GLOBAL WOMEN'S HEALTH FELLOWSHIP 2016 - 2017 - Brigham and Women's ...

 
CONNORS CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH AND GENDER BIOLOGY
          BRIGHAM AND WOMEN’S HOSPITAL

                   IN COORDINATION WITH

           HARVARD HUMANITARIAN INITIATIVE
           HARVARD GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE
       HARVARD T.H. CHAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

GLOBAL WOMEN’S HEALTH FELLOWSHIP

                 2016 – 2017
             PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
[GLOBAL WOMEN’S HEALTH FELLOWSHIP] 2016 – 2017

OVERVIEW
In recognition of the growing need for physician leadership within the global community and the
lack of a comprehensive and integrative training program, the Connors Center for Women’s Health
and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative
(HHI) have developed an interdisciplinary and cross-collaborative research and training fellowship.
This fellowship is designed to enable health care professionals to develop and apply research skills
and experience to significantly impact the global community, with an emphasis on women’s health.

This Partners GME/PEC approved fellowship is an institutional collaboration of Brigham and
Women’s Hospital, a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, the Harvard
Humanitarian Initiative, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of
Public Health.

The goal of the Global Women’s Health Fellowship is to train physicians for successful
careers dedicated to furthering the health and well-being of women globally through
innovative, meaningful and wide-reaching research. This two-year training program prepares
physicians who want to pursue an academic career path in Global Women’s Health (GWH)
research, understand how best to serve specific populations of women, and contribute to the
knowledge base of the field of GWH.

The fellowship takes a comprehensive approach to women’s health. It includes health issues unique
to women (e.g. reproductive health and family planning, female genital cutting, breast and cervical
cancer); areas where women experience a disproportionate health impact (e.g. cancer,
cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease); and health issues where women experience a particular
disadvantage based on gender inequalities and other social determinants (e.g. HIV and AIDS,
displacement due to war and disaster).

The fellowship is open to health professionals of all specialties involving women’s health,
including, but not limited to, obstetrics/gynecology, internal medicine, infectious disease,
emergency medicine, medicine/pediatrics, psychiatry, surgery, and anesthesia. The fellowship is
designed to provide rigorous training in academic research methods together with formal public
health education and mentored research experiences in GWH, including required field-based
research. We are poised to take full advantage of the Harvard University community to provide rich
and deep mentorship for each fellow. Each fellow will have an individualized mentorship team to
ensure academic growth and productivity in specific areas of women’s health. The team will be
multidisciplinary and will provide guidance when working within the social, environmental,
cultural, and political context of GWH.

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THE NEED FOR GLOBAL WOMEN’S HEALTH SPECIALISTS
Women are a vulnerable population, most evidently due to the risks associated with maternal
morbidity and mortality. In developing countries, the complications of pregnancy and childbirth are
among the leading causes of death for women between the ages of 15 to 49. At least 40 percent of
women experience complications during pregnancy, childbirth, and the period after delivery, and
more than one woman dies every minute in pregnancy and childbirth. Three hundred million
women (one out of four adult women) currently suffer from short- or long-term illnesses and
injuries related to pregnancy and childbirth. An estimated 15 percent of these women develop
potentially life-threatening problems. Long-term complications can include chronic pain, impaired
mobility, damage to the reproductive system, and infertility. 12

However, beyond the unique risks associated with reproductive health, particular factors increase
the vulnerability of women including gender-based violence, displacement due to war and natural
disaster, exposure to HIV and AIDS, human trafficking, and inequities in gender roles that affect
access to food, education and other resources important for improving health. For example, at least
one in five women and girls worldwide has been physically or sexually abused in their lifetime.
Eighty percent of the world’s displaced population are women and children. Of the over 20 million
women with HIV and AIDS, 70 percent are between the ages of 15 and 25 years old. In southern
Africa, women and girls account for 60 percent of all HIV and AIDS cases. Four million women
and girls each year are subjected to trafficking and forced into prostitution, slavery, or marriage.3

