Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones

 
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
Utah State University
DigitalCommons@USU
All Graduate Plan B and other Reports                                                                       Graduate Studies

5-2018

Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for
Flying and Programming Mini Drones
Jordan Lynn Bartholomew
Utah State University

Russell Scott Mayo
Utah State University

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Bartholomew, Jordan Lynn and Mayo, Russell Scott, "Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini
Drones" (2018). All Graduate Plan B and other Reports. 1203.
https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/gradreports/1203

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Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
iii

                                           ABSTRACT

     Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones

                                                 by

                                    Jordan Lynn Bartholomew

                                       Russell Scott Mayo

                                   Utah State University, 2017

Major Professor: Dr. Gary Stewardson
Department: Technology and Engineering Education

       This project was a joint effort by Jordan Bartholomew and Russell Mayo. The project

consisted of three parts. Part one was the development of the lesson content led by Jordan

Bartholomew. Part two was the production of a multimedia package that included lesson videos,

animations and logos for the ROAV copter mini curriculum, led by Russell Mayo. Part three

included a journal article to introduce the curriculum co-written by both Jordan and Russ. The

curriculum was developed for hands-on experiential learning and includes a computational

thinking component. The lesson videos were intended for self-instruction or in a classroom

setting. The curriculum was piloted with elementary and middle school students. This project

documents the curriculum and journal article. This project will be submitted individually by

each author for their master’s plan-B project.
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
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                      TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                        Page
ABSTRACT………...…………………………………………………………………………... iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS………………………………………………………………...……... iv
LIST OF FIGURES………..…………………………………………………………………......v
SECTION I: Proposal
      Introduction………………………………………………………………………….…...1
      Purpose.………………………………………………………………………………..…2
      Need…………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
SECTION II: Article to Be Published
      Introduction…………………………………………………………………………........4
      ROAV copter challenge...……………………………………………………………......5
      Conclusion.......…………………………………………………………………...……....8
SECTION III: Reflections
      Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………….... .13
      Recommendations………………………………………………………….………….... 13
REFERENCES…...…………………………………………………………………………..... . 14
APPENDIX A
CODING WITH PARROT MINI DRONES CURRICULUM………………………………. . . 15
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
v

                                           LIST OF FIGURES

Figure                                                                                                      Page

 1.      Scope and sequence of coding with Parrot drones curriculum.................................7

 2.      Student learning the safe handling of mini drone......................................................8

 3.      Students remotely operating mini drone during curriculum pilot ............................8
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
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                                             SECTION I

                                             Introduction

Introduction to Coding With Drones

       In the field of Technology and Engineering Education (TEE), the rate at which new

content is presented is rapidly increasing. When new technologies emerge often times they are

so impactful on the world in which we live that the demand for education on such technologies is

vital. When drones first emerged, they were used almost primarily by the military. When they

became accessible to industries and even consumers, their potential uses multiplied with the

increasing availability. Many industries today are pushing for the widespread education and use

of drones. In fact, the agriculture industry in particular is one of the driving forces that is

pushing for the use of drones and less stringent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

regulations. Tasks that would take farmers days can now be done in minutes using a drone

equipped with the right data collecting technology. This could include surveying wet and dry

areas of a field or flying over to check crop harvest readiness.

       Many Technology and Engineering education programs are driven by the demands from

industry. In recent years, the demand for skilled drone pilots has dramatically increased, and the

need for skilled technicians and programmers has as well. The Association for Unmanned

Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI, 2013) estimated over 100,000 new jobs to be created in

unmanned aerial vehicles by 2025 (p. 3). With this demand from industry, technology programs

need to step up the preparation of students for these opportunities. Not only do students need to

learn the skills of flying, they also need to master the skills of programming and computational

thinking to solve complex problems.

       Within the last few years the term coding has flooded school curriculum. Even to the
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
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levels of middle and elementary school. There are many programs that are teaching students to

make apps, games and web pages, but there are few that are teaching students to program drones.

Purpose

       The purpose of this project was to develop a comprehensive piloting, coding, and data

collecting curriculum for the upper elementary and middle school aged students. This curriculum

offers both hands on experiences and teaches problem solving skills. The curriculum is designed

to take a student with little or no prior experience and guide them to be able to pilot, then

eventually program a Mini drone to perform a task. The tutorial style videos will guide students

and teachers through the steps with clarity and ease. The videos were designed to make it easy

for students to pause, or back up to further grasp key concepts.

       This curriculum will be distributed through the http://roavcopters.usu.edu/curriculum web

page and an article will be submitted for publication in the Technology and Engineering

Teacher. This article will not only introduce the curriculum but include details of a student skill

based competition that the curriculum prepares students to compete in. This curriculum and

competition will challenge students in problem solving, coding and computational thinking. The

curriculum found in appendix A, includes the scope and sequence, lesson outlines, activities and

assessments.

Need

       Just like many of the robotic competitions that are prevalent in technology education

programs now, this curriculum encompasses true STEM education. It will also aid the

development of drone programs in the future. There are many programs that offer robotics,

automation and programing, but there are no current programs or curriculum sets that offer drone

piloting, coding, problem solving, and computational thinking at the 4th-8th grade level. This
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
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curriculum and its complementing videos will bring with it a new excitement to the classroom

and allow students to explore a new emerging pathway focused on drone technology. The

curriculum is divided into 4 units of instruction that follow a scope and sequence. Each lesson

contains activities and assessments. This curriculum can be implemented in its entirety in 2-3

weeks but can be adapted into longer lessons depending on the age group and skill level.
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
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                                            SECTION II

                                               Article

Introduction

       Revolving like clockwork, it can be seen that a new and exciting technology comes

around and makes an influential impact on the world as we know it. For example the Computer

Numerical Control (CNC) machines in manufacturing, the 3D printer for prototyping, and the

laser engraver/cutter for making models.

