Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD

 
Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
19 th International Conference on
Autism, Intellectual Disability &
  Developmental Disabilities

 Research Informed Practice

Council for Exceptional Children
     Division on Autism &
  Developmental Disabilities

       January 17 – 19, 2018
    Clearwater Beach, Florida
Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
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                            On behalf of the Council for Exceptional Children’s Division on Autism
                            and Developmental Disabilities (DADD), I would like to welcome you to
                            the 19th International Conference on Autism, Intellectual Disability, and
                            Developmental Disabilities.

                            This year’s conference is once again centered on research informed
                            practice, including strategies, innovations, and information related to
                            best practices for teaching students with autism, intellectual disability,
                            and other developmental disabilities. Planning for this conference
                            began in earnest over one year ago with the selection of the venue,
updates to the session proposal process, as well as selection of our keynote speakers. This past
summer over 60 of your fellow DADD members, including classroom teachers, professors,
consultants, administrators and everything in between, assisted in the anonymous proposal review
process. In late summer and early fall, sessions were selected and many, many other details were
finalized to ensure that 2018 is our best conference yet.

I, along with the conference coordinator, the conference committee, and the board of directors am
very proud to present this year’s annual division conference with both a continuation of our
tradition of excellence in content as well as ample opportunity for professional networking.
The program begins with two pre-conference training institutes on Wednesday. Institute I, led
by David Cihak, Ph.D., Don McMahon, Ph.D., Amanda McMahon, Doctoral Student, and Rachel
Wright, Ph.D., will focus on cutting edge technology for use in the classroom. Institute II contains a
two-part focus on ethics and collaboration for effective practice. Part one, led by Amanda
Boutot, Ph.D., BCBA-D. Sam DiGangi, Ph.D., BCBA-D, will describe best practices in consulting
and supervising in general education while part two, led by Peggy Schaefer-Whitby, Ph.D.,
BCBA-D, will focus on strategies and considerations for working with the IEP team. Our main
program kickoff will include a keynote presentation from former Florida State Senator, and
longtime advocate for individuals with developmental disabilities, Andy Gardiner. Senator
Gardiner will describe his work and success for individuals with disabilities in the state of Florida as
well as advocacy strategies for non-politicians wishing to have a meaningful impact on law
and policy. Immediately following will be the President’s welcome reception and the first of
three poster sessions. The following two days will include a full schedule of insightful lectures
and poster sessions, DADD informational sessions, committee meetings, and opportunities for
connections with colleagues. Our program will conclude on Friday afternoon with our second
keynote speaker, Robert Pio Hajjar, author and self-advocate. Robert will share his inspirational
message, I Can, YOU Can.

As a division, we are aware that you have many choices in your conference attendance.
We sincerely thank you for choosing the Division on Autism and Developmental Disabilities.
And, to the many presenters who make this conference one of the most timely and relevant in the
field, we say a heartfelt thank you. On behalf of the board of directors, we wish you a refreshing,
engaging, and enlightening week! I look forward to seeing you around.
Sincerely,

Jordan Shurr, Ph.D.
President
CEC-DADD
Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
The Conference Committee extends appreciation to
the following individuals for their work on the conference:

     Cindy Perras, M.Ed., Conference Co-ordinator & Past President
           Special Education Consultant, CLP Educational Consulting
                               Ontario, Canada

              Dr. Elizabeth West, Immediate Past President
               DADD Conference Committee Co-chair, 2016
            Special Education Director, Longview School District

                        Dr. Jordan Shurr, President
                DADD Conference Committee Co-chair, 2017
            Associate Professor, Counseling and Special Education
                         Central Michigan University

                Dr. Michael Wehmeyer, President Elect
                DADD Conference Committee Co-chair, 2018
    Ross and Marianna Beach Distinguished Professor of Special Education
          Director and Senior Scientist, Beach Center on Disability
     Co-Director, Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities

                  Dr. Ginevra Courtade, Vice President
                    DADD Conference Committee, 2018
        Associate Professor, Chair, Department of Special Education
                          University of Louisville

    Dr. Teresa Taber Doughty, Executive Director & Past President
                          Dean, College of Education
                       University of Texas at Arlington

                   Dr. Gardner Umbarger, Treasurer
   Special Education, Disability and Health Consultant, Blue Ridge Bioethics
                                Marion, Virginia

            Dr. Stanley H. Zucker, Editor & Past President
             Professor, Educational Leadership and Innovation
         Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University

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Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
Conference at a Glance
Tuesday, January 16, 2018
TIME                      LOCATION                     EVENT

4:00 – 7:00 p.m.          Sand Key Room                DADD Board of Directors’ Meeting

Wednesday, January 17, 2018
TIME                      LOCATION                     EVENT

7:30 – 8:30 a.m.          Gulf/Palm/Bay Foyer          Pre-Conference Training Institute Registration
                          Palm Room                    Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.     Gulf Room                    Pre-Conference Training Institute I:
                                                       Using Current and Emerging Technologies

8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.     Bay Room                     Pre-Conference Training Institute II:
                                                       Ethical and Supervising Considerations

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.   Poolside                     Lunch

4:30 – 6:00 p.m.          Gulf/Palm/Bay Ballroom       Opening General Session

4:30 – 8:00 p.m.          Lobby II                     Vendor/Exhibitor Display

6:00 – 7:30 p.m.          Poolside                     Poster Presentations & President’s Reception

7:30 – 10:00 p.m.         Mainstay Tavern              Student Social

Thursday, January 18, 2018
TIME                      LOCATION                     EVENT

7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.     Gulf/Palm/Bay Foyer          Conference Registration
                          Lobby II                     Vendor/Exhibitor Display

8:00 – 9:30 a.m.          Poolside                     Poster Presentations/Continental Breakfast

9:45 – 10:45 a.m.         Meeting Rooms *              Concurrent Breakout Sessions

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon   Meeting Rooms                Concurrent Sessions

11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.   Room 801                     Conference Committee Meeting