Reports on cancers demonstrate that there are gender disparities in the developing world, as well as
disparities between women in more versus less developed countries. More than half of cancer cases
and 60 percent of deaths occur in the less-developed countries and the outcomes for women are far
worse than for men. In some resource-poor countries, social and cultural barriers may impede early
detection and effective management of cancer, particularly in women. The World Health
Organization World Cancer Report 2008 cites these regional disparities in both incidence and
mortality with women far more vulnerable than men.4

While many of the leading causes of death in women around the world are the same as those for
men (cardiovascular disease, HIV and AIDS, cancers, respiratory diseases), some have a greater or
different impact on women, and women may face greater difficulties getting access to the health
care they need. The factors involved in improving the health of women are multi-factorial, and
include reducing gender inequality; improving women's nutritional status; increasing girls' access to
education; providing appropriate antenatal, delivery, and postpartum care; and providing access to
family planning services and information to all women and adolescents of reproductive age.5

1
  World Health Organization (WHO). The World Health Report 2005: Make Every Mother and Child Count. Geneva,
Switzerland: WHO; 2005.
2
  For more information see Center for Reproductive Law and Policy website: http://www.crlp.org.
3
  For more information see the UNICEF and UNHCR websites: http://www.unicef .org and http://www.unhcr.org.
4
  World Health Organization (WHO) World Cancer Report 2008. Switzerland: WHO; 2008.
5
  For more information see WHO website: htt://www.who.int
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PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The defining goal of the Brigham and Women’s Global Women’s Health Fellowship is to train
physicians for successful careers dedicated to furthering the health and well-being of women
through innovative and effective research. This two-year training program will prepare graduates to
pursue an academic career path in GWH research, understand how best to serve specific populations
of women, and contribute to the knowledge base of the field.

The scope of the program spans in-field experiences to in-class didactics. The core curriculum is
organized into four major themes: 1) research; 2) leadership; 3) program planning; and 4) key issues
in GWH. All fellows are expected to leave the fellowship with a basic understanding of:
reproductive health and family planning; HIV and AIDS; gender-based violence; maternal mortality
and morbidity; health, human rights and humanitarian law; sex trafficking and the informal labor
sector; mental health and aging; women and poverty; and, health policy and advocacy as it relates to
women. There will also be sufficient in-class academic training in biostatistics, clinical
epidemiology, decision analysis, health policy and management, ethics, and quantitative and
analytic research skills courses offered through the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The objectives of the program, in relation to the goals listed above, will be to train leaders in GWH
who:

1. Achieve successful careers dedicated to furthering the health and well-being of women
   globally. After the fellowship, fellows will be well prepared to launch a career in GWH. This
   may be a well-trodden research pathway, a pathway dedicated to developing and evaluating
   GWH programs, or a newly carved pathway that has not yet been taken. Fellows will leave the
   fellowship with a broad-based understanding of fundamental academic skills for carrying-out
   GWH research, requirements for getting promoted within an academic institution, and a deep
   familiarity of the landscape of GWH research, seminal conferences and seminars for their area
   of interest, and knowledge of key players of that field.

2. Conduct clinical and field research based on solid quantitative and analytic research skills.
   Fellows will take the summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness (PCE) offered through the
   Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. They will also complete an MPH, if they do not
   already have one. Through the PCE, fellows will develop the framework for a research project
   as well as have the opportunity to engage with fellow students and faculty on their projects.
   They will be expected to take these skills to the field as they continue to develop their research
   project. Within the first few months, fellows are expected to develop their research question,
   conduct literature reviews and build relationships with potential mentors and collaborators. The
   next couple of months will be spent on refining their research question, developing the study
   design, and determining the resources needed (access to data, IRB approvals, in-country site) to
   conduct a study. It is important to note that each fellow’s research pathway is unique. The
   Fellowship Director will work with each fellow as they identify research opportunities based on
   their area of interest and specialization. Developing a relationship with a senior research mentor
   is a critical part of the training process. Many fellows enter the fellowship program with
   established areas of interest and connection with a research mentor.

