Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...

 
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
Purdue University – Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de
Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 – Spring 2018
Research Programs

Aerospace and Automotive Research
AAR-1. Advanced Manufacturing of Materials for Extreme Environments, Predictive Modeling of
Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST)
Professor Marcial Gonzalez, School of Mechanical Engineering, marcial-gonzalez@purdue.edu
Research website: www.marcialgonzalez.net

Discovery and characterization of materials for extreme environments (such as titanium aluminide
alloys for aero and auto-engine applications) require fundamental understanding of heterogeneous
structures and the behavior of interfaces between particles, grains and phases. In recent years,
experimental efforts have been instrumental for significant progress in understanding the relationship
between microstructure and performance (e.g., materials response far from equilibrium and under
combined external fields). Experimental efforts will always remain necessary, but predictive modeling
and simulation have the potential to dramatically reduce the need for expensive characterization and
testing down-stream of the design/fabrication process. It is worth noting, however, that current
modeling approaches often make casual inference about the microstructural features and, therefore,
experimental characterization and quantification of the microstructure remains of paramount
importance. Here we propose to numerically predict this microstructure from the fundamental
understanding, characterization and quantification of the manufacturing process itself. As a result, we
aim at moving up-stream the paradigm behind simulation-based materials design, with the potential
of reducing even further the need of expensive characterization and testing campaigns. Given the
relative maturity of the computational infrastructure necessary to predict the relationship between
microstructure and performance, the research challenges associated with the proposed study largely
stem from the need to fundamentally understand and predict formation and evolution of
microstructure during manufacturing and, subsequently, to seamlessly integrate these results with
predictions of material response far from equilibrium and under combined external fields. To this end,
and with the purpose to complementing and expanding current sintering expertise available in
academic and industry sectors in the state of Nuevo León, the proposed Ph.D. study will restrict
attention to Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) and it will specifically consider the following
research aims:
- Aim 1 – Develop multi-physics predictive models, based on a particle mechanics approach, that are
capable of describing the complex phenomena occurring in confined granular media undergoing
sintering under mechanical, thermal and electric loads.
- Aim 2 – Develop ad-hoc experimental characterization tests that enable fundamental understanding
of elastoplastic creep deformation, heat transfer, phase transformation and thermal expansion of
individual particles.
- Aim 3 – Utilize these predictive modeling (Aim 1) and characterization (Aim 2) capabilities to develop
fundamental, mechanistic understanding of the influence on microstructure formation and evolution
of FAST processing variables, material thermo-mechano-chemical properties and powder morphology.
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
Partnerships with groups associated with I2T2, ITESM, UANL and UDEM whose expertise is in the
experimental characterization of these systems or in the modeling at length scales different from
those studied here are desirable and will solidify the global impact of the project, but are not required.
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School of Mechanical Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 15 2016 for Fall 2017; November 1 2017 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 575; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): no minimum required. For fellowship consideration; 162 Quantitative, 155 Verbal, 4.0 Analytical
Writing
GPA mimimum: 3.2 (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: megradapps@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mech.html

AAR-2. Forging of Parts, Light and Strong Materials for Vessels and Parts, and Additive
Manufacturing
Professor Michael D. Sangid, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, msangid@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/~msangid/

The research we do is building relationships between the material's microstructure and the
subsequent performance of the material, in terms of fatigue, fracture, creep, delamination, corrosion,
plasticity, etc. The majority of our group’s work has been on advanced alloys and composites. Both
material systems have direct applications in Aerospace and Automotive Engineering, as we work
closely with these industries. This research includes microstructural-sensitive modeling and in situ
experiments. The experimental aspects include advanced materials testing, using state-of-the-art 3d
strain mapping, and characterization. This research lies at the confluence of materials science, solid
mechanics, and manufacturing. Specific projects look at increasing the structural integrity of additive
manufactured materials, increasing fidelity of lifing analysis to introduce new light weight materials
into applications, and working within the forging process to tailor material properties from location to
location within components.
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School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017; September 15 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Minimum required: 159 Quantitative, 156 Verbal, 4.0 Analytical Writing
GPA mimimum: 3.5 (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: Xiaomin Qian, xiaomin@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/aaen.html

AAR-3. Materials for High Energy Generation Efficiency
Professor Michael D. Sangid, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, msangid@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/~msangid/

In many applications, it is the material choices that restrict the energy efficiency of the system’s cycle.
For instance, in gas turbine engines and nuclear systems, operations at higher temperatures result in
an increase in efficiency. Further, polycrystalline materials dominate the infrastructure for the
transportation industry. Even incremental improvements in tailored material’s properties can result in
higher allowable stress levels, thus removing weight from the overall systems and thereby having an
economic impact in the range of billions per year in increased fuel efficiency. Research in our group
focuses on structure to property relationships, in the form of in situ micromechanical experiments and
microstructure-based modeling to allow higher fidelity lifing analysis and the design of new advanced
materials with higher temperature and strength capabilities.
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
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School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017; September 15 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Minimum required: 159 Quantitative, 156 Verbal, 4.0 Analytical Writing
GPA mimimum: 3.5 (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: Xiaomin Qian, xiaomin@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/aaen.html

AAR-4. Thermomechanical Properties of Metallic Thin Films at High Temperatures
Professor Vikas Tomar, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, tomar@purdue.edu
Research website: https://www.interfacialmultiphysics.com

