Secondary School plan 2020-2024 - Scholen op de kaart

 
Secondary School plan 2020-2024 - Scholen op de kaart
Secondary School plan 2020-2024

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Secondary School plan 2020-2024 - Scholen op de kaart
Table of Contents

1. Previous inspection report ............................................................................................................... 4

2. Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 5
    2.1 The International School of The Hague (ISH) ..................................................................................... 5
    2.2 Purpose and function of the school plan ............................................................................................ 5
    2.3 Realisation of school plan .................................................................................................................. 5
    2.4 Relationship with other documents ................................................................................................... 6
    2.5 Evaluation of the school plan ............................................................................................................. 6
    2.6 Development ...................................................................................................................................... 6

3. Executive board ............................................................................................................................... 7
    3.1 Governance structure of the Stichting ............................................................................................... 7
    3.2 Mission, vision and core values of the Stichting................................................................................. 7
    3.2.1 Mission ............................................................................................................................................ 7
    3.2.2 Vision .............................................................................................................................................. 8
    3.2.3 Core values of the Stichting............................................................................................................. 9
    3.3 Participation....................................................................................................................................... 9

4. Description of the school ............................................................................................................... 11
    4.1 Management of the school .............................................................................................................. 11
    4.2 School and class organisation .......................................................................................................... 11
    4.3 Student population .......................................................................................................................... 12
    4.4 Staff details ...................................................................................................................................... 12
    4.5 Location of the school ...................................................................................................................... 13
    4.6 Internal and external communication .............................................................................................. 13

5. Educational Policy .......................................................................................................................... 14
    5.1 Building blocks for the mission of the school ................................................................................... 14
    5.2 Objectives of the school ................................................................................................................... 15
    5.3 Educational principles at the school................................................................................................. 15
    5.4 Vision of ISH ..................................................................................................................................... 17
    5.5 Mission statement of ISH ................................................................................................................. 17
    5.5.1 International Mindedness/Intercultural understanding for Global Citizens ................................. 17
    5.5.2 Educational approach ................................................................................................................... 18
    5.5.3 Cooperation with parents ............................................................................................................. 19
    5.6 Subjects offered and allocated time................................................................................................. 20
    5.7 Educational climate and school climate ........................................................................................... 21
    5.8 Care and guidance, forms of support and support structure ........................................................... 21

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Secondary School plan 2020-2024 - Scholen op de kaart
5.9 External assistance and referral ....................................................................................................... 23
    5.10 Information and Communication Technology (ICT) ....................................................................... 23

6. Personnel Policy ............................................................................................................................. 24
    6.1 Goals and principles of the personnel policy .................................................................................... 24
    6.2 ‘Functiemix’ ...................................................................................................................................... 25
    6.2.1 Recruitment and selection ............................................................................................................ 26
    6.2.2 Staffing plan .................................................................................................................................. 26
    6.3 Policy concerning extra responsibilities ........................................................................................... 26
    6.4 Training and development ............................................................................................................... 26
    6.5 CPL and Appraisal ............................................................................................................................ 27
    6.6 Women in the school management ................................................................................................. 27

7. Quality Assurance Policy ................................................................................................................ 28
    7.1 Aim of the quality assurance policy ................................................................................................. 28
    7.2 Methods and tools ........................................................................................................................... 28
    7.3 Future developments ....................................................................................................................... 28

Development plan ............................................................................................................................. 29

Selected achievements of this previous school plan: .......................................................................... 30

Development Plan for 2020-2024 ....................................................................................................... 30

Associated Documents ....................................................................................................................... 31

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1. Previous inspection report

In November 2015 we have had our previous inspection. The focus of the inspection was as follows:

     •     They have analysed relevant documents from and about the school.
     •     School visits, during which they have observed educational practice in a number of classes.
     •     They held discussions with management, teachers, care coordinators, extracurricular activities
           coordinators, mentors and pupils. At the end of the school visit, the inspectorate discussed the
           findings of the study with the management and the board.

Conclusion of the inspection report
Our conclusion for the International School the Hague is as follows:
On the basis of the research, we attribute the basic arrangement to the International School the Hague,
because the quality of the educational process and the quality assurance in the components studied is of
a sufficient level.
We have not identified any shortcomings in compliance with the legal requirements. This means that we
currently have no reason to intensify supervision.

General feedback
   • We assess the quality of education at the International School the Hague (ISH) as sufficient to
       good.
   • ISH has a pleasant and safe school climate in which teachers and pupils from various countries
       with different cultural backgrounds treat each other respectfully both inside and outside the
       classroom. The school has a high success rate and good final exam results.
   • Remarkable is the use of iPads and laptops in the lessons to support and supplement the
       educational process.
   • There is a rich and varied range of extracurricular activities.
   • A strong point of ISH is that it knows and guides students with a specific support need.
   • We assess quality assurance as sufficient, although the school management could evaluate the
       data of the educational process more systematically.

Feedback about quality assurance
Quality assurance at ISH is sufficient, but one point for improvement is the systematic evaluation of the
educational process. A lot is happening in the field of quality assurance at ISH and in many areas, such as
the monitoring revenue, it is also planned and effectively set up according to the pdca cycle*.

