INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

SPECIAL REPORT | 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 With the support of INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS 13 14 > 21 22 > 32 33 > 39 40 > 46

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

1 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 | SPECIAL REPORT | INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS | EurActiv 13 14 > 21 22 > 32 33 > 39 40 > 46 SPECIAL REPORT | 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS http://www.euractiv.com/archives/sections/investment-regions Regional president confident of Juncker Plan flexibility . . p.1 Markkula: Juncker Plan should change the mentality of Europe . . p.2 European Council mulls stability pact leniency . . p.2 Regions warn Juncker plan could eat cohesion funds .

p.3 Juncker investment plan: project list imminent . . p.4 Regions chief: ‘Use local nous to mobilise investment fund . . p.5 Contents Regional president confident of Juncker Plan flexibility Published 27/02/2015 The Commission is prepared to consider flexibility for member states, in order to offset structural funds from their annual budgets under the Stability and Growth pact, where these are used to cofinance Juncker Plan projects (see background), according to the new president of the Committee of the Regions (CoR).

Such flexibility would address warnings voiced by political representatives of Europe’s regions that Juncker’s €315 billion investment plan could divert money away from the EU’s existing structural funds. According to the Juncker Plan (see background), member states have been offered the opportunity to top-up amounts in the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) - which will act as the investment vehicle for projects. The Commission has pledged that member state contributions to the EFSI will not be counted for the purposes of the stability and growth pact.

Elected President of the European Committee of the Regions (CoR) with effect from this month, Markku Markkula – a member of the centre-right National Coalition Party of Finland – called for regional collaboration on the Juncker Plan projects in an interview with EurActiv.

EurActiv has previously reported that the European Council is mulling the idea of allowing member states to contribute to projects identified under the Juncker Plan using structural funds, and offset their share of co-financing such investments from their balance sheets within the European semester. “Each [Juncker Plan] investment needs to be reviewed from the point of view of its impact, and the rules need to have flexibility. I have heard that the Commission recognises the need to be more flexible on this,” Markkula, the first Finn to head up a major European institution, said.

Markkula said that he wanted to bring about a “change of mentality” in the way the EU approaches regulation, with regional participation feeding into the decisionmaking process. He also said that the CoR had a role to play in the Ukraine crisis, saying that regional experience should be brought to bear in helping Ukrainians to build decentralised government structures and to rebuild infrastructure damaged by the conflict. With the support of Photo: Andrei Shumskiy/Shutterstock Markku Markkula [Flickr/Committee of the Regions]

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

2 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 | SPECIAL REPORT | INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS | EurActiv Markkula: Juncker Plan should change the mentality of Europe Published 27/02/2015 In an interview with EurActiv’s Jeremy Fleming, Markku Markkula talked about his new role as president of the Committee of the Regions and the importance of the regional input on the Juncker plan.

We are having in mid-April in our plenary a special resolution on the Juncker Plan where we are putting all our concrete proposals”, Markkula said. “If we take stronger the perspective of the regions, how we can integrate better private investments, the knowledge coming from Universities, that’s our role - to get the regional voice heard”.

European Council mulls stability pact leniency Published 13/02/2015 The European Council is mulling the idea of allowing member states to offset money designated for cofinancing projects, using structural funds from their annual budgets under the stability and growth pact, EurActiv has learned. The proposal would enable member states to contribute to projects identified under the Juncker plan using structural funds, and offset their share of co-financing such investments from their balance sheets within the European semester.

The plan would impact significantly on southern European member states stricken by the financial crisis.

It would also address warnings voiced by political representatives of Europe’s regions that Juncker’s €315 billion investment plan could divert money away from the EU’s existing structural funds. Under Juncker’s plan (see background), member states have been offered the opportunity to top-up amounts in the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) - which will act as the investment vehicle of the plan.

Fears that exemptions will funnel money to Juncker plan The Commission has pledged that member state contributions to the EFSI will not be counted for the purposes of the stability and growth pact. At a plenary session held yesterday (13 February), the Committee of the Regions (CoR) adopted a resolution calling for such flexibility to be extended across all cohesion and structural funds. The CoR fears that national cofinancing money from these instruments will leak to the new Juncker plan. Yesterday’s resolution reflected a similar demand made by the CoR last month.

Extending the exemption to all national and regional investment matching EU structural funds would be resisted by fiscal hawks, since the total earmarked for the structural funds within the EU’s multiannual financial framework (MFF) is roughly €350 billion.

Moreover, that sum mobilises similar Continued on Page 3 http://eurac.tv/4Ut [Images Money/Flickr]

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

EurActiv | INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS | SPECIAL REPORT | 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 3 Regions warn Juncker plan could eat cohesion funds Published 05/12/2014 Political representatives of Europe’s regions warned yesterday (4 December) that Juncker’s €315 billion investment plan could divert money away from the EU’s existing cohesion funds. At a plenary session held in the European Parliament, the Committee of the Regions (CoR) endorsed the Commission’s decision to exempt public investments projects from deficit calculations under the Stability and Growth Pact.