       From parks to fields, drones or multi-rotor copters are becoming more popular as a hobby

as well as a tool in industry. This is largely in part due to the advancing technology of the

onboard control systems that are being integrated into these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

Even the inexpensive models found at department stores will include a basic set of sensing

technologies such as an onboard flight controller containing a gyrometer that measures rotational

movement and an accelerometer that measures acceleration. These allow the pilot to control the

copter with ease. While the pilot controls direction and speed, the flight controller controls

balance and stabilization making it easy to fly. With the addition of global positioning system

(GPS) modules, these UAVs or drones can be programmed to fly in a specific path or hold to a

specific spot and hover. Even some of the most basic copters have built in fail safes for landing

autonomously. Most people who pick up a controller for the first time are surprised at how easy

they are to operate. Because they are so easy to fly, hobbyists and professionals are flocking to

this growing technology.

       More than just flying for hobby or sport, drones are becoming a powerful tool. By

adding a camera and other sensing technologies, drones become an invaluable asset to many

industries. Some of them include news agencies, photography, movies, surveillance, transport,
Development of a 4th-8th Grade Curriculum for Flying and Programming Mini Drones
5

search and rescue, and agriculture. Where expensive helicopters were required before, these

relatively inexpensive multi-rotor copters can execute the most basic to more complex tasks. A

properly equipped quadcopter can fly over a natural gas pipeline and detect leaks. Another could

quickly take flight with infrared cameras to locate a lost hiker. The possibilities are truly endless

and the jobs that will be created seem to be as well. It is projected that by 2025, over 103,776

jobs will be created related to UAVs with a projected economic impact of $3.5 billion each year

over the next ten year (AUVSI, 2017).

       Drone pilots are already in demand and the need for skilled technicians to build, program,

and repair drones, is growing just as fast. In order to keep up with these demands, there needs to

be training programs for both technicians and pilots and what better way to promote and recruit

than in a high school setting. For years, technology education students have participated in

robotic competitions of many varieties. These educational competitions not only provide students

with fun opportunities, but students are also learning engineering and physics principles through

hands on interaction with building robots. This same type of program can be applied to

quadcopters. Dr. Gary Stewardson, associate professor of technology and engineering education

at Utah State University (USU), agrees that quadcopters are the next logical step to staying

current with industry demands (G. Stewardson, 2016). Stewardson has developed a challenge

based approach to educating students in this new exciting technology.

ROAV copter challenge

       ROAV (remotely operated aerial vehicles) copter challenge is a tournament style

competition where students demonstrate various skills (see http://roavcopters.usu.edu/).

Although the challenge is in its early stages, it has already gained interest from teachers,

students and industry. In its first year (2016-2017) Stewardson and his colleagues trained over
6

20 teams and ran two competitions. Currently, the competition consists of a variety of skill

based challenges, depending on the quadcopter platform used in each age specific division.

There are three divisions, elementary, middle, and high school. The platform for the elementary

and middle school is the "Parrot Mambo" minidrone. High school students will utilize the

"Parrot Bebop 2" drone. Students compete in five different skill challenges consisting of

manual flight, autonomous flight, computational thinking, relay race, and data acquisition.

       The manual flight consists of different obstacles that the pilot must navigate through,

over, under, and around in the field. At the elementary level this is done with plain sight where

the middle and high school levels require first person view (FPV) headsets. Autonomous flight

is where the drone is programmed to fly a particular path through the course using software.

Currently the Mambo is using a drag and drop programming language called Tynker. The

computational thinking component includes a number of missions that students will have to

complete in the shortest amount of time. Students will be allowed to complete multiple missions

in one trip or multiple single mission trips. The relay portion of the challenge utilizes a pyramid

shaped baton that is carried by the drone around the course. The last component, data acquisition

consists of teams developing ways to accurately collect data. With the use of a pair of small

arduino programmable boards called "moteinos" equipped with long range (LoRa) radio

transceivers and sensors, teams will have to retrieve information from elements in the field. An

example of this would be to determine the color (red, green or blue) emitted from LEDs mounted

out of site in a bucket. Like most robotic competitions, there are many variations that can be

changed each year to maintain a high level of challenge for the teams. These challenges will be

designed to reflect real world applications of UAVs in industry.
7

       With the growing demand of programming and coding in K-12 classrooms from the next

generation science standards (NGSS) and the standards for technological literacy (ITEA, 2007),

graduate students at USU, Russ Mayo and Jordan Bartholomew, have taken ROAV a step further

by developing curriculum bringing the quadcopters to the 4th through 8th grade level. One of

the major difficulties for the ROAV copter challenge was the ability to train teachers and

students in order to compete in the competition. Clinics were becoming difficult to organize due

to geographical concerns of accessibility. ROAV mini is a curriculum set designed to introduce

students to the new technology of drones as well as teach logic, programming and computational

thinking with the aid of tutorial style videos.

       During the creation of this curriculum, there were a few decisions that needed to be

made. The first decision was which drones should be used. The Parrot Mambo was selected due

to its’ ease of programming with the Tynker app. It also has a small light frame that doubles as a

prop guard. The frame includes connecting points on the bottom and top of the frame to easily

attach blocks or even 3D printed brackets which is useful for students to design and produce their

own unique mounting system for the sensor board. The Mambo also has some nice built in

safety features and comes at a price point that makes it a logical choice for classroom

curriculum.

       Sensing technology to collect data was another primary concern. Because Learning, a

Utah based technology company caught our eye (see https://www.becauselearning.com) their

product to collect data. Because Learning produces a product called the ROAV copter sensor kit

which contains a product called the space board (see https://store.ardusat.com/products/rova-

copter-sensor-kit). The space board contains nine different sensors. This board has been used

for a variety of educational endeavors including, weather balloons, satellites, and even measuring
8

acceleration of CO2 cars. The combination of the Parrot Mambo and the Because Learning

space board creates an exciting vehicle for an engaging curriculum. ROAV mini brings with it a

variety of fun lessons to the instruct and challenge students.

The Curriculum

       Lessons include short videos full of engaging content from vocabulary and terms to 3D

animations and illustrations. Figure 1 shows the scope and sequence of the curriculum.

