VCE - Course Selection Handbook 2019

 
 
VCE - Course Selection Handbook 2019
VCE
                                                 Course Selection
                                                 Handbook 2019

Principal                        Maria Karvouni
Assistant Principal              Kristie Satilmis
Manager VCE                      Mark Christopoulos
Manager Pathways & Transitions   Debra Martis
Manager Overseas Students        Roz Mills

Address                          Burgess Street
                                 East Hawthorn 3123
Telephone                        9822 3247
VCE - Course Selection Handbook 2019
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      Contents


Contents
SELECTION PROCESS 2018-19 .............................................................................................................................. 3

AHS VCE UNITS OFFERED* 2019 - 2020 ........................................................................................................... 3

WHAT IS A VCE PROGRAM? ........................................................................................................................... 5

SELECTING A VCE PATHWAY .......................................................................................................................... 7

CHOOSING A YEAR 12 COURSE ....................................................................................................................... 8

TERTIARY AND HIGHER EDUCATION ............................................................................................................... 9

SUBJECT DESCRIPTIONS ............................................................................................................................... 10
ACCOUNTING - CONTACT: MR STANNARD, MR FELBEL ......................................................................................... 10
BIOLOGY - CONTACT: MR VAN EST, MR CHRISTOPOULOS ...................................................................................... 11
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT - CONTACT: MS PRICE, MS ZHANG .............................................................................. 12
CHEMISTRY - CONTACT: MS SOBEY. MS PHILLIPSON ............................................................................................ 13
COMPUTING - CONTACT: MR MCPHERSON ....................................................................................................... 14
DRAMA – CONTACT: MR. JEDD ......................................................................................................................... 15
ENGLISH/EAL - CONTACT: MS MICHAEL, MS KETSAKIDIS, MS WEYMOUTH, MR FIRTH, MS MILLS ................................. 16
ENGLISH LANGUAGE - CONTACT: MS MICHAEL, MS KETSAKIDIS ............................................................................ 17
FOOD STUDIES - CONTACT: MS STAMBOLZIEV .................................................................................................... 18
HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTACT: MR JORDON, MR LANFRANCHI ....................................................... 19
HISTORY - CONTACT: MS AMOS, MR TRUMBLE ................................................................................................... 21
LANGUAGES: CHINESE - CONTACT: MS ZHANG ................................................................................................... 22
LEGAL STUDIES - CONTACT: MS PRICE, MS GIBSON ............................................................................................. 24
LITERATURE - CONTACT: MS MICHAEL .............................................................................................................. 25
MATHEMATICS - CONTACT: MR DE SILVA, MR CHRISTOPOULOS, MR FELBEL, MR STANNARD, MS KOULOUMENDAS ......... 26
MEDIA - CONTACT: MR JEDD, MR FIRTH............................................................................................................. 28
PHYSICAL EDUCATION - CONTACT: MR JORDON, MR LANFRANCHI ........................................................................ 29
PHYSICS - CONTACT: MS KOULOUMENDAS, MR LAMB........................................................................................... 30
PSYCHOLOGY - CONTACT: MS GIBSON, MS PRICE ............................................................................................... 31
STUDIO ARTS - CONTACT: MS CLARK REFER TO VCAA PHYSICS STUDY DESIGN 2017 - 2021......................................... 32

RGLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................. 33

USEFUL WEBSITES ....................................................................................................................................... 34




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Selection Process 2018-19

    Week              Date                                       Details
           Term 3
    1
    2      Thursday 26 July ‘18      VCE Expo and Information Evening (5:00pm – 7:00pm)
                                      From 5:00pm students and parent have the opportunity to
                                      speak to subject specialist teachers.

                                       From 6:30 to 7:00pm there is a special presentation about your
                                       2019 VCE course selection (VCE Common)

           Friday 27 July 2018       Current Year 9 and Year 10 Students receive their ‘2019 Subject
                                      Recommendation Letter”. This letter will notify students of the
                                      Mathematics, Science, and English recommendation for 2019. It
                                      will also notify students if they have been recommended for
                                      VCE acceleration in 2019.

    3
    4      Tuesday 7 August ‘18      Current Year 11 students have their proposed course
                                      approved and then enter 2019 subjects online.

           Wednesday 8 August ‘18    Current Year 10 Course Selection Interviews for 2019 subjects
                                      Students present their proposed 2019 subject selections. If
                                      approved, students may then enter their subjects online.

    5      Tuesday 14 August ‘18     Current Y9 Course Selection Interviews for 2019
                                      Students present their proposed 2019 subject selections. If
                                      approved, students may then enter their subjects online.

           Thursday 16 August ‘18    Current Y9 & 10 students Online 2019 Unit Selection due

           Friday 17 August ‘18      Current Y9, 10 and 11 students Signed Hardcopy due to
                                      General Office
    6
    7
    8
    9                                2019 Y10-12 Course confirmation
    10




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AHS VCE Units Offered*
*The following VCE Units will run subject to student choices




    Subject                                               Units    Units
                                                          1&2      3&4
    Accounting                                                     
    Biology                                                        
    Business Management                                            
    Chemistry                                                      
    Chinese 1st & 2nd Language & Adv.                              
    Computing                                              
    Computing: Software Development                                 
    Drama                                                         2020
    English                                                        
    English as an Additional Language                              
    (EAL)
    English Language                                              2020
    Food Studies                                                    
    French                                                         
    Health & Human Development                                     
    History: 20th Century                                      
    History: Revolutions                                            
    Legal Studies                                                 2020
    Literature                                                      
    Mathematics: Further                                            
    Mathematics: General                                       
    Mathematics: Methods                                           
    Mathematics: Specialist                                        
    Media                                                          
    Physical Education                                             
    Physics                                                        
    Psychology                                                     
    Spanish (VSL)                                                  
    Studio Art                                                     




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What is a VCE program?
A “VCE Program” is a set of semester units undertaken over a minimum period of two years. This program is
designed by you to meet your needs within the rules laid down by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment
Authority (VCAA).

Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority Requirements:
To meet the graduation requirements of the VCE, each continuing student (other than students returning to study) must
satisfactorily complete a total of no fewer than 16 units. These units must include:
 Three units from the English Group (English/EAL Units 1-4) English Language (Units 3 & 4) and Literature (Units 3 & 4)
     including one 3 & 4 sequence and
 Three sequences of Units 3 and 4 studies other than English

English Requirements - The English Group:

    No more than two units of English or EAL Units 1 and 2 and Foundation English Units 1 and 2 may count towards the
     English requirement.
    Students who satisfactorily complete more than four units from the English Group will have the additional units
     credited towards meeting the total units for VCE. An English sequence will count as a sequence other than English
     when
     (a) it is additional to a student satisfying three units from the English group, or
     (b) the student has satisfied more than one sequence from the English group.
    Students cannot obtain credit for both English Units 3 and 4 and EAL Units 3 and 4.

Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) Requirements:
Successful completion of the VCE
 VTAC advises that for the calculation of a student’s ATAR, satisfactory completion of both Units 3 and 4 of an English
    study is required.
 VCE VET qualifications with revised requirements normally have a sequence at Unit 3 and 4 level.
 No more than two sequences at Units 3 and 4 of the English group of studies can be included in the ‘Primary Four’.


School Requirements:
Students at Year 10 will proceed to Year 11 provided they have demonstrated the following:
A.      Year 10 to VCE (Unit 1 and 2)
        Based on Semester Reports
                 Regular timely submission of work in all classes
                 A minimum Victorian Curriculum rating of ‘At the level’ in English
                 EAL will be based on teacher recommendation
                 A minimum Victorian Curriculum rating of ‘At the level’ in at least 4 other subjects
                 Work habits rated as ‘ Acceptable’ across all subjects
                 Approved Attendance percentage of at least 90 percent for each semester subject

B.       In addition to the above criteria, there are additional requirements that a student must satisfy
         to undertake studies in certain Maths and/or Science VCE subjects
         General Mathematics: a minimum Victorian Curriculum rating of ‘At the level’ in Year 10 Mathematics.
         Mathematical Methods: a minimum Victorian Curriculum rating of ‘Above the level’ in Year 10 Mathematics.
         Chemistry & Physics: a minimum Victorian Curriculum rating of ‘At the level’ for Year 10 Science

         Further Mathematics 3 & 4 (Acceleration in Y11): a ‘Well above the level’ Victorian Curriculum rating in Year 10
         Mathematics.

C.       Students who do not meet the criteria for promotion will be required to complete a further year of Year 10 studies
         or negotiate a VCE pathway based on specific subject selection and entry.

D.       Special Consideration may be granted depending on individual circumstances.

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VCE flexibility
    Q.   How many units should I choose each semester in the VCE?


    A.   You should choose 6 units per semester in Year 11 and 5 units per semester in Year 12.


    Q.   How many units should I choose in total for my VCE?


    A.   Most full time students attempt 22 units over the two years (12 in Year 11 and 10 in Year 12).


    Q.   Can I take longer than 2 years to complete my VCE?


    A.   Yes. You may spread your VCE over 3 years or more.


    Q.   If I spread my VCE over 3 years, will I be disadvantaged for tertiary entrance?


    A.   No.


    Q.   Can I do some Unit 3 and 4 studies while in my first year of VCE?


    A.   Yes subject to recommendation. Furthermore, in your second year, you may wish to do some Unit 1 and 2
         studies along with your Unit 3 & 4 studies.

    Q.   Should I consider doing some Unit 3 & 4s in my first year?


    A.   If you are a capable student, you should extend yourself. Unit 3 & 4 studies completed in your first year will be
         counted as part of your Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank. Increments apply to 5 th and 6th subjects in Units 3
         and 4.

    Q.   May I change my VCE course for the second semester?


    A.   Yes for Unit 2. However, Units 3 & 4 must be done as a sequence and so cannot be changed halfway through
         the year.

    Q    If I repeat a Unit 3 & 4 subject will I be penalised?


    A.   There is no penalty for repeating VCE units. Repeating a study at Unit 3&4 level may improve your study score
         and enhance your chances of getting into a tertiary course, however you cannot count a unit more than once
         towards satisfactory completion of the VCE. It is necessary to repeat Unit 3 of VCE studies as well as Unit 4 to
         gain a study score.

    Q.   Is there special provision due to physical disability or serious illness?


    A.   Yes. The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority and the school make “special provision” for students
          with physical disabilities
          who are from non-English speaking backgrounds
          who experience significant hardship during their VCE
          Applications must be made to the VCE Coordinator in the year prior to commencing your VCE studies.




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Selecting a VCE pathway
The Victorian Certificate of Education provides a flexible vehicle to move from a general education to either employment or
further education and training.

Within the VCE there is a range of programs and pathways to consider. Students need to be aware of these options.

The four key pathways within the later years are:

1.   Victorian Certificate of Education Units – These are the most commonly selected units. They lead to tertiary and higher
     education as well as other employment options.