However, the aspect of evaluation of the educational process is still at an early stage and has not yet
received sufficient attention. The school management does make informal class visits/lesson
observations but does not use an unambiguous form and standard for this. The school does not yet make
class visits/lesson observations in the context of personnel policy. We have therefore judged the
systematic evaluation of the educational process to be insufficient. At the foundation level, people talk
about what is a good idea. "Rijnlands Lesson" should be and at school level ISH has developed an
observation form. From January 2016, the school will start with an English-language management system
"Blue Sky" in which the safety of the formal class visits and performance interviews will be central.

*The PDCA / PDSA cycle is a continuous loop of planning, doing, checking (or studying), and acting. It provides a simple and effective approach
for solving problems and managing change, and it's useful for testing improvement measures on a small scale before updating procedures and
working methods.

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2. Introduction

2.1 The International School of The Hague (ISH)

The International School of The Hague located in Kijkduin opened the new building by Queen Beatrix in
2008. This year the new wing for the Primary school has been opened and Primary students have been
moved to this new building. The total student body is more that 640 students for Primary with close to
1400 students in Secondary. ISH Primary and Secondary are under one roof and the two schools have
always worked from a one-school concept. The ISH staff consists of skilled and motivated professionals
that come from a variety of international backgrounds.

ISH Secondary is an IB World School that delivers the MYP, DP and CP programmes. It is also accredited by
CIS. An 18 months self-study of school improvement has ensured that the school’s new guiding statement
are driving the strategic planning of the school.

There are currently 101 nationalities represented in the whole school. The school is proud of its
international mindedness. This principle is constantly reinforced, with the students being provided many
opportunities to develop a fascination for the culture, beliefs and habits of those around them and beyond.
Supporting international mindedness, our Mother-tongue programme is practically unique, with dedicated
curriculum time for children to gather in mother-tongue groups, learning together in one of 60 different
languages.

ISH is part of the Dutch regular state education system with a subsidy from the government and an equal
contribution from parents/companies. The state and the city of The Hague are responsible for buildings,
educational material and salaries and as a result of our double income we can compete with any private
international school.

In order to be able to start government funded international education, the school should be linked to a
Dutch school. The school is part of a larger education foundation, ‘Stichting Het Rijnlands Lyceum’. The
foundation is the umbrella organization for five secondary schools in The Hague and Leiden area, and three
primary schools. All of the foundation’s schools are separate entities with their own management, staff
and budgets. SRL stands for quality and has already been able to substantiate this for almost 80 years.

2.2 Purpose and function of the school plan

The purpose of the school plan for the ISH is a policy document for a period of four years; 2020-2024. In
the school plan the school describes the strategic vision and policy objectives for the educational policy,
the staff policy and policies with respect to the monitoring and improvement of the quality of education.

The school plan is primarily an internal quality instrument to assist the school with both the policy
objectives made and the further planning, implementation and evaluation of the policy. In the second
instance the school plan serves to offer accountability to its own competent authority, to the inspectorate
and to the parents.

2.3 Realisation of school plan

The previous school plan was developed through a joint effort of the leadership team and the majority of
the teaching staff. In 2018 all staff have been involved in the self-study for the CIS accreditation and the
information of the different domains form the basis of the current school plan 2020-2024.
An 18 months self-study of school improvement has ensured that the school’s new guiding statement are
driving the strategic planning of the school. A new mission, vision and value statements and strategic
objectives were introduced in August 2018 and further development of High-Quality Learning, the ISH
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Community Profile, as well as statements on Global Citizenship and Intercultural Learning were developed
with the whole school staff.
The “Stichting Het Rijnlands Lyceum” strategic plan is also under review at the present time and it is
expected that the new guiding statements from ISH will make a significant contribution to this process.

2.4 Relationship with other documents

Over the last few years the school embarked on various improvement plans, which are closely linked to
this school plan. The leadership team of ISH has developed a strategic plan on which this school plan is
based.

Each year the school guide is updated and passed on to parents. The school guide informs parents about
important aspects of education at the school as well as practical information for parents. The school’s
website provides parents with more detailed information in regard to these areas as well.

2.5 Evaluation of the school plan

The school plan will be evaluated on the basis of results of the examination by the Dutch Inspectorate of
Education. The school plan will be a dynamic plan in which the time frame may be adjusted according to
the progress made over the four years. Data collection of learning over the four years should drive any
changes that need to be made. Analysis of the curriculum should also be part of this evaluation. The impact
on learning should continue to be the main focus in all these discussions.

2.6 Development

The development of this plan should strengthen the school’s ability to provide quality education and drive
to be a learning-focused school. The development and data collection that is proposed should allow the
school to create a dynamic yet focused attention to educational good practice where boundaries are
pushed and critical reflections guide the principles of high-quality teaching and learning.

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3. Executive board

3.1 Governance structure of the Stichting

The International School of The Hague is part of a larger education foundation, ‘Stichting Het Rijnlands
Lyceum’. The foundation is the umbrella organization for five schools of secondary education in The Hague
and Leiden area, and three schools for primary education.

