Gas cages should be located in areas away from traffic movements to minimise risks of impact and
damage. If location options are restricted or concerns about impact exist, consider the use of
impact protection devices such as bollards and physical barriers.

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LPG tanks
Many, but not all service stations have an LP gas tank on site. When they do, the tanks are
generally installed and owned by the gas supplier and sales managed by the operator. Such an
installation introduces another duty holder to the site. The Act (s.14 and s.15) states that a duty
cannot be transferred to another person, and that a person can have more than one duty (e.g. duty
holder could be a person conducting a business and a supplier). Service station operators should
clearly record in their business documentation (e.g. agreements and licenses) the duty holders
associated with the site and what they are responsible for and have these formally acknowledged
by each of the duty-holders. This should cover specific activities such as the on-going maintenance
and repair of LPG tank installations and emergency response actions.
LPG tanks must have a plant design registration number (s.260) and an individual plant item
registration (s.273) under the WHS Regulation. Further information is available at
www.worksafe.qld.gov.au.
Guidance on the safe management of LPG is provided in the Australian Standard AS1596: The
storage and handling of LP Gas. LPG tank installations are specifically regulated in Queensland
under the Petroleum and Gas (Production and Safety) Act 2004, administered by the Petroleum
and Gas Inspectorate within the Department of Natural Resources Mines and Energy. Further
information is available at www.dnrm.qld.gov.au.

Controlling potential ignition sources (s.355)
The PCBU must identify areas where an explosive gas atmosphere is expected to exist from time to
time to control potential ignition sources such that a fire or explosion cannot occur. This requires the
classification of hazardous areas by a suitably qualified person. Site plans detailing hazardous areas
applicable to the service station (e.g. around petrol tank vent termination points, petrol dispensers,
LPG cylinders and tanks) should be kept by the PCBU and made available to workers or contractors
that may need to perform construction, maintenance and repair work in or near a hazardous area.
Check for potential ignition sources encroaching into the hazardous area associated with the fuel
systems. An example-hazardous area6 is provided by AS/NZS 60079.10.1 (ZA 4.4) of 4 m (laterally)
around petrol dispensers for excluding ignition sources.

                                          Maintain a minimum separation
                                          distance of 4 metres from a
                                          dispenser to ignition source.

                                          Ignition sources
                                          (e.g. freezers and vending machines)

Additional example-hazardous areas provided by AS/NZS 60079.10.1 (refer to ZA 4.4.2.5) for
underground petrol tanks include 4 metres (laterally) around fill-pipe and dip-pipe openings and a
3D-radius of 1.5 metres around a vent-pipe outlet down to ground level.

6   Hazardous areas must be determined by a suitably qualified person who should assess the suitability of
    applying the example hazardous areas provided in AS/NZS60079.10.1 for the specific circumstances at
    that location.
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Firefighting equipment (s.359)
The WHS Regulation requires appropriate fire protection and firefighting equipment for the types
and quantities of hazardous chemicals at the workplace. AS1940 provides guidance for this
situation in section 11 (Fire protection) for tank vehicle delivery locations and fuel dispensing
locations. There should be at least two 9 kg ABE (powder type) extinguishers located near the
dispensers or at least one extinguisher per dispensing bay.

                                                                               Extinguishers must be easily accessible when
                                                                               dispenser is in use.

                                                                               During operating hours when dispensing of fuel
                                                                               occurs, fire extinguishers must be available on
                                                                               the forecourt area and not solely kept inside
                                                                               the shop area.

                                                                               They may be located in a box with break glass
                                                                               screen to prevent theft and damage by
                                      Avoid obstructions in                    vandalism. Ensure fire extinguishers are
                                      front of fire extinguishers              maintained and access is not obstructed.

Extinguisher maintenance (s.359)
Ensure extinguishers are fit for purpose and maintained. Dated records of maintenance are
required by the WHS Regulation (s.359) for fire fighting equipment.

                                                                                                                Check the
                                                                                                                needle of the
                                                                                                                gauge is in the
                                                                                                                green region

Check stamp or indentation on yellow maintenance tag indicating dates of servicing, typically
required every six months for portable fire extinguishers.

AS1851 Routine service of fire protection systems and equipment provides information on routine
maintenance of fire equipment such as fire extinguishers, hose reels and hydrants. Section 1.16
provides information on routine service records including logbooks, and in the case of tags and
labels, hardcopy summary records.
Routine service records for fire hose reels and portable fire extinguishers consist of tags or labels
along with a supporting hardcopy summary record which includes a register of the equipment on
the premises, a statement of the service performed and details of missing or defective items. Other
recorded information should include items such as date of service, name and signature of service
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person and date, name of service provider or company. For fire extinguishers, the date of
manufacture or the date of the last pressure test should be provided. For fire hose reels, details of
the flow test results for the most hydraulically disadvantaged hose reel should be included.

General housekeeping (s.53)
There should be no accumulation of combustible materials such as wooden pallets, tyres,
cardboard and plastic or fallen vegetation (e.g. leaves) in and around the site.
Ensure vegetation (e.g. tall grass or overhanging trees) is kept clear of storage and handling
systems (LP gas tanks and cylinder cages, fill and dip points, vent pipes and dispensers). Ensure
vent termination points aren’t located within foliage of trees.
Eliminate the need to conduct on-going maintenance of vegetation by keeping it clear of storage
and handling systems. Such maintenance requires use of portable ignition sources such as hedge
trimmers and mowers which may be subject to the workplace’s hot work permit policy and
procedures.