2.   Vocational Education and Training Units – Part of the VCE and the Australian Qualification Framework. They provide
     industry specific skills and in many cases these satisfy the entry-level requirements for that industry.

3.   The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning – This certificate focuses more directly on vocational education. It links
     industry specific skills with part time work as well as literacy and numeracy and personal development.

4.   Part time Traineeships and Apprenticeships- Prospective Year 11 students need to be aware of these options and
     mindful of the vocational and educational implications.




A starting point
The Job Guide
Students complete a Career Action Plan, access The Job Guide, My Future, VTAC and VICTER 2020 Tertiary Prerequisites
Planner. These resources should be used as a starting point. The Job Guide identifies the types of jobs and the skill levels
required to perform them.

The next step on the pathway
Once you have a pathway in mind you need to reflect on how best to achieve that goal. If it involves a Traineeship or VCAL
discuss the details with the Careers teacher. If however it involves VCE and VET units, you need to consider the following:

1.   The educational requirements or entry prerequisites for that job or course (i.e. subjects that must be successfully
     completed before you will be considered for the job or course). The details for courses can be found on the VTAC website,
     or the My Future website, and in documents such as VICTER 2020, the Job Guide or the TAFE Course Directory.

2.   Your results in the previous year are the best indicator of likely success. As a general rule we would like students to have
     achieved a C level in the Victorian Curriculum in that subject or in a related study before they choose to continue in that
     subject. Students and parents must also be aware of the Auburn High School Promotion Policy for Year 10-11.

3.   Once you have identified the prerequisites, consider the balance of the course and the general workload. A combination
     of art, studio art and VCD sounds great but it is incredibly demanding in terms of time (3 Folios) and, to a lesser extent,
     expense. Equally, what if you are wrong and the course isn't suitable? By taking such a specific focus you may limit your
     options.

4.   A number of students pursue the maths and sciences because of prerequisites and scaling. Such a choice may not be
     appropriate. Please consider the advice of the AHS Careers Advisor, University Representatives, teachers and others.

5.   Investigate the option of undertaking a unit three and four subject while in Year 11. The experience can be very
     productive in the long term while relieving some pressure in the following year.

6.   Scaling is a consideration but ultimately, interest and ability are more important factors.


7.   Consider a three-year VCE course. This may suit people who:


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         a.   want to take a more measured approach to the VCE
         b.   are seeking a very high ATAR
         c.   are developing folios

8.   Note: there is no penalty for repeating subjects.

    Ultimately if a student is uncertain, the key issue is to keep their options open.
    Also be aware Universities have prerequisites and other specific requirements governing the entry to some courses
     e.g. Maths Methods CAS. (Use VTAC ‘Course search’ and ‘Course Link’ to check these requirements.




Choosing a year 12 course
Effectively this is much easier than choosing a Year 11 course. You already have an understanding of how successful you have
been in specific subjects. You have also eliminated a number of other subjects because you didn’t choose them in Year 11.
Hopefully you also have investigated the pathway that is right for you.




Items to be considered are therefore:

1.   Completing the VCE, ensuring you have at least 16 total units and met other course requirements (see page 5)
2.   Your Year 11 results
3.   Complementing vocational and personal interests.
4.   Identifying prerequisites for tertiary courses and employment (VTAC; VICTER 2020)
5.   Considering the implications of the ATAR and scaling (ATAR booklet)
6.   Choosing the appropriate subject given the blocking
7.   Recognising that other options are available. Either taking another year or perhaps looking at attempting a first year
     University extension subject.
8.   Continuing studies in Languages not offered at Auburn High School. These may be offered through external providers
     including the Victorian School of Languages (VSL) and Distance Education.




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Tertiary and higher education
Considerations

Most students will undertake some form of post-secondary education. Very few students move directly from secondary
education to full time employment. Therefore it is important that students understand the process, investigate the choices
and identify an appropriate pathway in terms of their education and vocation. The following is a brief summary of
issues/information that need to be examined. It is not a definitive study.

Students need to understand the following

       Prerequisite subjects (VTAC website; VICTER 2018/2019 or 2020 – the year they will enter tertiary studies).
       VCE requirements (VCE Handbook).
       The Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank ATAR (VCAA and VTAC publications).
       Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre – VTAC (VTAC website www.vtac.edu.au – outlines courses/processes for that
        year – using VICTER).
       Direct entry to TAFE is applicable for apprenticeships; post Year 10/11 courses and some post-secondary courses.
       Articulation – movement from one course to another related course such as a Diploma course (TAFE) to a degree
        (University) course. Credit transfer may apply (direct contact with course advisers and selection officers advised).

The choices

       Vocational training e.g. Apprenticeships and Traineeships (TAFE Course Directory). Students may be required to do
        a Pre-apprenticeship course (Certificate II) before commencing an apprenticeship.
       Institutes of TAFE – varying levels of certification. Range of entry points and campuses. (TAFE Course Directory).
       University – different campuses, general or niche degrees, single or double degrees, level of industry involvement,
        ATAR Rank, selection criteria (Open Days, course descriptions, University handbooks), middle band criteria, CSP
        (previously HECS) vs Fee based courses, Distance Education and Open Learning.
       Employment.
       Other.

Details, documentation and assistance are available from the Careers office. While students are counselled in terms of VCE
subject choices and VTAC, it is important that they take some responsibility for finding out what is available and what suits
their particular needs.




