Intellectual Output 1 Free-standing courses provided by partner universities - European Ecocycles Society

 
Intellectual Output 1 Free-standing courses provided by partner universities - European Ecocycles Society
Intellectual Output 1

Free-standing courses provided by partner
               universities

                  1
Intellectual Output 1 Free-standing courses provided by partner universities - European Ecocycles Society
CONTENT

Nature sports – theory and practice .................................................................................................... 3
Earth System Science – Biogeochemical Cycles ............................................................................... 5
Bioremediation ................................................................................................................................... 7
Cities in history .................................................................................................................................. 9
Community development in rural and urban areas .......................................................................... 11
Geography of urban and rural spaces ............................................................................................... 14
Introduction to GIS .......................................................................................................................... 16
Hydrogeography............................................................................................................................... 18
Introduction to Geology ................................................................................................................................ 20
Local societies in context ................................................................................................................. 22
Meteorology and Climatology ......................................................................................................... 24
Programme Evaluation ..................................................................................................................... 26
Social inequalities: local, regional, global ....................................................................................... 28
Stakeholder management ................................................................................................................. 30
Sustanability and changing landuse of islands and island-like territories ..................................................... 33
Global education .............................................................................................................................. 36
Sustainable management of historical built infrastructure of Hungarian small and
middle-seized cities in the 21 century .............................................................................................. 40
A disadvantaged hungarian region and opportunities for development: Case studies
of villages or Ormánság ................................................................................................................... 43
Urban anmd regional planning ......................................................................................................... 46
Urban and regional planning and land use from a heritage perspective .......................................... 49
Inorganic, organic and biochemistry ................................................................................................ 60
Earth System Science – from biogeochemical cycles to ecosystem services .................................. 61
Genetics and Biotechnology for Landscape Conservators............................................................... 63
Industrial heritage, use and reuse ..................................................................................................... 65
Maritime heritage ............................................................................................................................. 68
Sustainable Management of Cultural Landscapes ........................................................................... 72
Theory and history of conservation ................................................................................................. 75
Cultural and historical geography of grapes, wine and gastronomy, I-II......................................... 77
Environment Economics and Natural Resources ............................................................................. 78
Geographical information systems in RD ........................................................................................ 80
Projects for natural resources use and protection ............................................................................. 81
Agri-Environmental Legislation of the EU ...................................................................................... 82
Basic landscape ecology .................................................................................................................. 85
Inorganic, organic and biochemsitry ................................................................................................ 86
Environmental economics and ecosystem services.......................................................................... 87
Historical and cultural approaches of landscape change.................................................................. 88
Rurl societies and development ....................................................................................................... 90

                                                                        2
Intellectual Output 1 Free-standing courses provided by partner universities - European Ecocycles Society
(1.) Name of the course: Nature sports – theory and practice                                  Credits: 6

      Course classification: compulsory electable                     Language of education: English

      Degree of theoretical or practical nature of the subject, "training character" 12 : 60% theory 40% practice
      (credit %)

      Type of lesson1: lecture / seminar / practice / consultation and number of hours: lecture: 2 / week (26 / semester)
      practice: 4 in the given semester. Additional (specific) ways and characteristics to be used in the transfer of the
      given knowledge (if any) 2: case reports, thematic presentations, field trips and exercises

      Method of examination (colloquium / practical mark / other 3): practical mark
      Additional (specific) methods to be used in the knowledge test 4 (if any): case studies, dissertations to be submitted.
      Curriculum location of the subject (number of semester): 6 th semester
      Prerequisites / previous studies (if any): basic biology, ecology and human physiology

      Course description: a concise but informative description of the knowledge and skills to be acquired

       Health and wellbeing are growing areas of importance in the sport and active leisure industry, particularly regarding
       a wide range of nature sports. Recently there has been more consideration given to the impact that physical and
       mental health has on day-to-day living, as well as on sport. Increasing numbers of individuals recognise the
       limitations that poor mental and physical health can have on their wellness. The course outlines the environmental
       and technical conditions of nature sports (often referred to as outdoor sports – from a sustainability viewpoint not
       fully correct term), explains the classification and the vast multitude and key conceptualizations and characteristics
       of nature sports, the physiological and psychological aspects for exercising nature-based sports related to age,
       gender, social relations, socio-economic development; resolving conflicts in relation to technical development
       needs of nature-based sport facilities (sustainability issues – nature-based/green solutions). Particular emphasis is
       placed on the education and skills development of young athletes (age groups of 10 – 12, 14 – 16 and 16 – 18
       years) in natural environments. Nature based sports are analysed both as main sport branches and complementary
       training methods for traditional indoor sports (including all built and urban environments, even stadiums).
       Furthermore, nature sports are assessed as possibilities for development of young athletes in regions, whose social
       and economic development is lagging after. The contribution of nature sports to the improvement of public health
       and the methods to raise awareness in these issues are also discussed.
      List of the 2-5 most important compulsory or recommended literature (notes, textbooks) with bibliographic data
      (author, title, publication data, (possibly pages), ISBN)
      Compulsory literature:
      1. Lecture notes, ppt presentations
      2. Ricardo Melo, Derek Van Rheenen & Sean James Gammon (2020) Part I: nature sports: a unifying concept,
      Annals of Leisure Research, 23:1, 1-18, https://doi.org/10.1080/11745398.2019.1672307
      3. Nils Asle Bergsgard, Solfrid Bratland-Sanda, Richard Giulianotti, Jan Ove Tangen (eds. 2019): Sport, Outdoor
      Life and the Nordic World. ISBN 9780367443283 Published December 4, 2019 by Routledge, 224 Pages
      4. H. Ken Cordell: The latest on trends in outdoor recreation. https://www.srs.fs.fed.us/pubs/ja/ja_cordell021.pdf
      5. Sian Evans: Physical Education: Outdoor Games Book. Publisher: Folens Publishers. ISBN-10: 1852763183
      ISBN-13: 978-1852763183
      6. Brian P. McCullough & Timothy B. Kellison (eds. 2020): Routledge Handbook of Sport and the Environment.
      ISBN 9780367896867

      Recommended literature:
      Inga Wolfram (2013): The Science of Equestrian Sports: Theory, Practice and Performance of the Equestrian Rider
      1st Edition. Routledge; ISBN-10: 0415637252; ISBN-13 : 978-0415637251
      David Epstein (2013): The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance. Current, Kindle
      Edition. http://thesportsgene.com
      Dina Gentile (2009): Teaching Sport Management: A Practical Guide. Jones & Bartlett Learning. 1st edition.