But CoR members called for the move to be extended across all cohesion and structural funds, as they fear the national co-financing money from these instruments will leach to the new Juncker plan.

Under Juncker’s plan, member states have been offered the opportunity to topup amounts into the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) - which will act as the investment vehicle of the plan. The money they provide is discounted from the calculations of national deficits within the so-called European Semester, a scheme that gives the Commission the power to review drafts of national budgets and provide recommendations that governments have to follow.

Commission sources have told EurActiv that Slovakia, Finland and Spain have already expressed an interest in making such ‘top-up’ payments. The CoR resolution called for the deficit discount to be spread across all cohesion funding. Hands off our structural funds “The Committee of the Regions’ demand that national co-financing of the European Structural and Investment Funds be exempted from deficit calculations of the Stability and Growth Pact and asks therefore the European Commission to assess the feasibility of this demand,” the resolution – unanimously adopted by the regional body – said.

The CoR underlined that any overlaps between EFSI and the European Structural and Investment Funds “must be avoided” and called on the EU executive to “clarify the complementarity needed between these investment funds.” Member states currently commit their own resources to elicit existing EU structural funds – worth €350 billion during the current multi-annual financial framework, which runs from this year until 2020.

The regions fear that faced with limited resources for allotting funds within the member states, the attraction of investing in a fund offering a deficit discount procedure might draw resources away from the existing projects,” a CoR spokesman told EurActiv. “What we don’t want is for this [Juncker plan] to lead to substitutional activity. We want that activity already there through structural funds, ESIF and other existing funds to remain, and for the Juncker initiative to add to that,” said Sir Albert Bore, the vicepresident of the socialist group in the CoR and the leader of Birmingham council.

volumes of national and regional cofinancing, with the EU share of investment ranging between 50% and 85% of total spending.

That sum considerably outstrips the likely contribution of member states to the Juncker plan, with EFSI underpinned with €5 billion coming from the European Investment Bank and an €8 billion guarantee from existing EU funds designed to secure a contribution of €16 billion in total, from the institutions. However a compromise is under consideration at the Council, EU officials told EurActiv. Optimism that stability fund flexibility can be extended Instead of extending the Commission’s flexibility proposal to all structural funds, the plan would see those projects identified for investment by the Juncker plan opened to structural fund co-financing from the member states.

In this scenario, co-financing mobilised structural funds would also be exempt from budget calculations within the stability and growth pact. “The Commission has acknowledged – through its flexibility provision under the Juncker plan – that it is possible to apply such flexibility to the stability pact,” said one EU official, adding: “The issue is now under consideration among high-level Council officials who feel that this would be a viable option.” Continued from Page 2 Fan of Euro notes on scales [Flickr/TaxRebate.org.uk]

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

4 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 | SPECIAL REPORT | INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS | EurActiv Juncker investment plan: project list imminent Published 03/12/2014 European regions and sectors hoping to benefit from the new €315 billion Juncker investment plan will be named on a list set to be published shortly by a joint task force of the European Investment Bank and the Commission.

An EU official told EurActiv that not all the projects listed by the task force will actually receive money from the fund, but the list will serve as an indication of those which might do so.

The list will be included in further details of the investment plan that will be put before EU heads of state and government meeting in Brussels later this month (18-19 December). The exact details of how the fund will be administered are still under discussion, the EU official said, though these too will also be tabled at the December summit. Broadly speaking, a new administrative council to be controlled jointly by the EU executive and the European Investment Bank will decide on how the investments are made, but the detailed mechanics of how this will work are still under discussion.

Miguel Gil-Tertre – a member of Vice President Jyrki Katainen’s cabinet – said that the decision-making process would be detached from the politics of the EU executive to ensure impartiality.

The list will include projects from all 28 member states, which have been sending lists of possible investment projects to the task force over the past fortnight. The EU official told EurActiv that, in addition to the new advisory council an independent investment committee consisting of experts will be chosen to deal with the day-to-day handling of the fund.

Projects “with high socio-economic returns” and which can begin at latest within the next three year and which have the potential to leverage other sources of funding will be preferred. Fund encouraged not to dismiss smaller projects They should also be of reasonable size and scalability, according to the EU executive. The Commission and the EIB will also launch a major programme of technical assistance to identify projects and help make them more attractive for private investors. “What is important is that the funds go where they are most needed and used to fund projects that bring the most added-value, having the greatest impact locally,” Michel Lebrun, the President of the Commissitee of the Regions told EurActiv in an interview.

Lebrun said that he agreed with the Commission’s stated aim that there should be no thematic or geographic preallocations. “All regions have their own specific investment needs and all regions have projects that should be judged on their own merits,” Lebrun said. However, he said that size and scalability should not rule out smaller projects. “What I would like to see in the Plan’s implementation is particular attention given to small-scale projects and clusters of projects that can be undertaken at the local and regional level,” he said. “These types of projects might not make the headlines but taken together can have an enormous and rapid impact on employment and prosperity,” he added.