Executive Board
The principals of the primary and secondary schools are accountable to the Chair of the Executive Board,
Mr Arjan Kastelein MSc, MBA. The Chair of the Executive Board is the competent authority (bevoegd
gezag).

Supervisory Board
The Supervisory Board (Raad van Toezicht) appoints the Chair of the Executive Board (Bestuurder). They
have a supervisory role and approve the Budget, the Annual Accounts and the Stichting Strategy. One
member of the Supervisory Board has been nominated by the GMR Primary, one member by the GMR
Secondary. The Supervisory Board has six members.

All schools are separate entities with their own management, staff and budgets. ISH Primary and ISH
Secondary are under one roof and the two schools have always worked together in a one-school
concept.

3.2 Mission, vision and core values of the Stichting

The origins of ‘Het Rijnlands Lyceum’ are in Wassenaar. Professors from Leiden University, who were
dissatisfied with the quality of the teaching activities in the area, offered strong support. In 1936 a modern
school on a general basis was established. The initiative was successful; ‘Het Rijnlands Lyceum’ continued
to grow into a group of schools with schools in The Netherlands and was previously also affiliated with five
schools abroad. The ‘Rijnlands’ has become a brand name and together the schools offer Dutch, bilingual
(Dutch/English) and international education to approximately 6000 students. The Rijnlands Lyceum still
feels a bond with the tradition from which they originated. The main focus is on the quality of education:
the schools have the ambition to offer high-quality education and to stimulate students to develop to their
full potential.

3.2.1 Mission

From Strategy 2016-2020

Stichting Het Rijnlands Lyceum offers:
● in our education we aim “to go from good to great”;
● education that challenges students to attain their maximum level;
● an educational climate focused on a student’s development with extra learning support where needed;
● engaging education that challenges the students, evokes curiosity and encourages inquiry and
    research;
● education with an international orientation;
● an innovative and ambitious learning climate;
● education focused on the creative, cultural, civic and social/emotional development of the students;
● secondary education focused on the successful transfer from primary education and a strong focus on
    the transfer to vocational or higher education;
● primary education focused on the successful transfer to secondary education and achieving the
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maximum potential in the creative, motoric, cognitive and social-emotional field;
● a positive atmosphere with mutual respect between students, staff and parents;
● a school climate in which the students can develop in a safe learning environment;
● a school climate in which there are clear agreements, norms and values that are observed consistently.

3.2.2 Vision

The future of a student is partly determined by their education, both in secondary and primary education.
That entails great responsibility for the executive board, principals, directors and staff. Quality benefits
from constant improvement and innovation. SRL is a dynamic organisation that is firmly rooted in society
and is aware that an innovative and ambitious educational approach is essential in a changing world.

This is partly reflected in the international dimension of our education. For international students, SRL
offers international educational programmes at ISH, RLO, RLW and ESH. An innovative approach to
education is also shaped by means of an outcome-driven, needs-based approach and an activating
teaching strategy, which - supported by intensive use of ICT in the learning process - recognizes differences
between students.

Students from the schools of the Stichting are encouraged to attain the highest possible academic level.
We see that students thrive if they are challenged at their own level. We offer a broad education that
evokes curiosity and invites inquiry and research and a deepening of knowledge, in addition to the
development of creative and social skills. We consider it important for our schools, besides educating
students for a qualification, to also provide training for life (“Bildung”). We help our students with their
development towards adulthood and to bear social and civic responsibilities, also in the form of citizenship
education. Our starting point is a respectful relationship between students, staff and parents. Therefore,
clear agreements that are consistently adhered to apply within the schools. In addition, we encourage an
open attitude with respect to different ideologies, philosophies and cultures. We therefore believe that it
is important for students and staff to speak out and exchange thoughts with one another. This includes
reflective dialogue on ethical and global issues and critical engagement in the pursuit of mutual respect
and tolerance.

The foundation is committed to quality, both within education itself as well as in all support activities, such
as the use of ICT in education and in facilities, for example. The organisation’s staff, both teachers and
support staff, are a key factor in achieving quality.

In order to ensure quality across the board at our schools, use is made at each school of a quality assurance
system with result and quality indicators. This structured approach to quality assurance contributes to the
further development of the schools as professional organisations.

Goals for 2016-2020
Quality of education
- ‘From good to great’ is evidenced by accreditations or inspection judgements
- Results in primary and secondary education in line with the national average
   (or international benchmarks), or higher
- Our education is outcome-driven and in primary also needs-based (with assessment for
   learning)
- Schools have laid down a standard for ‘high-quality teaching and learning’ in the school plan and
   act
   accordingly
- Schools have laid down their quality assurance policy and HR policy in the School Plan
- Schools observe the appraisal cycle as agreed
- There is mutual learning and professional dialogue in the school and among our schools
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-   Systematic data analysis of study success in secondary, vocational and higher education,
    followed by action if necessary, to improve the transfer to the next level of education.