1
  Nftv. 108. § 37. lesson: an activity (lecture, seminar, practice, consultation) requiring the personal participation of the instructor
to meet the study requirements specified in the curriculum, the duration of which is at least forty-five and at most sixty minutes.
2
  e.g.. case studies, role-plays, thematic presentations, etc.
3
  e.g. continuous accountability, mid-year report
4
  e.g. case studies, thematic papers, assignment works, essays, organizational plans, etc.
                                                                  3
ISBN-10: 0763766720; ISBN-13: 978-0763766726
Naturvårdsverket: Environmental Management System (EMS) in Swedish governmental agencies
https://www.naturvardsverket.se/Documents/publikationer/620-8191-8.pdf?pid=3931136-778b82cc03a7

List of the required professional competencies, competence elements (knowledge, ability, etc.) of the development
which is typically and substantially contributed by the subject
a) knowledge
The student after successfully completing the course:
     has a thorough knowledge of the interdisciplinary nature of natural sports and sports ecology
     knows the methods, spatial concepts, facts, main characteristics and contexts, relevant economic actors,
        functions and processes for the assessment of the infrastructural development of nature sports at the
        national and international level
     has a deep knowledge about the physiological requirements of different nature sports
     knows and is able to apply special sports pedagogical methods in the teaching of natural sports
     knows the conditions for the development and progressive socio-economic utilization of natural sports.

b) skills
The student is able to:
     investigate how factors affecting health and wellbeing impact on physical activity and sport’s participants.
     apply his/her knowledge and skills to assess his/her own health status and that of a chosen individual.
     using the data he/she collects, identifies strategies to improve the health and wellbeing of young athlets
         devoted to nature sports
     using the data he/she collects, identifies strategies to improve the health and wellbeing of general public
         by promoting and teaching nature sports
     based on the acquired knowledge and methods, is able to make a detailed analysis of the capabilities of
         the field of sports development and their integration into regional development programs

c) attitude
      Susceptible to the values of nature sports, including both professional and recreational applications
      He/she is committed to environmental protection and culturally sustainable sports organization and
         education

d) autonomy and responsibility
     Adheres to professional, legal, ethical and health standards and regulations, and seeks to enforce them
        both in the workplace and even in the wider social environment

Course coordinator (name, position, degree):

Other teachers, instructor (s) involved in the teaching of the subject, if any (name, position, degree):

                                                        4
Course title: Earth System Science – Biogeochemical Cycles              ECTS Credit points: 3
Course code:                                                            Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):

Course type, number of lecture hours a week: 3

Method of assessment: lectures
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in): 3
Entry requirements (if any):
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Aim: The objectives of this course to give scientific information to the students about chemical,
physical and biological processes, the pollutants, their possibilities for transport and transformation
processes in the environment. The knowledge of biogeochemical circuits of elements and their
compounds, the physical chemical characterization are necessary in hindering of environmental
contamination and development of technological methods to keep sustainable management. The aim
of acquirement of knowledge for students to evaluate and define the processes in the natural and
anthropogenic environments with global and complex manner, even the creating problems in health
aspect.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:
The experts working on environmental science are up against the problems creating in the
environmental systems in this century. Increasingly difficult to solve these occurent problems.
Restriction and removal of emitted pollutants and toxic compounds amounts into the atmosphere, fresh
waters, groundwaters, seas, oceans and pedosphere created by lack of knowledge, irresponsibility or
convenience are scientific and social questions, as they have unconditional impact on ecological
systems, living organisms, our health through the biogeochemical circuits and cultural landscapes.
Acquirement of environmental scientific store of learning by students is essential important in the
future for sustainable management.

Knowledge and understanding:
  Characterization of lithosphere. Rocks and minerals. Decomposition and wethering processes. Soil
chemistry.
  Hydrosphere. Water structure and characterization. Chemistry of water and aqueous solution.
   Structural characteristics and composition of atmosphere. Interaction between molecules and energy
of radiation. Photophysics and photochemical processes.
  Environmental photochemistry. Chemical reactions in atmosphere. Formation and decomposition of
ozone. Reactions of nitrogen and carbon compounds.
  Anthropogenic effect on natural environment. Effect of human activity on biogeochemical circuits.
Anthropogenic pollutants in atmosphere. Dusts and aerosols. Gaseous pollutants. Greenhouse effect,
acid rains and smog.
  Anthropogenic pollutants in hydrosphere. Types of pollutants in hydrosphere and their effects. Plant
nutrients, fertilizers, organic pollutants containing oxygen, hydrocarbons, halohydrocarbons,
pesticides, detergents, metallic compounds, radionuclides. Description of surface waters by sum

                                                         5
parameters. Anthropogenic pollutants in pedosphere and anthropogenic execution in biological
systems.
  Transport and chemical processes in the environment. Partitioning processes. Interfacial effect.
Redox process, equilibrium. Complex formation. Methylation during biological processes,
biomethylation, non-enzyme catalyzed methylation and demethylation.
  Oxygen localities and atmospherical household. Carbon circuit, photosynthesis, decomposition of
biomass, methane - carbon-dioxide circuit. Anthropogenic effect on circuit.
  Circuit and chemical reactions of nitrogen. Reactions of nitrogen compounds in hydrosphere,
pedosphere and biosphere.
  Biogeochemical circuit of oxygene, phosphorus.
  Biogeochemical circuit of sulfur.
  Environmental circuit of metal elements I.
  Environmental circuit of metal elements II.
  Transport processes and alteration of anthropogenic pollutants in ecosphere. Chemodinamics.
Vapour pressure and evaporation rate. Solubility and diffusion. Adsorption and desorption. Transport
processes in biological systems.