 The goal of the proposed research is to investigate the role played by grain boundary level
deformation on the overall mechanical response of metallic (Ni) thin films at high temperatures. In the
current state of the art, the global response of materials to externally applied load is typically
measured or modeled while taking into account combined influence of grain and grain boundary
properties [1-3]. This is probably because of very small fraction of grain boundary atoms at the bulk
scale. At the nanoscale, the fraction of atoms in grain boundary and triple junctions is very high, and
evidence of significantly localized strain in these regions is available experimentally [4-10]. Even
though it is accepted that the properties of grain boundaries are different from the grain interior, the
difference is not critical at lower temperatures (
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
References
[1]. Franz, G., Abed-Meraim, F., and Berveiller, M., "Strain localization analysis for single crystals and polycrystals: Towards microstructure-
ductility linkage". International Journal of Plasticity, 2013. 48(0): p. 1-33.
[2]. Requena, G. and Degischer, H.P., "Three-dimensional architecture of engineering multiphase metals". Annual Review of Materials
Research, 2012. 42: p. 145-161.
[3]. Luzin, V., Spencer, K., and Zhang, M.-X., "Residual stress and thermo-mechanical properties of cold spray metal coatings". Acta
Materialia, 2011. 59(3): p. 1259-1270.
[4]. Tomar, V. and Zhou, M., "Tension-compression strength asymmetry of nanocrystalline a-Fe2O3+fcc-Al ceramic-metal composites". Appl.
Phys. Lett., 2006. 88: p. 233107 (1-3).
[5]. Tomar, V. and Zhou, M., "Analyses of tensile deformation of nanocrystalline α-Fe2O3+fcc-Al composites using classical molecular
dynamics". Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 2007. 55: p. 1053-1085.
[6]. Oliver, J., Huespe, A., and Dias, I., "Strain localization, strong discontinuities and material fracture: Matches and mismatches". Computer
Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 2012. 241: p. 323-336.
[7]. Walley, J., Wheeler, R., Uchic, M., and Mills, M., "In-situ mechanical testing for characterizing strain localization during deformation at
elevated temperatures". Experimental mechanics, 2012. 52(4): p. 405-416.
[8]. Chan, T., Backman, D., Bos, R., Sears, T., Brooks, I., and Erb, U., "In situ heat generation and strain localization of polycrystalline and
nanocrystalline nickel", in Thermomechanics and Infra-Red Imaging, Volume 7. 2011, Springer. p. 17-23.
[9]. Rupert, T.J., "Strain localization in a nanocrystalline metal: Atomic mechanisms and the effect of testing conditions". Journal of Applied
Physics, 2013. 114(3): p. 033527.
[10]. Wu, Z., Zhang, Y., Jhon, M., and Srolovitz, D., "Anatomy of nanomaterial deformation: Grain boundary sliding, plasticity and cavitation in
nanocrystalline Ni". Acta Materialia, 2013. 61(15): p. 5807-5820.
[11]. Wang, Y., Ott, R., Van Buuren, T., Willey, T., Biener, M., and Hamza, A., "Controlling factors in tensile deformation of nanocrystalline
cobalt and nickel". Physical Review B, 2012. 85(1): p. 014101.
[12]. Furnish, T., Lohmiller, J., Gruber, P., Barbee Jr, T., and Hodge, A., "Temperature-dependent strain localization and texture evolution of
highly nanotwinned Cu". Applied Physics Letters, 2013. 103(1): p. 011904.
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School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017; September 15 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Minimum required: 159 Quantitative, 156 Verbal, 4.0 Analytical Writing
GPA mimimum: 3.5 (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: Xiaomin Qian, xiaomin@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/aaen.html

AAR-5. Multiscale Modeling of Polymer Composites
Professor Alejandro Strachan, School of Materials Engineering, strachan@purdue.edu
Professor Marisol Koslowski, School of Mechanical Engineering, marisol@purdue.edu)
Research websites: https://nanohub.org/groups/strachangroup/overview
https://engineering.purdue.edu/~marisol/Home.html

The use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites (FR-PMC) in structural applications is
growing at a rapid pace; the current 50 million pounds per year production of carbon fiber (a
third of which is for aerospace applications) is expected to growth at an annual rate between
13 and 16% in the coming years, to satisfy demand in automotive and renewable energy
sectors. Despite their growing importance and after decades of research and development, we
have only begun to “scratch the surface” of the potential of this class of materials. Predictive
computational modeling tools are key to enable the effective optimization of this class of
materials; yet existing tools are unable to predict ultimate mechanical properties. In this
project we will combine molecular dynamics and phase field simulations to connect the
molecular-level and microstructural processes that govern fracture toughness. Large-scale MD
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
simulations will be used to characterize crack propagation in thermoset and thermoplastic
polymers and to uncover and quantify the interplay between molecular processes and stress
concentration in failure. Constitutive laws obtained from the atomistic simulations will be
used in phase field micro mechanical simulations to model crack propagation with an explicit
description of microstructure (fiber arrangement). A predictive tool such as the one proposed
here has the potential to lead to the design of improved polymers and composite
microstructures for applications such as aerospace, automotive, and energy sectors.