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 Subject Descriptions
     ACCOUNTING - Contact: Mr Stannard, Mr Felbel
 Refer to VCAA Accounting Study Design 2019 – 2023

 Rationale
 This study focuses on the procedures of accounting and finance and the ways in which these may be used. The study
 examines the processes of recording and reporting financial information to provide users with appropriate information for
 planning, control and effective decision-making. All units focus on accounting and finance for sole-proprietor small
 businesses. Students will be introduced to the use of information technology in accounting procedures in all units.

 Unit 1 – Role of accounting in business

 This unit explores the establishment of a business and the role of accounting in the determination of business success or
 failure. In this, it considers the importance of accounting information to stakeholders. Students analyse, interpret and
 evaluate the performance of the business using financial and non-financial information. They use these evaluations to make
 recommendations regarding the suitability of a business as an investment.

 Unit 2 – Accounting and decision making for a trading business

 In this unit students develop their knowledge of the accounting process for sole proprietors operating a trading business,
 with a focus on inventory, accounts receivable, accounts payable and non-current assets. Students use manual processes
 and ICT, including spreadsheets, to prepare historical and budgeted accounting reports.

 Assessment
 Assessment tasks for these units are selected from the following:
 • A folio of exercises utilising manual methods and ICT
 • Structured questions utilising manual methods and ICT
 • An assignment including use of ICT
 • A case study including use of ICT
 • A classroom presentation, role-play or debate
 • A report utilising ICT

 Advice to students
 It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 & 4 Accounting have studied Unit 1 & 2 Accounting.

 Unit 3 and Unit 4 – Financial accounting for a trading business/Recording, reporting, budgeting and decision-making.
 While each unit has its particular application, both examine the underlying principles and professional practices of
 accounting, the managerial role of the accountant and likely future directions in accounting. Unit 3 introduces a double
 entry system using the accrual basis of accounting. Unit 4 focuses on the analysis of accounting reports and information,
 and using this evaluation to suggest strategies to improve business performance.

 Assessment

     Study                    Graded        Type of assessment                     Contribution to study score
                              assessment                                           (%)
     Accounting 3&4           1             Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework      25
                              2             Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework      25
                              3             Written examination (2 hours)          50




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BIOLOGY - Contact: Mr Van Est, Mr Christopoulos
Refer to VCAA Biology Study Design 2016 – 2020

Rationale
Biology is the study of living things and how science studies living things. Much of it centres on humans – how our bodies
work, how we came to be as we are and how we fit in with other living things on this planet. The course also allows you to
gain practical experience in the ways scientists come up with their ideas about living things.

Unit 1: How do living things stay alive?
In this unit students explain what is needed by an organism to stay alive. Students examine the cell as the structural and
functional unit of life and the requirements for sustaining cellular processes in terms of inputs and outputs. Types of
adaptations that enhance the organism’s survival are also studied, and students consider how the planet’s biodiversity is
classified and investigate the factors that affect population growth.

Unit 2: How is continuity of life maintained?
In this unit students focus on asexual and sexual cell reproduction and the transmission of biological information from
generation to generation. The role of stem cells in the differentiation, growth, repair and replacement of cells in humans is
examined, and their potential use in medical therapies is considered. Students explain the inheritance of characteristics,
analyse patterns of inheritance, interpret pedigree charts and predict outcomes of genetic crosses.

Assessment
Suitable tasks for assessment may be selected from the following:
a report of a fieldwork activity, annotations of a practical work folio of activities or investigations, a bioinformatics exercise,
media response, data analysis, problem solving involving biological concepts, skills and/or issues, a reflective learning
journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue, a test comprising multiple choice and/or short answer
and/or extended response, a report of a student-designed or adapted investigation

Advice to students
It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 & 4 Biology have studied Unit 1 & 2 Biology. Some background in
chemistry is advised for students considering Units 3 and 4.

Unit 3: How do cells maintain life?
Students investigate the workings of the cell from several perspectives. These different perspectives enable consideration
of both the capabilities and the limitations of living organisms whether animal, plant, fungus or microorganism. Students
examine the key molecules and biochemical pathways involved in cellular processes both within the cell and between cells.
Students study the human immune system and the interactions between its components to provide immunity to a specific
antigen.

Advice to students
It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 & 4 Biology have studied Unit 1 & 2 Biology.

Unit 4: How does life change and respond to challenges over time?
In this unit students consider the continual change and challenges to which life on Earth has been subjected. They examine
change in life forms, investigate the relatedness between species and consider the impact of various change events on a
population’s gene pool. The biological consequences, and social and ethical implications, of manipulating the DNA molecule
and applying biotechnologies are explored for both the individual and the species.

Assessment

 Study                 Graded                 Type of assessment                          Contribution to study score
                       assessment                                                         (%)
 Biology 3&4           1                      Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework           20
                       2                       Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework          20
                       3                      Written examination (2½ hours)              60

Nature of the Work: The courses centre on practical work and, in Unit 2, on field work. Most of the work requires
researching advances in biology from books, magazines and the internet. An interest in animals, plants and micro-
organisms is useful. Some background in chemistry is advised for students considering Units 3 and 4.


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 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT - Contact: Ms Price, Ms Zhang
 Refer to VCAA Business Management Study Design 2017 - 2021

 Rationale
 Business Management examines the ways in which people at various levels within a business organisation manage
 resources to achieve the objectives of the organisation. The study recognises that there is a range of management theories
 rather than a single theory of management. Each unit examines some of these theories and, through exposure to real
 business scenarios and/or direct contact with business, tests them against management in practice.

 Unit 1 – Planning a business
 Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation, therefore how businesses
 are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing.
 Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. This
 unit explores the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses
 operate, and the effect of these on planning a business.