Jean-Claude Juncker [EPP/Flickr]

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

EurActiv | INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS | SPECIAL REPORT | 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 5 Regions chief: ‘Use local nous to mobilise investment fund’ Published 02/12/2014 Committee of the Regions’ President Michel Lebrun welcomes the EU’s new investment fund plan, but calls on the expertise of local regions to be deployed to maximise its impact. A former Belgian federal MP, Michel Lebrun was the head of the Christian Democratic group, and he has served as minister of higher education, research and international relations in the French community. He became Member of the Committee of the Regions (CoR) in 1994 and was elected its president this year.

He answered questions put by EurActiv’s Jeremy Fleming What are your first reactions to the Juncker investment plan announced this week?

I welcome this investment plan which has the potential to mobilise private investment and kick-start growth and job creation so badly needed in Europe. The three main strands (the creation of the European Fund for Strategic Investments, the establishment of a credible project pipeline and an ambitious roadmap) look indeed very much like an “investment offensive that optimises our economic policy”, as Juncker called it. The Plan does not provide fresh public money but it does use it in a way that can maximise its impact. In the words of President Juncker it is “smart public money”. Using the EU budget to partially cover potential losses of private investors who invest in projects does carry risks and it is wiser to test it with limited public resources and assess its implications before surging forward.

The commitment made by President Juncker that future contributions to the Fund from Member States will be excluded from the Stability and Growth Pact calculations of deficit is a step in the right direction towards increased flexibility. The same logic should be extended to all national and regional co-financing in the context of the European Structural and Investment Funds. Indeed, this would allow Member States, and also cities and regions, to make today the investments that will help deliver the growth and the jobs of tomorrow. Does the fifteenfold multiplied leverage seem feasible to you? The figure of fifteen is a simple estimate.

The final figure will depend on individual projects and their capacity to attract new investors and private investors. Other funds under the European Investment Bank’s responsibility are reaching a higher multiplier effect of 1:18 so I see no reason to doubt this estimate at this stage. The new European Fund for Strategic Investments totalling €21 billion is expected to generate €240 billion for longterm investments and €75 billion for SMEs and mid-cap firms over the period 2015- 2017; do either of these funding measures apply better to the regions of Europe? What good are broadband internet and improved transport infrastructure if companies do not take advantage of them creating jobs? Middle capitalisation companies, and even more so SMEs, are the backbone of our regional economies and create the vast majority of jobs in the EU.

They need financing and currently many struggle to find sufficient amounts or at acceptable conditions. It is clear that this extra support for companies can have a huge impact in unlocking growth. Long-term investments and the financing of SMEs and mid-cap firms go hand in hand which together, I believe, can kick-start growth in Europe’s regions and cities. These two pillars of the Plan as complementary: they are the two sides of the same coin. Long-term investment in transport and communication infrastructure, energy, research or education, are key to enhance the economic and social development prospects of our regions.

They give a solid basis for our economies to build upon and in the case of investments in renewables or resource and energy efficiency, are necessary to preserve our environment and in the long run our well-being.

Continued on Page 6 Michel Lebrun was elected interim President of the Committee of the Regions in 2014 Michel Lebrun [Flickr/Committee of the Regions/Tim De Backer - with permission]

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

6 1 Dec. 2014 - 28 Feb. 2015 | SPECIAL REPORT | INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS | EurActiv The method of distribution of the funds will be decided by an administrative council jointly controlled by the EIB and the Commission, though no quotas are foreseen in respect of member states, or indeed regions. Do you think that is the best way to administrate the new funds? What is important is that the funds go where they are most needed and used to fund projects that bring the most addedvalue, having the greatest impact locally.

This is why I welcome President Juncker’s speech to the European Parliament where he explicitly stated that “all levels of government” shall be mobilised in the investment Plan so regions and cities have a key role to play. Their knowledge of the local economy and local challenges is invaluable in identifying the best projects to be funded. It is essential to make the most of this expertise in the governance of the Fund if it is to fulfil its potential. What will the CoR be looking for from the plan in order to deem it a success? It’s important to remember that this Plan is an additional tool to stimulate private investment and could have a serious impact.

But, as President Juncker has said, it comes on top of many other EU initiatives. EU structural and investment funds are the key investment tool of the Union not only because of the quantity of resources, €350 billion over seven years, but because of the unique approach it takes requiring the involvement of EU, national, regional and local actors in delivering growth. We will look at the impact of the Plan on Europe’s regions and cities but we are aware that it is not our only bet.

Also rather than starting to consider whether this Plan will be a success, what is important in the coming weeks and months is to do everything in our power to make sure that it is one. The CoR has already begun work and intends to provide proposals to strengthen and maximise its territorial impact. We should not forget that more than 70% of public investment in Europe are made by local and regional authorities. Therefore we should ensure that we make the best use of local and regional expertise in identifying and implementing projects worthy of investment and ensure those investments are also focused on smallscale projects and clusters of projects at sub-national level.