[1] C. Li and A. Strachan. Molecular Simulations of Cross-linking Process of Thermosetting Polymers. Polymer 51, 6058-6070, 2010.
[2] C. Li and A. Strachan. Molecular Dynamics Predictions of Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Thermoset
Polymer EPON862/DETDA. Polymer 52, 2920-2928, 2011.
[3] C. Li and A. Strachan. Effect of Thickness on the Thermo-Mechanical Response of Free-standing Thermoset Nanofilms
from Molecular Dynamic. Macromolecules 44, 9448–9454, 2011.
[4] C. Li, G. Medvedev, E-W. Lee, J. Kim, J. Caruthers and A. Strachan. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental Studies
of the Thermomechanical Response of an Epoxy Thermoset Polymer. Polymer 53, 4222-4230, 2012.
[5] O. G. Kravchenko, C. Li, Alejandro Strachan, S. G. Kravchenko and R. B. Pipes, “Prediction of the chemical and thermal shrinkage
in a thermoset polymer” Journal of Composites, Part A. 66, 35-43 2014.
[6] C. Li, E. Jaramillo and A. Strachan. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Cyclic Deformation of an Epoxy
Thermoset. Polymer Polymer, 54, 881-890, 2013.
[7] C. Li, M. Koslowski and A. Strachan, “Engineering curvature in graphene ribbons using ultra-thin polymer films”, Nano
Letters, 14 7085–7089 (2014)
[8] E. Jaramillo, N. Wilson, S. Christensen, J. Gosse, and A. Strachan. Energy-based Yield Criterion for PMMA from Large-scale
MD Simulations. Physical Review B 85, 024114, 2012.
[9] C. Li, A. Browning, S. Christensen and A. Strachan. Atomistic Simulations on Multilayer Graphene Reinforced
Epoxy Composites. Composites Part A 43, 1293–1300, 2012.
[10] Y-J. Kim, K-H. Lin and A. Strachan. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of PMMA Slabs. Modelling and Simulation in Materials
Science and Engineering, 21, 065010, 2013.
[11] A. J. Mendoza-Jasso, J. E. Goodsell, A. Ritchey, R. B. Pipes and M. Koslowski. A Parametric Study of Fiber Volume
Fraction Distribution on the Failure Initiation Location in Open Hole Off-Axis Tensile Specimen. Composites Science and
Technology 71, (16) 1819-1825, 2011.
[12] A. J. Mendoza-Jasso, J. E. Goodsell, R. B. Pipes and M. Koslowski. Validation of Strain Invariant Failure Analysis in an Open
Hole off Axis Specimen. JOM 63, (9) 43-48, 2011.
[13] O. G. Kravchenko, C. Li, A. Strachan, S. J. Kravchenko, and R. B. Pipes, R.B., Prediction of the chemical and thermal shrinkage in
a thermoset polymer, J. Composites-A (submitted).
[14] Y. Xie, Y. Mao, L. sun and M. Koslowski, “Local versus average field failure criterion in amorphous polymers”, Modeling and
Simulations in Materials Science and Engineering 23 025004, 2015.

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School of Materials Engineering Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 for Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores. Suggested New Format Averages: Verbal 154, Quantitative 164;
Analytical Writing 4.0
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Rosemary Son, son39@ecn.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mse.html
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School of Mechanical Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 15 2016 for Fall 2017; November 1 2017 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 575; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): no minimum required. For fellowship consideration; 162 Quantitative, 155 Verbal, 4.0 Analytical
Writing
GPA mimimum: 3.2 (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: megradapps@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mech.html

Agro-Industry

AI-1. Next Generation Crop Plant Phenotyping System with Advanced Sensors and Robotics
Professor Jian Jin, School of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, jinjian@purdue.edu
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
Research website: https://ag.purdue.edu/plantsciences/Pages/default.aspx

Purdue University’s Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering has been ranked as the #1
Graduate Program by US News & World Report for the past 7 consecutive years. The program calls for
applications for PhD positions working on imaging and sensors development for plant phenotyping.
The successful candidates will be involved in the development of next generation plant phenotyping
systems. More specifically, the research will include integrating modern sensor technologies such as
hyperspectral, 3D, thermal, fluorescent cameras, and so on for plant screening purpose. The system is
expected to help in plant breeding and gene selection so as to produce more and safer food with
higher nutrition quality for the world’s growing population. The candidates will also be studying
imaging processing and machine vision algorithms. Statistical modeling and big data analysis will be
conducted to assist the search of plant genes in a much faster speed than before, so as to produce
more and safer food for the world’s growing population.
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School of Agriculture and Biological Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 1 2016 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for
Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): required, no minimum score set
GPA mimimum: 3.0 for undergraduate
Contact information: Gail G. Biberstine, abegrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/abe.html

AI-2. Engineering Microbes for the Production of Fuels, Medicines and Materials
Professor Kevin Solomon, School of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, kvs@purdue.edu
Research website: https://solomonlab.weebly.com

We are seeking enthusiastic students to develop next generation microbial systems that sustainably
produce fuels, medicines, and advanced materials with synthetic biology. These platforms exploit
the breadth and flexibility of biological metabolism to sustainably produce many valuable compounds
at mild conditions with minimal pollution. Scaling these processes to produce hydrophobic commodity
chemicals such as a biofuels, however, remains an ongoing challenge due to low conversion and
product toxicity. This project proposes to develop a novel protein biocatalyst that acts as a sponge to
capture products within microbes, protecting them from its toxic effects, and allow for better process
efficiency. These biocatalysts can be modified further to scaffold the needed enzymes together in
close proximity, and increase pathway flux to product, thereby improving yield. Other projects also
being offered include developing new chemistries for the production of renewable biochemical, and
analysis of antibiotic-producing microbial communities for new medicines. Potential students are
expected to have a strong background in chemistry, the life sciences, biotechnology, and/or
engineering principles with the creativity to tackle and independently solve exciting problems at the
forefront of synthetic biology.
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School of Agriculture and Biological Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 1 2016 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for
Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): required, no minimum score set
GPA mimimum: 3.0 for undergraduate
Contact information: Gail G. Biberstine, abegrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/abe.html