 Unit 2 – Establishing a business

 This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business’s life. Establishing a business involves complying with legal
 requirements as well as making decisions about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the
 business and establish a customer base. In this unit students examine the legal requirements that must be satisfied to
 establish a business. They investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the
 needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping. Students analyse various management practices in
 this area by applying this knowledge to contemporary business case studies from the past four years

 Assessment

 Suitable tasks for assessment include the following: a case study analysis, a business research report, development of a
 business plan and/or feasibility study, an interview and a report on contact with business, a school-based, short-term
 business activity, a business simulation exercise, an essay, a business survey and analysis, a media analysis.

 Advice to students
 It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 & 4 Business Management have studied Unit 1 & 2 Business Management.

 Unit 3 – Managing a business
 In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to
 achieve the business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They
 consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students
 investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives. Students develop an understanding
 of the complexity and challenge of managing businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from
 the past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current practice.

 Unit 4 – Transforming a business
 Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit Students consider the
 importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management
 necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and consider a
 variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They
 investigate the importance of leadership in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past
 four years, students evaluate business practice against theory.

 Assessment
  Study                    Graded assessment       Type of assessment                     Contribution to study score
                                                                                          (%)
     Business Management   1                       Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework      25
     3&4                   2                       Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework      25
                           3                       Written examination (2 hours)          50




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CHEMISTRY - Contact: Ms Sobey. Ms Phillipson

Refer to VCAA Chemistry Study Design 2016 - 2020

Rationale
Chemistry is a science that explores the workings of the universe from the smallest particles we know –atoms. Chemistry is
a course for students who like patterns, practical experiments and enjoy maths, or want to get better at maths. Chemistry
is used to explain natural phenomena at the molecular level, as well as create new materials such as medicines and
polymers.

Unit 1: How can the diversity of materials be explained?
The development and use of materials for specific purposes is an important human endeavour. In this unit students
investigate the chemical properties and practical applications of a range of materials including metals, crystals, polymers,
nanomaterials and giant lattices. They explore and explain the relationships between properties, structure and bonding
forces within and between particles that vary in size from the visible through to nanoparticles, molecules and atoms. Students
are introduced to quantitative concepts in chemistry.

Unit 2: What makes water such a unique chemical?
Water is the most widely used solvent on Earth. In this unit students explore the physical and chemical properties of water,
the reactions that occur in water and various methods of water analysis. Students examine the structure and bonding
within and between water molecules in order to investigate solubility, concentration, pH and reactions in water including
precipitation, acid-base and redox. They are introduced to stoichiometry and to analytical techniques and instrumental
procedures analysis, and apply these to determine concentrations of different species in water samples, including chemical
contaminants.

Assessment
Suitable tasks for assessment may be selected from the following: annotations of a practical work folio of activities or
investigations, a report of a practical activity or investigation, a modelling activity, media response, problem-solving
involving chemical concepts, skills and/or issues, a reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in
response to an issue, data analysis, a test comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response, a
report of an independent investigation

Advice to students
It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 & 4 Chemistry have studied Unit 1 & 2 Chemistry.

Unit 3: How can chemical processes be designed to optimise efficiency? (2017)
In this unit students explore energy options and the chemical production of materials with reference to efficiencies,
renewability and the minimisation of their impact on the environment. Students compare and evaluate different chemical
energy resources and investigate the combustion of fuels. They consider the purpose, design and operating principles of
galvanic cells, fuel cells and electrolytic cells and calculate quantities in electrolytic reactions. Students analyse
manufacturing processes with reference to factors that influence their reaction rates and extent. They apply the
equilibrium law and Le Chatelier’s principle to predict and explain the conditions that will improve the efficiency and
percentage yield of chemical processes.

Unit 4: How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used? (2017)
Carbon is the basis of the diverse compounds found in living tissues and in the fuels, foods, medicines and many of the
materials we use in everyday life. In this unit students investigate the structural features, bonding, reactions and uses of the
major families of organic compounds including those found in food. Students process data from instrumental analyses to
confirm or deduce organic structures, and perform volumetric analyses to determine the concentrations of organic
chemicals in mixtures. They predict the products of reaction pathways and design pathways to produce particular
compounds from given starting materials. Students investigate key food molecules including carbohydrates, proteins, lipids
and vitamins and use calorimetry to determine the energy released in the combustion of food.

Assessment

 Study                           Graded assessment      Type of assessment                   Contribution to study score (%)
 Chemistry 3&4                   1                      Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework    20
                                 2                      Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework    20
                                 3                      Written examination (2½ hours)       60


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14
 COMPUTING - Contact: Mr McPherson

 Refer to VCAA Computing Study Design 2016 – 2019

 Rationale
 The ubiquity and rapid pace of developments in digital systems, and the increasing availability of digitised data and
 information are having major influences on many aspects of society and the economy. This study equips students with the
 knowledge and skills to be discerning users of digital systems, data and information and creators of digital solutions. They
 are equipped to apply new ways of thinking as well as technical and social protocols when developing intellectual and social
 capital.

 Computing
 Unit 1: Computing
 In this unit students focus on how data, information and networked digital systems can be used to meet a range of users’
 current and future needs. Students collect primary data when investigating an issue, practice or event and create a digital
 solution that graphically presents the findings of the investigation. Students examine the technical underpinnings of
 wireless and mobile networks, and security controls to protect stored and transmitted data, to design a network solution
 that meets an identified need or opportunity. Students acquire and apply their knowledge of information architecture and
 user interfaces, together with web authoring skills, when creating a website to present different viewpoints on a
 contemporary issue.