Due to their quicker implementation, these projects often instigate the most immediate impact on growth and jobs.

Since the funds are intended to act as levers for growth, will there be a bias towards those regions – particularly the southern Mediterranean countries – which have suffered most as a result of the financial crisis? Will that suit the CoR? The Commission’s Communication is very clear in this respect: “there should be no thematic or geographic preallocations”. This is key to ensuring that projects are chosen on the basis of their quality and utility and that we do not finance the construction of bridges to nowhere just to tick a box. The projects selected for funding will be chosen based on their societal and economic added value and I fully support this approach.

But this does not mean that all the funds will be channelled to less favoured regions. All regions have their own specific investment needs and all regions have projects that should be judged on their own merits. Simply because an infrastructure project is located in a more economically developed part of Europe does not mean that it cannot have a hugely beneficial impact for the region and for the EU as a whole. What is important is that there is synergy between the Juncker Plan and the European Structural and Investment Funds, to avoid duplication and make possible the concentration of funds where the real need is.

The countries and regions that have suffered the most from the crisis will of course have greater needs in some respects but as long as the allocation of funds is made on an objective and fair basis, and maximises territorial impact across the EU, I am confident that the CoR will put its full weight behind the Investment Plan.

Can you give examples of the types of regions – and project – that are likely to benefit most from the plan? What I would like to see in the Plan’s implementation is particular attention given to small-scale projects and clusters of projects that can be undertaken at the local and regional level. These types of projects might not make the headlines but taken together can have an enormous and rapid impact on employment and prosperity. The reason for this is that these projects can often be implemented much faster and that thanks to cities and regions’ knowledge of local strengths and challenges, truly respond to the needs of European citizens and businesses.

Continued from Page 5 For information on EurActiv Special Reports... Contact us Davide Patteri paexecutive@euractiv.com tel. +32(0)2 788 36 74 Natalie Sarkic-Todd euprojects@euractiv.com tel. +32(0)2 788 36 63 Other relevant contacts: Rick Zedník ceo@euractiv.com tel. +32(0)2 226 58 12 Jeremy Fleming-Jones jeremy.fleming.jones@euractiv.com tel. +32(0)2 788 36 85

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

ÉDITION SPÉCIALE | 26 - 30 janvier 2015 LE PLAN JUNCKER ET LES RÉGIONS http://www.euractiv.fr/sections/le-plan-juncker-et-les-regions Le financement du plan Juncker pose question ___ 7
Vincent Aussilloux : « Le plan Juncker doit sortir des logiques partisanes et bénéficier aux projets les plus rentables ___ 8
Les régions tentent de s’impliquer dans le plan Juncker ___ 10
Le plan Juncker pourrait avoir des effets pervers sur la politique régionale ___ 11
Bernard Soulage: « Le plan Juncker marque une petite volonté d’investissement de la part de l’UE ___ 12
Table des matières Le financement du plan Juncker pose question Le plan Juncker suscite des questions sur son architecture et son financement.

Mais le monde de la finance attend avec impatience ces « project bonds sous stéroïdes ». Appelé de ses vœux par la France de longue date, le plan d’investissement que l’UE est en train de mettre en place n’est qu’une pâle image des projets initiaux de l’Hexagone. La France souhaitait 1200 milliards sur 4 ans, le plan actuel représente 315 milliards sur 3 ans. Un montant déjà arraché de haute lutte aux partisans de la rigueur monétaire, dont le principe se retrouve dans l’architecture du dispositif. En effet, pour l’heure, seulement 2 milliards de fonds publics y sont consacrés, en provenance du budget européen.

6 milliards prélevés sur des programmes en cours Au total, l’UE prévoit de verser 8 milliards d’euros, mais sur cette somme, 6 milliards d’euros étaient déjà budgetisés pour abonder le programme de soutien à la recherche Horizon 2020, ainsi que le mécanisme d’interconnexion européen (MIE), consacré aux transports et aux réseaux européens. Un montant sous forme de garantie, et qui comptera double (16 ) en raison de la qualité de la signature. La BEI doit de son côté apporter 5 milliards, pour un fonds de départ de 5+16, soit 21 milliards d’euros. A partir de là, le programme d’investissement de la Commission Juncker parie sur un effet « démultiplicateur » de 15.

Un coup de poker qui s’inspire aussi de l’idée qu’un investissement privé sera économiquement plus efficace qu’un investissement public. La rentabilité étant a priori plus probable, les investissements potentiels seront plus importants. Risque de déshabiller Paul pour habiller Jacques Mais les parties prenantes ne sont pas dupes : ce nouveau mécanisme se fera à budget constant. Ce qui suppose nécessairement de déshabiller Paul pour habiller Jacques. C’est ce que montre l’exemple du Canal Seine-Nord Europe, un des principaux projets d’infrastructure du moment, dont le financement nécessite 4,5 milliards d’euros.