AI-3. Developing an Efficient Spray Coating Mechanism for Feed/Pet-food Pellets
Professor Kingsley Ambrose, School of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, rambrose@purdue.edu
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/ABE/People/ptProfile?resource_id=124618

Uniform coating of pellets is a challenge faced by the feed and pet-food industry. Obtaining a uniform
coating is important for safety and storability of pellets. Aim of this part of study will be to optimize
the process of coating of rendered protein meals. The product coating uniformity will be determined
by two factors – the percent coating per pass of solids (total mass of solids) and the percent covered
by the coating. The coating efficiency as influenced by particle size, consistency of mixed tocopherol,
application temperature, pressure and velocity will be determined in this study. The color pigment
yellow iron oxide, added with mixed tocopherol before spray coating, will be used as the tracing
agent. Analytical measurement of coating uniformity and percent coating will be conducted using a
colorimeter with the color values measured and reported in CIELAB units. Extensive simulation of
spray coating process will be an integral part of this investigation. The simulation work will be carried
out by the discrete element method (DEM) of particle modeling. Through this modeling work, the
appropriate design of conveyor, length and speed of conveying of powders for effective coating,
length of treatment, number of spray applicators, amount of antioxidant, spray volume contact, and
velocity and pressure of mixed tocopherol application will be optimized.
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School of Agriculture and Biological Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 1 2016 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for
Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): required, no minimum score set
GPA mimimum: 3.0 for undergraduate
Contact information: Gail G. Biberstine, abegrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/abe.html

AI-4. Renewable Fuels and Chemicals from Agricultural Materials
Professor Nathan Mosier, School of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, mosiern@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/ABE/People/ptProfile?resource_id=7208

Plant materials from agricultural production, including cellulosics (straw), starches (grains), and oils
are potential sources for fuels, chemicals, and polymers for industrial and consumer use. Dr. Nathan
Mosier, in Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE) and the Laboratory of Renewable Resources
Engineering (LORRE), has research programs focusing on the development of catalysts and catalytic
processes to transform cellulose and plant oils to valuable fuels and chemicals. Potential graduate
students are expected to have a strong background in chemistry, biochemistry, and process
engineering with a passion for developing innovative approaches to make renewable, plant-based
products.
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School of Agriculture and Biological Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 1 2016 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for
Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): required, no minimum score set
GPA mimimum: 3.0 for undergraduate
Contact information: Gail G. Biberstine, abegrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/abe.html

AI-5. Exploring the Impacts of Increased Food Production Using the Water-Energy-Food Nexus,
Professor Bernie Engel, School of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, engelb@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/~engelb/
Purdue University - Instituto de Innovación y Transferencia de Tecnología de Nuevo León Partnership, AY Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 Research Programs ...
The water-energy-food nexus provides a framework to examine the interconnection of food
production with water and energy consumption. The research effort will focus on the water
conservation component of a water-energy-food nexus research effort for a location or locations in
Mexico and locations in Indiana. The effort will examine relationships between increased food
production that will require increased irrigation and the impacts on energy requirements as well. The
project will examine the impacts of a range of water conservation practices on their ability to reduce
water consumption for the study sites and the economics of these practices. Water conservation
practices that will be examined include irrigation practices as well. The SWAT model as well as other
models will be used to explore the impacts of these practices.
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School of Agriculture and Biological Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 1 2016 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for
Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): required, no minimum score set
GPA mimimum: 3.0 for undergraduate
Contact information: Gail G. Biberstine, abegrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/abe.html

Advanced Manufacturing

AM-1. Simulation of Composite Manufacturing
Professor R. Byron Pipes, School of Materials Engineering, bpipes@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/MSE/people/ptProfile?id=1436,
https://engineering.purdue.edu/ChE/People/ptProfile?id=1436#research-interests-page
https://cdmhub.org/

This project will engage in the integration of a suite of simulation tools to develop a virtual process
environment to allow carbon fiber composites manufacturing processes such as prepreg stamping,
high pressure resin transfer molding of continuous fiber composites, injection over-molding of
thermoplastic composites and additive manufacturing. Experiments will be carried out in the Indiana
Manufacturing Institute to validate the simulation suite predictions.
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School of Materials Engineering Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 for Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores. Suggested New Format Averages: Verbal 154, Quantitative 164;
Analytical Writing 4.0
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Rosemary Son, son39@ecn.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mse.html

AM-2. Additive Composites Manufacturing
Professor R. Byron Pipes, School of Materials Engineering, bpipes@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/MSE/people/ptProfile?id=1436,
https://engineering.purdue.edu/ChE/People/ptProfile?id=1436#research-interests-page
https://cdmhub.org/

