Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018

 
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
NSW Education Standards Authority

Graphics Technology
Years 7–10
Draft Syllabus for Consultation

7 May – 18 June 2018
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
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DSSP-28877
D2018/48933
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus
for Consultation (May 2018)
This Graphics Technology Years 7–10 draft syllabus, including Life Skills outcomes and content, is
open for consultation from 7 May – 18 June 2018. You are invited to provide feedback through an
online survey or written submission. Details can be found on the Technologies K–10 syllabus
development page on the NESA website.

Online translation
The Graphics Technology Years 7–10 syllabus was first published in 2003. It is now being converted
to an interactive online format. This involves some amendments to content and its presentation,
including learning across the curriculum areas, and a glossary. Where applicable, Australian
Curriculum content is being included.

Feedback
Responses to the online survey conducted in late 2017 raised the following key areas for change.
   Review the core content to avoid repetition.
   Update the content to include CAD, CAM and related technologies.
   Update and strengthen references to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander histories and
    cultures.
   Update the content to increase the emphasis on project based learning, collaboration and group
    work
   Ensure the Life Skills content is inclusive of the range of students for whom this is an appropriate
    option.

Changes evident in this draft syllabus
In addition to the online translation work, the following changes are reflected in this draft syllabus:
   The syllabus content has been restructured to provide greater clarity for teachers (pages 30–58).
         100-hour course
         Core Module 1: Instrument Drawing, Core Module 2: Computer Aided Design and one or two
         Option Modules
         200-hour course
         Core Module 1: Instrument Drawing, Core Module 2: Computer Aided Design and four to six
         Option Modules.
   The core content includes both instrument drawing and CAD (pages 30–35).
   The syllabus has been reduced to ten option modules to avoid repetition.
   The content has been updated and includes contemporary examples.
   Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures have been strengthened in the
    content.
   Life Skills content has been aligned and strengthened (pages 67–80).

For more information, please contact:
Mark Tyler
Inspector, Technology Education
mark.tyler@nesa.nsw.edu.au
(02) 9367 8454
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
Contents
NESA K–10 Syllabus Development Process .......................................................................................... 5
Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 6
Graphics Technology Key ....................................................................................................................... 9
Rationale ............................................................................................................................................... 12
The Place of the Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus in the K–12 Curriculum ......................... 14
Aim ........................................................................................................................................................ 15
Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 16
Outcomes .............................................................................................................................................. 17
Stage Statements .................................................................................................................................. 20
Content .................................................................................................................................................. 22
Content for Years 7–10 ......................................................................................................................... 30
Years 7–10 Life Skills Outcomes and Content ..................................................................................... 59
Years 7–10 Life Skills Outcomes .......................................................................................................... 60
Years 7–10 Life Skills Content .............................................................................................................. 66
Assessment ........................................................................................................................................... 81
Glossary ................................................................................................................................................ 84
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
NESA K–10 Syllabus Development Process
The New South Wales Education Standards Authority (NESA) process for the development of K–10
syllabuses to include Australian curriculum content involves expert writers and opportunities for broad
consultation with teachers and other stakeholder groups in order to receive the highest quality advice
from across the education community.

This project will follow the NESA syllabus development process, recognising the substantial review
and development work that the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA),
together with all states and territories has undertaken.

Each subsection of the Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus addresses a syllabus
component and includes an explanation of the component’s purpose.

Assisting Respondents
The following icons are used throughout this document to assist respondents:

Icon and label                 Description

                               This icon indicates general information that assists in reading or
       for your information   understanding the information contained in the document. Text
                               introduced by this icon will not appear in the final syllabus.

        consult
                               This icon indicates material on which responses and views are sought
                               through consultation.

              Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation              5
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
Introduction
       for your information

This text is included in all K–10 syllabuses.

The K–10 Curriculum
The NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) syllabuses are developed with respect to some
overarching views about education. These include the NESA K–10 Curriculum Framework and
Statement of Equity Principles and the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young
Australians (December 2008).

NESA syllabuses include agreed Australian Curriculum content and content that clarifies the scope,
breadth and depth of learning. The Australian Curriculum achievement standards underpin the
syllabus outcomes and the Stage statements for Early Stage 1 to Stage 5.

In accordance with the K–10 Curriculum Framework and the Statement of Equity Principles, the
syllabus takes into account the diverse needs of all students. It identifies essential knowledge,
understanding, skills, values and attitudes. It outlines clear standards of what students are expected
to know and be able to do in Years 7–10. It provides structures and processes by which teachers can
provide continuity of study for all students.

The framework also provides a set of broad learning outcomes that summarise the knowledge,
understanding, skills, values and attitudes essential for all students in all learning areas to succeed in
and beyond their schooling.

The continued relevance of the K–10 Curriculum Framework is consistent with the intent of the
Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (December 2008), which sets the
direction for Australian schooling for the next ten years. There are two broad goals:
     Goal 1: Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence
     Goal 2: All young Australians become successful learners, confident and creative individuals,
             and active and informed citizens.