Goals for 2016-2020:
Educational vision and education offered
- We offer a broad education in an educational climate that pays attention to more than
   the core subjects
- We actively contribute to citizenship (European and global citizenship)
- The schools have an ambitious learning culture evidenced by their pedagogical
   approach and educational offering
- Activating learning is the dominant teaching strategy
- Teachers recognize differences between students, thereby paying attention to students who
   are able to do more and need a deepening of knowledge at each level
- Schools offer the learning support described in the school support profile
- Primary schools promote ‘enquiry-based learning’, ‘science and technology’ and ‘cultural
   education’
- Schools evaluate the policy concerning promotion and retention
- Schools continue to focus on internationalisation/international and European mindedness,
   among other things by increasing student exchanges and strengthening ties between our
   Dutch and international/European schools
- The three primary schools actively seek intercultural cooperation (in content)

3.2.3 Core values of the Stichting

Our shared core values follow from the above mission and vision:

Core values
● Openness, tolerance and mutual respect
● Intercultural awareness of different ideologies, philosophies and values
● Ambition
● Innovation, an entrepreneurial attitude and market orientation
● International mindedness focused on global/ European citizenship
● Professionalism
● A learning organisation
● Accountability at all levels
● Social involvement
● A genuine concern for others

3.3 Participation

For matters of mutual importance, there is a joint participation council (GMR), in which each participation
council (MR) of the Rijnlands Lyceum is represented. The GMR advises management with and without
being asked and takes a viewpoint with regard to decisions which management submits to the GMR for
approval in accordance with the WMO or CAO (collective employment agreement).

The International School of The Hague (ISH) Secondary School has a participation council (MR). In a school
environment, it is important that the various parties (students, staff and parents) are able to advise on, or

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have a say in certain matters. The participation of the schools has been set up in accordance with the
guidelines of the law on participation, Wet Medezeggenschap Onderwijs (WMO).

Secondary School MR Representatives are:

Staff                                      Parents
        Mr. J. Bayot                       Pending election
        Mr R. Boeyink                      Pending election
        Mr O. Quinton                      Pending election
        Ms. A. van Nieuwkoop-Read
        Mr. S. van der Niet
        Ms. A. Giese-Koch

GMR representative is Ms. S. van den Bosche

Parent Association (PA)
The PA is a committee made up of Secondary School parents. Its main duties are:
 ● representing the interests of parents
 ● organising and running social and charity events
 ● helping new families settle in The Hague

For some specific occasions in the year, the two groups (Primary PTA and Secondary PA) may work together
on joint projects. The date of every meeting is published on the school website. Members of the PA can
be contacted individually or via the office.

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4. Description of the school

4.1 Management of the school

The whole School Leadership Team (SLT) comprises the Primary Principal, Secondary Principal, Vice
Principals Primary and Secondary, as well as the Director of Operations

Richard Matthews (Principal Secondary School)
Juliette van Eerdewijk (Principal Primary School)
Erwin Mossel (Director of Operations)
Steve Middleton (Vice-Principal Academic Secondary School)
Kerry Gray (Vice-Principal Pastoral Secondary School)
Ben Le Heux (Vice-Principal Service and Experiential Learning Secondary School)
Michelle Lawrence (Vice-Principal Primary School)

This team meets once a week to discuss any strategic objectives.
The Principals also meet once a week with the Communications Manager, together with the Director of
Operations.

The Secondary School is led by a Principal who is supported by three Vice Principals and five Deputy Heads.
These leaders form the Secondary School Leadership Team (SecLT).

Richard Matthews      (Principal)
Steve Middleton       (Vice Principal Academic)
Kerry Gray            (Vice Principal Pastoral)
Ben Le Heux           (Vice Principal Service and Experiential Learning)
Brigit Nijsten        (Deputy Head - Student Guidance)
Simon Brooks          (Deputy Head Student - Data and Logistics)
Camelia Constantinescu (Deputy Head - IBDP Coordinator)
Alma Trumic           (Deputy Head - IBCP Coordinator)
Maria Lamminaho       (Deputy Head - IBMYP Coordinator)

The SecLT is responsible for the implementation of the school’s academic, pastoral and experiential
programmes, the implementation of policy and the further development of the school. The overlying
responsibility lies with the Principal. SecLT meets formally on a weekly basis to discuss school
developments.

4.2 School and class organisation

Secondary education at ISH is delivered in English. All students are placed in age appropriate mixed ability
mentor classes within their year group. Each year group has 8 mentor groups of approximately 25 students.
In the final two years extra groups are provided depending on the number of students admitted each year.

Classes are mostly taught in mixed-ability sets, though setting is used in some instances, for example, in
language acquisition.

Schedule

                        Year 7 - 13
Period 1                08:30-09:15

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Period 2                 09:15-10:00
Break 1                  10:00–10:20
Period 3                 10:20–11:05
Period 4                 11:05-11:50
Period 5 / Lunch 1       11:50-12:35
Period 6 / Lunch 2       12:35-13:20
Period 7                 13:20-14:05
Break 2                  14:05-14:20
Period 8                 14:20-15:05
Period 9                 15:05-15:50
Period 10                15:50-16:35

During breaks and lunch-times, students are supervised by staff. Clubs and activities may also be offered
at lunchtimes. Students may bring a packed lunch or purchase lunch in our canteen.