This project focuses on the development of Additive composites manufacturing as a vehicle to
accelerate the tool-less manufacturing concepts that will provide viable manufacturing processes for
personalized products across the aerospace, automotive, medical and leisure products industries.
Additive Composites Manufacturing is a process for making a three-dimensional object of virtually any
shape from a digital model by the melting and consolidation of comingled reinforcing and polymer
matrix fibers. By controlling the location of the melt and consolidation site, three-dimensional shapes
can be formed that possess the extraordinary properties of high performance polymer composites.
Further, the integration of embedded sensors in the structure during the process is both feasible and
viable. Here the addition of electrically conductive elements and MEMS devices within the fiber array
provides for placement in situ sensors with electrical continuity within the structure.
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School of Materials Engineering Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 for Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores. Suggested New Format Averages: Verbal 154, Quantitative 164;
Analytical Writing 4.0
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Rosemary Son, son39@ecn.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mse.html

AM-3. Assembly of Soft-Micromachines in Microfluidic Channels
Professor Carlos Martinez, School of Materials Engineering, cjmartinez@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/MSE/People/ptProfile?id=34724

The technological world is rapidly moving towards the fabrication of soft-micro/nano-machines
for applications in medicine, drug delivery, and environmental cleanup. The idea is simple, build
active machines that can do work at the nano and picoliter scales. A key challenge in this area is
how to integrate different functionalities into the micromachines by assembling active units that
can provide power, mechanical and chemical work as well as sensing capabilities. One potential
approach is through the fabrication of functional hydrogel microparticles with well-defined
shapes and dedicated functions that can self-assemble into versatile micromachines. In this
project we aim to develop the methodology, materials, and assembly approaches to fabricate
functional hydrogel-based microparticles and assemble them into soft-micromachines in
microfluidic channels. Prof. Martinez group has both the necessary equipment and expertise to
operate microfluidic devices and generate hydrogel particles. The first part of the project
involves building a bench-top soft lithography station to fabricate microfluidic devices and
functional hydrogel microparticles. The microparticles will range in size between 25 to 100 μm
and will be made in a variety of shapes according to the desired micromachine shape and
functionality. In the second part of the project, microfluidics devices will be fabricated with
microchannel arrangements that ease the sequential assembly of the microparticles into a
micromachine. The functionality of the micromachines will be tested against different external
triggers including chemical and temperature gradients, magnetic and electric fields, as well as
light sources. This work will serve as the foundation for the fabrication of highly advanced soft
micromachines.
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School of Materials Engineering Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 for Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores. Suggested New Format Averages: Verbal 154, Quantitative 164;
Analytical Writing 4.0
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Rosemary Son, son39@ecn.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mse.html

AM-4. Simulation of Granular Manufacturing Science
Professor R. Edwin Garcia, School of Materials Engineering, redwing@purdue.edu
Research website: http://www.redwingresearch.org/research/microstructure-evolution

At the core of manufacturing science is the development of improved processing operations that
result on better material properties, reliability, and performance. The focus of this research is on the
development of practical analytical and numerical descriptions that will allow to accelerate the
development of materials. Here, we are currently developing theories, advanced software and
visualization techniques that will accelerate such process and will make the analysis of a processing
operation an intuitive step on the development of new science and even intellectual property.
Simulation techniques such as kinetic Monte Carlo, phase field modeling, and level set methods are
adapted, generalized, and coupled with each other in an effort to have a realistic description of the
complexity associated to real processing operations. Granulation, Physical and Chemical Vapor
Deposition, Annealing and Sintering, and Electrodeposition are example applications of systems that
are being studied.
http://www.redwingresearch.org/research/microstructure-evolution

Simulation of sintering processing of polycrystalline YSZ. Left: colors indicate the different grains and phases, included the trapped porosity
(in black). Right: Predicted macroscopic ionic conductivity (lines) compared against experimental measurements (symbols). Here, the
understanding of how processing impacts the microstructure and then how the microstructure impacts properties are critical steps to
optimize SOFC properties.

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School of Materials Engineering Application Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 for Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores. Suggested New Format Averages: Verbal 154, Quantitative 164;
Analytical Writing 4.0
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Rosemary Son, son39@ecn.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mse.html

AM-5. Prefabricated Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms
Professors Rodolfo Pinal, Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, rpinal@purdue.edu; Josef Kokini,
Department of Food Sciences, jkokini@purdue.edu
Research website: http://www.ipph.purdue.edu/faculty/?uid=pinal

This will be a new paradigm for the manufacture of pharmaceutical dosage forms, based on the 3D
assembly of prefabricated working components according to an a priori design or blueprint. Inspired
on the approach for building 3D integrated circuits (3D IC), this new technology is termed 3D
Integrated Pharmaceuticals (3D IP). The basic working part of 3D IP products is a polymer film,
laminate or smart membrane, used to perform a specific predetermined pharmaceutical function.
Drug nanoparticles and proteins are stabilized into functional/smart films. Other desirable
pharmaceutical performance attributes of the dosage form (e.g., taste masking, solubilizing agent,
absorption enhancer, pH control, bioadhesive layer, ID/anticounterfeiting layer, etc.) are included by
integrating additional functional layers into the 3D stack design. The prefabricated 3D IP dosage forms
can be made to look and feel as traditional tablets or caplets, as small tablets (minitabs) for elderly
patients, or they can be shaped as taste masked sprinkles for children. The core concept of 3D stacking
of functional layers will be enhanced through the application of advanced manufacturing methods.
Nanolithography and advanced printing technologies will be implemented for engineering smart
responsive/triggered working components. Web based methods such as roll-to-roll printing will be
used as the basis for the production of highly effective, low cost pharmaceutical dosage forms. The
technology will open the creation of inventories of re-usable working parts to an industry where such
a concept is lacking: once a solubilizing or an absorption promoting laminate for example, is
developed, it will be possible to use it time and again as a working component for the design and
assembly of any new product that requires it. Dosage forms built from prefabricated functional parts
represent a paradigm shift on dosage form design and manufacture, enabling unprecedented levels of
control and flexibility for customizing end product performance of small molecules and
biopharmaceuticals.
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Industrial and Physical Pharmacy Application Submission Deadline: December 1 2016 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 2017 for
Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 580; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores set.
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Mary Ellen Hurt, mhurt@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/inpp.html
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Department of Food Science Application Submission Deadline: July 15 for Fall 2017; November 15 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): required, Verbal 146, Quantitative 144, Analytical 4.0
GPA mimimum: 3.0 for undergraduate
Contact information: gradadmissions@foodsci.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/ifsn.html