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3. Obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of global health issues that uniquely
   affect the health of women within the context of social, cultural, and political
   environments. Fellows will participate in specific course work in GWH topics, in addition to a
   core curriculum. The core curriculum is organized into four major themes: 1) research; 2)
   leadership; 3) program planning; and 4) key issues in GWH delivered through monthly
   education seminars, journal clubs, grand rounds presentations and web-based learning.
   Participation in the two-week Humanitarian Studies Initiative at Harvard is optional.
   Educational rotations at agencies such as CDC and WHO or non-governmental organizations
   (NGOs) are encouraged.

4. Develop administrative leadership skills through understanding how to assess, build,
   implement, monitor, and evaluate GWH programs. Each fellow is required to complete at
   least one research project in GWH under the guidance of an experienced faculty mentor of
   sufficient quality for publication, as well as work on one grant proposal related to original
   research prior to completion of the fellowship. All fellows will need to go through IRB Human
   Subjects Research Training and obtain IRB approval for their studies. Part of developing this
   competency will be having experience reviewing publications and/or grants; undergoing grant-
   writing and grantsmanship training; polishing presentation skills; and, attending leadership and
   management workshops.

5. Understand the particularly vulnerable role of women in humanitarian crises, war,
   conflict and disasters. Given the shifting burden of global disease, there is an increasing
   displaced and vulnerable population. Fellows will focus on the particular challenges that women
   face in humanitarian crises, war, conflict and disasters. Fellows will have the option of
   furthering their understanding through a two-week Humanitarian Studies Initiative at Harvard,
   attending the annual Humanitarian Action Summit, and/or the World Conference on
   Humanitarian Studies.

PROGRAM SCHEDULE AND BENEFITS
The fellowship begins July 1 and lasts two years. Fellows divide their time between international
research projects, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health classes, and clinical service within
their discipline.
                    Figure 1: Effort distribution during Fellowship

                                                                      Research
                                                                      Academic Training
                                                                      Clinical Service

Fellows receive a competitive salary based on the Partners HealthCare System PGY salary scale,
and a generous package of benefits. The fellowship covers: full tuition and fees related to the

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Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health MPH degree program or related coursework, including
the cost of required textbooks; fellowship-related travel costs, including airfare, room and board,
global malpractice coverage, and international medical and evacuation insurance; and CME funds.
Four weeks of vacation are allowed per year.

PROGRAM CORE CURRICULUM

1. Understanding the Landscape of Global Women’s Health
Learning Objectives: Fellows should have a solid understanding of the major issues in Global
Women’s Health and how they are being played out on the world’s stage today. Fellows will
become familiar with accessing information from and understanding resources including:

   Global Health Information (i.e. The Human Poverty Index; Global Burden of Disease, etc)
   Human Rights Perspectives (i.e. UN Declaration of Human Rights; CEDAW; UN Declaration
    on the Elimination of Violence Against Women; UN Division for the Advancement of Women)
   Major Global Health Players (i.e. National Ministries of Health, UN Agencies (UNAIDS;
    UNICEF), NGOs, Inter-University Programs, etc)
   Funding Resources (i.e. government, foundations, NGOs, contracts/subcontracts, etc)

2. Women’s Health and Human Rights
Learning Objectives: Fellows will gain a better understanding about the status and rights of women
around the globe – systematic rape and sexual slavery in situations of war and armed conflict;
domestic violence in countries where women are not considered to be equal to men; women and
girls who are bought, sold and trafficked into forced prostitution; and the inability to make one’s
own reproductive choices.

Fellows are recommended to attend at least one of the below courses/trainings/programs:
 WGH 200: Women, Gender and Health
    Women, Gender and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 214: Health, Human Rights & the International System
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 231: Sexual and Reproductive Health
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 268: Field Experience in Health and Human Rights
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 288: Issues in Health and Human Rights
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 502: International Reproductive Health Issues: From Theory to Practice
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 A course/training/program of the Fellow’s choosing with approval from the Fellowship
    Director
 Courses cross-listed at TUFTS Fletchers School of Law & Diplomacy

3. Key Issues in Global Women’s Health
Learning Objectives: Fellows are expected to have an advanced understanding of key global health
issues that affect women in the world today. Topical issues in the field of Global Women’s Health
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include, but are not limited to: violence against women; sex trafficking; maternal mortality and
morbidity; female genital mutilation; the intersection of health, rights and poverty; sexual and
reproductive rights and family planning; women and war; the informal workforce; and issues related
to mental health and aging. They will be expected to learn about outstanding debates in the field, the
most pressing knowledge gaps, effective evidence-based interventions, current challenges and the
most promising public health approaches to overcome them.