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.         Poolside                     Lunch & Networking
                                                       Early Career Lunch – Designated Tables
                                                   4
Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.               Meeting Rooms                  Concurrent Breakout Sessions

1:30 – 2:00 p.m.               Room 801                       Awards Committee Meeting

2:00 – 3:00 p.m.               Room 801                       Critical Issues Committee Meeting

2:15 – 3:15 p.m.               Meeting Rooms                  Concurrent Breakout Sessions

3:00 – 4:00 p.m.               Room 801                       Communications Committee Meeting

3:30 – 4:30 p.m.               Meeting Rooms                  Concurrent Breakout Sessions

4:00 – 5:00 p.m.               Room 801                       Finance Committee Meeting

5:00 – 6:00 p.m.               Sand Key Room                  DADD Annual General Business Meeting

Friday, January 19, 2018

TIME                           LOCATION                       EVENT

7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.          Gulf/Palm/Bay Foyer            Conference Registration
                               Lobby II                       Vendor/Exhibitor Display

8:00 – 9:30 a.m.               Poolside                       Poster Presentations/Continental Breakfast

9:00 – 10:00 a.m.              Room 801                       DADD Membership Committee Meeting

9:45 – 10:45 a.m.              Meeting Rooms                  Concurrent Breakout Sessions

11:00 – 12:00 noon             Meeting Rooms                  Concurrent Breakout Sessions
                               Room 801                       DADD Publication Committee Meeting

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.              Poolside                       Luncheon/Networking
                                                              Student Lunch – Designated Tables
                                                              DADD Diversity Committee Meeting

1:00 – 2:00 p.m.               Meeting Rooms                  Concurrent Breakout Sessions

1:30 – 2:30 p.m.               Room 801                       DADD Subdivision Presidents’ Meeting

2:15 – 3:15 p.m.               Gulf/Palm/Bay Ballroom         Closing General Session

4:00 – 6:30 p.m.               Sand Key Room                  DADD Board of Directors’ Meeting

*Please note: Meeting rooms include Beach, Gulf, Palm, Bay, Sand Key, Island I, and Island II, on the main lobby
level and conference rooms Coquina, Sundial, Cardita, Conch, Starfish and Sand Dollar, located on floors 3-8. Please
refer to resort map on the inside back cover.

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Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Pre-Conference Training Institutes
 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

 Gulf            Using Current and Emerging Technologies to Enhance Outcomes for Students
                 with ASD and/or Intellectual Disability: Practical Training for Educators
     Don McMahon, Ph.D., & Amanda McMahon, Doctoral Student, Washington State University, Rachel Wright,
     Ph.D., Common Threads Family Resource Center, Madison, WI, and David Cihak, Ph.D. University of
     Tennessee

     This full-day training session combines practical demonstrations for educators and families while providing
     updated research evidence supporting interventions for students with ASD and/or intellectual disability (ID).
     Immersive learning tools such as augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and wearable devices provide us
     with new resources to build a more inclusive future for everyone. This session will feature applications of these
     technologies for students with disabilities. In addition to the demonstrations, the audience will have
     opportunities to try different tools in stations with our experienced session leaders.

     Participants will be taught how to use classroom and community ready AR, VR, and wearable devices.
     Participants will also have hands on opportunities to use more advanced AR and VR tools such as smartglasses
     and VR headsets to explore new educational resources to support academic and functional needs. These
     immersive learning tools can be used to creatively meet the academic and functional needs of a wide range of
     diverse learners with ASD and/or ID. Enjoy hands on demonstrations of dozens of engaging new technologies
     that are easy to use. These demonstrations will be paired with the necessary research evidence to establish
     how AR, VR, and wearable devices can be used to help students with disabilities. This session will provide
     suggestions for future research and implementation of these technologies.

     Learner Outcomes:

     •   Participants will learn about the capabilities of augmented reality, virtual reality, and wearable devices to
         support individuals with ID and ASD in academic skills.
     •   Participants will be able to utilize augmented reality, virtual reality, and wearable devices to help support
         the functional needs of individuals with ID and ASD.
     •   Participants will walk away with resources to implement no cost/low cost augmented reality and virtual
         reality educational experiences that support student with ID and/or ASD.

 Bay             Ethical and Supervising Considerations When Working with School-based Teams
                 Note: 6 BCBA CEUs available for this institute (3 in supervision, 3 in ethics)

 ♦   Morning – Making Friends and Influencing Teachers: Supervising and Consulting in General
     Education Settings. Amanda Boutot, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Texas State University, Sam DiGangi, Ph.D., BCBA-D,
     Arizona State University

     This workshop is intended for specialists and BCBAs working at the district level or as outside consultants who
     work with students with disabilities and their teachers in general education settings. We will discuss issues
     related to: finding a common language; data collection; training and fidelity; feedback and effective
     communication; collaboration; and promoting FAPE. Participants will be encouraged to share successes and
     challenges in large and small group discussions. This workshop will utilize discussion, presentation, and role play.
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Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
Learner Outcomes – by the end of the workshop, participants will:

    •   Describe the role of the behavior/BCBA specialist/consultant in general education classrooms.
    •   Discuss potential challenges for behavior/BCBA specialist/consultants in general education classrooms and
        describe ways to diminish/prevent these.
    •   Describe effective collaboration.
    •   Analyze real life scenarios and discuss potential solutions to issues presented.
    •   Explain the use of the Inclusion Planning Matrix in promoting FAPE for students with disabilities in general
        education classrooms

!   Afternoon - Ethics and School Based Services: Working with the IEP Team Peggy Schaefer-Whitby,
    Ph.D., BCBA-D, University of Arkansas Fayetteville

    Many behavior analysts report concerns regarding ethical issues related to providing school based services in
    the public school setting. This maybe complicated by the differing governing bodies and ethical guidelines set
    forth by different professions. Schools follow guidelines for teaching and behavior support outline by the
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Special Education teachers follow ethical guidelines set forth by
    the Council for Exceptional Children. Behavior Analysts follow ethical guidelines set forth by the Behavior
    Analyst Certification Board. Many times the issues that behavior analysts face are related to supervision,
    implementation, and support plan development. This session will focus on ethical dilemmas faced by behavior
    analysts providing services in public school settings. By understanding the laws and ethical guidelines as they
    relate to each other, behavior analyst can work with IEP teams to improve services and resolve ethical
    dilemmas in the school setting. Case studies and problem solving strategies will be provided.