Bioengineering
BE-1. Role of Polyphenols in Understanding the Mechanisms of Protein Aggregation in Parkinson
Disease
Professor Lia Stanciu, School of Materials Engineering, lstanciu@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/MSE/People/ptProfile?id=11440

The mechanism of aggregation of the a-synuclein amyloid protein into fibrils goes through
intermediate molecular species that are pore-like and have been shown to be toxic to neurons,
leading to neuropathologies such as Parkinson’s disease. To date, it has been firmly established that
these intermediate stage pore-like species (termed “protofibrils”), rather than the mature fibrils, are
neurotoxic. Certain compounds, such as polyphenols (e.g. baicalein and epigallocatechin gallate
(EGCG)) were shown to suppress a-synuclein toxic aggregation. However, the exact mechanism of
polyphenol neuroprotection is still a mystery. In this project, we put forward the use of cryo-EM
visualization as being unique in its ability to illuminate the exact mechanisms of action of polyphenols
on the structure of toxic a-synuclein protofibrils appearing during the dynamic aggregation-
disaggregation pathway. The hypothesis that will be verified is that polyphenols may inhibit the
formation of neurotoxic a-synuclein protofibrils by interacting with the hydrophobic groups involved
in the intermediate stages of alpha-synuclein self-assembly into mature fibrils.
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School of Materials Engineering Admission Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 for Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores. Suggested New Format Averages: Verbal 154, Quantitative 164;
Analytical Writing 4.0
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Rosemary Son, son39@ecn.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mse.html

BE-2. Novel Mechanically Compatible Osteoinductive Scaffolds for Large Bone Defect Healing
Professor Meng Deng, School of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, deng65@purdue.edu
Research website: http://www.regenerativematter.com/index.html

Bone loss resulting from trauma, pathological degeneration, or congenital deformity poses a
significant health care challenge. In cases of fracture non-unions and large mass bone loss, surgical
intervention is often warranted. Transplantation of autografts (patients' own bone) is considered the
gold standard for the repair of bone defects. Upon implantation, the grafts support the recruitment
and differentiation of stem cells or osteoprogenitor cells into osteoblasts (osteoinductivity). However,
autografts are limited in availability and often are associated with donor-site morbidity. Material-
based bone graft substitutes such as calcium phosphates have been proposed as alternatives but
often fail due to mechanical mismatch between the grafts and surrounding bone. Thus, there is a
critical need to engineer mechanically compatible synthetic materials with osteoinductivity to
promote successful in situ bone regeneration. Bone is a natural composite comprising an organic
collagen phase and an inorganic phase of hydroxyapatite. For example, advances in polymer science
have allowed for the design of biodegradable biomaterials with an appropriate combination of
degradation profiles, and physico-chemical and mechanical properties. Furthermore, our recent work
has provided new insights into the role of liberated calcium and phosphate ions from calcium
phosphates on enhanced osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. The objective of this proposal is to
develop a novel biodegradable polymer/ceramic biomaterial system with suitable osteoinductivity and
mechanical properties towards accelerated healing of large segmental bone defects.
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School of Agriculture and Biological Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 1 2016 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for
Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): required, no minimum score set
GPA mimimum: 3.0 for undergraduate
Contact information: Gail G. Biberstine, abegrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/abe.html

BE-3. Biomechanics of Nerve Injury in Traumatic Blast Injury
Professor Riyi Shi, of Biomedical Engineering, riyi@purdue.edu
Research website: http://www.vet.purdue.edu/cpr/riyi/

By integrating biological, engineering, and computational methods we are interested in developing
biomechanical models of brain and spinal cord tissue to better understand the structural damage, and
more importantly, capable of predicting functional loss resulting from various trauma, such as
mechanical (compression, contusion) and blast injury. Mechanical or blast injuries to the brain and
spinal cord often results in tissue damage that lead to various functional loss. Effective prognosis and
treatment of these types of injury is virtually non-existent because of poor understanding of the
mechanisms of injury and the mechanical properties of the CNS tissues. Computational models are a
valuable tool that can predict the extent of structural damage to the spinal cord and the consequent
loss of nerve function. Development of an effective model requires a rigorous interdisciplinary effort
that takes into account the anatomical mechanisms of injury as well as the mechanical behavior of the
tissue. Engineers can characterize the tissue properties and biologists can monitor anatomical and
functional changes. These disciplines have been brought together to in our lab to build an effective
model. We have established an interdisciplinary research team working together to understand the
mechanisms of various traumatic injuries and establish models that can predict the severity of tissue
damage at given external load and also guild treatments.
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School of Biomedical Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 15 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): 156 Verbal, 159 quantitative for revised-GRE
GPA mimimum: 3.25/4.0 Undergraduate (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: Sandy May, WeldonBMEGrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/bmep.html