Fellows are recommended to attend at least two of the below courses/trainings/programs:
 WGH 200: Women, Gender and Health
    Women, Gender and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 WGH 210: Issues in Mental Health
    Women, Gender and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 214: Health, Human Rights & the International System
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 231: Sexual and Reproductive Health
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 267: HIV/AIDS in Developing Countries
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 272: Foundations of Global Health and Population
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 GHP 502: International Reproductive Health Issues: From Theory to Practice
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 SHH 210: Women, Health & Development
    Society, Human Development and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
    Health
 SHH 246: Issues in Maternal and Child Health Programs and Policies
    Society, Human Development and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
    Health
 A course/training/program of the Fellow’s choosing with approval from the Fellowship
    Director
 Courses cross-listed at TUFTS Fletchers School of Law & Diplomacy

4. Methods of Global Health Research
Learning Objectives: In addition to the courses offered through the Harvard T.H. Chan School of
Public Health, fellows will be engaged in quantitative and qualitative studies that seek to address
women’s poor health outcomes as a result of inequities in gender roles, access and rights. Fellows
will gain skills in Global Health research methods through a combination of their in-field
experience; engagement with a mentor team; preparation of grants, publications, and presentations;
and, the execution of their research projects. If it is a part of the Fellows’ interest/research, specific
research methodology applied to research in sexual and gender-based violence and human
trafficking will be offered.

Fellows must:
 Take the summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
    Health (in the first summer)
 Attend the Bi-annual Research Retreat in Global Women’s Health
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   Attend at least 5 sessions a year of the GWH Education Seminar Series/Journal Club Discussion
    Sessions
   Attend at least 2 outside seminar/conferences that are relevant to Global Health research
   Submit at least 1 grant during fellowship
   Have published at least once by the end of fellowship
   Go through ethics training (IRB) and submit at least one IRB application

5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Global Women’s Health Programs
Learning Objectives: Improved monitoring and evaluation is not only necessary to report back to
funders, but also to provide gold standard health information to the world. Fellows are expected to
gain skills that allow for monitoring and evaluation of women’s health programs through
coursework at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and in-field training and mentoring. It is
important to understand how to assess a program’s efficiency, effectiveness and impact. Fellows
will design appropriate conceptual frameworks for evaluation to be presented as part of their overall
in-field research program.

Fellows are recommended to attend at least one of the below courses/trainings/programs:
 GHP 251: Planning & Evaluation of Health Programs
    Global Health and Population Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 SHH 245: Social and Behavioral Research Methods I
    Society, Human Development and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
    Health
 SHH 250: Research in Social and Behavioral Health
    Society, Human Development and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
    Health
 SHH 265: Program Planning: Design & Evaluation
    Society, Human Development and Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
    Health
 A course/training/program of the Fellow’s choosing with approval from the Fellowship
    Director

6. Leadership Skills
Learning Objectives: Fellows are expected to become leaders in the field of Global Women’s
Health. As such, it is important that they understand what it means to be a leader and how to lead
successfully. Specifically, Fellows will learn how to communicate and listen effectively; work in
teams; have a better understanding of their own strengths and weaknesses; have the ability to
navigate in complex social and political systems; be able to mobilize others; learn to negotiate and
resolve conflicts; and understand the contextual situations in which they are operating. Exposure to
basic managerial skills is also considered important and includes: budget development and
management; HR skills; strategic planning and marketing; overall project management; and, a basic
understanding of organizational behavior.