                     Coding with Drones: Scope and Sequence
Unit 1: Following safety procedures
 1.1 Follow mini drone safety practices
 1.2 Sync control device to specific minidrone
 1.2a Documentation for renaming drones

Unit 2: Flying the Parrot mini drone remotely
 2.1 Hover the minidrone at specified altitudes
 2.2 Fly the minidrone in a square pattern without using pitch and roll controls
 2.3 Fly the minidrone in a square pattern using yaw controls
 2.4 Fly the minidrone through an obstacle course
 2.5* Design an obstacle course and fly through it remotely

Unit 3: Flying the Parrot mini drone autonomously using Tynker
 3.1 Program the minidrone to fly a simple pattern
 3.2 Program the minidrone to fly through an obstacle course
 3.3* Design an obstacle course and fly through it autonomously

Unit 4: Collecting data autonomously
 4.1 Collect data using Ardusat space board
 4.2 Design problem (making a mount for the space board)
 4.3 Retrieve data remotely using minidrone and space board
 4.4* Retrieve data autonomously using minidrone and space board

* Optional, for faster learners or for an extra challenge

Figure 1. Scope and sequence of the curriculum
9

The lessons start with unit one focusing on safety procedures. Technological literacy implies a

student should be able to assess and use the technology in a safe manner. Students learn basic

safety practices like never touch the drone while the props are spinning and allowing only one

operator at a time to handle the remote and the drone. A quiz is used to assess safety knowledge

levels before moving on to future lessons. Figure 2 shows an instructor demonstrating to a

student the proper handling of the drone.

                      Figure 2. Student observes the proper handling of the drone.

       Once the students have taken a safety quiz, they then move on to the second unit focusing

on the manual flight of the drone. These lessons teach students the basic controls of the drone.

Students learn proper aviation terms including yaw, pitch, and roll. Students will manually fly

the drone through a series of obstacles. Figure 3 shows students navigating obstacles during a

curriculum pilot.
10

                              Figure 3. Student fly drone through obstacles

         Unit three takes the student through the basics of programming using the Tynker app.

This app connects the drone to a graphical programming language were the students can drag

elements together to create a program. Unit four includes lessons that provide students with real

world applications of using drone technology. Students will learn about sensing technology

through the use of the Ardusat space board(https://store.ardusat.com/products/ardusat-space-

board). Students will then design and fabricate a mounting bracket to attach the board to the

mini drone in order to retrieve data. This will ultimately prepare students with the physical

infrastructure, to compete in a remote sensing skill challenge.

       The ROAV mini competition has many components. The first component is a precision

flight challenge where students will remotely fly the drone through a series of obstacles. The

second component is a remote sensing challenge where students will have a number of missions

to complete. Some examples of tasks included in these missions are reading the temperature of

an aluminum plate, and determining color of light being emitted by LEDs, in a five gallon
11

bucket. The competition will continue to evolve and implement new missions. Students will

decide how and what missions to complete to receive points in a given time. This is where

students will learn and apply computational thinking. "Computational thinking is the thought

processes involved in formulating a problem and expressing its solution(s) in such a way that a

computer—human or machine—can effectively carry out" (Wing, 2014, ¶ 5). In essence, it is

the ability to break down a complex problem into smaller tasks. This type of thinking is linked to

computer code. Each line of code is a part of an algorithm. A program may be made up of many

algorithms. Students will demonstrate how to effectively solve a problem in the competition in

order to complete various missions.

Conclusion

       Like many new technologies implemented into classroom curriculum, drones are another

engaging method of integrating STEM education. Technology teachers are always looking for

ways to engage students and provide meaningful lessons that will impact their students lives.

This ROAV mini curriculum shows significant promise through its exciting and dynamic

approach to teach programming and technology. It should prove exceptionally motivating to

students and teachers. The curriculum is easy to implement and the competitions take the

students to a new level of active learning. This will be a new and exciting part of technology and

engineering education for years to come.
12

                                       REFERENCES

AUVSI, Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. (2017). Economic Report.
     Retrieved from http://www.auvsi.org/our-impact/economic-report.

ITEA, International Technology Education Association (2007). Standards for technological
       literacy: Content for the study of technology. Reston, VA: Author.

Wing, J. M. (2014). Computational Thinking Benefits Society. Social Issues in Computing.
       Retrieved from http://socialissues.cs.toronto.edu/index.html%3Fp=279.html.
13

                                          SECTION III

                                            Reflections

Conclusion

       This curriculum was developed as a way to engage students in coding and remote

sensing. Additionally, it focuses on computational thinking, which is an important skill of future

21st century professionals. Through hands on activities and real world scenarios, students can

see connections between the lessons and practical applications. When piloted, students were

excited and their level of confidence increased as they gained the skills necessary to complete the

tasks. In many situations, there were several people passing by that would stop and watch as the

students navigated the drone through and around the obstacles. Although no formal studies of

this curriculum have been implemented, the excitement and engagement it provided created

evidence that there is room for a curriculum such as this.

Recommendations

         This curriculum has incorporated lessons that are challenging to many students.

Although there are lesson outlines provided, there are many ways that the lessons could be

extended to more depth. Additional lessons on topics of flight, drone design and even

automation systems could enhance the curriculum for older age groups. This curriculum was

intended to introduce and captivate younger students and encourage students to solve problems

through computational thinking. One question that could be asked is, how effective is this

curriculum at teaching what it is suppose to teach? This will hopefully be answered with further

studies and projects.
14

                                       REFERENCES

AUVSI, Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. (2017). Economic Report.
     Retrieved from http://www.auvsi.org/our-impact/economic-report.

ITEA, International Technology Education Association (2007). Standards for technological
       literacy: Content for the study of technology. Reston, VA: Author.

Wing, J. M. (2014). Computational Thinking Benefits Society. Social Issues in Computing.
       Retrieved from http://socialissues.cs.toronto.edu/index.html%3Fp=279.html.
15

APPENDIX A

 Curriculum
16

                     Coding with Drones: Scope and Sequence
Unit 1: Following safety procedures
 1.1 Follow mini drone safety practices
 1.2 Sync control device to specific minidrone
 1.2a Documentation for renaming drones

Unit 2: Flying the Parrot mini drone remotely
 2.1 Hover the minidrone at specified altitudes
 2.2 Fly the minidrone in a square pattern without using pitch and roll controls
 2.3 Fly the minidrone in a square pattern using yaw controls
 2.4 Fly the minidrone through an obstacle course
 2.5* Design an obstacle course and fly through it remotely

Unit 3: Flying the Parrot mini drone autonomously using Tynker
 3.1 Program the minidrone to fly a simple pattern
 3.2 Program the minidrone to fly through an obstacle course
 3.3* Design an obstacle course and fly through it autonomously