    Learner Outcomes – by the end of the workshop, participants will:
    • Understand the governing bodies that guide education and behavior services in the public school setting.
    • Develop problem-solving strategies to dissipate ethical dilemmas when providing services in the public
       school setting.
    • Evaluate situations so they better understand when to remove themselves from problematic situations that
       arise when providing services in the school based setting.
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4:30 – 6:00 p.m.

Gulf/Palm/Bay Ballroom

Opening Keynote Speaker

                                     Andy Gardiner, Senior Vice President of External Affairs and Community
                                     Relations, joined Orlando Health in June 2008. He oversees the strategy for
                                     corporate external affairs and is responsible for all community and business
                                     relations activities for the organization.

                                     Previously, Mr. Gardiner was the president of the Apopka Chamber of
                                     Commerce, a position he held for ten years. Mr. Gardiner is a former member
                                     of the Florida State Senate. He served as President of the Senate for 2015-
                                     2016. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Stetson University (1992).

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Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
Mr. Gardiner’s professional memberships include Florida Hospital Association Advocacy Committee; Florida Medical
Association Council on Legislation; Central Florida Commission on Homelessness Board of Directors; Orlando
Economic Partnership Executive Committee; LIFT Orlando Board of Directors; YMCA of Central Florida Board of
Directors; and Orlando Museum of Art Board of Trustees.

This opening keynote session will describe recent legislative advocacy on behalf of individuals with developmental
disabilities in the state of Florida. The inspiration and process as well as the noted success of these initiatives for
improving quality of life and increased opportunities for many will be shared. In addition, attendees will hear tips
for non-politicians to positively impact policy in their own communities and beyond. have a positive impact on policy.

Poster Presentations and President’s Reception
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Poolside
   1. Evaluating the Gap Between Research and Practice In Mathematics Instruction for Students with Autism
      and Intellectual Disability
      Dr. Jenny Root, BCBA, Florida State University
      High quality mathematics instruction for students with Autism (ASD) and Intellectual Disability (ID)
      enhances their quality of life by increasing skills needed for independence and employment. This session will
      present the current state of mathematics research based on a comprehensive literature review on
      mathematics instruction for students with ASD/ID and the current state of practice based on a nationwide
      survey of over 500 special education teachers of students with extensive support needs. Learner
      Outcomes:
      • Participants will describe the current state of research in teaching mathematics to students with
          ASD/ID.
      • Participants will identify areas of need in teacher preparation, planning, and instruction to increase the
          quality and quantity of mathematics instruction for students with ASD/ID.
      • Participants will analyze the discrepancy between research knowledge and current practices.

   2. Creating Independent Community Engagement Through Mobile Assistive Technology
      Dr. Kimberly Maich, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
      Twelve pilot project participants with ID used mobile devices, smartwatch technology, and individualized
      apps to support independence and community engagement. Participants reported decreased need for direct
      staff support and an increase in related interests, self-esteem, and self-confidence. Duration data
      suggested an overall change in the amount and quality of supports.. Learner Outcomes:
      • Participants will learn about a community-based pilot project for adults with ID.
      • Participants will discover how everyday mobile devices and assistive technology applications can work
          together for successful outcomes.
      • Participants will listen to feedback from project participants from multiple points of view, including the
          voices of the involved adults with ID.

   3. University-Based Peer Mentoring Between Students with Autism: A Case Study
      Dr. Debra Cote and Dr. Erica Howell, California State University at Fullerton
      This case study explored the role of a college student with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as a mentor to
      university peers with ASD. The examination will share how a student with ASD successfully advocated and
      equipped peers on a college campus through the Peer Assisted College Support Program (PACS). Learner
      Outcomes:
      • Participants will be presented with an overview of the PACS program.
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Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
•   Participants will understand what supports can be given to mentees.
   •   Participants will review data that suggests the benefits of PACS for mentees and mentors with ASD.

4. The Effects of Covert Audio Coaching on the Attending Behavior of Elementary Students with Autism
   Spectrum Disorder
   Dr. Kyle Bennett, Florida International University
   Using a multiple probe design, we examined the effects of covert audio coaching on attending behaviors of
   students with ASD. Covert audio coaching involves a practitioner providing feedback to students using an
   earbud speaker connected to a walkie-talkie. Results showed that participants' attending behavior
   increased as a result of the intervention. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will be able to describe covert audio coaching.
   • Participants will be able to describe the steps involved in covert audio coaching.
   • Participants will be able to note limitations of covert audio coach in regards to student, task, and
       setting variables.

5. The Effectiveness of Electronic Visual Schedules on Task Completion and Independent Transitioning of
   Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities
   Dr. Amy Accardo, Rowan University
   Students with ASD and developmental disabilities may benefit from visual supports to increase
   independence. The use of an electronic visual schedule application on iPods was found to be effective on the
   task completion and independent task transitioning of four adolescent students with developmental
   disabilities in a private high school setting. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will consider strategies for promoting independence of students with developmental
       disabilities through the use of electronic visual schedule applications.
   • Participants will increase knowledge of specific procedures for applying electronic visual schedules in
       both classroom and community settings.
   • Participants will discuss possible next steps in research and practice using assistive technology apps
       such as the First Then Visual Schedule High Definition iPad application.