L’UE s’est engagée à y contribuer à hauteur de 60 %, par le biais du Mécanisme pour l’interconnexion en Europe. Or ce dernier va justement être allégé d’une partie de ses fonds par le plan Juncker, soit -3,3 milliards sur trois ans. Le mécanisme est doté d’un budget total de 23 milliards sur 5 ans.

Flou artistique Le Canal Seine-Nord, qui fait partie des 5 priorités européennes, à l’instar du train Lyon-Turin, pourrait conserver son budget. Mais rien n’est acquis et un flou artistique demeure. Ainsi, ces deux projets Avec le soutien de Suite à la page 8 Le Comité des régions à Bruxelles - © European Union / CoR 13 14 > 21 22 > 32 33 > 39 40 > 46

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

8 26 - 30 janvier 2015 | ÉDITION SPÉCIALE | LE PLAN JUNCKER ET LES RÉGIONS | EurActiv majeurs pour la France n’ont pas été insérés dans la liste des projets français candidats au plan Juncker, justement parce que la France souhaite qu’ils soient financés par le Mécanisme pour l’interconnexion en Europe.

L’Italie a en revanche inscrit le Lyon-Turin dans sa propre liste... Concrètement, « sur 4 ans, cela représente 16% de moins pour les projets transports européens et 790 millions d’euros dès 2015 » souligne la député européenne Karima Delli, qui regrette que « ce qui devait être un investissement est en réalité une nouvelle coupe dans un budget européen déjà réduit à peau de chagrin, selon la logique d’austérité qui guide encore la Commission ».

Les députés européens globalement favorables à la mise en place d’un plan d’investissement regrettent en revanche de ne pas avoir voix au chapitre. Logé au sein de la Banque Européenne d’Investissement, le nouveau Fonds d’investissement sera géré par un double conseil d’administration, d’une part des experts, et d’autres part des représentants des parties prenantes (BEI, Commission). Interrogations sur la mise en place Au-delà des questions encore sans réponse, le plan Juncker s’est aussi attiré des critiques quant à ses chances de succès. L’agence S&P souligne ainsi, au rang des risques, celui que le plan n’attire pas suffisamment de capital, et qu’il peine à convaincre que les investissements en infrastructures permettent de relancer la croissance.

La liste à la Prévert de 2000 projets présentée jusqu’à maintenant n’aide pas : au total, les Etats ont mis sur la table pour 1300 milliards de propositions d’investissement sans hiérarchiser leurs priorités, à l’exception des Pays-Bas et du Royaume-Uni.

La plan Juncker, ou les « project bonds sous stéroïdes » Une erreur qui peut aussi s’expliquer par la précipitation du plan, annoncé 3 semaines après la prise de fonction de la nouvelle Commission. Le programme est encore en devenir et les travaux associent désormais plus d’acteurs, y compris les collectivités locales comme les régions européennes qui devraient désormais être impliquées dans le processus, après ne pas l’avoir pas été au sein des « task forces » initiales mise en place en novembre entre BEI, Etats et Commission.

Sur le fond, l’appétit des investisseurs européens pour des investissements garantis semble avoir été démontré par les « project bonds » mis en place par la BEI, qui représentent un réel succès en terme de levée de fonds.

Parmi les 5 premiers projects bonds mis en place, la France héberge notamment celui d’Axione infrastructures, premier project bond sur les infrastructures numériques, il porte sur l’installation du Très Haut Débit dans des zones cibles. Les projets qui seront financés par le Fonds européen pour les investissements stratégiques qualifiés de « project bonds sous stéroïdes » par un fonctionnaire européen, devraient rencontrer une demande encore plus importante de la part des investisseurs, ce qui permettrait de faire baisser leur coupon. Et d’assurer leur financement, selon des spécialistes du crédit.

Vincent Aussilloux : «Le plan Juncker doit sortir des logiques partisanes et bénéficier aux projets les plus rentables» La logique macro économique du plan Juncker vise à relancer la croissance, en injectant de l’argent dans les zones particulièrement affectées par le ralentissement de la demande. Une théorie expliquée par Vincent Aussilloux, chef du département recherche au thinkSuite de la page 7 Suite à la page 9 Vincent Aussilloux est responsable de la recherche du think-tank France Stratégie

INVESTMENT FOR REGIONS

EurActiv | LE PLAN JUNCKER ET LES RÉGIONS | ÉDITION SPÉCIALE | 26 - 30 janvier 2015 9 tank France Stratégie, qui dépend du Premier ministre. L’Europe a-t-elle vraiment besoin d’un plan d’investissement aujourd’hui alors que les liquidités sont abondantes ? La zone euro est dans une phase de stagnation de la croissance. Il y a un vrai risque de déflation : les derniers chiffres de l’inflation reflète une évolution des prix négative. La politique monétaire doit être activée en réponse à ce problème, et la BCE le fait notamment avec la perspective du Quantitative Easing.

Mais les instruments monétaires sont insuffisants : il faut une vraie relance de la demande, et pour cela la plupart des États n’ont pas de marge de manœuvre en raison des contraintes budgétaires.