Unit 4: Collecting data autonomously
 4.1 Collect data using Ardusat space board
 4.2 Design problem (making a mount for the space board)
 4.3 Retrieve data remotely using minidrone and space board
 4.4* Retrieve data autonomously using minidrone and space board

* Optional, for faster learners or for an extra challenge
17

                         Coding with Parrot Mini Drones

Unit 1: Following safety procedures

Terminal Objective 1.1: Follow mini drone safety practices

Performance Objective 1.1: While observing and operating mini drones, follow safety
practices at all times.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Identify Hazards
   2. Demonstrate understanding of safety practices for operators and spectators

Materials and Supplies:
  ● Parrot mini drone: Cargo or Mambo
  ● Quiz 1.1: Mini Drone Safety Practices

Learning Activities:
   1. Video ROAV mini 1.1 v1
   2. Discussion of possible risks

Summative Assessment:
  1. Quiz 1.1: Mini Drone Safety Practices with answer key

Supplemental teacher resources:

   ● Know before you fly (FAA rules for drones)
     http://knowbeforeyoufly.org/
18

                             Quiz 1.1: Mini Drone Safety Practices

Name:                                                                 Date:

Indicate whether the statement is true or false by wiring T for true or F for false next to the
statement.

    1.       It is OK to fly a drone over people?

    2.       The fly zone is safe to stand in while drone is flying

    3.       A drone must be flown at least 10 ft. away from people

    4.       It’s not safe to pick up the drone when props are spinning

    5.       It’s OK to look away from the drone for just a second

    6.       Safety glasses must be worn when drone is in operation

    7.       Safety netting is required while flying more than one drone in an area

List two possible risks while operating the mini drone.

    8.

    9.

Read the following statement:

I understand and will follow the practices outlined in this lesson while participating in this

activity.

Signature:                                           Date:
19

                             Quiz 1.1: Mini Drone Safety Practices
                                         Answer Key

Name:                                                               Date:

Indicate whether the statement is true or false by wiring T for true or F for false next to the
statement.

   1.   __F__ It is OK to fly a drone over people

   2.     F    The fly zone is safe to stand in while drone is flying

   3.     T    A drone must be flown at least 10 ft. away from people

   4.     T    It’s not safe to pick up the drone when props are spinning

   5.     F    It’s OK to look away from the drone for just a second

   6.     T    Safety glasses must be worn when drone is in operation

   7.     T    Safety netting is required while flying more than one drone in an area

   8-9 List two possible risks while operating the mini drone.

Answers can come from discussion

       Could connect to wrong drone

       Props could break on impact

       Drone could fail and fall out of sky

       Props can cause harm to hands or skin

       Drone can lose connection and fly toward spectators
20

                         Coding with Parrot Mini Drones
Unit 1: Following safety procedures

Terminal Objective 1.2: Sync control device to a specific minidrone

Performance Objective 1.2: Follow procedures for syncing control device to specific mini
drone

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Locate settings within app for Classroom mode
   2. Safely demonstrate connecting to correct minidrone

Materials and Supplies:
  ● Parrot mini drone: Cargo or Mambo
  ● Free flight 3 app installed on a Bluetooth enabled device

Learning Activities:
   1. Video: Parrot Minidrones - MAMBO - Tutorial #1: Setup
       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXt88r4r2uI
   2. Demonstration
       Students will identify where in the Free Flight 3 app to locate which drone they are
       connecting to.

Summative Assessment:
  1. Performance Assessment 1.1: Connecting to minidrone

Supplemental teacher resources:
   1. Operation of Mambo minidrone
       https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Using-the-Parrot-Mambo-
       with-a-smartphone/ta-p/145927
   2. 1.2a: Documentation for renaming the mini drone

                             Performance Assessment 1.2:
21

                                Connecting to minidrone

Name:                                                         Date

Terminal Objective 1.2: Sync control device to a specific minidrone

Performance Objective 1.2: Follow procedures for syncing control device to specific
minidrone

                                         Assessment

                              Skill Check                                  Pass       Retry

 Followed safe practices                                                    ○          ○
 Demonstrated proper power up and power down procedures                     ○          ○
 Correctly identified assigned drone                                        ○          ○
 Connected successfully to minidrone                                        ○          ○

Note: To pass this objective, all skill check items must receive a pass.

Assessed by:                                                    Date:

                           Coding with Parrot Mini Drones
22

Unit 1: Following safety procedures

1.2a: Documentation for renaming the mini drone

       When working in a classroom setting with multiple drones, the possibility of connecting
to the incorrect drone is likely. To mitigate this problem, it is recommended to rename the
drones to a unique and easily recognized name. The default name for the Parrot Mambo is
"Mambo_xxxxxxx". Examples of unique naming sequences would be Mambo_1, Mambo_2
and so on. Other examples could include colors such as Red, Blue, or Green. School names
and team IDs could be used to eliminate confusion at competitions. It is good practice to have
the names of the drones identified on the drone for easy reference. Using a label maker,
permanent marker, colored tape or even spray paint are good ways of identifying the drones
quickly.

Steps for renaming mini drone
      1. Connect drone to freeflight mini app
      2. Long press on SSID name of connected device. Default is Mambo_xxxxxxx

      3. Rename device. You may have to restart mini drone and reconnect smart device.

                         Coding with Parrot Mini Drones
23

Unit 2: Flying the Parrot mini drone remotely

Terminal Objective 2.1: Hover the Parrot mini drone

Performance Objective 2.1: Using an iPad or Android tablet, hover the Parrot mini drone at
two specified heights ± 1 foot.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Identify parts of the mini drone
   2. Charge mini drone batteries
   3. Connect mini drone to remote control (tablet)
   4. Demonstrate the use of controls for throttle
   5. Practice hovering the mini drone in safe manner

Materials and Supplies:
  ● iPad with iOS 8.0 or later or Android tablet with 4.0 or later
  ● Download and install Free flight mini app on tablet (found in app store)
  ● Safety glasses for all participants
  ● Parrot mini drone: Cargo or Mamba
  ● USB charging device
  ● Activity Sheet 2.1: Parts of the mini drone (for each student) and answer key
  ● Hover challenge 2.1 (for reference) and Performance Assessment 2.1: Hover challenge
  ● Construction style tape measure with lock