6. Effects of Embedding Video-based Instruction in Visual Activity Schedules
   Dr. Amy Spriggs & Dr. Sally Shepley, University of Kentucky, and Dr. Emily Sartini, Western Illinois
   University
   This poster will provide evidence of visual activity schedules with embedded videos as a means of self-
   instruction to increase daily living, vocational, and academic skills for learners with intellectual disability
   and autism. Results from three studies will be provided; directions for future research will be discussed.
   Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will explore research related to video-based self instruction (i.e., visual schedules with
       embedded video models or prompts).
   • Participants will discuss trends, issues, and ideas for replications to further this line of research.
   • Participants will discuss implications for practice and directions for future research using visual
       schedules with embedded video models or prompts for self instruction..

7. The Effectiveness of a Visually-based Breathing app on the Reduction of Anxiety Among Individuals with
   ASD
   Dr. Toni Van Laarhoven, Dr. Jesse (Woody) Johnson, BCBA-D, Dr. Stephanie DeSpain, Northern Illinois
   University, and Elizabeth Monterosso, Jennifer McCormick, & Maggie Hoffman, Special Education
   Teachers and Students at Northern Illinois University
   The purpose of this research is to determine the effectiveness of wearable biosensor technology on
   measuring physiological processes associated with stress and anxiety among individuals with ASD/ID.

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Research Informed Practice - CEC DADD
Specifically, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a visually-based breathing app on
   reducing stress/anxiety during anxiety-provoking situations. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will be able to describe physiological markers related to anxiety and stress.
   • Participants will become familiar with various wearable devices that measure stress-related biomarkers.
   • Participants will become familiar with breathing apps that can assist learners with self-calming.

8. State of the Science: High-tech AAC as an EBP for Individuals with DD
   Dr. Ee Rea Hong, The University of Tsukuba, Japan
   The number of individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) supports has
   risen while the use of mobile technology has become ubiquitous. This poster will present the results of a
   review of the quality of the design and evidence for the use of AAC with individuals with IDD. Learner
   Outcomes:
   • Participants will be able to describe the quality of the single-case literature for high-tech AAC.
   • Participants will be able to describe the critical issues in improving the quality of single-case
       experimental research.
   • Participants will be able to describe the quality of the evidence of the use of high-tech AAC in
       comparison with low-tech AAC.

9. Enhancing Social Interactions through Play: A Teacher’s Guide
   Dr. Kate Zimmer, Kennesaw State University
   This presentation provides strategies that can easily be implemented by educators and caregivers to
   enhance social development opportunities for children with autism throughout the school day.           All
   strategies are evidenced-based and if put into practice could lay the groundwork for increase in joint
   attention as well as emergent literacy skills. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participant will be able highlight the importance of social interaction for children with autism.
   • Participant will be able to explain 7 effective research-based strategies that teachers and caregivers
       can use throughout the day to increase social opportunities for children with autism.
   • Participant will leave with a better understanding of how to effectively provide social interaction to
       ensure that children with autism students are exposed to language-learning, social opportunities that
       incorporate the child’s existing interests.

10. Building Leaders in the Disability Field through Inter-professional Training
    Dr. Cynthia Chambers, East Tennessee State University
    The Vanderbilt Consortium Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) program
    prepares graduate-level health professionals across 15 disciplines to assume leadership roles for serving
    children with neurodevelopmental and related disabilities (NDD). This presentation will describe the 300-
    hour program including the curriculum, projects/activities, and outcomes. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will identify key elements of the leadership and neurodevelopmental disabilities training.
    • Participants will recognize the importance of varied disciplines receiving training collectively.
    • Participants will consider ways to increase interdisciplinary opportunities at their universities.

11. Hanging Out’: Meeting IDEA’s Requirements for Recreation Planning
    Dr. Juliet Hart Barnett and Dr. Stanley Zucker, Arizona State University
    Participation in recreation offers social and therapeutic value for youth with autism spectrum disorders
    (ASD), including improved quality of life and social acceptance. Adolescents with ASD engage in limited
    recreation activities. We describe IDEA's requirements for recreation and present strategies to engage
    family, peers, and the community in promoting meaningful recreation for ASD students. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will develop an understanding of the importance of recreation and leisure to the
        socialization and quality of life of individuals with ASD.
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•   Participants will develop an understanding of IDEA's basic requirements for recreation/leisure as part
       of the IEP planning process.
   •   Participants will acquire evidence-based strategies to promote opportunities for meaningful
       recreation/leisure activities for their students with ASD.

12. Using Read-Alouds of Grade-Level Social Studies Text and Systematic Prompting to Promote
    Comprehension for Students with Severe Disabilities
    Dr. Ginevra Courtade, University of Louisville
    During this session, the presenter will describe the results of a study during which three students with
    severe disabilities were taught to answer comprehension questions during read-alouds of social studies text
    using a modified system of least prompts and a graphic organizer. Implications for practice and ideas for
    future research will be discussed. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will describe the research base for teaching social studies to students with severe
        disabilities.
    • Participants will identify strategies to teach social studies concepts during a read aloud.
    • Participants will identify implications for practice related to teaching academics to students with
        severe disabilities.

13. Difficult Conversations with College Students with Disabilities: Interior Preparation is Key
    Dr. Karen Myers & Dr. Mark Pousson, Saint Louis University
    Difficult conversations occur with students regardless of disability. This interactive presentation focuses
    on difficult conversation preparation as a developmental tool for faculty and student affairs professionals.
    Topics of discussion include the brain and perceived threat, the emotional triggering cycle, and strategies
    to mitigate the effects of the triggering cycle. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will understand the emotional triggering cycle.
    • Participants will identify cognitive and emotional strategies to help navigate the terrain of a difficult
        conversation.
    • Participants will identify methods for preparing for the topic of the difficult dialogue.