4.3 Student population

ISH provides education for children of parents who work in The Hague or its surroundings. Many of these
parents work for various international organisations, embassies and international companies that are
established in and around The Hague. The student body is made up of a range of nationalities, cultural
backgrounds and languages. A large number of children already have a bilingual or multilingual upbringing
at home.

Current Student Numbers, (as per 1st October 2019)

 Group                                    Total

 Year 7                  185                185

 Year 8
                         177                177

 Year 9                  181 + 9 (PF3)      190

 Year 10                 195 + 4 (PF4)      199

 Year 11                 187 + 3 (PF5)      190

 Year 12                 192 + 24 (CP1)     216

 Year 13                 198 + 20 (CP2)     218

 Overall Total           1375               1375

4.4 Staff details

Staff appointed to The International School of The Hague (ISH) are well qualified professionals committed
to international education. Teaching staff have sound academic qualifications in their areas of
expertise. Non-teaching staff possess similar attributes, experience and dedication.
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The ISH seeks to keep a balanced staff comprising both experienced and young teachers, with a range of
abilities and qualities. We aim for a diversity of nationalities in our staff team, where this is possible within
employment laws. We particularly seek staff willing to commit themselves to the development of the
school. All staff show a commitment to students’ learning.

Staff Nationalities

Staffing based (as per 1st October 2019)

Position                                                                     Total
Number of staff                                                              216,62 FTE
(including Teachers, TOAs, Management and Admin)                             261 employees
Number of Teachers                                                           162
Number of Management Staff (Principal + Adjunct)                             6
Total Number of Admin Staff                                                  66
(including concergies, facility and admin)

4.5 Location of the school

ISH primary and secondary schools are housed in the same building. The building consists of 3 stories with
sports fields, playgrounds and other outside areas. It is surrounded by woods, a lake and within walking
distance of the beach and dunes.

Visiting address:
The International School of The Hague
Wijndaelerweg 1
2554 BX Den Haag
The Netherlands

4.6 Internal and external communication

Telephone +31 (0)70 3281450
Email: ish.secondary@ishthehague.nl

Postal address:
The International School of The Hague
P. O. Box 52047
2505 CA The Hague
The Netherlands

Communication between staff internally consists of regular meetings to share school decisions, training
opportunities, have input into the running of the school and collaborative planning. A bi-weekly briefing
allows management and staff to communicate current news and concerns. In addition to the above, ISH
staff use g-mail and google docs to plan, share and discuss information.

Communication with parents takes various forms. Parents are invited into the school for ‘Parents Teacher
Student Conferences, workshops, information evenings, coffee mornings, Year Representatives meetings,

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plus individual meeting with teachers or members of the middle and senior leadership teams as and when
appropriate. Parents also receive emails from the school, alongside letters. A weekly whole-school
newsletter is published via the school website.

5. Educational Policy

5.1 Building blocks for the mission of the school

ISH still feels the bond with the tradition from which the school originated. The main focus is on the quality
of education: the schools have the ambition to offer high-quality education and to stimulate students to
develop to their full potential.

In 2018, the school community committed itself to reframing its purpose and direction. There is evidence
to suggest that the newly revised Guiding Statements are helping to inform decision making and strategic
planning. Mission driven improvement projects are now time-lined and leadership meetings are driven
by strategic objectives designed to implement the guiding statements. The consultative process used for
developing the Guiding Statements included the various constituent groups that make up the ISH
learning community, thus ensuring that they were both relevant and appropriate for students, parents
and staff. The key values centred on being curious, connected and compassionate have resonated well
with many people within the community. Our mission of Inspiring Personal Excellence is beginning to
take hold in the community, with wide acceptance of the holistic approach inherent in our aims.

The new purpose and direction have been well communicated and is increasingly visible throughout the
school. Annual review is scheduled to help ensure that the new Guiding Statements are widely
understood and that they become integral to the fabric of everyday life. The school will now look to
develop key performance indicators in order to effectively monitor and evaluate the implementation of
its Guiding Statements.

Guiding Statements - International School of The Hague

Mission
Curious, connected and compassionate: inspiring personal excellence in our strong and diverse
community

Vision
To shape a better future for all: inspiring students to become compassionate and proactive global
citizens

Value Statements:

Curious
    ● We are open-minded critical thinkers who learn through inquiry, reflection and engaging with
        different perspectives
    ● We learn about ourselves and improve the world around us through service and experiential
        learning
    ● We are independent and interdependent life-long learners with a thirst for knowledge

Connected
   ● We take pride in the strength of our community and its diversity
   ● We value our individual identities and celebrate cultural diversity
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●   We connect with local and global communities through our learning

Compassionate
   ● We develop self-respect and show compassion to others
   ● We take responsibility for our actions and strive to have a positive impact
   ● We show courage and act with integrity, fairness and respect

5.2 Objectives of the school
Strategic Objectives:
     A. To ensure that the ISH mission, vision and values are integral to our thinking, actions and
        decision-making across the whole school
     B. To promote high quality teaching and learning through evidence-based inquiry and the
        appropriate use of data
     C. To provide our students and our staff with a physically and psychologically safe learning
        environment that is conducive to learning and wellbeing