Learning Activities:
   1. Video ROAV mini 2.1 v1
   2. Practice charging battery (if needed), connecting devices, and hovering the mini drone.
   3. Complete Activity Sheet 2.1: Parts of the mini drone

Formative Assessment:
   1. Practice charging battery (if needed), connecting devices, and hovering the mini drone.
   2. Complete Activity Sheet 2.1: Parts of the mini drone

Summative Assessment:
  1. Safely perform hovering maneuver at two specified heights. Evaluate students using
     Performance Assessment 2.1: Hover Challenge
24

Supplemental teacher resources:
   ● How do quadcopters and multicopters fly? Video
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_T6LBwuBKY
   ● Setting up mini drone from Parrot
      https://www.parrot.com/us/minidrones/parrot-Mambo#Tutorials
   ● Getting started Parrot Mambo
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Getting-Started/ta-p/145926
   ● Updating firmware on mini drone
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Update-Parrot-Mambo-Softw
      are/ta-p/153647
25

                    Activity Sheet 2.1: Parts of the mini drone

Match the parts with the correct name by writing the letter in the space provided.
      1.     Prop Guard            3.      Prop                5.   Body

      2.      USB cable             4.     Battery             6.   Frame

Answer the following questions regarding charging.
     7). List the steps for charging the mini drone
             a)

              b)

       8). What indicates that the battery is fully charged?
26

                    Activity Sheet 2.1: Parts of the mini drone
                                   Answer key

Match the parts with the correct name by writing the letter in the space provided.
     1. _F    Prop Guard           3. _B    Prop           5. _D   Body

     2. _E __USB cable             4. _A    Battery        6. _C   Frame

Answer the following questions regarding charging.
     7). List the steps for charging the mini drone
         a. Insert battery into mini drone

          b. Connect USB to charger or computer

       8). What indicates that the battery is fully charged?
              The red charging light will change to green.
27

                                   Hover Challenge 2.1

To set up this challenge you will need a tape measure or some way to determine a specified
height. For this example, we will use a common construction tape measure with a working
lock.

Steps:
   1. Establish designated fly and safe zones in an open area
   2. In the fly zone, extend tape measure to 7 feet and lock
   3. Place tape measure with the end on the ground so tape is extended into the air.
       (see figure 1.1)
   4. Have student operating the minidrone, place drone in the fly zone
   5. Move to the safe zone
   6. Have student practice the task of hovering at 3 feet and 7 feet heights
   7. Evaluate student’s performance using Performance Assessment 2.1: Hover

Figure 1.1
28

                               Performance Assessment 2.1:
                                     Hover Challenge

Name:                                                          Date

Terminal Objective 2.1: Hover the Parrot mini drone

Performance Objective 2.1: Using an iPad or Android tablet, hover the Parrot mini drone at
two specified heights.

                                          Assessment

                              Skill Check                                  Pass     Retry

 Followed safe practices                                                    ○         ○
 Demonstrated proper power up and power down procedures                     ○         ○
 Hovered at 3 feet ± 1ft.                                                   ○         ○
 Hovered at 7 feet ± 1ft.                                                   ○         ○

Note: To pass this objective, all skill check items must receive a pass.

Assessed by:                                                    Date:
29

                          Coding with Parrot Mini Drones
Unit 2: Flying the Parrot mini drone remotely

Terminal Objective 2.2: Fly the mini drone in a square pattern using pitch and roll controls.

Performance Objective 2.2: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app, fly
the mini drone safely in a square pattern using pitch and roll controls in both clockwise (CW)
and counterclockwise (CCW) directions.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Identify pitch and roll as it relates to a quadcopter
   2. Demonstrate how pitch controls forward and reverse, and roll controls left and right
   3. Demonstrate forward, reverse, left, and right movements of the mini drone

Materials and Supplies:
  ● iPad with iOS 8.0 or later or Android tablet with 4.0 or later
  ● Download and install free flight mini app on tablet (found in app store)
  ● Safety glasses for all participants
  ● Parrot Mini Drone: Cargo or Mamba and USB charging device
  ● Flight Challenge 2.2 (for reference)
  ● Rope or other means of creating a square space
  ● Performance Assessment 2.2: Square Challenge, Pitch and Roll (copy for each student)

Learning Activities:
   1. Video: ROAV mini 2.2 v1
   2. Practice flying square pattern using pitch and roll controls

Formative Assessment:
   1. Practice flying mini drone controlling pitch and roll
   2. Safely perform square pattern maneuver in boundaries. (Refer to Square challenge)

Summative Assessment:
  1. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.2: Square Challenge, Pitch and Roll

Supplemental teacher resources:
   ● Flight controls for free flight 3 mini app
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Using-the-Parrot-Mambo-wit
      h-a-smartphone/ta-p/145927
   ● Optional flypad accessory
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Parrot-Flypad/ta-p/145932
30

                                   Square Challenge 2.2

To set up this challenge you will need rope or some way to establish a square. For this example,
we will use rope and barriers to create the square area.

Steps:
   1. Establish designated fly and safe zones in an open area
   2. Rope off a square area using barrier stands. (figure 1.)
   3. Have student operating the minidrone, place drone in the fly zone
   4. Move to the safe zone
   5. Have students practice flying in a CW & CCW square pattern using pitch and roll
      controls (figure 2.)
   6. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.2: Square Challenge, Pitch and Roll

Figure 1.                                   Figure 2.
31

                               Performance Assessment 2.2:
                                    Square Challenge

Name:                                                          Date

Terminal Objective 2.2: Fly the mini drone in a square pattern using pitch and roll controls

Performance Objective 2.2: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app, fly
the mini drone safely in a square pattern using pitch and roll controls in both clockwise and
counterclockwise directions.

                                          Assessment

                                 Skill Check                                  Pass     Retry

 Followed safe practices                                                       ○          ○
 Demonstrated proper power up and power down procedures                        ○         ○
 Flew the mini drone in a CW square pattern using pitch and roll controls,     ○          ○
 Flew the mini drone in a CCW square pattern using pitch and roll controls     ○          ○

Note: To pass this objective, all skill check items must receive a pass.