Skills and abilities:
Fulfillment of this environmental course by students will contribute to their development and expansion
of their thinkings about environmental contamination, anthropogenic effects on natural environmental
processes and evaluation of global environmental problems.

Judgement and approach: During the semester, one test-paper has to be written and implemented with
50% of success. There is one possibility for correction. The condition of release for exam is to write a
test with 90% of success. The test-paper contain 10 questions.

Literature
Compulsory readings:

Colin Baird, Michael Cann: Environmental Chemistry. 2004 by W. H. Freeman, ISBN
0716748770

Colin Baird: Environmental Chemistry. 2012 by W. H. Freeman, ISBN 1464113491

Recommended readings:

Course leader: Pernyeszi Tímea Judit Ph.D.

Other contributors:

Contact: ptimea@gamma.ttk.pte.hu

                                                         6
Course title: Bioremediation                                            ECTS Credit points: 3
Course code:                                                            Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):

Course type, number of lessons: 3

Method of assessment: lectures
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in): 3
Entry requirements (if any): Earth system science
Course description: Bioremediation processes and technology in the environment
Aim: The objectives of this course to give scientific information to the students about bioremediation
methods applicable in decontamination of soil and water systems in the environment. The knowledge
of this scientific technological informations are also necessary in development of novel environmental-
friendly technological methods to keep sustainable management in the environment.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:
The experts working on environmental science are up against the problems creating in the
environmental systems in this century. Increasingly difficult to solve these occurent problems.
Acquirement of environmental scientific technological store of learning by students is essential
important in the future for sustainable environmental management.

Knowledge and understanding:
Types of remediation. Environmental contamination: soil and water. Pollutants in hydrosphere and
pedosphere. Remediation methods. Bioremediation. Biodegradation. Biosorption. Environmental
parameters affecting on biosorption. Kinetics and equilibrium of biosorption. Application of modified
microorganisms in bioremediation. Phytoremediation. International case studies. Clay minerals,
modified clay minerals and natural soil components application as sorbent in bioremediation. Their
role in natural decontamination processes. Combined use of microbiological and physical chemical
processes in environmental bioremediation.

Skills and abilities:
Fulfillment of this environmental science course by students will contribute to their development and
expansion of their thinkings about environmental contamination and decontamination, anthropogenic
effects on natural environmental processes, evaluation of global environmental problems and
development of environmental-friendly, cost-effective remediation technological processes.

Judgement and approach: There will an oral examination about the environmental bioremediation.
The students will be able to evaluate environmental contamination and decontamination technological
processes.

Literature
Compulsory readings:
Ranny Farial: Bioremediation of heavy metals and organic pollutants by microbes. 2010 by
Lambert Academic Publishing, ISBN-10: 3843371245, ISBN-13: 978-3843371247

                                                         7
Jatindra Nath Bhakta, Susmita Lahiri and Bana Bihari Jana: Green Technology for
bioremediation of environmental pollution. 2019 by Nova Science Publishers, ISBN: 978-1-
53614-528-1

Colin Baird: Environmental Chemistry. 2012 by W. H. Freeman, ISBN 1464113491

Recommended readings:

Course leader: Pernyeszi Tímea Judit Ph.D.

Other contributors:

Contact: ptimea@gamma.ttk.pte.hu

                                                8
Course title: Cities in history                                            ECTS Credit points:
                                                                           Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):
Course code:

Course type, number of lessons: seminar, 14 hours / semester

Method of assessment: complex
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in): spring
Entry requirements (if any):
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Aim:
The aim of this course is to give an overview about temporal and spatial dimension of urbanity. It
discusses the birth and development of cities from the ancient times to the 20th century and tries to
introduce the variety of urbanity in the globalised world. It analyses the social conditions of the creation
and recreation of urban spaces, defining the background of the birth of the different elements of urban
heritage.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:
Students will be able to recognise the heritage of different epochs in urban space, reveal the elements
of the historical structure of cities. They will be able to analyse maps, written and other sources related
to urban history and urban heritage.

Knowledge and understanding:
Understanding urbanisation, links between urbanisation and human civilisation. The birth of the cities,
the ancient urbanisation from Jericho to Athens. The beginnings of the urban planning: theoretical
and practical views from Hippodamos to Vitruvius. The Roman urbanisation: planning and practice,
challenges of the premodern metropoles. Roots and specialisation of urbanisation outside the Western
Civilisation. De-urbanisation in the post-Roman era in Europe. The medieval city: social structures
and built environment, the medieval heritage of Europe. The effects of humanism and renaissance on
the urbanisation, rebirth of urban planning. The baroque city: long-lasting effects of new planning
paradigm. Cities and industrialisation: forms, functions and planning in the era of liberalism. Cities
of modernity: innovations in architecture and planning. The CIAM and the Athens Charter. Autocratic
regimes and urban planning. The socialist city. Ideas and practices in the late 20th century city: urban
decay and urban regeneration. The 21st century: diversity in planning – green &sustainable city
concepts, smart cities, creative cities, compact city and the urban resilience. Beyond the planning:
informal settlements around the world.

Skills and abilities:
During the seminar several types of sources will be processed: archive and contemporary maps,
pictures, datasets and texts and videos will be given to the students. During individual and team-based
tasks, students will analyse the urban patterns in different epochs. The skills to be improved are team-
based cooperation, presentation, reading and processing academic papers, processing and
visualisation of data.