The way in which learning in the Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus contributes to the
curriculum, and to students’ achievement of the broad learning outcomes, is outlined in the syllabus
rationale.

              Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation               6
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
Diversity of Learners
NSW syllabuses are inclusive of the learning needs of all students. Syllabuses accommodate
teaching approaches that support student diversity, including students with special education needs,
gifted and talented students, and students learning English as an additional language or dialect
(EAL/D). Students may have more than one learning need.

Students with Special Education Needs
All students are entitled to participate in and progress through the curriculum. Under the Disability
Standards for Education 2005, schools are required to provide additional support or adjustments to
teaching, learning and assessment activities for some students with special education needs.
Adjustments are measures or actions taken in relation to teaching, learning and assessment that
enable a student with special education needs to access syllabus outcomes and content and
demonstrate achievement of outcomes.

Students with special education needs can access outcomes and content from Years 7–10 syllabuses
in a range of ways. Students may engage with:
   syllabus outcomes and content from their age-appropriate Stage with adjustments to teaching,
    learning and/or assessment activities; or
   selected syllabus outcomes and content from their age-appropriate Stage, relevant to their
    learning needs; or
   syllabus outcomes from an earlier Stage, using age-appropriate content; or
   selected Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content from one or more syllabuses for students in
    Stages 4 and 5.

Decisions regarding curriculum options, including adjustments, should be made in the context of
collaborative curriculum planning with the student, parent/carer and other significant individuals to
ensure that syllabus outcomes and content reflect the learning needs and priorities of individual
students.

Further information can be found in support materials for:
   Technologies
   Special education
   Life Skills.

Gifted and Talented Students
Gifted and talented students have specific learning needs that may require adjustments to the pace,
level and content of the curriculum. Differentiated educational opportunities assist in meeting the
needs of gifted and talented students.

Generally, gifted and talented students demonstrate the following characteristics:
   the capacity to learn at faster rates
   the capacity to find and solve problems
   the capacity to make connections and manipulate abstract ideas.

There are different kinds and levels of giftedness and talent. Gifted and talented students may also
have learning disabilities and/or English as an additional language or dialect. These needs should be
addressed when planning appropriate teaching, learning and assessment activities.

              Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation              7
Graphics Technology Years 7-10 Draft Syllabus for Consultation - 7 May - 18 June 2018
Curriculum strategies for gifted and talented students may include:
   differentiation: modifying the pace, level and content of teaching, learning and assessment
    activities
   acceleration: promoting a student to a level of study beyond their age group
   curriculum compacting: assessing a student’s current level of learning and addressing aspects of
    the curriculum that have not yet been mastered.

School decisions about appropriate strategies are generally collaborative and involve teachers,
parents/carers and students, with reference to documents and advice available from NESA and the
education sectors.

Gifted and talented students may also benefit from individual planning to determine the curriculum
options, as well as teaching, learning and assessment strategies, most suited to their needs and
abilities.

Students Learning English as an Additional Language or Dialect
(EAL/D)
Many students in Australian schools are learning English as an additional language or dialect
(EAL/D). EAL/D students are those whose first language is a language or dialect other than Standard
Australian English and who require additional support to assist them to develop English language
proficiency.

EAL/D students come from diverse backgrounds and may include:
   overseas and Australian-born students whose first language is a language other than English,
    including creoles and related varieties
   Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students whose first language is Aboriginal English, including
    Kriol and related varieties.

EAL/D students enter Australian schools at different ages and stages of schooling and at different
stages of English language learning. They have diverse talents and capabilities and a range of prior
learning experiences and levels of literacy in their first language and in Standard Australian English.
EAL/D students represent a significant and growing percentage of learners in NSW schools. For
some, school is the only place they use Standard Australian English.

EAL/D students are simultaneously learning a new language and the knowledge, understanding and
skills of a syllabus through that new language. They require additional time and support, along with
informed teaching that explicitly addresses their language needs, and assessments that take into
account their developing language proficiency.

The ESL Scales and the English as an Additional Language or Dialect: Teacher Resource provide
information about the English language development phases of EAL/D students. These materials and
other resources can be used to support the specific needs of EAL/D students and to assist students to
access syllabus outcomes and content.

              Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation              8
Graphics Technology Key
        for your information

The following codes and icons are used in the Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus.

Outcome Coding
Syllabus outcomes are coded in a consistent way. The code identifies the subject, Stage, outcome
number and the way content is organised.