BE-4. Novel Adhesives and Scaffolds for Nerve Repair Generation
Professor Riyi Shi, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, riyi@purdue.edu
Research website: http://www.vet.purdue.edu/cpr/riyi/

We have been researching the use of biological and synthetic polymer adhesives for providing
mechanical strength to the recovering injured spinal cord, as well as peripheral nerves. An ideal
adhesive is expected to provide synergistic benefits along with Polyethylene Glycol, to the injured
spinal cord and peripheral nerves. It was found that a biological adhesive, mussel adhesive proteins
(MAP) and a Rapidly Photo-Cross-Linkable Chitosan Hydrogel, can provide strength that is compatible
to or better than, some known non-biological adhesives. On-going testing will combine the use of PEG,
nerve membrane fusion, and bioadhesives, connective tissue fusion, to achieve optimal results in CNS
and PNS nerve repair.
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School of Biomedical Engineering Application Submission Deadline: December 15 for Fall 2017; October 1 2017 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): 156 Verbal, 159 quantitative for revised-GRE
GPA mimimum: 3.25/4.0 Undergraduate (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: Sandy May, WeldonBMEGrad@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/bmep.html

BE-5. Materials at the Beach: Characterizing and Mimicking Shellfish Adhesives
Professor Jonathan Wilker, Department of Chemistry and School of Materials Engineering,
wilker@purdue.edu , Research website: https://www.chem.purdue.edu/wilker/

The oceans are home to a diverse collection of animals producing intriguing materials. Mussels,
barnacles, oysters, starfish, and kelp are examples of the organisms generating adhesive matrices for
affixing themselves to the sea floor. Our laboratory is characterizing these biological materials,
designing synthetic polymer mimics, and developing applications. Characterization efforts include
experiments with live animals, extracted proteins, and peptide models. Along the way we have
observed that shellfish make use of iron and oxygen chemistry to generate their glues. Synthetic
mimics of these bioadhesives begin with the chemistry learned from characterization studies and
incorporate the findings into bulk polymers. For example, we can mimic the cross-linking of DOPA-
containing adhesive proteins by placing monomers with pendant catechols into various polymer
backbones. Adhesion strengths of these new polymers can rival that of the cyanoacrylate “super
glues.” Underwater bonding is also appreciable. We are currently developing new biomimetic polymer
systems with a variety of mechanical properties ranging from flexibility to degradability and potential
use in biomedical contexts.

Figure. Material-producing organisms: Barnacles, starfish, limpets, and kelp.
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Department of Chemistry Application Submission Deadline: January 1 2017 for Fall 2017
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): not required
Contact information: Candice Kissinger, ckissing@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/chem.html

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School of Materials Engineering Submission Deadline: January 1 for Fall 2017 admission; September 15 for Spring 2018.
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 550; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Required, no minimum scores. Suggested New Format Averages: Verbal 154, Quantitative 164;
Analytical Writing 4.0
GPA minimum: Undergraduate 3.0
Contact information: Rosemary Son, son39@ecn.purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mse.html

Biotechnology Research

BR-1. Towards Cost Effective Techniques for Real-time Release Testing in Pharmaceuticals and
Nutraceuticals
Professor Marcial Gonzalez, School of Mechanical Engineering, marcial-gonzalez@purdue.edu
Research website: www.marcialgonzalez.net

After many decades of near-stagnation, pharmaceutical manufacturing is experiencing unprecedented
scientific and technological innovation. In the last few years, the pharmaceutical industry and its
technology suppliers have embraced a worldwide transformation from batch to continuous
manufacturing of API and solid dosage forms. Interest has already expanded from branded companies
to generic companies, and technology suppliers are actively developing a range of process analytical
technology (PAT) to enable continuous processing. It is expected that
within a few years this technology will also be adopted by the nutraceutical industry. With PAT,
production costs are reduced and quality is designed into the process, rather than verified afterwards.
In general, performance characterization of solid dosage forms cannot be evaluated on-line due to
long laboratory analysis time. PAT closes this information gap with in-process data and analysis tools
that improve process understanding and control.
Therefore, PAT tools give nutra- and pharmaceutical industries a basis for continuous quality
verification during continuous operation. However, this concept is not yet fully implemented in
practice, and thus real-time product release (RTR) not yet available. The PAT component of RTR
requires a valid combination of assessed material attributes and process controls. The set of direct
and/or indirect process analytical methods employed to assess material attributes must be not only
redundant and complementary to control risk, but it must also be cost effective.
Both aspects then result in an overall cost reduction of the manufacturing process. Currently, no
mechanical material attributes that affect tablet compaction are assessed during the process and their
impact on the final product quality is only indirectly assessed after the product is manufactured, e.g.,
by measuring hardness of the tablets. Nevertheless, a feedback control loop can be used to ensure
quality during continuous operation.
Here we propose a radically different approach. We will implement a forward control loop based on a
novel mechanical characterization methodology at the particle scale. This methodology can potentially
further reduce production costs by reducing the volume used for assessing material attributes (i.e., a
tablet versus a particle) and by decreasing the time-response of the systems to process disturbances.
The proposed Ph.D. study will specifically
consider the following research aims:
          - Aim 1 – Develop an experimental procedure and novel contact models for extracting elasto-
plastic and breakage properties of micro-size particles and granules under diametrical compression.
          - Aim 2 – Assess the viability of single particle measurements as a reliable and robust RTR
testing using the continuous direct compression line available at Purdue University (a one of a kind
facility currently funded by NSF, FDA and the pharmaceutical sector).
          - Aim 3 – Develop multi-physics mechanistic models to predict tablet performance (such as
tablet hardness, swelling and disintegration) from particle properties, and use these models to
enhance PAT tools.
          Partnerships with groups associated with I2T2, ITESM, UANL and UDEM whose expertise is
complementary to this study (such as the groundbreaking research on fabrication of probiotic powder
that contains Lactobacillus casei) are desirable and will solidify the global impact of the project, but
are not required.
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School of Mechanical Engineering Submission Deadline: December 15 2016 for Fall 2017; November 1 2017 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 575; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): no minimum required. For fellowship consideration; 162 Quantitative, 155 Verbal, 4.0 Analytical
Writing
GPA mimimum: 3.2 (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: megradapps@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mech.html