L’autre intérêt de ce plan de relance vise à améliorer la compétitivité à terme : l’offre devrait s’en trouver améliorée, et l’UE sera plus attractive avec de meilleures infrastructures. Comment fonctionnera l’effet de levier ?

Le plan Juncker répond au besoin de mobilisation des capitaux : il n’y a pas de déficit d’épargne en Europe, mais les contraintes de solvabilité imposées aux banques après la crise financière les a rendues très frileuses. C’est pour cela que l’on a décidé de mettre de l’argent public en garantie : cela permet un effet de levier. Le simple fait que l’on réduise le risque permet de mobiliser des fonds privés. Ne serait-il pas plus simple de convaincre les banques de prêter de l’argent aux entreprises pour investir plutôt que de permettre aux entreprises d’accéder aux marchés des capitaux comme aux États-Unis ?

Non, parce qu’il ne faut pas risquer une nouvelle crise financière en poussant les banques à prendre trop de risques ! Les règles de solvabilité sont justifiées. Pour compléter le financement des banques, il faudrait surtout renforcer la finance de marché. La Commission travaille sur une nouvelle directive sur le marché unique des capitaux, mais cela prendra du temps. Aujourd’hui les grandes entreprises se financent sans problème sur les marchés, mais les petites et moyennes n’y arrivent pas. Du coup certaines d’entre elles se financent sur le marché américain, c’est le cas de grosses PME innovantes.

Et les investisseurs finissent par insister pour que le board s’installe près d’eux : cela incite les délocalisations. Il faut donc mieux développer le capital-risque en Europe, et décloisonner les marchés qui sont encore très nationaux. Il y a beaucoup de capitaux en Allemagne, mais peu d’accès aux informations sur les projets des entreprises appartenant à d’autres pays de l’UE. Il faut aussi standardiser les informations que donnent les entreprises non cotées d’un pays à l’autre, ce qui simplifierait le processus.

En quoi le plan Juncker peut-il contribuer à relancer la croissance ? Un de ses principaux critères repose sur la rapidité des projets : la logique est de ne financer que des projets qui démarrent au plus vite, et qui ne se feraient pas sans ce fond, ce qui permettra de la croissance additionnelle. Est-ce que la composante emploi des projets sera un critère important ? Pour l’instant les critères principaux reposent sur la rapidité de lancement du projet, la rentabilité de l’investissement ainsi que son niveau de risque. Mais il n’est pas impossible que ces critères soient pris en compte. On peut imaginer un plan de rénovation des bâtiments publics pour améliorer leur efficacité énergétique.

Ce sont des projets très diffus sur tout le territoire, et pourvoyeur d’emploi. Est-ce que les États du Sud de l’UE vont bénéficier plus que d’autres du plan Juncker ?

Ce qui est certain c’est qu’il n’est pas question de répartir l’enveloppe du plan Juncker artificiellement entre les 28 États membres : cela n’aurait pas de sens. Il faut choisir les projets les plus rentables, non financés par le marché et les plus utiles. Par ailleurs, c’est surtout dans les pays où la demande est insuffisante qu’il faut investir, notamment dans les pays du Sud. Si on commence à vouloir répartir artificiellement les sommes, on perd la logique qui est derrière le plan Juncker et on risque de financer des projets non rentables et inutiles, des “éléphants blancs”. En revanche, il serait souhaitable de créer un second fonds, qui serait complémentaire, et qui pourrait fonctionner sous le principe de subventions de projets non directement rentables : c’est l’idée développée dans le rapport Enderlein-Pisani-Ferry.

Comment les experts qui décideront des projets élus ou non au plan Juncker vont-ils être sélectionnés ? Il y aura un groupe d’experts de la BEI, et d’autres provenant des États membres. Nous souhaitons qu’un tiers du quorum soit représenté par des experts non européens, afin de sortir des logiques partisanes stériles, ce qui permettra aux projets d’être sélectionnés pour leur efficacité, et non en fonction d’affinités nationales.

EurActiv.fr | Aline Robert Suite de la page 8

10 26 - 30 janvier 2015 | ÉDITION SPÉCIALE | LE PLAN JUNCKER ET LES RÉGIONS | EurActiv Les régions tentent de s’impliquer dans le plan Juncker Les régions françaises veulent prendre part au plan Juncker, dans lequel elles voient une opportunité pour financer certains de leurs projets.

Elles n’ont pour l’heure guère été consultées sur le sujet. En décembre, la France a présenté une liste de 32 projets qu’elle considère comme éligible au plan d’investissement de 315 milliards d’euros porté par la Commission européenne. Une liste élaborée par le gouvernement, sans consultation des régions.

Malheureusement, les 32 projets présentés par le gouvernement ont été choisis de manière unilatérale » regrette Pascal Gruselle, en charge des affaires européennes à l’Association des régions de France (ARF). Manque de consultation Un manque de consultation reconnu en filigrane dans la contribution française, dont l’objet n’était pas « d’identifier et d’inclure des projets portés par les collectivités territoriales et les collectivités d’outre-mer susceptibles de remplir les critères » souligne le texte, ni « d’associer et de consulter pleinement les différentes parties prenantes sur cette liste (collectivités locales, parlementaires, opérateurs etc) ».