Stage 4, Stage 5 and Life Skills are represented by the following codes:

 Stage                Code

 Stage 4                4

 Stage 5                5

 Life Skills           LS

In the Graphics Technology syllabus, outcome codes indicate subject, Stage and outcome number.
For example:

 Outcome code        Interpretation

 GT5-1               Graphics Technology, Stage 5 – Outcome number 1

 GTLS-2              Graphics Technology, Life Skills – Outcome number 2

               Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation        9
Coding of Australian Curriculum content
The syllabus includes Australian Curriculum content for Digital Technologies with Australian
Curriculum codes in brackets at the end of each content description, for example:
   Investigate and make judgments, within a range of technologies specialisations, on how
    technologies can be combined to create designed solutions (ACTDEK047)

For example:
   using CAD or appropriate graphics software create final presentation renders, for example:
    (ACTDEK047)
    – photo-realistic rendering of CAD models through applying textures to model surfaces

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation           10
Learning Across the Curriculum Icons

       for your information

Learning across the curriculum content, including the cross-curriculum priorities, general capabilities
and other areas identified as important learning for all students, is incorporated and identified by icons
in the syllabus.

Cross-curriculum priorities

     Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

     Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia

     Sustainability

General capabilities

     Critical and creative thinking

     Ethical understanding

     Information and communication technology capability

     Intercultural understanding

     Literacy

     Numeracy

     Personal and social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

     Civics and citizenship

     Difference and diversity

     Work and enterprise

                Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation            11
Rationale
       for your information

The rationale describes the distinctive context of the subject and outlines its relationship to the
contemporary world and current practice. It explains the place and purpose of the subject in the
curriculum, including:
   why the subject exists
   the theoretical underpinnings
   what makes the subject distinctive
   why students would study the subject
   how it contributes to the purpose of the K–10 Curriculum Framework
   how it prepares students for further schooling.

Graphics Technology enables students to practise logical thought and decision-making while
developing skills applicable to a range of domestic, commercial and leisure activities. They engage in
both manual and digital forms of image generation and manipulation and develop knowledge of the
wide application of graphics in a variety of contexts and an ever-increasing range of vocations.
Graphics Technology also develops students’ technical and visual literacy, equipping them for
participation in a technological world.

The study of Graphics Technology develops in students an understanding of the significance of
graphical communication and the techniques and technologies used to convey technical and non-
technical ideas and information. They learn about the application of these techniques and
technologies in industrial, commercial and domestic contexts.

The use of graphical images to communicate information overcomes the barriers of time and
linguistic, cultural and social differences. In an age of globalised industry and rapid technological
development, where computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacture (CAM) and
multimedia applications are widely used, the study of Graphics Technology is particularly relevant.

Graphics is a universal language and an important tool for thinking and communicating. Graphics
Technology develops in students, specific manipulative and cognitive skills in using a variety of tools,
materials and techniques widely available in industrial, commercial and domestic settings. An
important part of the cognitive process associated with this syllabus involves the generation and use
of images, models and pictures. This includes the visualisation and manipulation of three-dimensional
concepts and images, and the interpretation and presentation of ideas graphically. Students develop
the capacity to solve problems and generate and communicate solutions. They become confident in
the application of conventions and procedures that are essential to the global transfer of concepts and
images irrespective of language barriers.

Through the study of Graphics Technology students become increasingly productive, creative,
discriminating and confident in the development and use of a range of technologies relevant to current
practice in graphics and graphics-related industries. The syllabus encourages the development of
collaborative skills in the real and virtual worlds and fosters an understanding of the advantages and
responsibilities that are associated with these processes.

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The study of Graphics Technology in Years 7–10 develops in students an understanding of related
work environments while developing skills and understanding that equip them for potential vocational
pathways, future learning and leisure and lifestyle activities.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation          13
The Place of the Graphics Technology Years 7–10
Syllabus in the K–12 Curriculum
       for your information

NSW syllabuses include a diagram that illustrates how the syllabus relates to the learning pathways in
K–12. This section places the Graphics Technology Year 7–10 syllabus in the K–12 curriculum as a
whole.

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Aim
       for your information

In NSW syllabuses, the aim provides a succinct statement of the overall purpose of the syllabus. It
indicates the general educational benefits for students from programs based on the syllabus.

The aim, objectives, outcomes and content of a syllabus are clearly linked and sequentially amplify
details of the intention of the syllabus.

The aim of the Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus is to develop in students the ability to think
creatively, devise solutions and communicate information to a range of audiences using a variety of
graphical techniques and media.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation            15
Objectives
       for your information

In NSW syllabuses, objectives provide specific statements of the intention of a syllabus. They amplify
the aim and provide direction to teachers on the teaching and learning process emerging from the
syllabus. They define, in broad terms, the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes to be
developed through study in the subject. They act as organisers for the intended outcomes.

       consult

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills
Students:
   develop knowledge, understanding and skills to visualise, sketch and accurately draw shapes and
    objects to communicate information to specific audiences
   develop knowledge and understanding to interpret, design, produce and evaluate a variety of
    graphical presentations using a range of manual and digital media and techniques
   develop knowledge, understanding and skills to use graphics conventions, standards and
    procedures in the design, production and interpretation of a range of manual and digital graphical
    presentations
   develop knowledge, understanding and skills to select and apply techniques in the design and
    creation of digital presentations and simulations to communicate information
   develop knowledge and understanding to apply Work Health and Safety (WHS) practices and risk
    management techniques to the work environment
   investigate the role of graphics in industry and the relationships between graphics technology, the
    individual, society and the environment