Assessed by:                                                    Date:
32

                          Coding with Parrot Mini Drones

Unit 2: Flying the Parrot mini drone remotely

Terminal Objective 2.3: Fly the mini drone in a square pattern using yaw controls.

Performance Objective 2.3: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app, fly
the mini drone safely in a square pattern using yaw controls in both clockwise (CW) and
counterclockwise (CCW) directions.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Identify yaw as it relates to the mini drone
   2. Demonstrate how yaw controls rotating left and right

Materials and Supplies:
  ● iPad with iOS 8.0 or later or Android tablet with 4.0 or later
  ● Download and install free flight mini app on tablet (found in app store)
  ● Safety glasses for all participants
  ● Parrot Mini Drone: Cargo or Mamba
  ● USB charging device
  ● Flight Challenge 2.3 (for reference)
  ● Rope or other means of creating a square space
  ● Performance Assessment 2.3: Square Challenge, Yaw (copy for each student)

Learning Activities:
   1. Video: ROAV mini 2.3 v1
   2. Practice flying square pattern using pitch and yaw controls

Formative Assessment:
   1. Practice flying mini drone controlling yaw
   2. Safely perform square pattern maneuver in boundaries. (Refer to Square challenge)

Summative Assessment:
  1. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.3: Square Challenge, Yaw

Supplemental teacher resources:
   ● Flight controls for free flight 3 mini app
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Using-the-Parrot-Mambo-wit
      h-a-smartphone/ta-p/145927
   ● Optional flypad accessory
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Parrot-Flypad/ta-p/145932
33

                                  Square Challenge 2.3

To set up this challenge you will need rope or some way to establish a square. For this example,
we will use rope and barriers to create the square area.

Steps:
   1. Establish designated fly and safe zones in an open area
   2. Rope off a square area using barrier stands. (figure 1.)
   3. Have student operating the minidrone, place drone in the fly zone
   4. Move to the safe zone
   5. Have student practice flying in a CW & CCW square pattern using yaw controls.
      (figure 2.)
   6. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.3: Square Challenge, Yaw

Figure 1.                                   Figure 2.
34

                              Performance Assessment 2.3:
                                Square Challenge, Yaw

Name:                                                         Date

Terminal Objective 2.3: Fly the mini drone in a square pattern using yaw controls

Performance Objective 2.3: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app, fly
the mini drone safely in a square pattern using yaw controls in both clockwise (CW) and
counterclockwise (CCW) directions.

                                          Assessment

                              Skill Check                                   Pass      Retry

 Followed safe practices                                                     ○          ○
 Demonstrated proper power up and power down procedures                      ○          ○
 Flew the mini drone in a CW square pattern using yaw controls               ○          ○
 Flew the mini drone in a CCW square pattern using yaw controls              ○          ○
 Note: To pass this objective, all skill check items must receive a pass.

 Assessed by:                                                   Date:
35

                          Coding with Parrot Mini Drones

Unit 2: Flying the Parrot mini drone remotely

Terminal Objective 2.4: Fly the mini drone through an obstacle course

Performance Objective 2.4: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app, fly
the mini drone safely through an obstacle courses with accuracy.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Demonstrate precision flight of the mini drone using pitch, yaw, and roll

Materials and Supplies:
  ● iPad with iOS 8.0 or later or Android tablet with 4.0 or later
  ● Download and install free flight mini app on tablet (found in app store)
  ● Safety glasses for all participants
  ● Parrot Mini Drone: Cargo or Mambo with USB charging device
  ● Flight Challenge 2.4 (for reference)
  ● 3 hoops and some way to secure
  ● 2 foam floor tiles, 2 feet x 2 feet
  ● Performance Assessment 2.4: Remote flight challenge (copy for each student)
  ● Understanding Check 2.4: Remote flight (copy for each student) and answer key

Learning Activities:
   1. Video: ROAV mini 2.4 v1
   2. Understanding Check 2.4: Remote flight

Formative Assessment:
   1. Practice flying mini drone through obstacle course
   2. Understanding Check 2.4: Remote flight use answer key

Summative Assessment:
  1. Safely perform obstacle course flight. (Refer to Remote flight challenge)
  2. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.4: Remote flight challenge

Supplemental teacher resources:
   ● Parrot Mambo Racing Club (just for fun)
   ● https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CR5lA4AMHlU
   ● Optional flypad accessory
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Parrot-Flypad/ta-p/145932
36

                               Remote flight challenge 2.4

To set up this challenge you will need 3 hoops fixed in an upright position and two foam floor
tiles.

Steps:
   1.    Establish designated fly and safe zones in an open area
   2.    Set up challenge using hoops and floor tiles. (see figure 1.)
   3.    Have operating student place mini drone in the fly zone
   4.    Move to the safe zone
   5.    Have student practice the task of maneuvering mini drone through the hoops
   6.    Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.4: Remote flight challenge

Figure 1.
37

                                  Understanding Check 2.4:
                                       Remote flight

Name:                                                   Date:

Fill in the blank with the proper flight control on the image below

 Word bank
 Yaw Left                          Yaw Right                          Pitch Forward

 Pitch Backward                    Roll Left                          Roll Right

 Throttle Up                       Throttle Down                      Auto Land
38

Understanding Check 2.4:
Remote flight Answer key
39

                               Performance Assessment 2.4:
                                 Remote flight challenge

Name:                                                          Date

Terminal Objective 2:4 Fly the mini drone through an obstacle course

Performance Objective 2.4: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app, fly
the mini drone safely through an obstacle courses with accuracy.

                                          Assessment

                              Skill Check                                  Pass       Retry

 Followed safe practices                                                    ○           ○
 Demonstrated proper power up and power down procedures                     ○           ○
 Flew the mini drone generally following path                               ○           ○
 Flew the mini drone hitting 1 or less obstacles                            ○           ○
 Landed mini drone touching pad                                             ○           ○

Note: To pass this objective, all skill check items must receive a pass.