La liste des projets portée par la France, qui reste pour l’heure « à vocation illustrative », est amenée à évoluer. Une brèche dans laquelle comptent bien s’engouffrer les régions. « Le président de l’Association des régions de France a appelé les régions françaises à se mobiliser pour identifier des projets susceptibles d’être financés en partie par le plan Juncker » explique Pascal Gruselle.

Pour l’heure, des premiers contacts ont été pris. « Les présidents des régions françaises ont rencontré Philippe LegliseCosta (alors conseiller Europe à l’Élysée) au début du mois de décembre afin d’aborder le plan d’investissement » indiquet-ton à la région Ile-de-France.

Le président de la région Ile-deFrance s’est également rendu en novembre à Bruxelles pour échanger sur le sujet. Mais du côté de la région Rhône-Alpes, on regrette « qu’aucun rendez-vous ne soit pris pour l’heure avec les services de la Commission européenne ou avec le gouvernement français » explique son vice-président, Bernard Soulage. « On est toujours dans l’expectative concernant ce plan d’investissement. Est-ce que les régions sont vraiment concernées par le plan ? Cela reste à voir » s’interroge Pascal Gruselle.

Pour la Commission européenne, la coopération avec les régions semble être envisagée de manière assez réduite. « Certains projets proposés par la Commission et les Etats-membres peuvent être cofinancés par les fonds structurels européens; dans ces cas-là, les régions seront impliquées dans la mise en place et le suivi des projets » a expliqué la Commission européenne à EurActiv. Des projets en régions Parmi les projets mentionnés dans la liste française figurent pourtant déjà quelques projets d’infrastructure – notamment dans les transports – dans lesquels les conseils régionaux sont en première ligne.

C’est notamment le cas de l’autoroute ferroviaire atlantique, auquel sont associées pas moins de cinq régions (Aquitaine, Centre, Ile-de-France, NordPas de Calais et Poitou-Charentes), ou encore de l’extension du port de Calais, projet porté en partie par la région NordPas de Calais. Le port de Calais se positionne L’extension du port de Calais, principal moyen de passage de la France au Royaume-Uni, prévoit le doublement de la capacité du port de Calais. Un projet censé permettre de répondre à Les ferries se succèdent chaque jour entre le port de Dover au Royaume-Uni) et de Calais (France)-Paul J Martin/shutterstock Suite à la page 11

EurActiv | LE PLAN JUNCKER ET LES RÉGIONS | ÉDITION SPÉCIALE | 26 - 30 janvier 2015 11 l’engorgement du port pour un coût total estimé de 900 millions d’euros. « Figurer sur la liste des projets français éligibles au plan Juncker nous donne bon espoir d’obtenir les financements européens nécessaires » se félicite Guillaume Dury, directeur adjoint à la direction des ports, de la mer et du littoral de la Région Nord Pas de Calais. « De plus, cela crédibilise le projet auprès des investisseurs privés » poursuit-il. Effet vertueux Premier signe de l’effet vertueux du plan Juncker, le port de Calais a obtenu au mois de décembre la validation de la Banqueeuropéenned’investissement(BEI) afin de lancer une émission obligataire, les fameux « Project bonds » de 525 millions d’euros, qui permettra d’appuyer la partie privée de l’investissement, d’un total de 630 millions d’euros.

C’est la dynamique du Plan Juncker qui nous a permis d’obtenir l’accord de la Banque européenne d’investissement » reconnait Guillaume Dury. De son côté, l’État français prévoit de débourser 100 millions d’euros, les collectivités locales 80 millions. Reste à financer 90 millions d’euros, « que nous allons demander à l’Union européenne » explique Guillaume Dury.

Ce financement européen pourrait toutefois ne pas provenir du Plan Juncker, mais du mécanisme pour l’interconnexion en Europe (MIE). Doté de 23 milliards d’euros, le MIE est affecté au financement des infrastructures de transports en Europe sur la période 2014-2020, et une partie doit être réorientée vers le plan d’investissement.

Le dossier de l’extension du port de Calais doit être soumis au plus tard fin février auprès de la Commission européenne pour une réponse vers la fin du mois de juin 2015.

Le plan Juncker pourrait avoir des effets pervers sur la politique régionale Pour encourager les États membres à participer financièrement au plan Juncker, la Commission s’est engagée à sortir leurs contributions éventuelles du calcul de leur déficit. Mais les régions craignent que la clémence de Bruxelles ne détourne l’argentpublicdesfondsstructurels. Le renforcement de l’investissement au sein de l’Union européenne via le plan Juncker de 315 milliards d’euros pourrait ne pas être une bonne nouvelle pour tout le monde.