Values and Attitudes
Students:
 appreciate the contribution and impact of innovation and technologies now and in the future
 appreciate the context and scope of graphics in industry and the relationships between graphics
    technology, the individual, society and the environment
 appreciate the finite context of some resources and the impact of their use on the environment
    and society
 value the development of skills and gain satisfaction from their use to solve problems and create
    quality products.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation            16
Outcomes
      for your information

In NSW syllabuses, outcomes provide detail about what students are expected to achieve at the end
of each Year in relation to the objectives. They indicate the knowledge, understanding and skills
expected to be demonstrated by most students as a result of effective teaching and learning. They
are derived from the objectives of the syllabus.

Table of Objectives and Outcomes – Continuum of
Learning

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills
Objective
Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills to:
   visualise, sketch and accurately draw shapes and objects to communicate information to
    specific audiences

Stage 4 outcomes                                  Stage 5 outcomes
A student:                                        A student:

GT4-1                                             GT5-1
uses freehand sketches to interpret and visualise communicates ideas graphically using freehand
objects                                           sketching and accurate drafting techniques

GT4-2                                             GT5-2
selects and uses a range of presentation          analyses the context of information and intended
techniques suitable to a variety of audiences     audience to select and develop appropriate
                                                  presentations

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation        17
Objective
Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills to:
   interpret, design, produce and evaluate a variety of graphical presentations using a range of
    manual and digital media and techniques

Stage 4 outcomes                                   Stage 5 outcomes
A student:                                         A student:

GT4-3                                              GT5-3
interprets and produces a range of drawings        designs and produces a range of graphical
                                                   presentations

GT4-4                                              GT5-4
recognises the application of a range of           evaluates the effectiveness of different modes of
drawings in conveying information                  graphical communications for a variety of
                                                   purposes

Objective
Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills to:
   use graphics conventions, standards and procedures in the design, production and
    interpretation of a range of manual and digital graphical presentations

Stage 4 outcomes                                   Stage 5 outcomes
A student:                                         A student:

GT4-5                                              GT5-5
applies elementary graphics conventions,           identifies, interprets, selects and applies
standards and procedures in graphical              graphics conventions, standards and procedures
communications                                     in graphical communications

GT4-6                                              GT5-6
completes drawings within specified time frames    manages the development of graphical
                                                   presentations to meet project briefs and
                                                   specifications

Objective
Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills to:
   select and apply techniques in the design and creation of digital presentations and simulations
    to communicate information

Stage 4 outcome                                    Stage 5 outcomes
A student:                                         A student:

GT4-7                                              GT5-7
understands and uses digital drafting              manipulates and produces images using digital
technologies                                       drafting and presentation technologies

                                                   GT5-8
                                                   designs, produces and evaluates multimedia
                                                   presentations

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation           18
Objective
Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills to:
   apply WHS practices and risk management techniques to the work environment

Stage 4 outcomes                                   Stage 5 outcomes
A student:                                         A student:

GT4-8                                              GT5-9
recognises and responds to workplace hazards       identifies, assesses and manages relevant WHS
                                                   factors to minimise risks in the work environment

GT4-9                                              GT5-10
works in a responsible and safe manner             demonstrates responsible and safe work
                                                   practices for self and others

Objective
Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills to:
   investigate the role of graphics in industry and the relationships between graphics technology,
    the individual, society and the environment

Stage 4 outcome                                    Stage 5 outcomes
A student:                                         A student:

GT4-10                                             GT5-11
relates classroom experiences to industrial and    demonstrates the application of graphics to a
commercial applications                            range of industrial, commercial and personal
                                                   settings

                                                   GT5-12
                                                   evaluates the impact of graphics on society,
                                                   industry and the environment

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation           19
Stage Statements
       for your information

In NSW syllabuses Stage statements summarise the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and
attitudes developed by students as a result of achieving the outcomes for each Stage of learning.

Australian Curriculum achievement standards underpin the development of the Stage statements.

Stage statements are summaries of the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes that
have been developed by students as a result of achieving the outcomes for the relevant Stage of
learning.

Stage 4 – Technology Mandatory
By the end of Stage 4, students explore problems and opportunities considering functional, economic,
environmental, social, technical and/or usability constraints. They investigate, select, justify and safely
use a range of tools, materials, components, equipment and processes to develop, test and
communicate design ideas using appropriate technical terms and technologies. Students plan,
manage and evaluate the production of design solutions. They develop thinking skills to communicate
the development of digital and non-digital solutions.