5.3 Educational principles at the school
A Philosophical Stance
Aligned with the ISH Guiding Statements, the International Baccalaureate and the International
Primary Curriculum
The International School of The Hague shares an understanding that at the centre of international
education are students who come to school with combinations of unique and shared patterns of values,
knowledge and experience of the world and their place within it. ISH encourages these students to
pursue personal excellence by being curious, connected and compassionate lifelong learners.
The International School of The Hague takes a holistic view of education, so that along with cognitive
development, the school programmes address social, emotional and physical well-being. ISH offers
opportunities for students to become active and caring members of local, national and global
communities and develop international mindedness and intercultural understanding through the
attributes of the ISH Community Profile.
Teachers at the school are committed to an inclusive learning environment and help empower and
inspire personal excellence in all students by encouraging them to take responsibility for their learning.
Teaching and learning grow from an understanding that people work together to construct meaning and
make sense of the world. ISH supports and challenges students to improve their learning by engaging
with a strong, diverse community and a coherent curriculum that is broad, balanced, challenging,
conceptual and connected.
High Quality Learning at ISH is supported by the ISH Guiding Statements and embedded in essential
practices and school programmes.
At ISH we inspire our students to be curious. To do this, we use student-led inquiry to solve challenging
problems that are set in authentic contexts wherever possible. Students learn to apply their knowledge
and skills to deepen conceptual, disciplinary and interdisciplinary understanding and make effective
connections. Our students learn how to collaborate, act with compassion and become responsible global
citizens. Our students, teachers and community model the attributes of the ISH Community Profile.

ISH Community Profile
The International School of The Hague Community Profile is used to promote intercultural learning and
develop global citizenship. It is based on the IB Learner Profile, the concept of international mindedness,
the IPC Personal Goals and the ISH Guiding Statements. Different departments in the school are
encouraged to develop subject-specific and/or age-appropriate adaptations for the attributes in the
profile.

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At ISH we are global citizens who strive to be:

                                          Curious, Connected and Compassionate

 Creative            We value creative processes and innovation even when the results are
                     unpredictable and surprising. We create ideas individually and in diverse groups
                     across the whole range of subjects and beyond. We respect and celebrate the
                     creativity arising from our different cultural backgrounds.

 Resilient           We persevere with a task, are capable of acknowledging disappointment and
                     adapting when we are not successful straight away. We strive to achieve the best
                     possible outcomes and support each other. We welcome the learning
                     opportunities provided by difficulties and challenges.

 Inquirers           We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how
                     to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our
                     love of learning throughout life.

 Knowledgeable       We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a
                     range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global
                     significance.

 Thinkers            We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action
                     on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

 Communicators       We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in
                     many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of
                     other individuals and groups.

 Principled          We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and
                     with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take
                     responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

 Open-minded         We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the
                     values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view,
                     and we are willing to grow from the experience.

 Caring              We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service,
                     and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world
                     around us.

 Risk-takers         We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work
                     independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies.
                     We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change.

 Balanced            We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives -
                     intellectual, physical, and emotional - to achieve well-being for ourselves and
                     others. We recognise our interdependence with other people and with the world
                     in which we live.

 Reflective          We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work
                     to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and
                     personal development.

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In the Dutch legal framework, the school may be characterized as (“algemeen bijzonder”) non-public and
non-denominational. This means that the City Council is not on the School Board and the schools are
maintained by a legal entity, the Rijnlands Lyceum foundation. The school is not a private school, however,
as it is predominantly government-funded.
Non-denominational in this context means that different ideologies are respected equally.

5.4 Vision of ISH

Vision
To shape a better future for all: inspiring students to become compassionate and proactive global
citizens

The International School of The Hague aims to provide top quality international education for children and
young people aged four to eighteen. The school offers internationally recognised curricula – the
International Primary Curriculum (IPC), the Middle Years Programme (MYP) and the Diploma Programme
(DP) as well as the Careers related Programme (CP) of the International Baccalaureate Organization. The
school encourages personal excellence and supports its students in all areas of their work and
development. The ISH is a caring and friendly environment in which young people can grow and develop
all their potential. The philosophy and aims of the ISH are contained in the school's Guiding Statements.
The ISH mission statement, along with the student charter, is displayed throughout the school.

5.5 Mission statement of ISH

Mission
Curious, connected and compassionate: inspiring personal excellence in our strong and diverse
community

5.5.1 International Mindedness/Intercultural understanding for Global Citizens
Intercultural Understanding for Global Citizens
Supported by the ISH Guiding Statements as well as embedded in essential practices and school
programmes
The International School of The Hague, with its strong diverse community within the International City of
Justice and Peace is well placed to provide a dynamic learning environment that is conducive to
intercultural learning and global citizenship.

 Intercultural Learning challenges students to learn from different cultures and to deepen their
 understanding, acceptance and respect for diverse groups of people. It allows students to develop
 their own cultural identity and to facilitate open-minded discussion. This enhanced level of
 communication helps engage students in tackling global issues.

 Global Citizenship is about understanding the ongoing and inevitable global opportunities and
 challenges we face. Global learners develop awareness and respect that motivates them to take
 action in relation to the complexities of the world.