Parmi les inquiets figurent les régions françaises, principales gestionnaires en France des fonds structurels européens, qui craignent de voir cette politique desservie par le plan Juncker.

En France, les régions viennent d’hériter de la gestion d’une importante partie de la manne de 15,9 milliards d’euros allouée à la politique de cohésion pour la période 2014-2020. C’est aussi le principal outil d’investissement de l’UE en faveur de la création d’emploi et de la croissance. Additionalité garantie Face aux inquiétudes des autorités régionales, la commissaire européenne à la politique régionale, Corina Cretu, a garanti que les fonds du Plan Juncker viendraient s’ajouter à ceux de la politique de cohésion, et ne grignoteraient pas les fonds structurels. À l’occasion de la 140e session plénière du Comité des Régions qui s’est tenue le 5 décembre, la commissaire a tenté de rassurer.

Au cours des discussions, certains représentants ont expliqué craindre que le plan d’investissement ne détourne l’argent des politiques de cohésion existantes. Je souhaite dissiper ces inquiétudes : il n’y a pas de chevauchements entre le fonds européen d’investissement et les fonds structurels » a-t-elle affirmé.

Une mise au point qui aura eu le mérite de rassurer – en partieles représentants des régionsfrançaises.«Iln’yapasd’argentprélevé sur le budget de la politique de cohésion, c’est déjà une bonne nouvelle ! » se félicite une source au sein de la région Ile-de-France Le Comité des régions à Bruxelles - © European Union / CoR Suite de la page 10 Suite à la page 12

12 26 - 30 janvier 2015 | ÉDITION SPÉCIALE | LE PLAN JUNCKER ET LES RÉGIONS | EurActiv Si l’additionalité entre les deux dispositifs semble garantie par la Commission européenne, ils pourraient cependant se retrouver en situation de concurrence.

Possibles victimes collatérales En effet, la Commission a confirmé mi-janvier qu’elle ne prendrait pas en compte les contributions nationales au plan d’investissement dans le calcul du déficit des États membres participants.

Dans une communication distincte publiéele13janvier,laCommissionaprécisé que les contributions des États membres au Fonds européen pour les investissements stratégiques, bras armé du plan Juncker, ne seront pas prises en compte au moment d’évaluer l’ajustement budgétaire dans le cadre du Pacte de stabilité et de croissance. Ce qui donne un avantage concurrentiel certain au plan Juncker pour attirer l’argent des États membres, au détriment de la politique de cohésion qui n’auront pas le même attrait pour l’Etat.

Le problème est connu » concède le porte-parole de la Commission pour la politiquerégionale.«Maislesrégionsdoivent aussi se saisir du plan d’investissement, qui représente une opportunité pour elles » poursuit-il.

Certains, au sein des conseils régionaux voient davantage dans le plan Juncker une fenêtre de tir pour négocier également l’exclusion de la part de cofinancements nationaux du calcul du déficit public, lorsqu’ils viennent compléter des projets bénéficiant d’un financement de la politique régionale. Une demande de longue date. « Lesrégionsfrançaisesvontsemobiliser pour que la déductibilité des contributions nationales au financement de projet soient thématiques (par exemple pour la transition énergétique, le transport, etc... et pas seulement réservées aux investissements consentis via le plan d’investissement » explique une source proche du dossier.

Articulations possibles ​ Dans un mémo explicatif, la Commission européenne tente de proposer des pistes pour concilier les deux dispositifs d’investissement. Elle explique par exemple que les fonds structurels européens peuvent être utilisés par les États membres pour investir dans les projets financés par le plan d’investissement.

Les États membres, mais aussi les régions sont encouragées à utiliser les fonds régionaux dont elles disposent sous forme de prêts, de fonds propres et de garanties afin d’en démultiplier l’effet. L’objectif affiché est de doubler le recours des fonds structurels à ces instruments financiers pour la période 2014-2020. Autre main tendue envers les région, la Commission européenne a lancé le 19 janvier en partenariat avec la banque européenne d’investissement une cellule d’information à destination des autorités régionales. Baptisée fi-compass, elle a pour ambition d’orienter et d’accompagner les régions européennes souhaitant porter des projets dans le cadre du plan Juncker.

Objectif assumé, passer au-dessus des dispositifs parfois très centralisés des États membres en permettant aux régions de porter directement leurs projets auprès de l’UE. Bernard Soulage: « Le plan Juncker marque une petite volonté d’investisse­ ment de la part de l’UE » Bernard Soulage, le vice-président de la région Rhône-Alpes estime le planJunckerpeuambitieux.Ilespère voir les régions françaises davantage impliquées dans sa mise en oeuvre. Bernard Soulage est membre du Comité des régions européen (CoR) et vice-président de la région Rhône-Alpes, cinquième région de l’Union européenne en matière de PIB.

C’est également la deuxième région française en termes de population, de PIB et de superficie.

Suite de la page 11 Suite à la page 13 Bernard Soulage, Vice-president de la Région Rhône-Alpes au Comité des Régions © European Union / Tim De Backer

You can also read