14. Postsecondary Education and Gender Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities
    Dr. Shannon Sparks, California State University, San Bernardino
    Transition planning is important for students with disabilities. The teacher’s role is to help individuals with
    disabilities understand the expectations of various jobs helping them set goals (Wehman, 2006).
    Unemployment rates are even higher for females (Lindsay, 2011). Gender is affecting employment in the
    workplace for individuals with disabilities. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will recognize the importance of implementing transition services for females with
        disabilities and how it has lasting effects on post school outcomes (i.e., autism, intellectual disability)
    • Participants will identify the importance of providing all individuals with disabilities (i.e., autism,
        intellectual disability) with job experience, vocational and occupational opportunities.
    • Participants will be able to describe and identify postsecondary options for individuals with disabilities.

15. Trends in Predictors and Prevalence of Developmental Disabilities and Autism: A Ten-year Study
    Dr. Robert Baer, Kent State University
    This session will provide the results of 10 years of tracking secondary transition outcomes of more than
    10,000 youth with disabilities in a Midwestern state. It will identify the course of study and service
    characteristics of successful transition plans and how educators can improve post school work and college
    outcomes by 30-60%. Learner Outcomes:

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•   Participants will identify successful transition plans and predictors for work, college, and overall
       engagement for students with DD.
   •   Participants will understand how disability type, gender, and ethnicity moderated these predictors.
   •   Participants will apply this knowledge in developing transition plans.

16. A Framework for Understanding the Role of Family Members in Adult Couples with an Intellectual
    Disability
    Rebecca Kammes, MA, Michigan State University
    This presentation will provide a theoretical framework for understanding adult couples in which one or both
    has an intellectual disability, created through literature reviews on romantic relationship and disability, and
    case study examples. Emphasis will be placed on further understanding the unique role family members have
    within these relationships. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will discover what high school teachers from a large urban school feel their role is in
        contributing to education and training in support of students' specific transition goals.
    • Participants will be able to discuss the different roles that family members play in these dynamics.
    • Participants will be able to summarize the dynamics that are most important for adult couples with an
        intellectual disability.

17. High School Teachers' Perceived Role in Education and Training in Support of Student Transition Goals
    Anne Mulligan, M.Ed., Dr. Peggy D’Antonio-Schleich & Dr. Rebecca Reimers, Phoenix Union High School
    District
    Twenty high school teachers share their perceived role in supporting students’ specific transition goals, list
    barriers to delivering instruction geared toward these goals, and offer strategies for structuring
    instruction in support of students’ specific transition goals. Information from this study can direct
    professional development efforts to improve student transition outcomes. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will understand the effective interventions designed to increase verbal mands for young
        children with autism.
    • Participants will learn what high school teachers in a large urban school perceive as barriers to
        delivering education and training geared toward specific student transition goals.
    • Participants will be given a list of strategies and tips used by practitioners that serve to connect
        education and training with specific student transition goals.

18. Social Instruction Strategies for Individuals with Autism from the Anime Community
    James Williams, University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center's Community of Practice on Autism
    Spectrum Disorders and Developmental Disabilities
    Many people with autism, and social skills deficits, enjoy anime. As a result, a series of teaching strategies,
    activities, and apps are utilized within the anime fan community to teach appropriate social skills among its
    members. This presentation will demonstrate how professionals can implement them during social skills
    instruction. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will describe teaching strategies, activities, games, and apps from the anime fan community
        that can be utilized during social skills instruction for individuals with autism.
    • Participants will analyze specific scenarios that commonly appear in Japanese anime films and shows
        that can be utilized during social skills instruction for individuals with autism.
    • Participants will summarize common social rules taught to individuals in the anime fan community, and
        how they relate to social rules commonly taught during social skills instruction for individuals with
        autism.

19. Perceived Barriers to Occupational Therapists Role in the Transition Planning Process
    Dr. Patrick Leytham, Touro University Nevada and Briel Paige, MA, BCBA, LBA, Center for Autism and
    Developmental Disabilities

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Interagency collaboration with related service personnel (i.e., occupational therapists) in the transition
   planning process is a critical step towards improving quality of life outcomes for adolescents with
   exceptionalities. This session will identify perceived barriers to collaboration in transition planning and
   report findings from a study conducted with occupational therapists. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will identify the perceived barriers to occupational therapy participation in the transition
       planning process for adolescents with exceptionalities.
   • Participants will identify the types of formal/informal assessments occupational therapists use in the
       transition planning process for adolescents with exceptionalities.
   • Participants will discuss the potential ways to collaborate more effectively and efficiently with other
       disciplines in the transition planning process.

20. The VRA Instructional Sequence for Supporting Students with MID and Other Disabilities
    Dr. Emily Bouck, Michigan State University, Dr. Jordan Shurr, Central Michigan University and Laura
    Bassette, Ball State University
    This session presents research regarding the effectiveness of virtual manipulatives and the Virtual-
    Representational-Abstract (VRA) instructional sequence for elementary and secondary students with
    disabilities - particularly students with mild intellectual disability and autism - on developmentally-
    appropriate academic mathematics. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will discuss the use of virtual manipulatives in comparison to concrete manipulatives as well
        as the use of virtual manipulatives within the instructional sequence of virtual-representational-
        abstract (VRA).
    • Participants will the research shared in this presentation to make data-based decision regarding
        mathematics manipulatives and instructional strategies for students with mild intellectual disability and
        autism.
    • Participants will gain an opportunity to explore the virtual manipulatives and instructional sequence
        (VRA) shared in the presentation.

21. Mediating effect of social problem-solving between stress and distress among mothers and fathers of
    children with an intellectual disability
    Dr. Lise Lachance, Université du Québec à Montréal and Dr. Louis Richer, Université du Québec à
    Chicoutimi
    Comparisons between mothers and fathers of children with an intellectual disability on parental stress,
    psychological health and problem-solving style revealed few significant differences. However, negative
    orientation towards problems seems an important dimension in parental coping stress. This should be
    considered in order to prevent parental distress. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will learn that when contextual factors are taken into account, very few differences
        between mothers and fathers of children with an intellectual disability are observed.
    • Participants will learn that fathers adopt a more avoiding problem-solving style than mothers. This
        could be an intervention target to prevent distress among them.
    • Participants will learn that the negative orientation towards problems seems an important dimension in
        the process of coping with stress contrarily to positive orientation and problem-solving style.