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Mother Tongue

It is crucial for children to develop their own mother tongue. It is the language they use to communicate
with their family and friends, it facilitates a possible rehabilitation to their home country, national school
or university and it gives them access to their own culture and family background. Research shows that a
strong mother tongue helps in the development of additional languages.

Identity Language

We feel strongly that we should celebrate and nurture the languages our pupils speak, whether they are
developed at home or from spending an extended time in another language environment. For this reason
we are introducing the term ‘Identity Language’. This refers to the language or languages the child
identifies with which may, or may not, be the language spoken by the parents.

‘To reject a child’s language in the school is to reject the child’. (Prof. Jim Cummins, 2001)

5.5.2 Educational approach

In our new Guiding Statements we outline our education principles at the school.
High Quality Learning at ISH is supported by the ISH Guiding Statements and embedded in essential
practices and school programmes.
At ISH we inspire our students to be curious. To do this, we use student-led inquiry to solve challenging
problems that are set in authentic contexts wherever possible. Students learn to apply their knowledge
and skills to deepen conceptual, disciplinary and interdisciplinary understanding and make effective
connections. Our students learn how to collaborate, act with compassion and become responsible global
citizens. Our students, teachers and community model the attributes of the ISH Community Profile.

High Quality Learning at ISH is:
    ● An active process where students make connections between new ideas and prior
       understandings.
    ● Collaborative and supported by quality interactions with teachers and other students.
    ● Centred on students’ responsibility for their own learning; they are able to exercise choice,
       develop goals, plan their approach and work independently.
    ● Reflective, enabling students to monitor and review their learning with a clear sense of how to
       improve; students are supported to learn from their failures as much as their successes.
    ● A process of change and personal growth.

High Quality Learning at ISH occurs when students:
    ● Are curious, inspired and motivated to take ownership of their learning.
    ● Build on prior skills, knowledge and understanding.
    ● Remain resilient and engaged, especially when learning about complex or unfamiliar ideas.
    ● Feel safe and secure in their learning environment and at home.
    ● Have confidence in their teachers and trust their peers.
    ● Actively apply their knowledge and skills towards solving local and global issues.

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High Quality Learning at ISH occurs when teachers:
    ● Have high expectations, and encourage students to set high expectations for themselves, which
       inspire, motivate and challenge students.
    ● Maintain good relationships with students in order to involve and motivate them.
    ● Promote students’ love of learning and intellectual curiosity.
    ● Guide students to reflect on the progress they have made and their emerging needs.
    ● Are aware of students’ capabilities and their prior knowledge, and plan teaching to build on
       these.
    ● Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how students learn and encourage them to take a
       responsible and conscientious attitude to their own work and study.
    ● Demonstrate an awareness of the physical, social and intellectual development of students, and
       know how to adapt teaching to support students’ learning at different stages of development.
    ● Have a clear understanding of the needs of all students, including those with
       unique and individual challenges. Teachers are able to adopt and constantly review a variety of
       teaching approaches to engage and support all students.
    ● Develop effective professional relationships with colleagues leading to successful collaboration,
       knowing how and when to draw on advice and specialist support.
    ● Reflect systematically on the effectiveness of lessons and approaches to teaching and its impact
       on learning.
    ● Make productive use of formative and summative assessment to support students’ learning.
    ● Use digital tools to effectively support and enhance pedagogical approaches which are known to
       improve learning.

High Quality Learning at ISH occurs when parents
    ● Are well informed and curious about their own child’s learning.
    ● Connect and collaborate with others to further support their child’s learning and wellbeing.
    ● Provide a compassionate home environment which celebrates and promotes individuals’ culture
       and language.
    ●

5.5.3 Cooperation with parents

Parents play an important role in recognising the needs of their children and providing support and
guidance at home. They can approach teachers to express concerns about their child and the school may
initiate a process of assessment and evaluation. They can also contact staff for general advice related to
their child’s education.

Parents are informed and expected to cooperate with any special provisions or arrangements made for
their child. Teachers inform parents of student progress during formal parent-teacher-student
conferences. Parents should notify the school of any professional help the child has received in the past or
is still receiving. Accurate and timely information will enable the school to make the right decisions for the
child.

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5.6 Subjects offered and allocated time

A wide range of subjects is offered through the MYP, DP and CP programmes of the International
Baccalaureate. Time allocations are in line with the IB requirements and subject choices are made for the
start of Year 10 as well as Year 12.

MYP

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DP will follow.

5.7 Educational climate and school climate

The ISH is a school community comprising many different nationalities and cultures. Within this community
we celebrate and respect the race, culture, sexual orientation, religion and nationality of all members.
These expectations are reflected in the ISH Community Profile. Assemblies, mentor lessons and the
FlourISH programme specifically address these issues, but the expectation is that the ISH Community
Profile be used in all contexts throughout the school.

5.8 Care and guidance, forms of support and support structure

Care and guidance are given to students with regard to both their academic and wellbeing needs via a wide
range of services. This includes Learning Support Department (LS), Wellbeing Department, English as an
Additional Language Department (EAL) as well as a system of mentors and year leaders.

There may be many reasons why a child has special educational needs. International students benefit from
an enriched cultural background. They have been exposed to different languages, cultures, education

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systems and curriculums, which add to their differences in learning styles. Our school attempts to
accommodate all learning styles and differences in our pupils.