 Unit 2: Computing
 Students develop their computational thinking skills when using a programming or scripting language to create solutions.
 They engage in the design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology. Students develop a sound
 understanding of data and how a range of software tools can be used to extract data from large repositories and
 manipulate it to create visualisations that are clear, usable and attractive, and reduce the complexity of data. Students
 apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology to create a solution using database management software and explain
 how they are personally affected by their interactions with a database system.

 Assessment
 Suitable tasks for assessment in this unit may be selected from the following: using digital systems and techniques, create a
 solution in response to a need, visual presentations, oral presentations, written reports.

 Advice to students
 It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 & 4 Software Development have studied Unit 1 & 2 Computing.

 Software Development
 Unit 3
 In Software development Units 3 and 4 students focus on the application of a problem-solving methodology and underlying
 skills to create purpose-designed solutions using a programming language. In Unit 3 students develop a detailed
 understanding of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology and use a programming
 language to create working software modules.

 Unit 4
 Students focus on how the information needs of individuals and organisations are met through the creation of software
 solutions used in a networked environment. They continue to study the programming language used in Unit 3. Students
 further their computational thinking skills by transforming their detailed design prepared in Unit 3 into a software solution.
 They evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the solution in meeting needs or opportunities. Students apply systems
 thinking skills when explaining the relationship between two information systems that share data and how that
 dependency affects the performance of the systems.

 Assessment

     Study             Graded            Type of assessment                                         Contribution to study
                       assessment                                                                   score (%)
     Software          1                 Units 3 and 4 School-assessed Task                         30
     Development 3&4   2                 Units 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework                   20
                       3                 Written examination (2 hours)                              50


                                                                                                                             14
15

DRAMA – Contact: Mr. Jedd

Refer to VCAA Drama Study Design 2019-2023

Rationale:
In VCE Drama, students tell stories, explore ideas, make sense of their worlds and communicate meaning through the
practice of performance-making. The study connects students to multiple traditions of drama practice across a range of
social, historical and cultural contexts. Through the processes of devising and performing drama, students investigate self
and others by exploring and responding to the contexts, the narratives and the stories that shape their worlds.
They develop skills of communication, criticism, aesthetic understanding and aesthetic control. VCE Drama equips students
with knowledge, skills and confidence to communicate as individuals and collaboratively in a broad range of social, cultural
and work-related contexts.
**Please Note: As part of the VCE Drama Course, all students will be required to attend at least ONE excursion / incursion
for each Unit. The responding to /and analysis of a performance is a requirement of the subject.

Unit 1: Introducing Performance Styles students study three or more performance styles from a range of social, historical
and cultural contexts. They examine drama traditions of ritual and storytelling to devise performances that go beyond re-
creation and/or representation of real life as it is lived. This unit focuses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised
solo and/or ensemble performance that includes real or imagined characters and is based on stimulus material

Unit 2: Australian Identity students study aspects of Australian identity evident in contemporary drama practice. This may
also involve exploring the work of selected drama practitioners and associated performance styles. This unit focuses on the
use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing a devised solo or ensemble performance. Students create,
present and analyse a performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an artwork, a text and/or an icon from a
contemporary or historical Australian context.

Assessment: Suitable tasks for assessment may include: documenting the process of performance and character through a
folio, perform devised solo and/or ensemble work, oral presentation, responses to structured questions

Unit 3: Devised Ensemble Performance students explore the work of drama practitioners and they work collaboratively to
devise, develop and present an ensemble performance. Students create work that reflects a specific performance style or
one that draws on multiple performance styles and is therefore eclectic in nature. They use play-making techniques to
extract dramatic potential from stimulus material, then apply and manipulate conventions, dramatic elements, expressive
skills, performance skills and production areas. Students devise and shape their work to communicate meaning or to have a
specific impact on their audience. In addition, students document and evaluate stages involved in the creation,
development and presentation of the ensemble performance.

Unit 4: Devised Solo Performance Students develop skills in extracting dramatic potential from stimulus material and use
play-making techniques to develop and present a short solo performance. They experiment with and apply non-naturalistic
conventions, dramatic elements, expressive skills, performance skills and performance styles to shape and give meaning to
their work. Students further develop and refine these skills as they create a performance in response to a prescribed
structure, which becomes their performance exam. Students document and evaluate the stages involved in the creation,
development and presentation of their solo performance.
End-of-year Performance examination Students will present a solo performance based on a prescribed structure selected
from the VCE Drama Solo Performance Examination published annually by the VCAA. A panel appointed by the VCAA will
set the structures for, and assess the performance examination.


 Study:        Graded Assessment          Type of assessment                          Contribution to Study Score
 Drama         1                          Unit 3 Coursework                           30%
 3&4           2                          Unit 4 Coursework                           10%
               3                          Performance Examination                     35%
               4                          Written Examination                         25%




15
16
 ENGLISH/EAL - Contact: Ms Michael, Ms Ketsakidis,
 Ms Weymouth, Mr Firth, Ms Mills

 Refer to VCAA English/EAL Study Design 2017 – 2020

 Rationale
 This study aims to develop competence in the understanding and use of English for a variety of purposes sufficient to meet
 the demands of post-school employment, further education, and participation in a democratic society. It emphasises the
 integration of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical thinking. It values student diversity and particularly encourages
 learning in which students take responsibility for their language development and thus grow in confidence and in language
 skill and understanding.

 Unit 1
 In this unit, students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of
 persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences.
 Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts.