Fellows are recommended to attend one of the below courses/trainings/programs:
 Barry R. Bloom Public Health Practice Leadership Speaker Series
    Division of Public Health Practice, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
 Taking Action: Leading the Way Seminar
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    Division of Public Health Practice, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
   HPM 245: Public Health Leadership Skills
    Health Policy and Management Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
   HPM 536: Leading Change
    Health Policy and Management Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
   HPM 542: Theory and Practice Leadership
    Health Policy and Management Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
   ID 506: Public Health Practice, Leadership and Social Justice
    Society, Human Development & Health Department, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
    Health
   Foundations of Leadership – Architecture of Leadership Program
    Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
   Leading Teams – Architecture of Leadership Program
    Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
   A course/training/program of the Fellow’s choosing with approval from the Fellowship
    Director

PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
Summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness – The Program in Clinical Effectiveness is designed for
clinicians seeking quantitative and analytic skills needed for clinical research or are interested in
health care administration. It is an intensive seven-week, 15-credit summer curriculum, which
contains summer-long core courses in Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Note, fellows should
not plan any travel or clinical work during these seven weeks as, in addition to three classes daily,
they may also have computer labs on some afternoons, and have considerable homework (on
average over 20 hours each week of homework). To find out more about the Harvard T.H. Chan
School of Public Health’s summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness:
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/clinical-effectiveness/

GWH Educational Seminar Series – The GWH Educational Seminar Series is a series of lectures
and discussions led by experts working within the field of Global Health. Seminars are organized
into four main areas: 1) research; 2) leadership; 3) program planning; and 4) key issues in GWH.
These seminars offer fellows an opportunity to participate in an active discussion about cutting-edge
research, meet other researchers who are interested in similar work, and discuss career pathways,
opportunities and challenges in the growing field of GWH. Past seminar topics have included:
female genital cutting, unsafe abortions, health care access, women and war, gender-based violence,
influencing policy and advocacy through research, social entrepreneurship projects for women, teen
pregnancy, and career development in GWH.

Journal Clubs/Grand Rounds – Fellows will also participate in journal clubs specifically focused on
“hot” issues related to GWH. Through this practice, fellows will learn how to dissect the evidence
base of each study. Occasionally, expert guests, including authors of the journals being reviewed,
will be invited to lead the session with fellows. Each fellow is expected to lead at least one journal
club a year. Journal club occurs once per quarter.

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The fellowship will also distribute information regarding seminars, lectures, and courses addressing
GWH-related topics that occur regularly around Harvard and Harvard-affiliated institutions so that
fellows may take advantage of the wealth of opportunities across institutions. Fellows are
encouraged to attend clinical grand rounds series in their area of expertise in order to remain current
with important clinical issues in women’s health.

Bi-annual Research Retreats – Twice per year, fellows will participate in a half-day retreat. The first
of the two retreat days aims to provide participants with an understanding of the opportunities and
challenges for creating a career pathway in GWH. The second is designed to allow fellows a chance
to present their research in progress and obtain timely feedback from faculty and senior audience
participants.

Ultimately the goal is for each participant to develop sustainable research collaborations to
effectively address health issues directly impacting women, including: reproductive and sexual
health, prevention of sexually transmitted infections, contraception, HIV and AIDS, or chronic
diseases, such as cancer and heart disease. Each retreat will have a specific theme under the domain
of research in GWH.

Academic Activities – Fellows are required to take the summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness
(PCE) offered through the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. They will also complete an
MPH, if they do not already have one. Through the PCE, fellows will develop the framework for a
research project, as well as, have the opportunity to engage fellow students and faculty on their
projects. They will be expected to take these skills to the field as they continue to develop their
research project.

Mentored Research – Each fellow will be expected to pair with a primary research mentor and/or
mentorship team. Fellows will spend most of their time conducting research under the supervision
of one or more faculty mentors who have a special interest and expertise in the fellow’s area of
interest. Developing a relationship with a research mentor is an important part of a fellow’s training
experience, and can be a lengthy process. Even before the start of the fellowship, the Fellowship
Director will discuss with the fellow about developing plans for connecting with possible research
mentors. Being able to develop a good “match” depends on the fit between the fellow’s interests
and skills, the mentor’s capacity to take on additional trainees, and the mentor’s expertise and
ongoing research project needs. The Fellowship Director will work closely with each fellow to
cultivate these relationships.