Assessed by:                                                    Date:
40

                         Coding with Parrot Mini Drones

Unit 2: Flying the Parrot mini drone remotely

Terminal Objective 2.5: Created an obstacle course

Performance Objective 2.5: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app,
create an obstacle course to challenge mini drone pilots flying skills.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Brainstorm course ideas

Materials and Supplies:
  ● iPad with iOS 8.0 or later or Android tablet with 4.0 or later
  ● Download and install free flight mini app on tablet (found in app store)
  ● Safety glasses for all participants
  ● Parrot Mini Drone: Cargo or Mamba
  ● USB charging device
  ● Flight Challenge 2.5 (for reference)
  ● Items for students to use for creating obstacle course
  ● Performance Assessment 2.5: Remote flight challenge (copy for each student)
  ● Understanding Check 2.4: Remote flight (copy for each student)

Learning Activities:
   1. Obstacle course design and build
   2. Practice flying through obstacle course

Formative Assessment:
   1. Build and test obstacle course using mini drone

Summative Assessment:
  1. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.5: Remote flight challenge(optional)

Supplemental teacher resources:
   ● Flight controls for free flight 3 mini app
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Using-the-Parrot-Mambo-wit
      h-a-smartphone/ta-p/145927
   ● Optional flypad accessory
      https://community.parrot.com/t5/Mambo-Knowledge-Base/Parrot-Flypad/ta-p/145932
41

                          Remote flight challenge 2.5 (optional)

In this challenge, students will design and build their own obstacle course to fly through. The
performance rubric for this activity ads the criteria of having three or more elements in the
course. To make this more interactive as a class, have students set the criteria for the obstacle
course. Encourage students to design course on paper with an explanation of what they are
wanting to do before they build. Students will love the flexibility with this challenge and it’s fun
to see the creativity of the students.

Steps:
   1.    Group students (2-3 works well)
   2.    Let students design obstacle course on paper
   3.    Establish designated fly and safe zones in an open area
   4.    Take turns with groups setting up their course
   5.    Have operating student place mini drone in the fly zone
   6.    Move to the safe zone
   7.    Have students practice the task of maneuvering through the course
   8.    Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 2.5: Remote flight challenge(optional)
42

                               Performance Assessment 2.5:
                             Remote flight challenge (optional)

Name:                                                         Date

Terminal Objective 2.5: Created an obstacle course

Performance Objective 2.5: Using an iPad or Android tablet with the free flight mini app,
create an obstacle courses uses creativity to challenge mini drone flight.

                                           Assessment
Follows safety practices                                          Yes ☐               No ☐

      Criteria         Much below             Below               Meets             Exceeds
                       Expectations        Expectations        expectations       Expectations
                         1 Point             2 points            3 points           4 points

      Course             1 element          2 elements          3 elements         4+ elements
     elements

      Course           Requires little   Requires left and   Requires left and    Requires great
     Difficulty          skill to fly       right turns       right turns and      piloting skills
                        through e.g.                         different heights   e.g. tight spaces,
                       straight lines                                                 or quick
                                                                                    maneuvers
   Follows flight                           Breaks path         Generally,        Maintains path
       path                                                    follows path

     Accurate                             Down the street       In the yard       On the porch
     Landing                               (Misses tile)      (Touching tile)    (Middle of tile)

               Total

Note: To pass this objective, the student must follow safety practices and receive a score of 12 or
higher.

Assessed by:                                                    Date:
43

                        Coding with Parrot Mini Drones
Unit 3: Flying the Parrot mini drone autonomously using Tynker

Terminal Objective 3.1: Program the mini drone to fly a simple pattern

Performance Objective 3.1: Using Tynker app, program the Parrot mini drone to fly a simple
pattern within boundaries.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Define programing
   2. Identify programing elements (blocks)
   3. Sketch program design (pseudocode)
   4. Program flight pattern using Tynker app
   5. Test program to perform flight task

Materials and Supplies:
  ● iPad with iOS 8.0 or later or Android tablet with 4.0 or later
  ● Download and install Tynker app on tablet (found in app store)
  ● Safety glasses for all participants
  ● Parrot mini drone: Cargo or Mambo and USB charging device
  ● Simple Pattern 3.1 (for reference)
  ● Performance Assessment 3.1: Simple pattern (one for each student)
  ● Roll of masking tape and 2 foam 2'x2' floor tiles

Learning Activities:
   1. Watch: Video ROAV mini 3.1 v1
   2. Create flight plan using pseudocode

Formative Assessment:
   1. Practice programing using blocks in Tynker app
   2. Safely perform autonomous flight of simple pattern.

Summative Assessment:
  1. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 3.1: Simple Pattern

Supplemental teacher resources:
    Enabling Classroom Mode
       https://www.tynker.com/blog/articles/ideas-and-tips/coding-at-school/programming-
      parrot-drones-with-tynker/
    Video: Enabling Classroom Mode for Tynker
44

                                       Simple Pattern 3.1

To set up this challenge you will need some tape to mark out squares and boundaries. You may
want to use a rug and have students fly above for reference. For this example, the pattern is
provided but alternative patterns can be used to increase challenge or practice. Students will
create a program to fly the pattern within the taped boundaries.

Steps:
   1.    Establish designated fly and safe zones in an open area
   2.    In the fly zone, mark out boundaries and starting square (red) on the floor using tape
   3.    Mark landing square (blue) on the floor (figure 1)
   4.    Set mini drone on red square
   5.    Have students create program to follow pattern at initial take off height (3 feet)
   6.    Have student operating minidrone, place drone in the fly zone
   7.    Move to the safe zone
   8.    Have student run program to perform simple pattern
   9.    Evaluate student’s performance using Performance Assessment 3.1: Simple pattern

Figure 1
45

                     Performance Assessment 3.1: Simple Pattern

Name:                                                          Date

Terminal Objective 3.1: Program the mini drone to fly a simple pattern

Performance Objective 3.1: Using Tynker app, program the Parrot mini drone to fly a simple
pattern within boundaries.

                                          Assessment

                              Skill Check                                  Pass    Retry

 Followed safety practices                                                  ○        ○
 Demonstrated proper power up and power down procedures                     ○        ○
 Flew mini drone following simple pattern                                   ○        ○
 Flew mini drone within boundaries                                          ○        ○

Note: To pass this objective, all skill check items must receive a pass.