 Unit 2
 In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They analyse arguments presented and
 the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences.
 Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts
 .
 Assessment
 Suitable tasks for assessment in this unit are: an analytical response to a set text, a creative response to a set text such as a
 monologue, script, short story, illustrated narrative, short film or graphic text • an analysis of the use of argument and
 persuasive language in text/s, a text intended to position an audience. Assessment tasks for Outcome 1 must include at
 least one analytical and one creative response to set texts. One assessment task, but no more than one task, in Unit 1 must
 be in oral or multimodal form. For EAL students at least one text provided for the assessment of Outcome 2 should be in
 spoken form or have a spoken component to allow for the assessment of listening skills.

 Unit 3
 In this unit students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of
 persuasive language in texts.

 Unit 4
 In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts.
 They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media.

 Assessment

     Study                         Graded assessment       Type of assessment                    Contribution to study score (%)
     English 3&4                   1                       Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework     25
     English as an Additional      2                       Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework     25
     Language 3&4
                                   3                       Written examination (3 hours)         50




                                                                                                                                  16
17

ENGLISH LANGUAGE - Contact: Ms Michael, Ms Ketsakidis
Refer to VCAA English Language Study Design 2016 - 2020

Rationale
The study of English Language enables students to further develop and refine their own skills in reading, writing, listening to
and speaking English. Students learn about personal and public discourses in workplaces, fields of study, trades or social
groups.
In this study students read widely to develop their analytical skills and understanding of linguistics. Students are expected to
study a range of texts, including publications and public commentary about language in print and multimodal form. Students
also observe and discuss contemporary language in use, as well as consider a range of historical and contemporary written
and spoken texts.

Unit 1: Language and communication
In this unit, students consider the way language is organised and explore the various functions of language and the nature of
language as an elaborate system of signs. The relationship between speech and writing as the dominant modes of language
and the impact of situational and cultural contexts on language choices are also considered. Students investigate children’s
ability to acquire language, and the stages of language acquisition across a range of subsystems.

Unit 2: Language change
In this unit, students consider factors contributing to change over time in the English language and factors contributing to
the spread of English. They explore texts from the past and from the present, considering how all subsystems of the language
system are affected. Students also consider how the global spread of English has led to a diversification of the language and
to English now being used by more people as an additional or a foreign language than as a first language. Students consider
the cultural repercussions of the spread of English and the various possibilities for the future of English.

Assessment
Suitable tasks for assessment in this unit may be selected from the following: • a folio of annotated texts • an essay • an
investigative report • an analysis of spoken and/or written text • an analytical commentary • a case study • short-answer
questions • an analysis of data. Assessment tasks may be written, oral or multi-modal.

Unit 3: Language variation and social purpose
In this unit students investigate English language in contemporary Australian social settings, along a continuum of informal
and formal registers. Students examine the stylistic features of formal and informal language in both spoken and written
modes. Students learn how to describe the interrelationship between words, sentences and text as a means of exploring how
texts construct message and meaning. Students consider how texts are influenced by the situational and cultural contexts in
which they occur. They learn how language can be indicative of relationships, power structures and purpose through the
choice of a particular variety of language, and through the ways in which language varieties are used in processes of inclusion
and exclusion.

Unit 4: Language variation and identity
In this unit students focus on the role of language in establishing and challenging different identities. Students examine both
print and digital texts to consider the ways different identities are constructed.
Students explore how our sense of identity evolves in response to situations and experiences and is influenced by how we
see ourselves and how others see us. Through our language we express ourselves as individuals and signal our membership
of particular groups. Students explore how language can distinguish between ‘us’ and ‘them’, creating solidarity and
reinforcing social distance.

Assessment

 Study                           Graded assessment      Type of assessment                   Contribution to study score (%)
 English Language 3&4            1                      Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework    25
                                 2                      Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework    25
                                 3                      Written examination (3 hours)        50




17
18
 FOOD STUDIES - Contact: Ms Stambolziev
 Refer to VCAA Food and Technology Study Design 2017 - 2021

 Rationale
 Food and Technology is designed to give students a greater understanding of food as a commodity and knowledge of food
 preparation and production from a small scale perspective to mass production.
 Throughout the four units, students will develop skills in the planning, preparation and evaluation of food products.

 Unit 1 - Food origins
 This unit focuses on food from historical and cultural perspectives. Students investigate the origins and roles of food
 through time and across the world. In Area of Study 1 students explore how humanity has historically sourced its food,
 examining the general progression from hunter-gatherer to rural-based agriculture, to today’s urban living and global trade
 in food. They look at Australian indigenous food prior to European settlement and how food patterns have changed since,
 particularly through the influence of food production, processing and manufacturing industries and immigration. Students
 investigate cuisines that are part of Australia’s culinary identity today and reflect on the concept of an Australian cuisine.

 Unit 2 – Food Makers
 In this unit students investigate food systems in contemporary Australia. Area of Study 1 focuses on commercial food
 production industries, while Area of Study 2 looks at food production in small-scale domestic settings, as both a comparison
 and complement to commercial production. Students use practical skills and knowledge to produce foods and consider a
 range of evaluation measures to compare their foods to commercial products. They consider the effective provision and
 preparation of food in the home, and analyse the benefits and challenges of developing and using practical food skills in
 daily life. In demonstrating their practical skills, students design new food products and adapt recipes to suit particular
 needs and circumstances.

 Assessment
 Tasks include a range of practical activities, a short written report: media analysis, research inquiry, historical timeline,
 comparative food-testing analysis or product evaluation, an oral presentation, a practical demonstration, a video or
 podcast.

