University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy

 
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
University of Canterbury
Wellbeing Strategy
Discussion Document
A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy

 University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document     1
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Contents
CONTENTS...................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

FOREWARD...................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................................................................. 4

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.................................................................................................................................................................... 5
     What is wellbeing?...................................................................................................................................................................... 5
     Wellbeing in a University setting................................................................................................................................................ 5
     Barriers to improving wellbeing.................................................................................................................................................. 6
     Current Services at the University of Canterbury........................................................................................................................ 6
     Student Services......................................................................................................................................................................... 7
     Staff Services............................................................................................................................................................................... 8
     Potential Improvements.............................................................................................................................................................. 9
     We want to know your views...................................................................................................................................................... 9

THE CONTEXT – ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES.......................................................................................................................... 10
     A Definition of Wellbeing?....................................................................................................................................................... 10
     International Wellbeing Frameworks:....................................................................................................................................... 11
     Barriers and Ways to Improve Wellbeing................................................................................................................................. 11
     Proposed Framework for UC.................................................................................................................................................... 12
     Summary of Aotearoa New Zealand’s Participation in Wellbeing Frameworks........................................................................ 12
     Aotearoa New Zealand Students in Universities....................................................................................................................... 13
     Students/Ākonga at the University of Canterbury.................................................................................................................... 13
     Staff at the University of Canterbury......................................................................................................................................... 14
     The University of Canterbury in Response to the 2010/11 Earthquakes and morerecently March 15th Attacks..................... 14

BICULTURAL FRAMEWORK........................................................................................................................................................... 15
     Bicultural models of wellbeing................................................................................................................................................. 15
     Proposed Bicultural Framework 2019: Te Pae Māhutonga....................................................................................................... 16

SUMMARY OF SERVICES & SPACES............................................................................................................................................. 18
     Types of Engagement and Communications............................................................................................................................ 18
     Cost of Access.......................................................................................................................................................................... 18
     Services for Students................................................................................................................................................................ 19
     Services for Staff....................................................................................................................................................................... 20
     Facilities and Spaces on Campus............................................................................................................................................. 21

APPENDIX ONE: Summary of Services.......................................................................................................................................... 22
     Services for Students................................................................................................................................................................ 22
     Services for Staff....................................................................................................................................................................... 28

REFERENCES................................................................................................................................................................................. 30

University Of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy Discussion Document – Student Feedback Form.................................................. 34

University Of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy Discussion Document – Staff Feedback Form....................................................... 35

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                                                                                 2
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Foreword
At University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha,           This information will support your knowledge around the
we aspire to be people prepared to make a difference –              current experience of wellbeing on campus and help you
Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora.                                            to answer either the online http://canterbury.qualtrics.com/
                                                                    jfe/form/SV_7QZPMORCEngdwTX or paper based survey.
The purpose of this document is to provide you, a member
of the UC community or a partner to the student/ākonga              We want to find out from you how you feel about your own
and staff/kaimahi groups on campus, a summary of the                wellbeing and how well you are supported, how we might
current operating context relating to Wellbeing.                    improve our communications around Wellbeing and where
                                                                    you think responsibility lies.
We have summarised key information pertaining to
wellbeing from a number of different sources, ranging from          The survey is designed to provide our team with information
international context through to a stocktake of the current         about our community’s experiences of wellbeing and this data
services available on campus to support wellbeing.                  will be analysed to support the development of the Wellbeing
                                                                    Strategy and Implementation Plan for 2020 and beyond.
The current Wellbeing Framework (2017) best describes
the vision for wellbeing at UC, that is UC “…envisions a            We need your feedback no later than 14 June 2019.
healthy environment to live and learn where each sphere
                                                                    Please go to this link here http://canterbury.qualtrics.com/
of influence primarily relates to particular dimensions and
                                                                    jfe/form/SV_7QZPMORCEngdwTX to fill out
elements of wellbeing…to embed wellbeing within both
                                                                    a short survey or email your comments to
the physical and social environments in a self-sustaining way
                                                                    wellbeingstrategy@canterbury.ac.nz.
to enable students and staff to be people prepared to make
a difference, Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora.”                             We look forward to receiving your feedback and
                                                                    incorporating that into a refreshed, wellbeing strategy for
How to use this document                                            the University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha

We have provided in the following pages an overview of              If you have any questions please contact
the issues and challenges facing students and staff in a            wellbeingstrategy@canterbury.ac.nz.
University context. We encourage you to read the three
sections: 1 Context – Issues and Opportunities and, 2 the
Bicultural Framework section and 3 the summary of services
and spaces section – our response to Wellbeing on campus.           Ngā mihi nui
However, if you only read the Executive Summary you will            Lynn McClelland
still get a sense of the challenges and opportunities and our       Executive Director Student Services and Communications
response to wellbeing at UC.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                  3
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Introduction
The University has adopted two key documents relating to wellbeing and wellness.

In 2017 the University adopted a Wellbeing Framework that amongst other things adopted an Aotearoa New Zealand
focused model of interpreting wellbeing at UC. It also brought together a Wellness Advisory Group which was charged with
overseeing the implementation of the framework and its implementation plan.

In 2018 the University also adopted the Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy: Te Rautaki Tākaro me te Hauora. This
strategy in particular has underpinned the development and business case of the new recreation facility to be located on the
wellness precinct. It also influenced the nature and direction of the UC RecCentre and UC Sport restructure.

A project commenced late 2018 in order to create a refreshed Wellbeing Strategy which would:

1.   take account of more information related to student and staff mental health;

2.   address some of the gaps in the framework and strategy;

3.   re-engage with the student and staff population of UC and connect with allied partners in the community associated with
     health, wellness and wellbeing.