BR-2. Bacterial Surface Attachment
Professor Arezoo M. Ardekani, School of Mechanical Engineering, ardekani@purdue.edu
Research website: www.engineering.purdue.edu/ardekani

 Microbes can be found in both planktonic state (free swimming) or attached to surfaces and
interfaces that lead to biofilm formation. Microbial biofilms have been shown to play a key role in a
multitude of health-related issues, such as human and animal infections, deficiency of currently
available antibiotics, and contamination of medical implants. According to the immunology report
published by the National Institute of Health, more than 80% of the microbial infections in the human
body are induced by pathogenic biofilms, making them one of the leading causes of death in the US.
These infections are initiated by the attachment of bacteria to tissue surfaces or implanted devices,
creating anchored biomass via synthesizing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Aggregation of
bacteria in these close-knit communities leads to a 1000-fold increase in their tolerance to antibiotics,
thereby making the common pharmaceutical methods to sanitize prosthetic devices ineffective.
Decades of research on diverse bacterial species has shown that the interaction of cells with a surface
inhibits motility and stimulates the synthesis of adhesins, cell-surface components that
facilitate bacterial adhesion. Experimental results for multiple bacterial species show stimulation of
production of adhesive polysaccharide upon bacterial surface contact. However, results are mainly
obtained from population and lack the analysis of single cells. The mechanism of stimulation of
adhesin synthesis and transition from reversible to irreversible adhesion is still unknown.
Mathematical modeling approaches are not well established in this area, mainly due to the lack of the
experimental analysis of single cells and the direct microscopic observation of adhesin production at
high temporal resolution. This theory-experiment project focuses on the mechanisms leading to
transition from reversible to irreversible adhesion which is critical for stable surface attachment of
bacteria and subsequent biofilm formation
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School of Mechanical Engineering Submission Deadline: December 15 2016 for Fall 2017; November 1 2017 for Spring 2018
TOEFL Requirement: Minimum Paper-Based Test (PBT) = 575; Minimum Internet-Based (IBT) Overall score= 77. Minimum section
requirements: Reading 19, Listening 14, Speaking 18 and Writing 18.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): no minimum required. For fellowship consideration; 162 Quantitative, 155 Verbal, 4.0 Analytical
Writing
GPA mimimum: 3.2 (for TA/RA 3.7 or higher)
Contact information: megradapps@purdue.edu
http://www.purdue.edu/gradschool/prospective/gradrequirements/westlafayette/mech.html

BR-3. Nanomaterial-enabled Amperometric Biosensing
Professor Timothy Fisher, School of Mechanical Engineering, tsfisher@purdue.edu
Research website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/ME/People/ptProfile?id=28558

The field of biomedical sensing has undergone a rapid expansion over the past decade. Much like the
fields of microelectronics and telecommunications decades earlier, this growth has been characterized
by many scientific breakthroughs whose transition to broad applications has been hindered by
insufficient definitions of broad-based standards and implementation protocols. We believe that the
field of in vitro physiological sensing has developed to the point at which such standards will become
essential to maintain the rate of progress in the field. To this end, we propose to develop, define, and
refine common packaging and signal processing standards using sensing elements based on carbon
nanopetals developed in Fisher’s lab.
We seek to implement next-generation platforms for advanced-throughput, in vitro physiology. These
will be based on micro-electromechanical systems developed for biological applications (bioMEMS).
Using an existing and expanding set of techniques to measure physiologically relevant analytes we will
adapt scalable bioMEMS microfabrication techniques to create platforms for in vitro physiology that
utilize the nanopetal sensor as a basis. We will utilize existing protocols and also develop new
technologies for enzyme integration in bioMEMS devices. Our focus for biosensor development is
based on electroanalytically coupled oxidase enzyme approaches with sensitive and selective
amperometric responses. We will exploit bottom-up approaches to grow nanomaterials on roll-to-roll
substrates amenable to commercial manufacturing scales as platforms for highly controlled and
efficient biosensors when functionalized. Without scalability and data processing/acquisition systems,
a biosensor chip is an expensive but esoteric work of craftsmanship. In order to bridge the gap
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