 Advice to students
 It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 & 4 Food Studies have studied Unit 1 & 2 Food Studies.

 Unit 3 – Food in daily life
 This unit investigates the many roles and everyday influences of food. Students explore the science of food: our physical
 need for food and how it nourishes and sometimes harms our bodies. Students investigate the physiology of eating and
 appreciating food, and the microbiology of digestion. They analyse the scientific rationale behind the Australian Dietary
 Guidelines and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (see www.eatforhealth.gov.au) and develop their understanding of
 diverse nutrient requirements. Students inquire into the role of food in shaping and expressing identity and connectedness
 and the ways in which food information can be filtered and manipulated. They investigate behavioural principles that assist
 in the establishment of lifelong, healthy dietary patterns. The practical component of this unit enables students to
 understand food science terminology and to apply specific techniques to the production of everyday food that facilitates
 the establishment of nutritious and sustainable meal patterns.

 Unit 4 – Food issues, challenges and futures
 In this unit students examine debates about global and Australian food systems. Students focus on issues about the
 environment, ecology, ethics, farming practices, the development and application of technologies, and the challenges of
 food security, food safety, food wastage, and the use and management of water and land. Students research a selected
 topic, seeking clarity on current situations and points of view, considering solutions and analysing work undertaken to solve
 problems and support sustainable futures. They practise and improve their food selection skills by interpreting food labels
 and analysing the marketing terms used on food packaging. The practical component of this unit provides students with
 opportunities to apply their responses to environmental and ethical food issues, and to extend their food production
 repertoire reflecting the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.

 Assessment

     Study              Graded assessment        Type of assessment                              Contribution to study score (%)
     Food Studies 3&4   1                        Units 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework        30
                        2                        School-assessed Task                            40
                        3                        Written examination (1½ hours)                  30

                                                                                                                                 18
19

HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Contact: Mr Jordon, Mr Lanfranchi

Refer to VCAA Health and Human Development Study Design 2018 – 2022


Rationale
VCE Health and Human Development provides students with broad understandings of health and wellbeing that reach far
beyond the individual. Students learn how important health and wellbeing is to themselves and to families, communities,
nations and global society. Students explore the complex interplay of biological, sociocultural and environmental factors
that support and improve health and wellbeing and those that put it at risk. The study provides opportunities for students
to view health and wellbeing, and development, holistically – across the lifespan and the globe, and through a lens of social
equity and justice. VCE Health and Human Development is designed to foster health literacy. As individuals and as citizens,
students develop their ability to navigate information, to recognise and enact supportive behaviours, and to evaluate
healthcare initiatives and interventions. Students take this capacity with them as they leave school and apply their learning
in positive and resilient ways through future changes and challenges. VCE Health and Human Development offers students
a range of pathways including further formal study in areas such as health promotion, community health research and
policy development, humanitarian aid work, allied health practices, education, and the health profession.

Unit 1 – Understanding Health and Wellbeing
This unit looks at health and wellbeing as a concept with varied and evolving perspectives and definitions. It takes the view
that health and wellbeing are subject to a wide range of contexts and interpretations, with different meanings for different
people. As a foundation to the understanding of health, students should investigate the World Health Organization’s (WHO)
definition and also explore other interpretations. Wellbeing is a complex combination of all dimensions of health,
characterised by an equilibrium in which the individual feels happy, healthy, capable and engaged. For the purposes of this
study, students should consider wellbeing to be an implicit element of health. In this unit students identify personal
perspectives and priorities relating to health and wellbeing, and enquire into factors that influence health attitudes, beliefs
and practices, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. Students look at multiple dimensions of health and
wellbeing, the complex interplay of influences on health and wellbeing and the indicators used to measure and evaluate
health status. With a focus on youth, students consider their own health as individuals and as a cohort. They build health
literacy through interpreting and using data, through investigating the role of food, and through extended inquiry into one
youth health focus area.

Unit 2 – Managing Health and Development
This unit investigates transitions in health and wellbeing, and development, from lifespan and societal perspectives.
Students look at changes and expectations that are part of the progression from youth to adulthood. This unit promotes
the application of health literacy skills through an examination of adulthood as a time of increasing independence and
responsibility, involving the establishment of long-term relationships, possible considerations of parenthood and
management of health-related milestones and changes. Students enquire into the Australian healthcare system and extend
their capacity to access and analyse health information. They investigate the challenges and opportunities presented by
digital media and health technologies, and consider issues surrounding the use of health data and access to quality health
care.

Assessment
The award of satisfactory completion for a unit is based on whether the student has demonstrated the set of outcomes
specified for the unit. Teachers should use a variety of learning activities and assessment tasks that provide a range of
opportunities for students to demonstrate the key knowledge and key skills in the outcomes. The areas of study, including
the key knowledge and key skills listed for the outcomes, should be used for course design and the development of learning
activities and assessment tasks. Assessment must be a part of the regular teaching and learning program and should be
completed mainly in class and within a limited timeframe. All assessments at Units 1 and 2 are school-based. Procedures for
assessment of levels of achievement in Units 1 and 2 are a matter for school decision. For this unit students are required to
demonstrate three outcomes. As a set these outcomes encompass the areas of study in the unit. Suitable tasks for
assessment in this unit may be selected from the following: • a short written report, such as a media analysis, a research
inquiry, a blog or a case study analysis • oral presentation, such as a debate or a podcast • a visual presentation such as a
graphic organiser, a concept/mind map, an annotated poster, a digital presentation • structured questions, including data
analysis. Where teachers allow students to choose between tasks they must ensure that the tasks they set are of
comparable scope and demand.




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