The project is supported by a Joint Working Group (JWG), made up of the following:

•    Jack Whittam and Amelia Morgan; Ee-Li Hong (USCA Execs/Mgmt)

•    Megan Nelis (UC Student / EWAG member)

•    RĪpeka Tamanui-Hurunui (AVC Māori)

•    Dr. Anna Thorpe (Community & Public Health)

•    Thomas Koruth; Hannah Seeley; Riki Welsh; Timothy Rowe; Stacey Niao (SSAC)

•    Paul O’Flaherty; Steve Hunter (HR)

•    Dr Susannah Stevens (CoEHHD)

This group is also supported by the Wellness Advisory Group (WAG) as a larger and representative group of staff and
students connected with the previous Wellbeing Framework. The group is made up of a mix of general staff and academic
staff from each of the Colleges and Support Services. Thanks goes to:

•    Associate Professor Ekant Veer, Associate Professor Sanna Malinen (College of Business and Law)

•    Professor Philippa Martin, Julie Stafford (College of Engineering)

•    Nicole Coles, Associate Professor Ruth McManus (College of Arts)

•    Professor Katharina Naswall, Charmaine Atherford (College of Science)

•    Tracy Clelland, Dr Susannah Stevens (College of Education, Human Health & Development)

•    Riki Welsh (Pacific Development team)

•    RĪpeka Tamanui-Hurunui (AVC Māori)

•    Kat Henderson, Stacey Niao, Jeni Moir, Cameron Scott, Kirsten Carey, Craig Forman, Rose Reynolds, Leonie Partridge (SSAC)

•    Marj Blake, Steve Hunter, Tracey Hooper (HR)

•    Gabrielle Moore (TEU)

•    Spanky Moore (UC Chaplain)

•    Steve Gibling (Director Wellness Services, Chair)

Thanks to all of the staff and students mentioned above that have contributed to the development of this document, with
particular thanks going to Megan Nelis and Stacey Niao who have helped pull the literature and services stocktakes together.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                4
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Executive Summary
What is wellbeing?
Wellbeing is meaningful for people to live the best life that they are able to and are entitled to. Good living conditions, the
quality of their relationships with people and environments, their positive emotions and resilience, the realisation of their
potential, and their overall satisfaction with life are all key aspects.

Wellbeing though is subjective, and there is no one agreed definition of wellbeing. Despite this, there is a general consensus
that wellbeing can be thought of as ‘feeling good’ and ‘functioning well’. ‘Feeling good’ is the presence of contentment,
happiness and feeling able to engage with life. ‘Functioning well’ is feeling in control, maintaining positive relationships,
being satisfied and having a sense of purpose.

In Aotearoa New Zealand we have kaupapa Māori models for wellbeing including, Te Whare Tapa Whā and Te Pae
Māhutonga that inform our understanding. These indigenous perspectives are important as they are contextually relevant
and provide us with place based frameworks for understanding wellbeing and achieving holistic wellness outcomes.

There are many factors that influence our wellbeing and health is one of these. For health purposes, physical well-being (e.g.,
feeling healthy and full of energy) is viewed as critical to overall wellbeing but it is not the only determinant of health. Health,
in this sense, is more than the absence of disease. It is a resource that allows people to realize their aspirations, satisfy their
needs and to cope with the environment in order to live a long, productive, and fruitful life.

Environmental and social resources for health can include peace, economic security, a stable ecosystem, and safe housing.
Individual resources for health can include physical activity, healthy diet and food security, social networks, resiliency, and
autonomy. By acknowledging both sets of resources, we acknowledge that an individual is not isolated in their surroundings
when it comes to their health and wellbeing. This is called the socio-ecological perspective from the social determinants
of health, (Stevens, 2019).

Wellbeing in a university setting
The Kei Te Pai Report on Student Mental Health in Aotearoa produced a survey for tertiary students. It found that students
indicated they commonly experienced moderate levels of psychological distress with noticeable increased levels of distress
from younger respondents, gender diverse and sexual minority participants.

The most common reasons for high levels of psychological distress and the main cause of wanting to drop out included:

•    feeling overwhelmed

•    mental illness

•    fear of failure

•    students’ living situation and the people they live with

•    financial situations including having to work a high number of hours a week and being on student allowance.

The report also explained triggering factors for depression, stress and anxiety which include feelings of loneliness, eating
habits, adjusting and coping with university/student life, and academic anxiety. Additionally, more factors following those
main triggers include, family issues, friend/ social networks and finances. All of these factors appear in the international
research and publications that have been reviewed and noted in the main section of this document.

UC has not directly surveyed staff or used any other method of assessment or data collection to establish the overall state
of staff wellbeing. Nor has UC attempted to measure the effectiveness of any of the initiatives we have in place to support
staff wellbeing. However, the Human Resources team has a lot of data from the Organisational Culture surveys that have
been completed across the past five years. Part of that data is about the individual and group outcomes of the current
organisational culture. We have surveyed 1146 continuing staff and staff have told us that we have work to do in order to
create a constructive culture e.g. employee involvement, use of rewards, fairness of appraisals. This in turn translates into
some employee group and individual outcomes that can potentially impact on staff wellbeing e.g. role clarity, satisfaction,
motivation, organisational and departmental quality.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                 5
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Barriers to improving wellbeing
A summary of the international, national and research from UC suggests some common themes that have affected the
response to managing wellbeing:

•    lack of clear direction and communication

•    lack of knowledge about services available

•    a lack of rigorous evaluation of the services

•    a lack of communication between services to staff/kaimahi and students/ākonga about wellbeing and what we have to
     offer in terms of a whole system approach

•    the challenge of establishing clarity and consistency within and between services and colleges

•    poor documentation of the implementation process and understanding of how to implement the Health Promoting
     Universities framework in the curriculum and different cultural contexts

The University of Canterbury is no exception to the above. However, in stating this, there is clear feedback from the UC
community (staff and students), that as an institution it could be argued that we have come a long way in recent years with
one of the broadest and most comprehensive suite of services, activities, events and communications focused on wellbeing
(over 180 services and activities as evidenced in the current stocktake) in Aotearoa New Zealand. However, these are not
necessarily, aligned, joined up or communicated as effectively as they could be.