                                                           9
Judgement and approach:
Assessment based on complex evaluation: tasks during the seminars and final team-presentation will
be evaluated.

Literature
Compulsory readings:
[1] Knox, P. L.; McCarthy, L. M. 2011: Urbanization: An Introduction to Urban Geography, Prentice
Hall
Recommended readings:
[1] Stein, Jay 2004: Classic Readings in Urban Planning. Routledge, 400 p.
[2] Andrusz, G. (ed) 1996: Cities After Socialism: Urban and Regional Change and Conflict in Post-
Socialist Societies. Wiley, 356 p.
[3] Mumford, L. 1961: The city in history, Mariner, 657 p.
Course leader:
PIRISI, Gábor PhD, lecturer, Department of Human Geography and Urban Studies

Other contributors:
TRÓCSÁNYI, András PhD, associate professor, head of the Department of Human Geography and
Urban Studies

Contact:
pirisig@gamma.ttk.pte.hu

                                                       10
Course title: Community development in rural and urban areas           ECTS Credit points:
                                                                       Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):
Course code:

Course type, number of lecture hours: Lecture/seminar

Methods of assessment: weekly assignments; midterm tests; presentation of a case study
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in):
Entry requirements (if any):
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Short description and aims:
Proactive and self-organised local communities play an essential role in the sustainable development
of urban and rural areas. However, their establishment and continuance require energy, professional
knowledge and facilitation from all participants in the development process. Therefore, the goal of
the course is to introduce students to the fundamental theories and practices of community
development. Besides an overall understanding of community development, it is also essential to
study the particular interventions at all levels of development policies; we need to learn how these
interventions facilitate networking, social acceptance, civil participation, social justice and trust-
building, and how much they contribute to creating a social context rich in resources. By providing
fundamental knowledge on community development, the course aims to enhance students’ ability to
study and understand various processes of it.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:
  - students learn fundamental theories and practices of local community development
  - going through an awareness-raising process, students will be more sensitive and tolerant to
      the cultures of social groups other than their own.
  - Students will be able think critically about social processes and problems regarding
      communities
  - Students will be familiar with the most important literature on participatory action research
      and community planning

Knowledge and understanding:
Students will learn about the essential role community development, community planning and
participatory approaches play in sustainable rural and urban development. They will learn about the
most important theoretical approaches promoting participation in development. With the help of
“good practices”, case studies, and situational exercises students will understand how indispensable
“practical theory” is in community development.

Schedule:
    1. What is a community? Introduction to communities – a historical view.
    2. Role of local communities in sustainability – theoretical approaches, ecological perspectives.

                                                        11
3. The theory of integrated rural development and the place of community planning in rural
        development and sustainability.
    4. Exploring communities – a methodological perspective. Methods of planning and analysis
        (SWOT analysthis, vision- and strategy-planning etc.)
    5. Visual and artistic methods in community planning (drawing, community film making, etc.)
    6. Participatory action research (art-based action research, self-reflective action research,
        action research reacting to social problems, etc.)
    7. Basic psychological knowledge in community development (transpersonal psychology,
        Gordon etc.)
    8. Facilitator’s knowledge and skills
    9. Professional brainstorming: the “open space” method
    10. Drama pedagogy methods in community development
    11. A visit to a local community. Fieldtrip
    12. Case study: the Kóspallag country house – community organisation (alternative food-
        systems)
    13. Case study: actions of solidarity for liveable cities. The Bike Maffia movement.
    14. Student reports: presentation of a case study.

Skills and abilities:
Students will be able to
    -   use basic methods of planning and community development
    -   mediate between different social- or opinion groups
    -   reach a dialogue and articulate their opinions
    -   to present a case study using the relevant presentation techniques

Teaching methods:
The course applies complex methodological approaches to communicate its subject matter to
students, with a minimum number of frontal lectures and a combination of formal and informal
methods. Lectures on theory are always closed by discussions based on the assigned readings.

Assessment:
Weekly assignments as detailed with methods above; midterm test; student reports: presentation of
a case study

Literature
Compulsory readings:

ARNSTEIN S. R. (1969): A Ladder of Citizen Participation. Journal of the American Planning
Association. 35, 4.

BODORKÓS B. – BALÁZS B. – BELA GY. – PATAKI GY. (2008): Community-based sustainability
planning and rural development in the South-Borsod region, Hungary. Anthropology of East Europe
Review, 26, 2, 7–18. p.

BODORKÓS B. – PATAKI GY. (2009a): Linking academic and local knowledge: Community-based
research and service learning for sustainable rural development in Hungary. Journal of Cleaner
Production, 17, 1123–1131. p.

                                                       12
BRIASSOULIS H. (1999): Who plans whose sustainability? Alternative roles for planners. Journal of
Environmental Planning and Management, 42, 6, 889–902. p.

COOKE B. – KOTHARI U. (Szerk.) (2001): Participation: The New Tyranny? New York: Zed Books. 207
p.

ROTHMAN C. (1995): Approaches to Community Intervention, in Jack Rothman, John L. Erlich,
John E. Tropman, and Fred M. Cox, eds., Strategies of Community Intervention, 5th edition,
Itasca, IL:F. E. Peacock, pp. 26-63

REASON P.–BRADBURY H. (eds.) Handbook of Action Research. London: Sage.