Students investigate how managed systems are used to sustainably produce food and fibre. They
explain food selection and preparation, food safety, and make informed and healthy food choices.
Students collect and interpret data from a range of sources to assist in making informed judgements.
They explain how data is represented in digital systems, and transmitted and secured in networks.

Students explain how force, motion and energy can be used in systems, machines and structures.
They investigate characteristics and properties of a range of materials, develop skills and techniques
in the use of a broad range of tools and safely apply them in the production of projects.

Students are responsible users of technology, capable of designing and producing solutions to
identified needs or opportunities. They develop an appreciation of the contribution of technologies on
their lives now and the impact of innovations for creating preferred futures. They develop an
appreciation of the dynamic context of design and production processes and how thinking skills are
used to develop solutions to personal, social and global issues.

Stage 4 – Graphics Technology
By the end of Stage 4, students build on the experiences developed through Technology Mandatory
Years 7–8. The course focuses more directly on the development of specific knowledge and practical
skills associated with the development of graphical communications and the technologies related to
graphics.

They use freehand sketches to draw objects and communicate information to audiences. They
identify and use graphic conventions and understand and use digital drafting technologies. Students
can work in a safe and responsible manner and relate what they are experiencing in the classroom to
the industrial and commercial applications.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation               20
Stage 5 – Graphics Technology
By the end of Stage 5, students are able to visualise, sketch and accurately draw shapes and objects
to assist with communication with a variety of audiences. They select from and use a range of
drawings to communicate ideas graphically using freehand sketching, instrument drawing and digital
techniques.

Students independently and collaboratively produce relevant types of drawings used in design,
manufacture and marketing. They are able to identify and select appropriate drawing types for
communication with a variety of technical and non-technical audiences across national and
international boundaries. They are proficient in selecting and producing appropriate drawing types for
communication in design, manufacturing and marketing.

Students select and apply the appropriate Australian drawing standards (AS1100), ordinances and
regulations to a range of drawings in a variety of contexts. Students are able to select and identify the
graphics standards applicable to graphics industries. They also consistently and proficiently apply
appropriate standards to all graphical communication exercises.

Students select and use appropriate digital presentation techniques to develop and communicate
design solutions. They manipulate and draw images using appropriate digital designing and
presentation technologies. They demonstrate a high level of proficiency in using digital technologies
to develop and communicate with a technically literate audience.

Students demonstrate knowledge and competence in applying WHS practices and risk management
techniques to the graphics work environment. They independently identify and assess relevant WHS
factors in the work environment and employ safe and responsible work practices.

Students recognise and appreciate the relationship between graphics technology, the individual,
society and the environment. Students demonstrate an understanding of the effect that the graphics
industry has on Australian society and an appreciation of the impact of the graphics industry on
commercial activities and the environment.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation              21
Content
       for your information

Content defines what students are expected to know and do as they work towards syllabus outcomes.
It provides the foundations for students to successfully progress to the next Stage of schooling or
post-school opportunities.

Teachers make decisions about content regarding the sequence, emphasis and any adjustments
required based on the needs, interests, abilities and prior learning of students.

Organisation of Content

       consult

The following diagram provides an illustrative representation of elements of the course and their
relationship.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation            22
Course Structure and Requirements
Graphics Technology Years 7–10 is an elective course that builds on the knowledge, skills and
experiences developed in the study of the Technology Mandatory Years 7–8 Syllabus.

The major emphasis of the Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus is on students being actively
involved in the planning, development and production of quality graphical presentations. Students
should be provided with broad experiences to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in a range
of media and areas of application.

Graphics Technology may be offered as a 100-hour or 200-hour course.

100-hour course
Students undertaking the 100-hour course are required to complete:
   Core Module 1 and
   Core Module 2 and
   One or two option modules.

200-hour course
Students studying the 200-hour course are required to complete:
   Core Module 1 and
   Core Module 2 and
   Four to six option modules.

Students studying the 200-hour course may choose to undertake a Student Negotiated Project as one
of the options. In this project students may choose to revisit an option for further investigation,
undertake projects that combine aspects of a number of option modules or pursue an area of graphics
with local or personal significance (eg marine, aeronautical or agricultural).

Modules
All modules provide essential content designed to develop knowledge, understanding and skills
related to the four key areas of:
   graphics principles and techniques
   design in graphics
   planning and construction
   presentation.

Core Modules:
Core modules are designed to provide a broad understanding of the principles and techniques
associated with producing graphical presentations in a variety of styles and formats.

   Core Module 1: Instrument Drawing
   Core Module 2: Computer Aided Design.

Schools may deliver the core modules concurrently to maximise the utilisation of resources. Option
modules may also be delivered concurrently to enable a thematic approach to the delivery of course
content.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation          23
Option Modules:
Option modules allow students to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in specific graphics-
related fields. These fields may be selected to provide experiences appropriate to individuals’ abilities
while catering for their special interests.
   Option Module 1: Architectural Drawing
   Option Module 2: Australian Architecture
   Option Module 3: Cabinet and Furniture Drawing
   Option Module 4: Computer Aided Design (CAD)
   Option Module 5: Computer Animation
   Option Module 6: Engineering Drawing
   Option Module 7: Graphic Design and Communication
   Option Module 8: Landscape Drawing
   Option Module 9: Product and Technical Illustration
   Option Module 10: Student Negotiated Project.