Current services at the University of Canterbury
There is a wide array of services and spaces offered on campus for students/ākonga and staff/kaimahi – over 180. These
services have, to varying degrees, a direct and indirect impact on an individual’s wellbeing in a wide range of ways, including
improving the knowledge, access and support to address:

a.   Health – mental, physical, emotional, spiritual, and sexual

b.   Social support

c.   Academic support

d. Cultural, diversity, & equity support

e.   Financial support

These are summarized in the graphs on pages 7 and 8 as well as in the Appendix (pages 22 and 28). You may find it easier to
view the graphs online. These can be found at http://canterbury.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_7QZPMORCEngdwTX.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                             6
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Student Services

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document   7
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Staff Services

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document   8
University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy - Discussion Document A refresh of the 2018 Wellness, Physical Activity and Sport Strategy
Potential improvements
A range of potential improvements to our service delivery have been identified:

1.   Clear and consistent messaging about wellbeing, supported and implemented from Senior Leaders, working groups,
     down through all colleges and services to staff and students

2.   Improve resourcing around health promotion function to ensure effective and efficient communication between all
     services/ staff and students about what is available

3.   Improve strategic partnerships between UC services and wider wellbeing and health community, accessing external
     skills by way of an advisory group, with potential for a collaborative Advisory Group of Students, Staff and Community
     representatives to monitor the implementation of this strategy

4.   Implement targeted initiatives focused on student to student wellbeing, and address / improve staff access and support
     related to wellbeing

5.   Implement an evaluation and documentation process for wellbeing services, levels of engagement and impact

6.   Ensure understanding of the bicultural framework for the wellbeing strategy and enhance the understanding of māori
     principles of wellbeing.

7.   Establish a clearer understanding of the partnership between students and staff

However, there are no doubt other improvements we could consider.

     We want to know your views
     Please go to this link here http://canterbury.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_7QZPMORCEngdwTX
     to fill out a short survey or email your comments to wellbeingstrategy@canterbury.ac.nz.

     Alternatively, use the feedback forms on the back page to write your feedback
     and drop in to either the UCSA, UC Health Centre or UC Rec Centre.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                             9
The Context – Issues and opportunities
A Definition of Wellbeing?
Wellbeing is meaningful for people to live the best life that they are able to and are entitled to. Good living conditions, the
quality of their relationships with people and environments, their positive emotions and resilience, the realisation of their
potential, and their overall satisfaction with life are all key aspects. Wellbeing is closely associated with physiological health,
and there are also links to sustained employment, positive social relationships and economic success, (Stevens, 2019).

For example, higher levels of wellbeing are associated with decreased risk of:

•    disease                                  • better immune functioning

•    illness                                  • speedier recovery

•    injury                                   • increased longevity

Individuals with high levels of wellbeing are more productive at work and study and are more likely to contribute to their
communities. Gathering information about wellbeing informs us if people perceive that their lives are going well or not. This
information can help to change policy and practice, provide more equitable outcomes, and support measures that improve
people’s overall wellbeing.

That said, wellbeing is also very subjective, and there is no agreed definition of wellbeing (Diener, Suh, Lucas, & Smith, 1999;
Diener and Seligman, 2004; Ryan & Deci, 2001). There are many models that help us to identify what wellbeing looks like,
but it is important to note that every human being needs different things to foster and nourish their wellbeing. Some of these
models are ego-centric and focus on the individual as the centre of their own wellbeing; whilst others consider wellbeing as a
seamless unit between individuals, family (whānau) and the physical world (Durie, 1985; Ministry of Health, 2019).

Despite this subjectivity, there is a general consensus in the literature that wellbeing can be thought of as ‘feeling good’
and ‘functioning well’. ‘Feeling good’ is the presence of contentment, happiness and feeling able to engage with life. It is
sometimes referred to as the hedonic approach to wellbeing. ‘Functioning well’ is feeling in control, maintaining positive
relationships, being satisfied and having a sense of purpose. It is sometimes referred to as the eudaimonic approach to
wellbeing. There is evidence to suggest that there is a positive correlation between the two, and both contribute towards
living a good life (Huppert, 2009; Huppert & So, 2013; Ryan & Deci, 2001).

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                  10
It is important to note that well-being is best thought of, not as an outcome or goal, rather as its name aptly suggests:
a state of being. There are many factors that influence our wellbeing and health is one of these. For health purposes,
physical wellbeing (e.g., feeling healthy and full of energy) is viewed as critical to overall wellbeing but it is not the only
determinant of health. Health, in this sense, is more than the absence of disease. It is a resource that allows people to realize
their aspirations, satisfy their needs and to cope with the environment in order to live a long, productive, and fruitful life.
Environmental and social resources for health can include peace, economic security, a stable ecosystem, and safe housing.
Individual resources for health can include physical activity, healthful diet and food security, social networks, resiliency, and
autonomy. By acknowledging both sets of resources, we acknowledge that an individual is not isolated in their surroundings
when it comes to their health and well-being. This is called the socio-ecological perspective, or social determinants of health.