22. Parent and Teacher Perspectives on Social Communication Assessment for Children with Autism
    Spectrum Disorder
    Dr. Colleen Butcher, Medical University of South Carolina
    Social communication deficits are a core feature of Autism Spectrum Disorder, however there is limited
    research into how to most effectively assess social communication functioning. This qualitative research
    study sought to understand caregiver perspectives about relevant skills to measure and assessment
    methods that are most informative. Learner Outcomes:

                                                     13
•   Participants will learn behaviors that caregivers identify as being important in measuring social
       communication functioning.
   •   Participants will learn various assessment techniques that can be used to examiner social communication
       functioning.
   •   Participants will learn strategies to link social communication assessment measures to intervention
       goals.

23. Social Skill Interventions for Youth and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review
    Dr. Kelly Whalon & Joonmo Yun, Doctoral Candidate, Florida State University
    This poster session will report findings from a research synthesis investigating the effectiveness of
    interventions designed to enhance the social competence of youth and adults with ASD. Forty-two studies
    met the inclusion criteria and were coded descriptively and quantitatively (effect size estimates).
    Limitations and implications for instruction will be shared. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will identify effective social competence interventions for youth and adults with ASD.
    • Participants will learn the importance of teaching social competence skills to youth and adults with
        ASD.
    • Participants will discuss methods used to teach social skills in contexts serving youth and adults with
        ASD.

24. Peer-Assisted Learning Strategy Enhanced with Video Modeling to Address Literacy Challenges in a
    Second-grade Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Dr. Cean Colcord, Whittier College, Dr. Juliet Hart Barnett & Dr. Stanley Zucker, Arizona State University
    Students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience challenges in reading decoding, fluency, and
    comprehension. In this research, a combination of PALS instruction supplemented with video self-modeling
    delivered via an iPad was implemented to address student reading difficulty. Results of this multiple
    baseline study will be presented along with implications for teacher practice. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will learn about research on Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS) and Video
        Modeling/Video Self-Modeling (VM & VSM)) and their effectiveness for students with ASD.
    • Participants will learn how to incorporate evidence-based strategies, specifically PALS and VM/VSM, to
        improve reading skills of students with ASD
    • Participants will learn about implications for teacher education in ASD and literacy.

25. A Review of Toilet Training for Children with Developmental Delays Implemented in the School and Home
    Dr. Rachel Cagliani, BCBA and Dr. Kevin Ayres, BCBA-D, University of Georgia
    Toilet training is often a difficult skill for individuals with developmental disabilities to acquire. Toilet
    training commonly takes place in the school or home leaving educators and parents with the responsibility
    of developing and implementing multifaceted protocols. The review evaluated the implementation of toilet
    training in the classroom and home. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will gain knowledge of published treatment packages for implementing toilet training in the
        classroom and home setting.
    • Participants will be able to describe the procedures associated with various treatments including the
        results associated with the various components.
    • Participants will be able to describe recommendations for implementing research-based toilet training
        packages in the classroom and home.

26. The Role of Pronouns in Reading Comprehension of Chinese-American Children with ASD
    Dr. Shirley Charles, Saint Thomas Aquinas College
    This study investigates the role of pronouns in reading comprehension by determining whether correlations
    exist between measures of sight word vocabulary, the use of pronouns, pronoun reversals, and the reading
    comprehension of Chinese-American children with ASD. Significant relationship was found with reading
    comprehension for sight vocabulary and the pronoun variables. Learner Outcomes:
                                                     14
•   Participants will learn that there is a relationship between sight vocabulary and reading comprehension.
   •   Participants will learn that there is a relationship between the use of pronouns, pronoun reversals and
       reading comprehension.
   •   Participants will learn about the implications of the study and the needs for further research.

27. Early Numeracy Skill for Students with Severe Disabilities and Complex Communication Needs
    Dr. Victoria Knight & John Wright, Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University
    Students with complex communication needs exist in nearly every special education classroom. Research
    into mathematics interventions for these students is lacking. The purpose of the current study is to expand
    the research in early numerical fluency and mathematic skill acquisition to include students with severe
    disabilities who also have complex communication needs. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will learn about the efficacy of early numeracy interventions for students with severe
        disabilities and complex communication needs (CCN).
    • Participants will understand potential modifications to curriculum materials that lend support to
        students with CCN.
    • Participants will be able to apply strengths and weaknesses of commercially available curriculum to their
        classrooms or research sites.

28. Examination of Dialogic, Shared, and Digitally Enhanced Storybook Reading on Vocabulary Acquisition
    Dr. Kim Floyd & Dr. Colleen Wood-Fields, West Virginia University
    Vocabulary development is a critical component of a competent reader; therefore, it’s imperative to
    investigate multiple modalities/ intervention types to reach every learner. This work examines dialogic,
    shared, and digitally enhanced reading opportunities on the vocabulary, oral language, and engagement of
    preschool children with autism spectrum disorders and other disabilities. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will identify key features of dialogic reading.
    • Participants will be able to create interactive digital storybooks as well as squishy books.
    • Participants will be able to design effective instruction for multiple vocabulary enhanced learning
        environments.

29. Art as a Coping Skill for Adults with Elevated Anxiety and Autism Spectrum Disorders and/or
    Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities
    Jordan Hobbs, Student and Dr. Kelly Carrero, BCBA, Texas A&M University-Commerce
    Art therapy is an emerging approach for people with mental health concerns. This poster will present the
    results of a study examining methods for teaching adults with autism and/or intellectual/developmental
    disabilities how to identify when they are experiencing anxiety and the effectiveness of using art-based
    activities to decrease anxiety. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will be able to describe the approach to teaching adults with ASD and/or IDD how to
        identify when they are beginning to become anxious..
    • Participants will be able to list and describe the empirical support for using art-based therapy for
        people with elevated anxiety.
    • Participants will be able to describe the effectiveness of using art-based activities to decrease anxiety
        for adults with ASD or IDD and elevated anxiety.