Practical experiences
To satisfy the requirements of the syllabus students must undertake a range of practical experiences
that occupy the majority of course time. Practical experiences will be used to develop knowledge and
understanding of and skills in designing, producing and evaluating.

Student capability, confidence and expertise at their current stage of development are an important
consideration in determining the teaching and learning sequences in the course.

Students with special education needs may require adjustments and/or additional support in order to
engage in practical experiences.

Safety
Schools have a legal obligation in relation to safety. Teachers need to ensure that they comply with
relevant legislation as well as system and school requirements in relation to safety and risk
management when implementing their programs. This includes legislation and guidelines relating to
Work Health and Safety, and the handling and storage of chemicals and dangerous goods. Teachers
need to be aware of activities that may require notification, certification, permission, permits and
licences.

Schools need to be aware of legal, ethical and cyber security considerations of digital solutions,
including copyright and intellectual property, cultural considerations, accessibility, privacy issues and
digital footprints.
.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation               24
Learning Across the Curriculum

       for your information

NSW syllabuses provide a context within which to develop core knowledge and understanding and
skills considered important for the acquisition of effective, higher-order thinking skills that underpin
successful participation in further education, work and everyday life, including problem-solving,
collaboration, self-management, communication and information technology skills.

Learning across the curriculum content, including the cross-curriculum priorities and general
capabilities, assists students to achieve the broad learning outcomes defined in the NESA K–10
Curriculum Framework and Statement of Equity Principles, and in the Melbourne Declaration on
Educational Goals for Young Australians (December 2008).

Cross-curriculum priorities enable students to develop understanding about and address the
contemporary issues they face.

The cross-curriculum priorities are:
   Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures
   Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia
   Sustainability

General capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours to assist students to
live and work successfully in the 21st century.

The general capabilities are:
   Critical and creative thinking
   Ethical understanding
   Information and communication technology capability
   Intercultural understanding
   Literacy
   Numeracy
   Personal and social capability

NESA syllabuses include other areas identified as important learning for all students:
   Civics and citizenship
   Difference and diversity
   Work and enterprise

Learning across the curriculum content is incorporated, and identified by icons, in the content of the
syllabus in the following ways.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation                25
       consult

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
The syllabus provides students with opportunities to learn about how Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Peoples have developed and refined knowledge about the world through observation,
making predictions, testing and responding to environmental factors within specific contexts. It
emphasises the relationships people have with places and their interconnectedness with the
environments in which they live. Students learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples'
understanding of the environment and the ways that traditional knowledge and Western knowledge
can be complementary. Students learn that there are different ways of interacting with the
environment and how this can influence sustainability.

When planning and programming content relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories
and cultures, teachers are encouraged to:
   read the Principles and Protocols relating to teaching and learning about Aboriginal and Torres
    Strait Islander histories and cultures and the involvement of local Aboriginal communities.
   involve local Aboriginal communities and/or appropriate knowledge holders in determining
    suitable resources, or to use Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander authored or endorsed
    publications

Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
Students have opportunities to explore the links that exist between Australia and Asia and appreciate
how our interactions help to shape Australia’s economy, areas of research and technological
advancement. Students identify how the Asia region plays an important role in research and
technological developments in areas such as medicine, natural resource management and natural
disaster prediction and management.

Sustainability
Sustainability content is focused on the use of renewable resources, the protection of the environment
and sustainable patterns of living and requires consideration of environmental, social, cultural and
economic systems and their interdependence. Students learn about the actions required to improve
sustainability in the graphics industry, helping them to take a more active role in shaping preferred
futures. Opportunities for students to develop an appreciation for the environmental impact of new
technologies and traditional practices are embedded in the core and option modules. Specific
environmental issues are addressed in the core and the option modules.

Critical and Creative Thinking
The syllabus provides students with a structured context for the development of the key competencies
considered essential for the acquisition of critical and creative thinking as they imagine, generate and
develop graphical solutions. Students are provided with opportunities to generate and apply new
ideas in specific contexts, view existing situations in a new way, identify alternative explanations, and
make links that generate a positive outcome. The skills and processes of Design and Production
provide critical and creative thinking opportunities as students design, plan, investigate, communicate,
generate, present, solve problems and make evidence-based decisions. Designing, drawing,
modelling and working with digital tools, equipment and software helps students to build their visual

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation              26
and spatial thinking and to create graphical solutions. Opportunities for students to develop critical
and creative thinking skills are embedded in the core and option modules.