International Wellbeing Frameworks:
The World Health Organisation (WHO) established the Ottawa Charter (Green, 2002; Kickbush, 2003; Mittelmark et al.,
2016) to encourage a vision of health and well-being that emphasizes health in the setting of everyday life, where people
work, learn, play and love. This whole of system approach had already been successfully implemented and utilised by
Healthy Cities (Flynn, 2002), Health-Promoting Hospitals (Pelikan, Krajic, & Dietscher, 2001) and Health Promoting Schools
(Murphy et al., 2014).

Through the development of the Ottawa Charter, the WHO published Health Promoting Universities (HPU) (Rocha, 2008)
which was established to specifically target Higher Education Institutions (HEI) embodying a settings based health and
wellbeing approach. The HPU approach explains protecting the health and promoting the wellbeing of students, staff and
the wider community through policies and practices, by increasingly relating health promotion to teaching and research and
by developing health promotion alliances and outreach into the community.

This approach would then enable enhanced staff performance, student achievement and overall organisational productivity;
helping to create a society characterized by social justice and individual and corporate citizenship (Cawood, Dooris, &
Powell, 2010). This was adopted, reviewed and critiqued in different cultural contexts and for varying HEIs (Came & Tudor,
2018; Cawood et al., 2010; Doherty, Cawood, & Dooris, 2011; Dooris & Doherty, 2010; Dooris et al., 2018; Dooris, Wills, &
Newton, 2014; Maxine Holt & Powell, 2016; Orme & Dooris, 2010; Reis, Ramiro, Gomez-baya, & Matos, 2018; Rocha, 2008;
Suárez-Reyes & Van den Broucke, 2016).

Barriers and Ways to Improve Wellbeing
However, research conducted on HPUs has recognised a number of common barriers to success, including;

•    a lack of rigorous evaluation (Dooris & Doherty, 2010),

•    difficulty of integrating health into a ‘non-health’ sector (Dooris & Doherty, 2010),

•    the complexity of securing sustainable change (Dooris & Doherty, 2010),

•    the challenge of establishing clarity and consistency (Dooris, 2001),

•    adequate resourcing and strategic direction (Cawood et al., 2010),

•    poor documentation of the implementation process and understanding how to implement the HPU framework in the
     curriculum and different cultural contexts (Suárez-Reyes & Van den Broucke, 2016).

Consequently, suggestions for improving such barriers included ensuring individual and community action is underpinned
and supported by organisational development and change. This consists of having effective management style and culture,
communication systems, decision-making procedures, manageable and safe workloads (Dooris, 2001; M. Holt, Monk, Powell,
& Dooris, 2015).

These barriers and solutions also resonated with Australia and New Zealand’s Student Services Association Survey on health
promotion, finding similarities in both barriers and solutions (Daly, 2019) emphasizing furthermore the direction of Health
Promotion in HEI.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                             11
Proposed Framework for UC
Understanding that health promotion is forever changing and with the evolution of HPUs, the Edmonton Charter (WHO,
2006) was developed creating a foundation for the Okanagan Charter. The Okanagan Charter provides a framework that
reflects the latest concepts, processes and principals relevant to the Health Promoting Universities and Colleges movement
(“Okanagan Charter: An International Charter for Health Promoting Universities & Colleges,” 2015).

The Okanagan Charter offers two call to action statements which are: (1) embed health into all aspects of campus culture,
across the administration, operations and academic mandates, and (2) lead health promotion action and collaboration locally
and globally which is followed by eight key principals for action.

The WHO and the Okanagan Charter explain utilising this model would mean UC as a HEI aspires to “infuse health into
everyday operations, business practices and academic mandates. By doing so it will aspire to enhance the success of our
institution, creating a campus culture of compassion, well-being, equity and social justice. Improve the health of the people
who live, learn, work, play and love our campus. Finally, it will strengthen the ecological, social and economic sustainability
of our communities and wider society” (“Okanagan Charter: An International Charter for Health Promoting Universities &
Colleges,” 2015).

Summary of Aotearoa New Zealand’s Participation in Wellbeing Frameworks
The tertiary sector in Aotearoa New Zealand includes eight universities (New Zealand Universities, 2016), 16 Institutes of
Technology and three Whare Wānanga.

In 2014 a review of all NZ university and Wānanga websites found no evidence that any of these institutions formally
engaged with the WHO’s HPU’s programme (Came & Tudor, 2018). The Okanagan Charter in 2015 was created to effectively
respond to the evolving health challenges in HEI for the 21st Century (Waterworth & Thorpe, 2017). Tertiary Wellbeing
Aotearoa New Zealand (TWANZ) was created in 2016 applying the framework depicted from the Okanagan Charter.

Following the launch of TWANZ the association produced ‘Applying the Okanagan Charter for health promoting campuses
in Aotearoa New Zealand 2018’ guide which is the current document for supporting health promotion to increase the health
and wellbeing of tertiary students and staff in Aotearoa, NZ (Waterworth & Thorpe, 2017).

The UC Strategy for Wellbeing, Sport and Physical Activity 2018 is currently aligned with the TWANZ guide, with the goal of
implementing a strategy that creates a sense of belonging and connection as a valued member of the UC community. The
Strategy emphasises its commitment to enhancing student and staff wellbeing and participation in physical activity for life,
it recognises the positive effects on wellbeing from participating in physical activity and sport. However, the strategy also
recognises the lack of communication between departments to achieve campus wide health, physical activity and wellbeing.
It would be most appropriate to utilise the great work put into the 2018 Wellbeing, Sport and Physical Activity 2018 strategy
as well as recognising the current and evolving needs of UC, the current health and safety policy which states:

    “Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (HSWA), Persons Conducting a Business or
    Undertaking (PCBUs) have a primary duty of care to provide a work environment that is without
    risk to health and safety, so far as is reasonably practicable. Whilst focus is typically given to reducing
    the risk of physical harm, HSWA importantly defines health as being both physical and mental.
    We (UC) have a duty of care to manage psychosocial risks in the same way we manage biological,
    chemical or physical risks.”