30. Physical Activity Program for Elementary School Students with ASD: Pilot Study Results
    Dr. Christopher Denning, University of Massachusetts-Boston and Dr. Amy Moody, University of North
    Carolina-Wilmington
    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-informed
    and teacher-delivered physical activity intervention for elementary school students with autism spectrum
    disorder. The intervention protocol included three components: (a) 10-15 minutes of exercise, (b) 10
    minutes of motor development activities, and (c) a 5 minute focused cool down. Results and impacts on
    future research will be discussed. Learner Outcomes:

                                                    15
•    Participants will understand why increasing opportunities for physical activity and motor development is
           important for students with ASD.
      •    Participants will understand key components to include in a physical activity and motor development
           program for students with ASD.
      •    Participants will understand potential impacts and future directions for the intervention.

   31. The Congenital Zika Syndrome and What it Means for Teachers
       Dr. Nikki Murdick, Dr. Joy Voss & Dr. Jo Nell Wood, Saint Louis University
       If a pregnant woman contracts the Zika virus during the first trimester of her pregnancy, she has a high
       chance the baby may have severe, rare brain defects. For teachers, the question is how to address issues
       inherent in providing appropriate education for children with this severe systemic disorder. Learner
       Outcomes:
       • Participants will be able to discuss the pattern of conditions, called congenital Zika syndrome.
       • Participants will be able to identify methods for working with children with rare brain defects.
       • Participants will be able to explain the issues related to children with congenital Zika syndrome when
           they enter the school system.

   32. The Use of an iPad to Promote Early Numeracy Skills Through Virtual Manipulatives
       Dr. Bree Jimenez, University of Sydney & Mater Dei School, New South Wales, Australia
       The use of iPads to support learning for students with disability is on the rise. This single case research
       study focuses on the use of virtual manipulatives via iPad application to increase early numeracy skill
       acquisition through evidence based systematic prompting and feedback three elementary students with
       moderate intellectual disability, including autism. Learner Outcomes:
       • Participants will identify EBP to support math instruction.
       • Participants will investigate use of technology to support evidenced-based instructional practices.
       • Participants will analyze ways in which virtual manipulatives can be developed and used within their own
           classroom/research to promote general curriculum access.

Conference Sessions & Speakers
Thursday, January 18, 2018
8:00 – 9:30 a.m.

Poolside

Poster Presentations/Continental Breakfast
   1. The Effects of Least-to-Most Prompting and Mobile Technology on Teaching Grocery Shopping Skills to
      Students with Intellectual Disability
      Dr. Kyle Bennett, Florida International University
      We examined the effects of least-to-most prompting and mobile technology to teach grocery shopping
      skills to students with intellectual disability. Sessions were completed in the community twice a week. Each
      of the three students showed improvements in their shopping skills. These results and the implications for
      practitioners will be discussed. Learner Outcomes:
      • Participants will be able to describe the effects of least-to-most prompting combined with mobile
           technology use on the acquisition of grocery shopping skills.
      • Participants will be able to describe potential issues with teaching skills entirely in the community.

                                                       16
•   Participants will be able to discuss the need for teaching functional daily living skills to individuals with
       intellectual disability.

2. All Hands on Deck: Building University Program Competencies to Improve Statewide Practice for
   Students with Severe Disabilities and ASD
   Dr. Robert Pennington, BCBA-D & Dr. Ginevra Courtade, University of Louisville, and Dr. Melinda Ault,
   University of Kentucky
   In this session, the presenters will describe a process by which faculty from multiple universities within
   the same state collaborate to improve services for students with severe disabilities. The presenters will
   share several products including a set of program competencies for use by faculty and community
   stakeholders. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will describe issues related to building capacity for programs in rural settings.
   • Participants will identify key university program competencies for severe disability programs.
   • Participants will identify strategies for collaboration across universities.

3. Decreasing Shouting Out Behaviors of a Child with Autism in a General Education Setting using Social
   Stories
   Dr. Stanley Zucker & Dr. Sam DiGangi, BCBA-D, Arizona State University
   A Social Story™, addressing shouting out was used throughout the school day and then again after each
   incidence of shouting out as an intervention to decrease the problem behavior of shouting out. Implications
   for inclusion will be discussed. Learner Outcomes - Participants in this presentation will develop their
   knowledge base regarding strategies for successful inclusion of young learners with autism through:
   • Presentation of a practical intervention which diminishes teacher dependency and increases appropriate
       behavior.
   • Discussion of skill mastery in the targeted location of the general education setting.
   • Description of successful elimination of prompt dependence.

4. Promoting Mindfulness in Adolescents with an Intellectual Disability Through the Support of a Wearable
   Device
   Amanda McMahon, M.S., Doctoral Student, & Dr. Donald McMahon, Washington State University, and Dr.
   Rachel Wright, Common Threads School
   The practice of mindfulness has been shown to benefit psychological and physical health, however
   individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) are not always mindful. The MUSE, a wearable device, can
   promote mindfulness in individuals with an ID through guiding sounds and providing biofeedback in a
   mindfulness session. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will learn more about the practice of mindfulness.
   • Participants will learn how to promote the practice of mindfulness for individuals with an ID.
   • Participants will learn about the numerous benefits that can be experienced from practicing
       mindfulness.

5. Reading Interventions by Using iPad, Tablets or Handheld Devices in Pre-K to Grade 12
   Seyma Intepe, M.Ed. & Bonnie Henning, M.A., Florida State University
   This presentation will provide an overview of reading interventions that used iPads/tablets/handheld
   devices. Reading intervention studies were identified using a systematic literature review. Findings suggest
   that technology can be used to effectively support the reading skills of students with ASD. Implications
   will be discussed for practitioners. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will learn about available apps used to improve reading skills.
   • Participants will learn methods to incorporate technology to support literacy instruction.
   • Participants will learn about effectiveness of the available apps for reading components.