Ethical Understanding
Students develop capacity to behave ethically as they identify and investigate ethical concepts, values
and principles, and understand how reasoning can assist ethical judgement. The syllabus provides
opportunities for students to form and make ethical judgements in relation to design solutions, codes
of practice, use of digital technologies and online collaborative environments.

Students apply ethical guidelines as they design projects, particularly when considering the
implications for others and the environment. They learn about Intellectual Property, including
Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property and the protection of cultural knowledge and designs.
Students are encouraged to demonstrate ethical digital citizenship, follow social and ethical protocols
and understand the need to protect data and intellectual property.

Information and Communication Technology Capability

Students engage with information and communication technology (ICT) when they design, generate
and present graphical images. Students become familiar with and gain skills when using a range of
software applications and digital technologies that enable them to collaborate online, generate plans,
communicate their designs and produce solutions using digital technologies, for example, creating
CAD models and drawings, presentation animations and models. ICT technologies, through
animations and simulations, provide opportunities to view phenomena, test predictions and visualise
designs that cannot be investigated or produced through practical experiences in the classroom, and
may enhance students' understanding and engagement with technology.

Intercultural Understanding
Students develop intercultural understanding and value their own culture and those of others as they
engage with people from diverse cultural backgrounds in ways that recognise similarities and
differences, create connections and cultivate respect. The syllabus provides opportunities for students
to develop an awareness and appreciation of the contributions made by people from a variety of
cultural backgrounds in the area of graphics. They develop an understanding of the importance of
graphics in overcoming linguistic barriers in the communication of information. Students learn about
and engage with issues requiring cultural sensitivity and recognise that people in graphics-related
professions work in culturally diverse teams.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation               27
Literacy
The syllabus provides students with opportunities to develop skills in literacy to effectively
communicate and comprehend using a variety of modes and media. Being 'literate' is more than the
acquisition of technical skills – it includes the ability to identify, understand, interpret, create and
communicate effectively using written, visual and/or digital forms of expression. The language of
images is often technical and includes specific terms for concepts, processes and features of the
world. The syllabus provides extensive opportunities for the development and consolidation of student
literacy with an emphasis on the development of visual and technical literacy. They develop an
understanding that graphical information can be presented in a variety of forms including animations,
diagrams, drawings, infographics, flowcharts, models, renders, tables and multimedia graphics.
Students use subject-specific vocabulary to describe, develop and present graphical images. Project
work and the associated documentation provides an authentic context for development of literacy
skills, particularly graphical and technological literacy

Numeracy
Real-world numeracy connections are formed when numerical data is collected and manipulated and
numeracy concepts, such as size, scale, proportion and measurement, are used by students as tools
in the design and production process. An appreciation of the fundamental importance of numeracy in
everyday life is fostered as students develop an understanding of how numeracy is essential to a
variety of graphics focus areas, such as the creation of digital models and the importance of accurate
measurement in the production of quality graphical images and models. As they develop projects and
solutions, students are provided with opportunities to learn, create technical drawings, application of
2D/3D coordinates, applied geometric constructions and generate and modify digital models.
Students experience numeracy concepts such as size, proportion and spatial relationships in both the
real and virtual worlds.

Personal and Social Capability
Students develop personal and social capability as they learn to understand and manage themselves,
their relationships and their lives more effectively. This provides students with opportunities to
establish positive relationships, work effectively both individually and collaboratively, and resolve
difficult situations. The syllabus encourages students to explore, question, solve problems and
develop skills in graphical communication, display initiative, set goals and make responsible
decisions.

Civics and Citizenship
The syllabus provides students with opportunities to become self-reliant and active members of a
society driven by change, advancing technologies and increasingly sophisticated communication and
information systems. Students broaden their understanding of civics and citizenship in relation to the
application of technological advances and the development of environmental and sustainable
practices. Students have opportunities to develop a sense of local responsibility and global citizenship
as they improve and advance Australia through their investigations and future-focused solutions.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation             28
Difference and Diversity
Difference and diversity comprises gender, ethnicity, ability and socioeconomic circumstances. The
Graphics Technology syllabus provides students with opportunities to develop their awareness,
understanding and appreciation of difference and diversity within their lives and the wider community.
Students have opportunities to work collaboratively and develop an appreciation of the values and
ideas of all group members. This also enables them to identify individual rights, challenge stereotypes
and engage with opinions different to their own.

Work and Enterprise
Students develop an understanding of the scope and context of the graphics industry and learn skills
relevant to work and leisure activities. Students are provided with opportunities to learn about careers
in the graphics industry and develop knowledge about and skills in specific areas of the industry and
to study issues related to work and employment. In all core and option modules students apply
appropriate industry standards and follow correct work practices. Students are provided with
opportunities to safely manage and produce projects, and to appreciate quality of work. The
application of design and production processes can provide students with work-related skills including
individual and collaborative work practices. Students are encouraged to develop initiative, and to
become independent thinkers and confident communicators.