In finalising our 2019 Wellbeing Straegy, it will also be important to take into consideration the international, national and
university research as well as the implementation strategies to improve health and wellbeing.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                12
Aotearoa New Zealand Students in Universities
The tertiary sector in Aotearoa has provided a setting for learning, developing, knowledge exchange, centres of research
and life transitions (Cawood et al., 2010). However, the tertiary setting has also been associated with an environment that,
unintentionally for some, may increase the risk of mental health disorders, poor levels of mental fitness, and threatening
our levels of life satisfaction due to juggling study, exams and the stressors of University life with work commitments, family
commitments, financial security as well as maintaining their fitness, social networks and mental wellbeing (Came & Tudor,
2018; Gharibi, 2018; R.P. et al., 2018).

The Kei Te Pai Report on Student Mental Health in Aotearoa produced a survey for tertiary students to partake in. Using the
Kessler Scale they found students indicated that they commonly experienced moderate levels of psychological distress and
also demonstrated gender and sexual minority participants are more psychologically distressed then students who do not
identify with these particular groups (Gharibi, 2018).

The most common reasons for high levels of psychological distress and the main cause of wanting to drop out included
feeling overwhelmed, mental illness and fear of failure. Additionally, students’ living situation and the people they lived with
had significant impacts of psychological distress and levels of depression, stress and anxiety. Financial situations including
having to work a high number of hours a week, being on student allowance, or withdrawing from the student loan scheme
were also leaving students more distressed. The report also explained triggering factors for depression, stress and anxiety
including feelings of loneliness, eating habits adjusting and coping with university/student life and academic anxiety.
Additionally, more factors following those main triggers include, family issues, friend/ social networks and finances. Newstalk
ZB, Salient (Victoria University student magazine), NZ Herald and Stuff NZ have also referenced the Kei Te Pai Survey as well
as the NZUSA (New Zealand Union of Students’ Association and Universities New Zealand (UNZ) explaining the research
provides information about the increasing number of students needing mental health support due to factors represented in
the Kei Te Pai survey.

UNZ’s submission into the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction 2018 also identified a number of current
issues trends that are currently not working well. These include a lack of clear understanding of the roles, responsibilities and
provision of services from the university for staff and students. The recognition of under resourced specialist areas causing
levels of psychological stress for students, long waiting times for services and the capacity within those facilities. Additionally,
practical issues related to poverty, drug use, alcohol misuse, sexual assault and the negative effects of technology (lack of
sleep, connectedness, less down time) as well as deliberate self-harm (Barnardos, 2018).

A critical review of health promoting universities from Aotearoa New Zealand also reiterated factors that increase
psychological distress and brought to light the lack of alignment from institutional values and health promoting values.
These include structural inequalities (e.g., under representation of women in leadership positions or ethnic minority
students’ not receiving equal opportunities), mental health and indigeneity (Came & Tudor, 2018).

Students/Ākonga at the University of Canterbury
The University of Canterbury | Te whare Wānanga o Waitaha is no real exception from the above national context. UC Student
Voice (Thinking Out Loud) explains as a first year student there is a culture shock to coming to university, students can feel
isolated and lonely in a new setting where you have to learn to be independent in a new environment, causing a strain on
mental wellbeing.

Many first year students/ākonga do not know how to be students and there is a lack of clear direction and communication
about supporting student life holistically. There is also a lack of communication in terms of what services are provided to
make that transition manageable and positive (Mcclelland, 2018).

UCSA’s submission to the government inquiry on mental health and addiction highlighted a number of issues associated
with campus services. For example, approximately 30% of all patient consultations at the Health Centre are related to mental
health including 14% of students using the counselling services. On the one hand it is great that students are accessing and
utilising the on-campus resources, but on the other hand, it has increased the strain on these services as evidenced through
the wait-times as one measure of demand.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                13
Additionally, UCSA found that there was a lack of clarity around the roles and responsibilities of the university in terms of
providing more specialised care for students and staff. Consequently, UCSA recognised that in order to support all cases of
disorder and addiction a collaborative, multi-disciplinary community approach would be more appropriate. As an example,
some students have recognised the strain on resources on campus and have had to look for alternative community options
for support, especially related to the provision of acute mental health services.

Staff at the University of Canterbury
For Staff, UC has not directly surveyed staff or used any other method of assessment or data collection to establish the
overall state of staff wellbeing. Nor has UC attempted to measure the effectiveness of any of the initiatives we have in place
to support staff wellbeing. However, the Human Resources team has a lot of data from the Organisational Culture surveys
that have been completed across the past five years. Part of that data is about the individual and group outcomes of the
current organisational culture. We have surveyed 1146 continuing staff and results are benchmarked against the historical
average of a norming group of over 1000 organisations from around the world. Staff have told us that we are below the
historical average in some of the elements that constitute a constructive culture e.g. employee involvement, use of rewards,
fairness of appraisals. This in turn translates into some employee group and individual outcomes that can potentially impact
on staff wellbeing and which are also below the historical average e.g. role clarity, satisfaction, motivation, organisational
and departmental quality. Other outcomes are above the historical average, e.g. stress and intention to stay, which is not to
preclude room for more improvement. Each College and Service is responding by developing projects or initiatives based
on their local results.

The University of Canterbury in Response to the 2010/11 Earthquakes
and more recently March 15th Attacks
The Earthquakes that occurred in 2010 and 2011 have had a profound effect on the community of Christchurch/Ōtautahi,
Canterbury/Waitaha and Aotearoa. Psychosocial wellbeing and community resilience have been a big theme in terms of
wellbeing since this disaster occurred (Cooper-Cabell, 2016).