SADAN, E. (1997) Empowerment and Community Planning.
http://www.mpow.org/elisheva_sadan_empowerment.pdf

Course leader:   Szilvia Nyers assistant lecturer, Balogh Pál Géza assistant lecturer

Other contributors:

Contact:

                                                      13
Course title: Geography of urban and rural spaces                         ECTS Credit points:
                                                                          Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):
Course code:

Course type, number of lessons: lecture, 11 hours / semester

Method of assessment: oral exam
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in): autumn
Entry requirements (if any):
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Aim:
The aim of the course is to give an introduction of the fundamental terms, concepts and models
regarding the spatiality of human settlements.
Competences/expected learning outcomes:
Students will have an overlook about the differences and similarities in the urbanisation of the different
regions around the globe. They will be able to recognise, analyse and interpret the spatial processes,
patterns of functions, morphology and social groups in urban and in rural space, classify and evaluate
settlements.
Knowledge and understanding:
Basic terms and concepts in urban geography. The settlement, the types and classifications of
settlements, cities, towns and villages. Basic and central functions of settlements. Walter Christaller’s
model of the urban network. Haggett’s model and the role of urban settlements in space production.
The geographical space and the settlements: role of the physical environment. Connections between
settlements: networks, hierarchy, catchment area, agglomeration. Urban and rural – dichotomy or
continuum? Settlements in rural space. Functional and morphological types of rural settlements.
Living in rural: social and economic problems of rural space. Rural restructuring and the post-rural
space. The inner structure of urban space. Functions and social groups in urban space. Segregation,
gentrification, spatial conflicts. Models of urban space. Regional differences of the urbanisation. The
different models of the urban development and urban space use in the American, European, Latin-
American, Asian and African cities. The socialist and post-socialist urbanisation. Cities and
globalisation. Cities as the fundamentals of the 21st spatial structure. Competitiveness and success of
cities. Challenges of the present and the near future: shrinking, sustainability, resilience.
Skills and abilities:
During the course the students’ skills in individual reading and interpreting scientific papers will be
improved, and also their abilities in team-based problem solving, presentation and scientific writing.
Judgement and approach:
During the semester an essay needs to be written by each student individually with a length of 15-
18,000 characters. The topic is one problem related with urban or rural development (listed by the
instructors), and how it appears in a specific settlement (can be chosen individually). Essays need to
be prepared by full regards of the formal prescriptions of a scientific paper, including structure,
citations and references, data and illustrations. The evaluation of the content of the essay is an element
of the oral exam. The final mark for the course will be given by the instructor on the oral exam.

Literature

                                                           14
Compulsory readings:
[1]     Pacione, M. 2009: Urban Geography: A Global Perspective. Routledge, 744 p.
Recommended readings:
[1] Hall, T. 2012: Urban geography. Routledge contemporary human geography series; 7. Vol. 366
p.
[2] Griffith, T. 2009: Urban geography: a study of site, evolution, pattern and classification in villages,
towns and cities. London; New York: Routledge 439 p.
[3] Knox, P. 2000: Urban social geography: An introduction. Prentice Hall: Pearson Education, 479
p.
[4] Cloke, P. et. al (ed). 2006: Handbook of Rural Studies. Sage Publications, 526 p.
Course leader:
TRÓCSÁNYI, András PhD, associate professor, head of the Department of Human Geography and
Urban Studies

Other contributors:
PIRISI, Gábor PhD, lecturer, Department of Human Geography and Urban Studies

Contact:
troand@gamma.ttk.pte.hu

                                                           15
Course title: Introduction to GIS                                            ECTS Credit points: 3
Course code:                                                                 Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):

Course type, number of lecture hours a week: 3

Method of assessment: project work
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in):
Entry requirements (if any):
Course description:

Course outline / Milestones
1. Disclose the course description to students. Downloading and installing Qgis, start and quit the
    application, file formats.
2. Vector layer, attribute table, query.
3. Vector layer style.
4. Raster layer settings query.
5. Georeferencing, digitizing.
6. Vector analysis.
7. Vector analysis.
8. Raster analysis.
9. Interpolation.
10. Preparation for field survey.
11. Field survey.
12. Processing of field data.
13. Tematic mapping of field data.

Mid-semester works
1. Download and install Qgis, start and quit the application. Open raster and vector layers in various format.
    Layer handling, set layer properties.
2. Attribute table management (open, edit, save, query and extend attribute table).
3. Join attribute table; display point, line and polygon layers.
4. Open raster layer, edit style, histogram creation.
5. Georeferencing raster image, point, line and polygon digitizing.
6. Vector map analysis: selection, run geoprocessing tools.
7. Vector map analysis: create buffer zone, selection by another map.
8. Raster map analysis: boole algebra.
9. Interpolation: delaunay, voronoi polygons, TIN and IDW interpolation.
10. Preparation for field data survey: select test site, data preparation, select sampling method.
11. Field survey: point-like object, measuring coordinates of track routes and surfaces.
12. Download and import field data, compare field data to available datasets.
13. Thematic map creation, export and print thematic maps.

                                                            16
Aim:
1. To provide an understanding of geoinformatics and Qgis software.
2. To provide a quantitative discussion of basic nomenclature of geoinformatics and methods of data analysis.
Competences/expected learning outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding:
On successful completion of this course students are expected to be able to comprehend fundamental
concepts of GIS, to have an understanding of GIS techniques, to be familiar with Qgis software and
vector and raster geo data processing.

Skills and abilities:
On successful completion of the course students are expected to be able to evaluate georeferencing tool
of Qgis, to able to digitize vector data and present thematic maps. Student comprehend basic field
survey techniques and able to collect data.

Judgement and approach:

Students can receive 0-5 more points during each lecture. Seminar points will be summed at the end of the
semester. Students have to participate on at least 10 seminars, therefor he or she can have minimum 0 and
maximum 50 points. If the student participates on more than 10 seminars than 10 highest seminar points will be
summed (cumulative points) at the end of the semester. Percentage of cumulative and maximum points will be
calculated.
Grading percentages may vary according to the position of the Gauss curve, but the approximate ranges are the
followings:
      just less than 50% = 1
      50 to 64.99% = 2
      65 to 74.99% = 3
      75 to 84.99% = 4
      85+% = 5
Attendance at all activities will be monitored. Students who fail to attend the activities, or to complete the
summative or formative assessment specified above, will not gain the credit for the course.