Assessed by:                                                    Date:
46

                        Coding with Parrot Mini Drones

Unit 3: Flying the Parrot mini drone autonomously using Tynker

Terminal Objective 3.2: Program the mini drone to fly through an obstacle course

Performance Objective 3.2: Using Tynker app, program the mini drone to fly through an
obstacle course with precision.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Define the following terms: dead reckoning, open loop, closed loop, feedback
   2. Change values on movement blocks
   3. Sketch program design (pseudocode)
   4. Program flight pattern using Tynker
   5. Troubleshoot program
   6. Execute program to perform flight task

Materials and Supplies:
  ● IPad with iOS 8.0 or later or Android tablet with 4.0 or later
  ● Download and install Tynker App on tablet (found in app store)
  ● Safety glasses for all participants
  ● Parrot Mini Drone: Cargo or Mambo and USB charging device
  ● Autonomous Challenge 3.2 (for each student)
  ● Performance Assessment 3.2: Operation Delivery (for each student)
  ● 3 Hula-hoops, tape, 2 foam 2'x2' tiles

Learning Activities:
   1. Video: ROAV mini 3.2 v1
   2. Create flight plan in pseudocode
   3. Practice programing using blocks in Tynker

Formative Assessment:
   1. Safely perform flight with Autonomous Challenge 3.2 activity

Summative Assessment:
  1. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 3.2: Operation Delivery

Supplemental teacher resources:
   ● Amazon prime air’s first customer delivery
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNySOrI2Ny8
47

                   Autonomous Challenge 3.2: Operation Delivery

Name:                                                        Date:

Situation
        Amazon and other companies are working toward using drones to deliver orders to their
customers. This type of drone system is complex and requires precision and accuracy. Choosing
most efficient routes and avoiding obstacles is key for the success of this type of transport.
Drone programmer pilots need to be able to program these drones to follow paths in order
to deliver packages safely.

Challenge
        As a team of independent programmers, you have been asked to test early drone
hardware and software to see if this can be
achieved. The customer, Amazon is wanting
these tests done before acquiring FAA approval.
Your challenge is to program the mini drone to
go through an obstacle course with precision and
efficiency. The course will consist of the
following layout set up in the gym. There will be
a pad for takeoff and one for landing. The drone
must take off and travel through three hula-
hoops before landing. The challenge will be to
get through the obstacles without crashing in the
shortest amount of time.

   1)   Sketch your program here using pseudocode

  . START                                        .
  .                                              .
  .                                              .
  .                                              .
  .                                              .
  .                                              .
  .                                              .
  .                                              .
  .                                              .
                                                 .
48

   2) Program using Tynker. Your program will probably not work the first time. You will
need to try out your program and make adjustments to achieve this goal. Make sure you
document what changes you made.

  Changes to program:

Follow safety practices while completing the following

       Criteria            Much below          Below             Meets            Exceeds
                           Expectations     Expectations      expectations      Expectations
                             1 Point          2 points          3 points          4 points

        Avoids            Touched ground   Hits more than     Hits 1 object     No collisions
       obstacles           during flight        one

   Follows flight                           Breaks path        Generally,      Maintains path
       path                                                   follows path

       Accurate                            Down the street     In the yard      On the porch
       Landing                              (Misses tile)    (Touching tile)   (Middle of tile)

 Time(standard)            15+ seconds     +10-14 seconds     +6-9 seconds      +1-5 seconds
 Set by Teacher

                  Total

  3)     Reflection What was the hardest part of this challenge? What would you have done
       different?
49

                        Autonomous Challenge 3.2 (reference)

To set up this challenge you will need 3 hoops fixed in an upright position and two foam floor
mats.

Steps:
   1.    Establish designated fly and safe zones in an open area
   2.    Set up challenge using hoops and mats. (see fig 1.1)
   3.    Have operating student place mini drone in the fly zone
   4.    Move to the safe zone
   5.    Have student test and troubleshoot code
   6.    Evaluate student’s performance using Performance Assessment 3.2: Operation Delivery

Figure 1.1
50

                                     Performance Assessment 3.2:
                                          Operation delivery

Name:                                                           Date

Terminal Objective 3.2: Program the mini drone to fly through an obstacle course

Performance Objective 3.2: Using Tynker, program the mini drone to fly through an obstacle
with precision.

                                               Assessment
Follows safety practices                                           Yes ☐              No ☐

         Criteria             Much below          Below             Meets           Exceeds
                              Expectations     Expectations      expectations     Expectations
                                1 Point          2 points          3 points         4 points

         Avoids              Touched ground   Hits more than     Hits 1 object     No collisions
        obstacles             during flight        one

     Follows flight                            Breaks path        Generally,      Maintains path
         path                                                    follows path

        Accurate                              Down the street     In the yard     On the porch
        Landing                                (Misses pad)     (Touching pad)   (Middle of pad)

    Time(standard)            15+ seconds     +10-14 seconds    +6-9 seconds       +1-5 seconds
    Set by Teacher

                     Total

Note: To pass this objective, the student must follow safety practices and receive a score of 12 or
higher

.

Assessed by:                                                      Date:
51

                         Coding with Parrot Mini Drones

Unit 4: Collecting data autonomously

Terminal Objective 4.1: Collect data using Ardusat space board

Performance Objective 4.1: Using a computer, collect data using an Ardusat space board and
read sensor values.

Enabling Objectives:
   1. Define what sensors do
   2. Identify different types of sensors
   3. Set up an Ardusat sensor experiment
   4. Record sensor data

Materials and Supplies:
  ● Computer with internet connection using chrome browser (plugin required for arduino)
  ● ROAVcopter sensor-kit https://store.ardusat.com/products/rova-copter-sensor-kit

Learning Activities:
   1. Video: ROAV mini 4.1 v1
   2. Ardusat Space board Sensors https://ehub.ardusat.com/experiments/4709
   3. (Optional) Sensor booklet Activity
      https://s3.amazonaws.com/ardusat-app/lesson_resources/Customize+Your+Sensor(s)/Sen
      sor+Booklet+V2.pdf

Formative Assessment:
   1. Activity sheet 4.1: Sensors

Summative Assessment:
  1. Evaluate students using Performance Assessment 4.1: Record Sensor Data

Supplemental teacher resources:
   ● ROAVcopter sensor-kit
      https://www.becauselearning.com/
   ● Ardusat experiment hub
      https://ehub.ardusat.com/experiments/overview
   ● Ardusat Safety video
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17iPwzWK440
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