We have to make sure we can offer students the necessary support and resources to enable them to learn
and develop in all areas. Occasionally, it may be found that a child’s needs are best catered for in a national
system given the limitations attached to special educational services in our international setting. It may
also be that a special school is better tailored to the pupil’s needs. In these cases, our school will cooperate
closely with parents so that appropriate placement can be found for that particular student.

Student results are adequately analysed.
    · A combination of summative and formative assessments is undertaken during the year. We have
        recently added the GL assessments and will be introducing the International Schools’ Assessments
        which will help us get a different perspective to our students’ achievements. An assessment policy
        is in place and is reviewed annually.
    · Every teacher is expected to formatively assess their students’ progress and to differentiate
        their lesson as appropriate. In addition, all class teachers, have a pastoral care and safeguarding
        duty within their role.
    · Every child has a mentor, assistant year leader and year leader who monitor their attendance,
        attainment and general wellbeing. This team monitors the students through feedback from staff,
        twice weekly mentor sessions and via their reports to ensure that any student requiring
        additional support and/or a differentiated approach in lessons is identified and the necessary
        interventions put in place.

There are facilities to fit our students into the care system.
    · We have a commitment to provide affordable international education. We receive additional
        funding for basic additional support and extra support, which goes towards individuals with a
        higher level of need.
    · There is a limit to what can be provided in this regard due to physical constraints of the building
        we do not have the facilities for level of student need. Children with complex disabilities may
        need resources and related services by professionals that school cannot always guarantee to
        offer.

Information is transferred when a student switches class.
     · Hand-over between year leaders at end of year
     · EAL-department, LS Department and SW Department keep their own register and communicate
        with the new class teachers.

Teachers have the knowledge and skills to aid our students. The teachers have the right qualifications to
teach in international mainstream education and receive training to support children with English as an
Additional Language, Learning Support and Social Emotional needs. However, they are not trained in
special education as such. The departments that comprise the Student Support Team and outside
agencies provide occasional training and resources on particular areas to inform teachers, but this does
not qualify as formal training.

The school has a specific team of staff who take care of children’s social and emotional needs. The first
point of contact for the child is their class teacher or mentor. Teachers and mentors support the child in
developing personal goals and care through lessons and mentor time. Cases that cannot be dealt with by
the class teacher or if the class teacher deems it necessary to escalate procedures and get other
professionals involved, there are a number of options, depending on the situation.

In such cases, we use a Student Support Team (SST) Structure. The purpose is to provide a
multidisciplinary approach to student support to maximise the impact of the expertise that exists in
different departments across the school. It is responsible for reviewing the cases of students with
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additional needs to ensure that they and the staff working with them receive the necessary guidance and
support. This approach enables us to streamline so that comprehensive, well-targeted support is
implemented as quickly and effectively as possible.

The SST is led by the Vice Principal Pastoral and is part of the core team which is comprised of:
    ● Deputy Head Pastoral: Student Guidance
    ● Learning Support Department Coordinator - Leading team of LS Specialists
    ● School Psychologist(s)
    ● Student Wellbeing Department Coordinator (also Care Coordinator) - Leading a team of
        counsellors and psychologists

The extended team can also include:
    ● Year Leaders (YLs) - Leading team of mentors and Assistant Year Leader
    ● English as an Additional Language Coordinator - Leading team of EAL teachers
    ● Health Officers
    ● Anti-bullying Advisor
    ● School Social Worker
    ● Deputy Head Pastoral: Student Data and Logistics
    ● Academic leads

The extent of involvement of each extended team member will vary depending on the year group and
needs of the student. In addition, through the JES meeting structure we collaborate with the school social
worker, leerplicht officer, and CJG case worker.

If the issue is linked to an injury, we are also able to call upon our health team. We have two qualified
health officers and numerous other staff who have current, up-to-date first aid training. This team, in
consultation with a senior member of staff, will decide whether specialist medical services need to be
called. In all instances, parents will be informed.

The behaviour management policy is readily available and annually reviewed. The Vice Principal is the
Designated Safeguarding Lead responsible for the oversight of child protection cases in close collaboration
with the Student Wellbeing department.

5.9 External assistance and referral

The school makes full use of external services as and when appropriate. At times it is hard to find
appropriate help, particularly for students with limited knowledge of the Dutch language. Further details
of how the school deals with this can be found in the school ondersteuningsprofiel (SOP).

5.10 Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Teachers plan for the use of digital tools to enhance tried and trusted pedagogical approaches. They
understand how to use the best available digital tools to support learning. Through their planning, ISH
teachers ensure that technology helps students learn more effectively and more deeply. The application
of digital tools improves access to learning content, collaborative activities, and effective feedback.

Technology is used by teachers to support differentiation and to enable learners to demonstrate their
learning more creatively. For these reasons it is a requirement (as outlined in the STC document) for
students to have access to their own devices at school, either an iPad, in Y7-9, or a laptop computer, in
Y10-13.

A wide range of technology skills are taught through all subjects across the curriculum although the
Digital Design subject takes on a significant element of this area. This integrated approach allows for the

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