Literature
Compulsory readings:
    1.   Qgis tutorials (http://qgis.org/en/docs/index.html)
    2.   Graser, A. (2016) Learning Qgis. (3rd ed.) Packt Publishing
Recommended readings:
    1.   Bruy, A. & Svidzinska, D. (2015) Qgis by example. Packt Publishing
    2.   Theide, R. & Sutton, T. & Duster, H. (2013) The quantum GIS Training Manual. Locate Press

Course leader: István Péter Kovács, PhD

Other contributors:

Contact: vonbock@gamma.ttk.pte.hu

                                                            17
1. Course title: Hydrogeography

 2. Code:                                              3. Type (lecture, seminar, laboratory): laboratory

 4. Total of contact hours: 43 hours                   5. Number of credits (ECTS): 4

 6. Pre-requisites (max. 3): none

 7. Announced: ☐autumn semester, ☒spring semester, ☐ both semesters

 8. Limit for participants: no

 10. Instructor-in-charge (faculty, institute and department):

          József DEZSŐ, PhD (FS, Institute of Geography, Department of Physical Geography and
          Environment)

                                                       József DEZSŐ                               90%

                                                       Szabolcs CZIGÁNY                           10%
 11. Instructor(s) and percentage:

 12. Language: English

 13. Course objectives and learning outcomes:
 The course combines theoretical and experimental elements aimed at
 providing practical experience in the measurement and analysis of hydrological processes;
 methods of analysis applicable to solving practical problems related to environmental, land use, low
 input management problems. Aims:
 1. To provide an understanding of the water cycle
 2. To provide a quantitative discussion of water bodies
 3. To apply water concepts to contemporary problems in water resources management
 This course familiarizes students with selected hydrological measurement and analytical techniques.
 Learning outcomes: Students are going obtain skills on different kind of investigation procedures.

 14. Course outline / Milestones
 Week 1       Lesson: History of hydrogeography
           Practice: OSH (occupational, safety and health) training, handling documentation and
 storage of the water samples
 Week 2       Lesson: classification of water bodies
             Practice: evaluation water quality categories
 Week 3       Lesson: distribution of precipitation and catchment areas
            Practice: measuring and evaluating precipitation
 Week 4       Lesson: vapour concentration
            Practice: measurement of water vapour concentrations
 Week 5       Lesson: theory of transpiration
            Practice: measurement of transpiration
 Week 6       midterm exam
 Week 7       Lesson: evapotranspiration
                                                            18
Practice: measurement of evapotranspiration
Week 8       Lesson: soil moisture, the WRC curves
           Practice: measuring of the saturated soil moisture content, capillarity
Week 9       Lesson: measurement of water potential
        Practice: measuring unsaturated liquid flows
Week10 Lesson: calculating in situ subsurface flow, infiltration
        Practice: measurement of subsurface flow, infiltration (field exercises)
Week 11 Lesson: Water stage/level measurements. The concept of Hydraulic head. Evaluating time
series data
        Practice: measuring water levels
Week 12 Flow measurement of water courses I. (field exercises)
Week 13 Determine water balance, volume at lake. (field exercises)
Week 14 Final exam

15. Mid-semester works
    Writing laboratory and field reports
16. Summative assessment, formative assessment
 Evaluation is based on homework and lab report points (30%), one midterm exam (30%) on week 8
 and one final written exam at the end of the semester (40%); Exams: both theory and calculations.
 Calculator and equation card (prepared individually by the students) are required. Grading
 percentages may vary according to the position of the Gauss curve, but the approximate ranges
 are the followings:
 0 to 49.99%: 1
 50.00 to 64.99%: 2
 65 to 79.99%: 3
 80 to 89.99%: 4
 90+ : 5

17. Reading assignments:
[1] Tim Davie (2002): Fundamentals of Hydrology. Routledge Fundamentals of Physical
Geography. Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group, London and New York. 2nd ed.
 [2] Flury, M. (2011) Soil physics laboratory manual Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164

18. Recommended texts:

                                                      Prepared           József DEZSŐ PhD

                                                                        instructor-in-charge
Date                       10. December, 2017

                                                      Endorsed        András TRÓCSÁNYI PhD
                                                                       leader of the program

                                                      19
Course title: Introduction to Geology                                          ECTS Credit points: 3
                                                                               Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):
Course code:

Course type, number of lessons: lecture, 26 hours

Method of assessment: Evaluation is based on midterm exams and homework points.
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in): autumn
Entry requirements (if any): none
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Aim: Geology is the core discipline of the earth sciences and encompasses many different phenomena,
including plate tectonics and mountain building, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the long-term
evolution of Earth’s atmosphere, surface, and life. Because of the ever-increasing demand for
resources, the growing exposure to natural hazards, and the changing climate, geology is of
considerable societal relevance. This course introduces students to the basics of geology. Through a
combination of lectures, labs, and field observations, we will address topics ranging from mineral and
rock identification to the origin of the continents, from geologic mapping to plate tectonics, and from
erosion by rivers and glaciers to the history of life.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:
The subject matter examined in the course covers the basics of geology and the objectives of the course
are to provide students with a general understanding of this discipline. The course will focus on the
chemistry and properties of minerals, the composition of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks
and some of the earth processes responsible for rock and mineral formation.
Knowledge and understanding:

       Students will be better able how to observe and think about landscapes and other aspects of Earth;
       Students will better understand the relevance of geology to their local geologic setting and the larger
        societal issues, like resources;
       Students will understand main geologic concepts and demonstrate an ability to apply geologic
        concepts;
       Students will become more informed citizens and leave class with an interest in learning more.