A recent review of the psychological impacts of the earthquakes on mental health has recently been published and
recognises increased rates of depression, other anxiety disorders and nicotine dependence and concluded that the
Canterbury Earthquakes equated to 13.3% of the overall rate of mental disorder in individuals directly affected. Additionally,
a 5% increase in people searching for treatment for mood and anxiety disorders was recorded following the Christchurch/
Ōtautahi Earthquakes (Hogg et al., 2014). The meta-analysis conducted recognised the adverse effects this disaster
had on mental health. However, there are relative gaps in the research on long term outcomes as well as importance in
understanding sample selection, disaster exposure, appropriate comparisons and repeated measures over time in order to
make the best estimates of the consequences on mental health (Cooper-Cabell, 2016). Furthermore, the recent events of
March 15th 2019 terror attacks on the Mosques in Christchurch have affected students and staff directly or indirectly in many
and differing ways. With the timeline of the recent events understanding the cultural sensitivity and offering help through all
services to ensure student’s and staffs wellbeing are actively supported is still currently ongoing.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                            14
Bicultural Framework
The Bicultural Framework is very important for representing, respecting and recognising the history and culture of Aotearoa
New Zealand, specifically the special rights of Tangata Whenua and the inclusive partnership of Tangata whenua and Tangata
Tiriti under the Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Our commitment to biculturalism goes beyond awareness and sensitivities, it strives to
develop and implement bicultural responsive processes, policies and practices. Bicultural competence represents the highly
diverse and multicultural background of UC’s student/ākonga and staff/kaimahi. It is important that we continue to develop a
culture that is accepting of, interested in and welcoming to all.

Bicultural models
                                                                Te Whare Tapa Whā
of wellbeing
The current UC Wellbeing Framework
(Reynolds, 2017) explains the UC PERMA
Culture. It is underpinned by four different
models of health and wellbeing including
Te Whare Tapa Whā (Durie, 2017), Fonofale,
PERMA and The 5 ways to Wellbeing. Te
Whare Tapa Whā created by Mason Durie
(1985) not only recognises wellbeing as
a holistic concept reliant on a community
approach but also is a representation that
is built on a foundation of kaupapa Māori
that represents all four elements as being
equally important to wellbeing. Represented
as a whare (house), the four realms that hold
the whare together include Taha Tinana
(physical wellbeing), Taha Whānau (social
wellbeing), Taha Hinengaro (mental and
emotional wellbeing) and Taha Wairua
(spiritual wellbeing).

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                         15
This community based framework has similar attributes and values as the Fonofale framework from the Pasifika view of health
(Kingi-Uluave and Olo- Whaanga 2010) depicting a visual representation of a fale with four main posts. This equates to six
dimensions of health; the foundation represents the nuclear and extended family forming the fundamental basis of social
organisation. The roof represents culture, values, attitudes and beliefs of the Pasifika culture. The four pou (posts) represent
the spiritual, physical, mental and other dimensions of wellbeing, and not only connect the culture and the family but are
continuous and interactive with each other. The ‘other’ pou relates to variables that can directly or indirectly affect health such
as, but not limited to, gender, sexual orientation, age, social class, employment and educational status which the Ministry of
Health (2008) explains promotes the philosophy of holism and continuity. The indigenous knowledge allows us to develop
a broader understanding of what constitutes wellbeing and draws on multiple paths to achieve that based on individual
needs, however always looking at the whole person.

Proposed Bicultural Framework 2019: Te Pae Māhutonga
Māori Health expert Sir Mason Durie developed and introduced the Te Whare Tapa Whā framework for mental health in
the 1980s in response to Māori disengagement in what was a largely Eurocentric health system. The model incorporated a
holistic Māori worldview on health and compared four dimensions of health to the four sides of a wharenui. The dimensions
included taha wairua - spiritual health, taha hinengaro - mental health, taha tinana - physical health and taha whānau - family
health (Durie, 1998). The Whare Tapa Whā model was important as it led to the recognition of Māori worldviews in health
and has been applied broadly across the health and education sectors.

In the Te Pae Māhutonga Māori Health Promotion Model Durie extends the Te Whare Tapa Whā framework to bring together
threads of Māori health promotion. Te Pae Māhutonga recognises Mauriora access to Te Ao Māori, Waiora Environmental
Protection, Toiora Healthy Lifestyles, Te Oranga Participation, Ngā Manukura Leadership and Te Mana Whakahaere Autonomy
are essential in improving health outcomes (Durie, 2004).

    Te Pae Māhutonga – Southern Cross
                                                                       Mauriora
                                                                       (Access to Te Ao Maori)

                        Waiora
                        (Environmental protection)

                                                                                    Te Oranga
                                                                                    (Participate)
                                         Ngā Manukura
                                         (Leadership)
                                                                         Toiora
                                                                         (Healthy Lifestyles)
             Te Mana Whakahaere
             (Autonomy)

The Te Pae Mahutonga framework also reflects values previously explained in the Fonofale framework of spirituality, people
and the environment as well as cultural values and beliefs, family, gender, sexual orientation, age, social class, employment
and educational status. Furthermore, health and wellbeing representation from Pasifika includes the understanding of vā; the
quality of our interconnectedness with land, sea, the sky, family, other people and with spirit (Mila, 2017). Waiora and Toiora
taking care of ourselves and the environment and Te Oranga by participating in society, making connections and creating
relationships represents vā. It is important to note also that most aspects of Māori models resonate with the Pasifika people’s
models of health and wellbeing and the cultural aspect of interconnectedness.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                               16
Te Pae Mahutonga offers a platform for the following to thrive:

1.   Te Rautaki Whakawhanake Kaupapa: UC Strategy for Māori Development

2.   Pasifika context: Vā, Mana Moana

3.   PERMA (Positive Emotions, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning and Accomplishments)

4.   5 Ways to Wellbeing (Give, Be Active, Keep Learning, Take Notice and Connect)

5.   UC Graduate Profile

6.   Social determinants of Health Model ‘SDOH’ (neighbourhood and build environment/ health and health care/ social and
     community context/ education/ economic stability)

7.   Seven Principles of Student Success

Te Pae Māhutonga aligns with UC’s graduate profile of bicultural competence and confidence, community engagement,
employability, innovation, enterprising and global awareness from Te Rautaki Whakawhanake Kaupapa Māori (Strategy for
Māori Development) and the six areas of development (AVC Māori, 2012) as well as the SDOH which were designed to
identify ways to create social and physical environments that promote good health for all.

PERMA explains if the five constructs are developing positively, it equates to improving optimum wellbeing (flourishing). The
5 Ways to Wellbeing are evidence based everyday actions that help influence PERMA and increase optimum wellbeing, both
were included in the previous UC Wellbeing Framework.

Te Pae Māhutonga is also complementary to the UC Wellbeing, Sport and Physical Activity Framework explaining the basis of
underlying principles which includes Kaitiakitanga, Kotahitanga, Manaakitanga and Rangatiratanga, and the Seven Universal
Principles of Student Success (“Strategy for Wellbeing, Sport and Physical Activity; Te Rautaki Tākaro me Hauora,” 2018).

Following engagement and discussions with Mana Whenua representatives from Ngāi Tūāhuriri it seems most appropriate
for the University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha to adopt and use the Te Pae Māhutonga model of health
promotion as the overall framework. It reflects and builds upon the previous UC Wellbeing Framework as well as improving
an alignment to the graduate profile, SDOH and the evolving community of UC.

     Question
     Do you support adopting the Te Pae Māhutonga model or would you prefer we retain the
     current te Whare Tapa Whā model?

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                          17
Summary of services & spaces
As part of developing this strategy we have undertaken a desktop review of the range of Wellbeing / Wellness Initiatives,
Services and Spaces at the University.

What the stocktake has found that UC has both breadth and depth in the services offered to its community to support
wellbeing and wellness that are available throughout the year, for both staff and students as well as for the wider
community in some cases.

Types of Engagement and Communications
•    There is a range in the type of engagement each of the services or initiatives are delivered through to the University
     body; from individual face to face meetings, both small and large student/staff groups, families of staff and students, and
     the wider Christchurch/Ōtautahi community.

•    Engagement also occurs online to individual students through the Learn (Moodle) website and the Canterbury University
     website, and to all students through mass media communications (through the use of TV screens throughout campus,
     publications (magazines, pamphlets, booklets), and the UCGo smartphone application).

Cost of Access
•    A large majority of student services are either free, covered by the Student Services Levy, or are subsidized.

•    Staff of the University are more likely to be charged fees, or a greater cost than students for the same service

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                            18
Services for Students/Ākonga
For students/ākonga there are over 146 services designed to support and improve the wellbeing of students on campus.
The following graphic identifies the key services, sectors and the types of engagement (both one-to-one and group).
We want to know from you, if you are a student or a staff member:

1.   what services you think are the most effective or least effective and why?

2.   are there any services that are missing from this list?

3.   are there any improvements you would want to see happen?

We realise there is a lot of information on this graphic so if you work better with lists please refer to Appendix One. In that,
we also identify where the specific service could align to Te Pae Mahutonga and also where it lies against the current Student
Voice (UC Study; UC Wellbeing; UC Student Life) communications campaign.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                             19
Services for Staff/Kaimahi
For staff/kaimahi members at UC there are over 37 services designed to support and improve the wellbeing of staff on
campus. We do not think we have captured all of those services and we also note that a number of the services listed in
the student services section can be accessed by staff members. We want to know from you, if you are a student or a staff
member:

1.   what services you think are the most effective or least effective and why?

2.   are there any services that are missing from this list?

3.   are there any improvements you would want to see happen?

Please refer to Appendix One for further details.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                          20
Facilities and Spaces on Campus
Within the Universities 2015 Campus Master Plan there is a recognition of the contribution that the campus design, including
the buildings and facilities, waterways, streams, landscape and pathway features support “a contribution to the health and
wellbeing of staff and students”. This is most obvious in the development of the proposed Wellness Precinct and the Ōtākaro
– Avon Park, but it also aligns to the cultural narrative of the area and its association with Mahinga Kai (gathering and sharing
of food) and Tūrangawaewae (sense of belonging and a place to stand).

The design features noted include:

•    Landscaping to facilitate a mix of outdoor leisure and recreational activities

•    Native planting and sustainability principles to assist in the restoration of the Ōtākaro-Avon River and improve
     biodiversity and ecosystem health

•    Implementation of ‘Living Laboratory’ and ‘Edible Campus’ themes to assist in Mahinga kai

•    Facilitation of environmental educational programs

•    Upgrade of existing riverside amphitheatre

•    Promote interaction, collaboration and relationships on campus by facilitating a mix of diverse activities

•    Celebrate and connect with the Avon’s natural environment.

The University has a multitude of spaces that can enhance wellbeing, through either creating a sense of connection to the
place or to the environment.