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation             29
Core Module 1 – Instrument Drawing

Content for Years 7–10

      consult

Core Module 1 – Instrument Drawing

Outcomes
A student:
›   communicates ideas graphically using freehand sketching and accurate drafting techniques
    GT5-1
›   analyses the context of information and intended audience to select and develop appropriate
    presentations GT5-2
›   designs and produces a range of graphical presentations GT5-3
›   evaluates the effectiveness of different modes of graphical communications for a variety of
    purposes GT5-4
›   identifies, interprets, selects and applies graphics conventions, standards and procedures in
    graphical communications GT5-5
›   manages the development of graphical presentations to meet project briefs and specifications
    GT5-6
›   manipulates and produces images using digital drafting and presentation technologies GT5-7
›   identifies, assesses and manages relevant WHS factors to minimise risks in the work environment
    GT5-9
›   demonstrates responsible and safe work practices for self and others GT5-10
›   demonstrates the application of graphics to a range of industrial, commercial and personal
    settings GT5-11
›   evaluates the impact of graphics on society, industry and the environment GT5-12

Related Life Skills outcomes: GTLS-1, GTLS-2, GTLS-3, GTLS-4, GTLS-5, GTLS-6, GTLS-7,
GTLS-8

Content

Graphics Principles and Techniques
Work Practices
Students:
   recognise the importance of selecting and maintaining drawing equipment and applying ordered
    approaches to work practices
   plan and manage graphics projects individually and collaboratively
   explore the role of professionals in the graphics industry, for example:
    – architect
    – draftsperson
    – graphic designer
    – industrial designer
    – graphic designer

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation        30
Core Module 1 – Instrument Drawing

   identify Work Health and Safety (WHS) issues related to products and processes in the graphics
    industry and demonstrate safe and responsible work practices, for example:
    – government legislation
    – creating safe work areas in graphics industries
    – potential work environment hazards and risks

Standards
Students:
   investigate Australian and international drawing standards and apply AS1100 Australian
    standards in the production of drawings, for example:
    – apply conventions to create standard page layouts, eg paper size, borders, title blocks,
        projection symbols

Social and Ethical Issues
Students:
   critically analyse graphical images for gender, social and cultural messages that may be
    conveyed
   identify the cultural significance of graphical communications throughout history, for example:
    – graphical communications produced by Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Peoples
   understand ethical responsibilities surrounding Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property
   identify the environmental effects of products and processes used in the graphics industry, for
    example:
    – environmental impact of materials
    – sustainable design, eg passive heating
    – waste management, eg packaging

Design in Graphics
Students:
   identify and apply design principles and processes in the development, production and evaluation
    of graphical presentations
   generate sketches to assist with problem-solving and communication of ideas (ACTDEP049)

   identify and interpret different methods of graphical representations in design
   apply freehand drawing techniques to a range of simple orthogonal and pictorial drawing types,
    for example:
    – visualise and sketch common objects
    – measure and sketch simple objects

Planning and Construction
Applied Geometry
Students:
   demonstrate measurement and accuracy through the use of scales in the production of drawings

   apply geometric construction techniques to graphical communication, for example:
    – construct regular shapes, eg pentagon, hexagon
    – tangency
    – curve construction techniques
    – determine the true length of included lines

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation            31
Core Module 1 – Instrument Drawing

Orthogonal Drawing
Students:
   recognise and apply appropriate AS1100 Technical Drawing Standards to orthogonal drawings,
    for example:
    – dimensioning
    – scales
   explore third angle projection of orthogonal drawings
   create orthogonal drawings in third angle projection used in design and manufacture, for example:

    – measuring and drawing objects
    – drawing from pictorial images
    – draw common engineering and architectural elements
   generate drawings demonstrating advanced orthogonal drawing techniques, for example:
    – auxiliary views to represent the true-shape-of surface
    – section views

Pictorial Drawing
Students:
   produce a range of pictorial representations of common objects, for example:
    – isometric and oblique views that include circles and arcs
    – 1 and 2 point perspective
   apply advanced techniques to pictorial projection, for example:
    – creation of true isometric drawings
    – creation of 2 and 3 point perspective
    – represent complex curved surfaces in isometric and oblique drawings

Presentation
Rendering
Students:
   use rendering techniques to aid in the visualisation of a product or concept, for example:
    – use of colour, shading, shadows, tone and texture

Product drawing
Students:
   produce presentation pictorial and orthogonal drawings to convey technical information or product
    concept, for example:
    – general assembly drawing
    – shape and size description

Tools, Techniques and Technologies
Students:
   identify and apply a range of tools, techniques and technologies to present product information
    graphically in a clear and innovative manner, for example:
    – use a compass to construct a polygon
    – use set squares and a tee square to generate orthogonal drawings
    – use templates for efficient work practices
    – use a variety of pencil grades to produce rendered drawings, eg HB, B, 2B

             Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus for consultation             32
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