Skills and abilities:
Observation, data collection, analysis and interpretation • Ability to prepare, process and present data
• Present and interpret information in a range of different mediums, e.g. textual, numerical, oral,
graphical • Written and verbal communication skills • Report writing skills • Problem-solving skills
and lateral thinking • The ability to recognize patterns and understand complex systems

Judgement and approach:
demonstrate the ability to make assessments in the main field of study informed by relevant
disciplinary, social and ethical issues and also to demonstrate awareness of ethical aspects of research
and development work demonstrate insight into the possibilities and limitations of research, its role in
society and the responsibility of the individual for how it is used, and demonstrate the ability to identify
the personal need for further knowledge and take responsibility for his or her ongoing learning.

                                                             20
Literature
Compulsory readings: Earle, S. (2015) Physical geology (e-book) https://opentextbc.ca/geology/

Recommended readings: Teaching materials and course documentation will be posted on the Neptune
MeetStreet website

Course leader: Dr. János Kovács

Other contributors: Dr. Krisztina Sebe

Contact: jones@gamma.ttk.pte.hu (J. Kovács)

                                                     21
Course title: Local societies in context                               ECTS Credit points:
                                                                       Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):
Course code:

Course type, number of lecture hours:

Method of assessment: active participation in classes, multiple choice / short answer questions
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in):
Entry requirements (if any):
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Aim:
This lecture introduces the spatial context of social phenomena. After a brief introduction to the
classical (Chicago School: human ecology and urbanism) and contemporary theories of urban and rural
society, some of the most influential processes (glocalization, rural exodus, residential segregation,
suburbanisation, gentrification etc.) will be discussed.

The course offers a methodological introduction to qualitative and quantitative research methods used
in rural and urban research projects.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding:

    -   understanding global problems in local context
    -   understanding social problems and challenges in spatial context
    -   understanding social aspects of sustainability
    -   strengthen methodological knowledge base for urban and rural research and projects

Skills and abilities:
    -   supporting the identification of local human stakeholders and human resources
    -   supporting local strategic development planning
    -   ability of analyse sustainability issues in a complex, multiple-sided way

Judgement and approach:

Literature

                                                        22
Compulsory readings:
Anthony Giddens et al (2018): Introduction to Sociology (11. Edition). London – New York: W. W.
Norton, 649-688.

Recommended readings:
Residential Segregation in Comparative Perspective - Making Sense of Contextual Diversity (2012)
Edited by Thomas Maloutas, Routledge
 Tartaglia, Stefano – Rossi, Monica (2015): The local identity functions in the age of globalization: a
study on a local culture In. Mannarini, Terri (edt.): Community Psychology in Global Perspective -
Special Issue: Culture and Community Interactions, Vol 1. (1).

Course leader: Kyra Tomay PhD, Tamás Ragadics PhD

Other contributors:

Contact: tomay.kyra@pte.hu ; ragadics.tamas@pte.hu

                                                         23
1. Course title: Meteorology and Climatology

2. Code:                                              3. Type (lecture, seminar, laboratory): lecture

4. Total of contact hours: 39 hours                   5. Number of credits (ECTS): 4

6. Pre-requisites (max. 3): none

7. Announced:☐autumn semester, ☒spring semester, ☐ both semesters

8. Limit for participants: no

10. Instructor-in-charge (faculty, institute and department):

        István GERESDI, PhD (FS, Institute of Geography, Department of Geology and Meteorology)

                                                      István GERESDI                              100 %
11. Instructor(s) and percentage:

12. Language: English

13. Course objectives and learning outcomes:

Aims:
To provide an understanding of the structure of the atmosphere, the physical processes impact the
weather and the climate
Knowledge:
On successful completion of this course students are expected to understand the basic concepts about
the atmosphere and they be familiar with phenomena occur in the atmosphere
Subject-specific skills:
On successful completion of the course students are expected to be able to
 give explanation about the different atmospherical phenomena. They are able to involve critically in
the debates about the climate changes. They are able to apply their knowledge in the other fields of
the earth sciences.

14. Course outline / Milestones

 Week 1 Introduction; history of the meteorology
 Week 2 Evolution of the atmosphere, composition of the atmosphere, vertical structure of the
        atmosphere. Radiation balance of the Earth - atmosphere system. Processes impact the
        short and long wave radiation. Zonal and seasonal change of the radiation budget.
 Week 3 Physics about the atmospheric motions. Different types of atmospheric motions:
        geostrophic, gradient and cyclostrophic winds. Effect of surface friction on the
        atmospheric motion.
 Week 4 Cloud and precipitation formation. Characteristics of the different type of precipitations.
 Week 5 Global circulation in the atmosphere. Formation of Headly’s cell, polar fronts and jets. The
        hydrological cycle. Observation of vapor content in the atmosphere. Residence time of
        vapor in different reservoir. Potential evaporation and aridity index.

                                                           24
Week 6 Weather of tropics. The tropical monsoon, characteristics and evolution of the tropical
         cyclones.
 Week 7 Characteristics of the mid-latitude cyclones and anticyclones. Weather at cold fronts and
         warm fronts. Effect of topography on the local weather. Foehn and bora; anabatic and
         katabatic wind; sea and land breezes. Characteristics of the thunderstorm, formation of
         gust front and tornados.
 Week 8 Optical and electrical phenomena in the atmosphere (rainbow, halo, circle around moon,
         lightning). Observation of the atmosphere. Surface observation, radio sounding, remote
         sensing (radar and satellite).
 Week 9 Weather forecast.
 Week 10 The climate system (the components of the climate system, constraints). External and
         internal factors.
 Week 11 The climate of the Earth. The climate zones, the deviations from the zonal pattern.
         Trewartha type climate classification.
 Week 12 Climate of Hungary (the spatial and temporal distribution of the characteristics of the
         climate. Antropogén factors in climate change. Forecast of climate.
 Week 13 Oral presentation about a selected atmospheric phenomenon.

15. Mid-semester works

    Students have to choose an atmospheric phenomenon, and they have to present an oral
    presentation about 5 – 10 minutes long. The date of the presentation is the 13th week of the
    semester.