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                              21
Appendix One: Summary of Services
Services for Students

  ACADEMIC

  SERVICE                                              DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES                                            OWNER

  Academic Skills Centre - Free Advisory               Individual consultations                                            UC
  Service & Resource Hub

                                                       Group workshop, seminars, lectures                                  UC

                                                       Online resources                                                    UC

                                                       Adult Support Programme                                             UC

                                                       English Language Support Programme                                  UC

  Student Care Team                                    Pastoral care for domestic & international students                 UC

  Advocacy & Welfare Team                              • Academic appeals                                                 UCSA

                                                       • Complaint process                                                UCSA

                                                       • Special consideration & late withdrawals                         UCSA

                                                       • Disciplinary/dispute issues                                      UCSA

                                                       • Support person for students during meetings                      UCSA

  Class Representatives                                Elected students responsible for:                                  UCSA

                                                       • Liaising with students and teachers                              UCSA

                                                       • Volunteer role with CCR given                                    UCSA

  Advisory Groups                                      • Post-graduate Advisory Group                                     UCSA

  UCSA Executive Team                                  • Executives for each school                                       UCSA

  Māori Student Support                                Māori-specific Scholarships and Awards                              UC

                                                       Maori Development Team                                              UC

                                                       Te Whare Māori Student Space - for studying & socialising           UC

                                                       Tukana-Tiana Mentoring Programme (TTMP) - experienced               UC
                                                       students guide those less experienced

  Pacific Development Team                             Pastoral care for domestic & international students - one-to-one    UC

                                                       Get FRESH - Pasifika Orientation                                    UC

                                                       Many other events, activities, and programmes throughout year       UC

                                                       The Pasifika Mentoring Programme                                    UC

                                                       The PASS Tutoring Programme                                         UC

  Careers Services                                     Careers Expo/Fest                                                   UC

                                                       Individual: CV aide, job application, internship schemes            UC

                                                       Group: workshops on CV                                              UC

                                                       Work-Integrated Learning (WIL)                                      UC

                                                       Co-Curricular Record                                                UC

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                22
ACADEMIC

  SERVICE                                              DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES                                                  OWNER

  International Student Support                        Incoming & outgoing exchange opportunities                                 UC

                                                       Mentoring programme (in development)                                       UC

  Clubs                                                • Talks/Seminars                                                         Students

  UC Mentoring Programme                               • Māori students                                                           UC

                                                       • Pacific students                                                         UC

                                                       Current students become mentors for incoming first-year students to UC     UC

                                                       • General students                                                         UC

                                                       • International Students                                                   UC

  Student Mentoring                                    Student Mentoring Programme currently run in only                        Students
                                                       Law and Engineering Departments (LawMe & EngMe)

  Advisory Groups                                      International Advisory Group                                              UCSA

  International Student Support                        International Welcome Day                                                  UC

  LIVING AND ACCOMMODATION
  SERVICE                                              DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES                                                  OWNER

  Early Learning Childcare Centres                     On-campus facilities with discounted rates for UC student parents         UCSA

  Halls of Residence                                   Temporary accommodation available at Sonada                                UC

                                                       Homestay programme - live with a family in the                             UC
                                                       wider Christchurch community

                                                       Seven options total for 1st year students,                                 UC
                                                       ranging in services and style of accommodation

                                                       • Fully catered                                                            UC

                                                       • Self-catered                                                             UC

                                                       • Flatting-style                                                           UC

                                                       • Dormitory/traditional hall-style                                         UC

  CULTURE, ARTS & COMMUNITY
  SERVICE                                              DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES                                                  OWNER

  Summer Start-Up & Winter Wellness Expos,             External organisations involved for expos                                 UCSA
  & Coffee Party

  CANTA Magazine                                       • External Organisation and Companies                                     UCSA

  Clubs                                                • Discounts                                                              Students

  UC Blues Awards                                      • Community Engagement                                                    UCSA

                                                       • Arts                                                                    UCSA

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                       23
ENVIRONMENTAL
  SERVICE                                              DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES                                                   OWNER

  Environment & Sustainability                         New building designs & remodelling are sustainable                         UC
                                                       & environmentally conscious & aware

                                                       Community Garden on campus                                                 UC

                                                       Edible gardens on campus                                                   UC

  FINANCIAL
  SERVICE                                              DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES                                                   OWNER

  Food Services                                        V-Plate available free to students for discount at other eateries at UC   UCSA

  HEALTH
  SERVICE                                              DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES                                                   OWNER

  Advocacy & Welfare Team                              Help Volunteers - 3rd & 4th year Law & Psychology Students                UCSA

                                                       Staff of the Year Awards                                                  UCSA

                                                       • Hardship grant                                                          UCSA

                                                       • Mickle Fund                                                             UCSA

                                                       • Food assistance:                                                        UCSA

                                                            - Foodbank                                                           UCSA

                                                            - Food support service                                               UCSA

                                                       • Menstrual Emergency (ME)                                                UCSA

  UC Health Centre                                     General Practitioners - medical appointments and consultations             UC

                                                       Nurses                                                                     UC

                                                       Healing Touch Therapy                                                      UC

                                                       Counsellors                                                                UC

                                                       Sexual Health                                                              UC

                                                       Physiotherapists                                                           UC

                                                       Vaccinations                                                               UC

                                                       Employment Medicals                                                        UC

  LGBTQIA+ Student Support                             UC website - links to support groups/pages                                 UC

                                                       UC Diversity Champions (UCDC) - go-to contacts throughout                  UC
                                                       uni for discussing equity/diversity-related issues

                                                       Q Canterbury club space in Elsie Locke Building (Arts College)             UC

                                                       LGBTQI+ Co-ordinator (currently seeking funding)                           UC

                                                       UC Health Centre Counsellor specific for LGBTQIA+ related issues           UC

University of Canterbury Wellbeing Strategy – Discussion Document                                                                       24
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