                                                      17
6. Practices Every Educator Should be Familiar With for Transition: Person-centered Planning, Summary of
   Performance and Guardianship
   Dr. Lynn Stansberry Brusnahan, University of St. Thomas, Dr. Debra Cote, California State University,
   Fullerton and Dr. Shannon Sparks, California State University, San Bernardino
   This session introduces person centered planning, the summary of performance, and guardianship as it
   relates to individuals with developmental disabilities including autism and intellectual disability.
   Participants will learn effective transition practices; discuss benefits and barriers to these practices; and
   leave with a variety of transition resources. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will learn effective person centered planning (PCP), summary of performance (SoP), and
       guardianship practices to meet the needs of individuals with developmental disabilities (DD) including
       autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID).
   • Participants will benefits and barriers to creating a PCP, SoP, and guardianship for individuals with DD
       including ASD and ID.
   • Participants will present a variety of resources for the PCP, SoP, and guardianship for individuals with
       DD including ASD and ID.

7. Measuring Communication and Engagement in Young Children Diagnosed with ASD: A Comparison of
   Electronic and Traditional Books
   Dr. Amelia Moody, University of North Carolina Wilmington and Dr. Christopher Denning, University of
   Massachusetts at Boston
   The purpose of this study was to examine the communication and engagement behaviors in children, ages 3 -
   6 years, diagnosed with ASD, and attending a low-income school. Children were read electronic books
   (eBooks) and traditional books, using an alternate treatment design. Results indicated that children had
   higher communication levels while reading the eBook, while engagement remained high for both conditions.
   Children showed definite preferences for the eBooks when offered a choice. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will understand the research on Ebook use with children at-risk and diagnosed with
       disabilities.
   • Participants will view videos and photographs of the intervention to better understand child behaviors.
   • Participants will understand study methods and results for the purposes of duplication of the research.

8. Partnerships with Purpose – How Service Learning Benefits Pre-service Teacher Preparation
   Christine Scholma, Trinity College, Palos Heights, IL
   Can you incorporate service learning to improve student growth and foster mutually beneficial
   collaborations at your school? This session shares the results of collaborative projects between pre-service
   teachers and both international and local special education programs. Participants will explore benefits of
   service learning with diverse populations in teacher education programs. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will identify the benefits of service learning in education.
   • Participants will increase multicultural awareness and competencies.
   • Participants will identify strategies for integrating service learning into classroom instruction.

9. A Decade of Undergraduate Student Research and Practicum Projects: Topic Overview and Application of
   Music Techniques to Individualized Practice
   Dr. Michele Gregoire, MT-BC, Flagler College
   The study describes trends over a decade of undergraduate projects with a focus on those using music
   with students in the practicum assignment during the capstone ESE course. Pre-service teachers illustrated
   their interest in music to facilitate positive change in ESE students through several projects that applied
   music to enhance learning/behavior. Learner Outcomes:
   • Participants will learn how special education teachers, through presentation of selected research, can
       use music to facilitate learning and behavior change in students with autism and/or intellectual
       disability.

                                                    18
•   Participants will be informed of basic techniques in the use of music that ESE teachers can successfully
       apply in their teaching through review of pre-service teacher projects.
   •   Participants will learn the scope of undergraduate research in one program preparing dual certified
       elementary and ESE teachers.

10. No Gravity in My Poetry: Poetry Workshop as Social-Emotional Literacy Learning
    Donald Welch, Creative Writing Teacher, Rebecca School, New York
    Poetry workshops are shared social spaces where students interact with both literature and each other.
    Drawing on theories and research connecting music therapy to social-emotional learning and applying them
    to literature, this session will show that students with Autism benefit as writers, communicators, and self-
    advocates when participating in poetry workshops. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will gain a fundamental knowledge of social-emotional learning and understand how it
         enhances reading and writing groups.
    • Participants will learn the benefits of and how to incorporate sensory activities and regulating
         movements into reading lessons.
    • Participants will understand how teaching elements of poetry, such as hyperboke, imagery and
         metaphor, help students who struggle with abstraction develop symbolic thinking and a more refined
         self-identity.

11. What We Know (and Don’t Know) About College Students with ASD
    Dr. Amy Accardo, Rowan University
    Young adults with autism spectrum disorder are participating in postsecondary education in increasing
    numbers, yet research on the factors that contribute to their success in higher education is limited. The
    purpose of this presentation is to review the existing research, report on current research, and propose
    future research directions. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will learn about past research on the experience of and supports for college students with
        ASD.
    • Participants will learn about current research on factors that are related to the success of college
        students with ASD.
    • Participants will earn about priorities for future research on college students with ASD.

12. Examining the Effects of Numbered Heads Together upon On-Task Behavior and Employability Skills
    content of Students Identified with Intellectual Disability in a Post-Secondary Education Program
    Adrain Christopher, M.A.T., Director of Instructional and Curriculum Unit, UMID TigerLIFE, Ed.D Student,
    University of Memphis
    There has been an emergence of post-secondary programs at the university level designed for students
    with ID, which provides opportunities to learn employment skills. This session will discuss post-secondary
    instruction and numbered heads together strategy to promote active student engagement and enhance
    interpersonal skills. Learner Outcomes:
    • Participants will recognize benefits of implementing numbered heads together strategy.
    • Participants will identify steps involved in implementing numbered heads together strategy.
    • Participants will identify methods used to address the learning deficits of students with intellectual
        disability.

13. Prioritizing Transition Competencies for Teachers of Transition-Aged Youth: Stakeholder's Perceptions
    Of Greatest Student Needs
    Dr. Sandra Miller, Grand Valley State University
    This study ranked transition components by greatest perceived need across three stakeholder groups.
    Findings revealed little agreement among results. Outcomes will be discussed in light of current
    educational shifts from functional to mainstreamed academics as well as research questioning secondary
    special educators’ ability to plan & deliver effective transition services. Learner Outcomes:
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