Over the two-year fellowship, each fellow will design, implement, analyze, and complete a
minimum of one publishable original research project under the supervision of a faculty mentor.
Typically fellows are involved in two to three research projects over the course of the two years.
Their research projects will utilize the qualitative, quantitative, and analytic skills learned from their
MPH and through the program curriculum. The Fellowship Director will closely guide the choice of
research projects.

Career Mentorship – the Fellowship Director will also function as the overall career mentor to
ensure each fellow is on a coherent pathway towards independence. The Fellowship Director will
do an initial needs assessment with the fellow to get a sense of their overall schedule, their career

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plans (short- and long-term), and get a better sense of their research interests as well as helping the
fellow to further refine their niche. The Director will meet with the fellow on a monthly basis in
person or via Skype to be sure goals are being met and also adapted according to individual and
ongoing needs; to review with the fellow the focus and appropriateness of the overall research
project; and to mentor the fellow in taking steps towards an independent research career.

Learning Network – An online platform is currently being developed for the purpose of linking
scholars, clinicians, and professionals from around the world who are working within the field of
women’s health. The goals of the network are: 1) to create a forum for peer-to-peer support and
learning that will go beyond the training stage; 2) to follow the longitudinal development of leaders
who have undergone training with us, and provide additional supports appropriate to their stage of
evolution; 3) to build a knowledge base of the trajectory of leaders in this field and understand how
to nurture and accelerate their growth; and 4) to establish a critical mass of alumni worldwide who
strategically collaborate to advance progress in women’s health, well-being and human rights.

Humanitarian Studies Initiative Training Programs – Fellows are given the option of participating in
the intensive two-week course in the management of humanitarian crises as well as the weekend-
long simulation. These courses are designed to give fellows a better understanding of the evolving
and multidisciplinary field of humanitarian studies. As part of the coursework, fellows will learn
about: fundamentals of humanitarian disaster relief work; controversies and challenges; research
methods; funding flow; how to implement rapid health assessments; communicable diseases; issues
concerning the environment in humanitarian crises; applied technology; mental health and
psychosocial aspects of disaster; security and protection issues; food aid and food security; logistics
and coordination; methods in cluster sampling; shelter, water and sanitation; interaction with media;
budgeting issues; and, monitoring and evaluation of relief programs.
http://www.humanitarianacademy.harvard.edu/humanitarian-response-intensive-course

Human Research Training and IRB Approvals – We require all fellows to have formal instruction
on the responsible conduct of research according to NIH guidelines. Each fellow must take the
University of Miami CITI Course offered by BWH, MGH and BIDMC. This program offers a web-
based tutorial on ethical principles governing research on human subjects, informed consent,
research with vulnerable human populations, use of tissues and genetic samples, survey research
and FDA rules. Each fellow is required to pass a web-based exam that accompanies the tutorial.
Fellows may also complete a similar web-based program offered by Harvard Ethics Training in
Human Research (HETHR). Instruction in research ethics also occurs in the Program in Clinical
Effectiveness Epidemiology course at HSPH. All fellows are required to maintain their certification
in the responsible conduct of research. We also require fellows to submit IRB applications for all of
their research projects and regularly monitor and update their protocols.

Collaborative Publication – Each year, the senior fellow is expected to take the lead on a
collaborative publication with the junior fellow and others interested in collaborating. These can be
editorials, book chapters, reviews, or lectures about and contributing to the field of GWH writ large.

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PROGRAM EVALUATION
Evaluation of Fellows – The fellows will meet monthly with the Fellowship Director to receive
immediate feedback regarding progress on their research project and career plans. Faculty and
mentors will be asked every six months during the fellowship to give formal written feedback about
the performance and progress of the fellows. The mid-term evaluation will assess the fellow’s
ability to identify research goals, collaborators and mentors, and develop a reasonable and
achievable career plan. The last formal evaluation will occur near the end of the fellowship and
evaluate whether or not the fellow was able to reach their research and learning objectives
(including publications, presentations, and grant submissions), career plans and overall development
as a GWH leader.