16. Summative assessment, formative assessment

 Oral presentation about the selected atmospheric phenomenon.

 After passing a written test (with success of at least 70%) oral examination

17. Reading assignments:

    [1] Barry, Charley and Routledge: Atmosphere, Weather and Climate
    [2] Ahrens : Meteorology Today: An Introduction to Weather, Climate and Environment
18. Recommended texts:

                                                        Prepared           István GERESDI PhD

Date                       13 November, 2017                               instructor-in-charge

                                                       Endorsed
                                                                         András TRÓCSÁNYI PhD
                                                                          leader of the program

                                                        25
Course title: Programme Evaluation                                      ECTS Credit points:
                                                                        Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):
Course code:

Course type, number of lecture hours: Lecture/seminar

Methods of assessment: weekly assignments; midterm tests; submission: programme evaluation draft
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in):
Entry requirements (if any):
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Aim:
Programme evaluation is a key to sustainable development as it identifies what works and how; what
does not; and what modifications could improve the programme. The goal of the course is to introduce
students into the complex evaluation of ecological sustainability programmes and interventions. The
course will familiarize students with the different paradigms, models, levels, logic, and a variety of
methods of programme evaluation. A special emphasis will be laid on community-based participatory
research and other types of developmental-collaborative approaches.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding:

    1. What is programme evaluation? Main objectives of evaluation research. The central role of
        programme evaluation in programme development and in the replication and multiplication
        of good practices. Essential links (feedbacks) between professional practice and programme
        evaluation.
    2. Differences between project monitoring and programme evaluation. Limitations of
        monitoring.
    3. Paradigms in evaluation research. The negative impact of problem-centred (judgmental)
        evaluations and the introduction of developmental evaluation. Fourth and fifth generation
        models.
    4. Approaches, levels and areas of evaluation (internal, external, complex; preformative,
        formative, summative; outcome, process etc.)
    5. Systemic thinking in evaluation research. The Trident framework and its three main
        constituents (outcome, process & stakeholder perspectives)
    6. Main questions and methods of outcome evaluation. Conceptualizing and distinguishing
        between outputs, outcomes and impacts. Selecting appropriate indicators and
        measurements.
    7. Process evaluation and methodological improvements (reconstitutive ethnography;
        shadowing and other methods of observation; case studies, critical incident analysis and
        other consultative methods; use of focus groups etc.)
    8. Stakeholder perspectives. Promoting stakeholders’ commitment to participation in the
        evaluation. Giving a voice to every stakeholder group. Methodological considerations.
    9. Limitations of the different methods. Sources of possible distortions/bias in data collection
        (e.g., respondents’ priorities and worries, cultural differences; technical issues as sources of
        bias in questionnaires and interviews; researchers’ own interests as a source of distortion..
        Practising dialogic approaches and critical-reflective thinking to minimize bias.
    10. Design and model building.
                                                         26
a. Combining internal and external evaluation
          b. Mixed methods evaluation designs
    11.   Interpreting the results. Avoiding fallacies in interpretations.
    12.   Validating the results. The use of the Delfi-method in validation.
    13.    Communicating evaluation results. The importance of steering groups.
    14.   Dilemmas and conflicts in evaluation. Evaluation ethics.

Skills and abilities:

On completion of the course, students are enabled to
    -     identify the relevant questions of evaluation in a complex project
    -     apply strength-based, developmental approaches in evaluation
    -     understand stakeholder priorities and communicate accordingly in order to motivate them
          to participate in the evaluation
    -     identify possible risks involved in the evaluation
    -     apply the Trident framework and select the appropriate methods for evaluation
    -     communicate preliminary and final results to stakeholder groups and to decision-makers
    -     write a research report on findings
    -     creatively apply and renew frameworks and methods acquired during the course
    -     design a program with respect to evaluation ethics
    -     work in research teams

Teaching methods:

Short introductory lectures (possibly: webinars); joint discussions led by the lecturer; accomplishing
tasks individually and in teamwork (outlining some solutions to possible problems frequently
occurring in programme evaluation; professional reflections on the contents of the class/tasks/on
teamwork

Assessment:

    -     weekly assignments as detailed with methods above; two midterm tests; designing a
          programme evaluation (4-5 pages evaluation plan)
Literature
Compulsory readings:

Recommended readings:

Course leader: Marta B. Erdos, Ph.D, Associate Professor

Other contributors:

Contact:

                                                       27
Course title: Social inequalities: local, regional, global              ECTS Credit points:
                                                                        Level (BSc/MSc/PhD):
Course code:

Course type, number of lecture hours: seminar

Method of assessment: regular, active participation, case study
Course in the curriculum (which semester is the course taught in): third semester
Entry requirements (if any): Local communities
Course description: Information outlining the course requirements in a concise yet descriptive
manner.
Aim:
The aim of the course is to highlight that there are systematic differences among and within different
countries and regions concerning wealth and power, and to identify the main patterns of different
dimensions of global, regional and local inequalities, such as demography, education, housing and
poverty. Methods of comparable measurement and its critics will be discussed as well as the most
well-known theories that try to explain causes of inequality on the global (modernisation theory,
dependency theory, world-system theory) level. After the global and regional perspective we will zoom
into the local level: processes of segregation, suburbanization, gentrification and displacement will be
discussed: its causes and consequences, theories amd measurememt as well as policies that foster/try
to eliminate the above mentioned phenomena.

Competences/expected learning outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding:
    - understanding social problems and inequalities in spatial context
    - strengthen methodological knowledge in the field of urban and rural researches and projects
    - being familiar with the social aspects of different urban/rural policies
Skills and abilities:
    - helps to formulate a special development plan supporting social integration and landscape
      development
Judgement and approach:

Literature
Compulsory readings: Giddens, Anthony et al (2018): Introduction to Sociology (11. Edition).
London – New York: Norton, pp. 251-278.

Recommended readings:

                                                        28
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