4. Inside the shop
The quantity of hazardous chemicals stored in the shop area should not exceed ‘minor storage’
quantities (Table 2.1 AS 1940 ) and must be stored away from food items.
Minor storage quantities within a service station building should not exceed:
 500 litres of Class 3 packing group I and II, e.g. petrol (all packages must be under 20 litres
  capacity and not opened)
 1250 litres of Class 3 packing group III, e.g. kerosene
 3000 litres of C1 and C2 (e.g. diesel and motor oil).
Any portable container used to decant flammable liquid must have a maximum capacity of 25 litres
and comply with AS2906 – Fuel containers – portable: plastic and metal.
                                                       The portable container should be embossed or marked with the
                                                       following words and information:
                                                           manufacturers name and year of manufacture
                                                           nominal capacity with a mark indicating that level
                                                           ‘Warning: Fuel only – vapor may cause flash fire’
                                                           ‘Keep out of reach of children’
                                                           first aid information.

     Every dispenser should be clearly visible from the console/counter or on video to the control
      console operator and have direct access to emergency isolation/shutdown controls.

                                                                  Example of emergency fuel shut off switch
                                                                  located at the control console.

                                                                  A telephone must also be located at the control
                                                                  console with the emergency contact telephone
                                                                  numbers prominently displayed.

       Unmanned or unsupervised self-service systems shall include a readily accessible
        emergency stop along with a notice giving instructions on how to operate the device in the
        event of a major spill or fire. When activated, the emergency stop shall shut off the dispenser
        pump and transmit an alarm to a person or organisation capable of responding. Further
        information is available in AS1940 Section 7 (Fuel dispensing).

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What should service station staff know?
Service station staff should know the procedures to deal with a forecourt leak or spill, as well as:
 emergency procedures and evacuation points
 tank dipping procedure
 tanker discharge procedures for the site
 where the written procedures such as the site emergency plan is
   kept
 under what circumstances a console operator should not allow
   fuel to be dispensed, such as when:
   - a vehicle engine is running (s.355)
   - a person is smoking in the forecourt (s.355)
   - a person under 16 years is attempting to operate a dispenser
       (s.336)
   - a person is attempting to fill a food container with fuel
   - a person is attempting to fill fuel into a non-compliant container (s.337, s.363)
   - a fuel delivery nozzle is wedged open by customer with a fuel cap or similar device
       (s.363)
   - a person is filling a container with flammable liquid inside a vehicle, in the boot or if on the back
       of a ute (s.363).
The console operator must have a clear understanding of their responsibilities and authority to
manage safety in a public place.

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Information the PCBU should keep on site or have available for an inspector
The following items should be available on site:
 A receipt to confirm notification of a MQW has been made as required by s.348. When a
   notification has been lodged complete with a copy of the Schedule 12 compliant manifest and
   site plan, a receipt letter should be available from WHSQ. Notification history can be checked
   directly via hicb@oir.qld.gov.au or by contacting 3874 7579.
 A register of all hazardous chemicals (s.346).
 Safety data sheets (SDS) for the hazardous chemicals at the workplace (s.346).
 Site operating procedures (s.39).
 Product tank filling and dipping procedures (s.39).
 Equipment inspection and maintenance procedures (s.39).
 A documented emergency plan to deal with the range of emergency situations that may arise
   at the workplace such as liquid and gaseous fuel leaks and spills, and fires (s.43). It is a
   requirement to submit a copy of the site emergency plan document in PDF format to QFRS
   (s.361). Refer to www.qfes.qld.gov.au/planning for further information.
 Reconciled inventory records of fuel received and dispensed (s.39).
 Other relevant documents which demonstrate the safety systems at the workplace including:
   - the roles and responsibilities of staff
   - staff training and retraining records
   - equipment inspection and maintenance records
   - firefighting equipment inspection records
   - fuel system equipment testing records
   - work permit system
   - incident reporting
   - investigation procedures and records
   - a system to review and update documents.

5. Further information
Australian Standards
Contact SAI Global on 131 242 or visit https://infostore.saiglobal.com to purchase AS1940 or other
Australian Standards.
Consultants and industry associations
For consultants specialising in fuel systems, refer to the Australasian Convenience and Petroleum
Marketers Association (ACAPMA) at www.acapma.com.au or contact 1300 160 270. ACAPMA
provide a public listing of contractors who have become a recognised contractor under their
National Petroleum Recognition Scheme. Services identified include site design, fuel tank and
pump installation, maintenance, and removal.
WHSQ maintain a voluntary list of consultants specialising in hazardous chemical safety
management as a contact service. Refer to ‘industry consultants for hazardous chemicals’ at
www.worksafe.qld.gov.au.
The Australasian Institute of Dangerous Goods Consultants provides a contact list at
www.aidgc.org.au.
Manufacturers, suppliers and local distributors of fuel products may be able to provide technical
assistance regarding their products, including the provision of safety data sheets.

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