Evaluation of Mentors – Fellows will have an opportunity to evaluate their mentors at the end of
each year through an online survey.

Evaluation of Fellowship Program – At the end of each year of the Fellowship, each fellow will
have the opportunity to evaluate the program through an online survey. The fellows will be asked
for feedback on particular strengths and weaknesses of the program and opportunities for
improvement. The Fellowship leadership team will review the summary of responses, and discuss
associated action plans and implementation timelines. The Fellowship Director also welcomes
feedback during monthly meetings in order to make changes and improvements on an ongoing
basis.

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ANNUAL SCHEDULE
September (prior to start of Fellowship)
     Applications due
October/November (prior to start of Fellowship)
     Interviews
December (prior to start of Fellowship)
     Informed re: acceptance into Fellowship
     Applications for HSPH MPH Program due
January (prior to start of Fellowship)
     Clinical placement search begins
February (prior to start of Fellowship)
     Appointment paperwork initiated
     HSPH PCE application due
May (prior to start of Fellowship)
     Initial needs assessment with Fellowship Director
     Fellow and Director develop initial two-year plan
     Director begins to build mentoring team and network for fellow
June (prior to start of Fellowship)
     Final contracts in place
July
     Welcome session                                            Note: Basic schedule repeats over 2nd year
     On-boarding of fellow
     HSPH PCE begins
     Fellow and Director – Research Proposal Phase I begins
September
     Journal Club Session
     Fellow and Director – Research Proposal Phase II begins
     Fall Research Retreat
October
     GWH Educational Seminar Series
November
     GWH Educational Seminar Series
December
     Journal Club Session
     Mid-year evaluation of Fellow
January
     GWH Educational Seminar Series
February
     Journal Club Session
March
     Spring Research Retreat
April
     GWH Educational Seminar Series
May
     Journal Club Session
June
     Senior fellow-led collaborative publication
     Senior fellow-led GWH Educational Seminar Series
     Year-end evaluation of fellow
     Fellow’s evaluation of mentors
     Fellow’s evaluation of fellowship program

       13 Last Updated: 7/21/2016
[GLOBAL WOMEN’S HEALTH FELLOWSHIP] 2016 – 2017

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS
Applicants must be board certified or board eligible in their trained specialty when they begin the
fellowship. Successful applicants will also (1) receive a research appointment with Brigham and
Women’s Hospital (as initiated by the Fellowship); (2) receive a research appointment with Harvard
Medical School (as initiated by the Fellowship); (3) obtain a Massachusetts medical license
(candidate’s responsibility); and (4) be accepted into the MPH program by the Harvard T.H. Chan
School of Public Health (candidate’s responsibility).

Please note that all application materials must be received by September 15 for the Fellowship
beginning July 1. Fellows will be notified on their acceptance into the Fellowship by December 1.

Please submit the following items by email (preferred), fax or mail to Jaclyn Chai (info below):
1. An application form
2. CV
3. Personal statement (one page maximum)
4. Three letters of recommendation (one from Residency Director or Chairman)
5. Official transcript of USMLE results
6. Official medical school transcript

You must also apply separately to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Masters in Public
Health program by December 15 and for the summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness by
February 1. Application for admission is available through the Schools of Public Health
Application Service (SOPHAS) at www.sophas.org.

For most current information, please visit: www.brighamandwomens.org/gwh

For additional information, please contact:

                                  Stephanie Kayden, MD, MPH
                         Global Women’s Health Fellowship Program Director
                                   Division of Women’s Health
                                  Brigham and Women’s Hospital
                                         75 Francis Street
                                        Boston, MA 02115
                                  Email: skayden@partners.org

                                         Jaclyn Chai, MPH
                                       Division Administrator
                                     Division of Women’s Health
                                  Brigham and Women’s Hospital
                                   1620 Tremont Street, 3rd Floor
                                         Boston, MA 02120
                  Tel 617.525.6766 | Fax 617.525.7746 | Email: jchai1@partners.org

     14 Last Updated: 7/21/2016
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