2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships With Ottawa O-Fest and Azimut Races July 20-28, 2019 Bulletin No. 2 (updated July 23/19) Welcome to the 2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships! This event is being organized and hosted by the Montreal Ramblers Orienteering Club and will be held in conjunction with several other orienteering events, including the Ottawa Orienteering Club’s O-Fest and several mid-week events hosted by Azimut Laurentides Orienteering Club. Registration for all competitions is available through our online site. Welcome everyone to the 2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships! On behalf of Orienteering Canada I would like to extend a huge thank you to the Montreal Ramblers for taking on the challenge of organizing our annual championships.

It is always a time when friends and competitors come together to catch up, challenge each other, and enjoy a bit of summer in the forest together. For the organizing team, it is a lot of hard work, rewarded by seeing the smiles on the faces of all the orienteers. This year the Ramblers are introducing us to new maps in new areas for orienteering. In addition they are offering us a number of low-key orienteering opportunities in advance of the championship races. Lots of opportunity for us to practice our favourite sport! Thank you Ramblers. Enjoy the week, enjoy the forest, take a second to thank a volunteer or two.

And if you pass me in the forest, don’t go by tooo fast!

On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to extend greetings to all competitors and visitors to our event. It has been exciting and challenging to organize the Canadian Orienteering Championships in the Montreal area for the first time in over 20 years. We are very grateful to the cities of Laval and Rawdon, and especially to Kinadapt Center and its owner Peter Boutin, for their support of our sport and to enable our use of their interesting terrain. The maps for the Middle and Long courses are one of a kind and we are sure you will find them interesting and challenging.

After more than a year of preparation we are ready to offer you great courses and hope that you will come again to future events! Anne Teutsch, Pres.

Orienteering Canada Dmitri Golovanov COC 2019 Director

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Table of Contents Page Topic 3 Information and Contacts 3 Schedule 4 Map 4 Registration, Race Kits, Registration Changes, Waivers and Information Desk 5 Rules 5 Start Times 5 Electronic Timing System 5 Competitor Risk & Responsibilities 6 Dogs and Drones 6 Fair Play 6 Medical & Safety 7 O-Store 7 Volunteers 8 Ottawa O-Fest 8 O-Fest Officials 8 O-Fest Middle Event 10 O-Fest Long Event 13 O-Fest Accommodation 14 Mid-Week Events 14 Azimut Laurentides Junior Orienteering Camp 14 HPP Fundraiser Relay 15 Vampire-O 16 Azimut Barebones 17 Orienteering Canada AGM and Conference 18 Maize-O-Mais 19 Canadian Championship Events 19 COC Officials & Organizing Committee 19 Start Procedure for COCs 21 Finish Procedure for COCs 22 Complaints & Protests 22 COC Sprint Event 26 COC Middle & Long Events 26 General Information 28 COC Middle Course 30 COC Long Course 32 Canadian Championship Awards 32 Accommodation 33 Banquet & Silent Auction 34 Dorwin Falls 34 Food Services 35 Sponsors

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Information and Contacts Start lists, results and updates for the Ottawa O-Fest and the Canadian Championships will be posted on the event website at coc2019.ca. Notices and updates will also be posted at each Event Centre. For information specific to the Ottawa O-Fest please email ofest@ottawaoc.ca. For information specific to the Canadian Championships please email info@coc2019.ca. Other links: Ramblers OC Website http://www.ramblersoc.ca/ Event Website http://www.coc2019.ca Email info@coc2019.ca Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ramblersorienteering Twitter https://twitter.com/ramblers_oc Schedule Date Event Location Race Start Time Saturday, July 20 Ottawa O-Fest Middle Orleans, ON 1 pm Sunday, July 21 Ottawa O-Fest Long Larose Forest, Limoges, ON 10 am Sun – Fri, July 21-26 Azimut Laurentides Junior Camp Morin Heights, QC Monday, July 22 HPP Fundraiser Race Larose Forest, Limoges, ON 10 am Tuesday, July 23 Vampire O Camping Morin Heights, QC 8 pm Wednesday, July 24 Azimut Barebones Morin Heights, QC 9 – 11 am Thursday, July 25 Orienteering Canda AGM and Conference Ski Morin-Heights Chalet, 2 nd floor 231 Rue Allen, Morin-Heights, QC 10 am Thurs – Sun, July 25- 28 Practice Course open Dorwin Falls Park, Rawdon, QC Friday, July 26 COC Sprint Race Parc Nature de Laval, Laval, QC 10 am Corn-Maze O Farm Rivest, Rawdon, QC 5 – 6:30 pm Saturday, July 27 COC Middle Event Kinadapt, Rawdon, QC 10 am Sprint & Middle Medal Ceremony Ski Montcalm, Rawdon, QC 5 pm Silent Auction Ski Montcalm 5 – 8 pm Banquet Ski Montcalm 6 – 8 pm Sunday, July 28 COC Long Event Kinadapt, Rawdon, QC 10 am

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 General Information Registration, Race Kits, Registration Changes, Waivers and Information Desk Pre-registration is required for all O-Fest and Canadian Championship events. Day of race registration for these competitions is available only to Open class participants. Day of race registration will be available for the fun events taking place during the week. Please notify the registration / information team if you change your SI stick and / or if you find any errors in your registration information (name, gender, class).

Other optional changes, such as adding a new event, changing classes or courses, will be at the discretion of the registrar.

The earlier requests are submitted the greater the likelihood that they can be accommodated. Changes requested after the registration deadline of July 6 will be made for exceptional circumstances only and are not guaranteed. Race Kit Pick-Up will be available in the arena at each race. The Registration/Information Desk will be open one hour in advance of the first start of each event (see schedule) and will remain open until all competitors have finished their courses. Our registration/information team will be happy to help you with any questions or requirements you may have.

Waivers must be signed before picking up race kits. The waiver is available online at in both English and French. Parents must sign waivers for those under 18.

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Rules This event is organized per Orienteering Canada rules which can be found at http://www.orienteering.ca/pdfs/OrienteeringCanada_Rules.pdf Start Times The start list for the O-Fest Middle, and the three COC races (Sprint, Middle & Long) is online at coc2019.ca. These start times are also printed on the race bibs. Start times for the O-Fest Long will be based on O-Fest Middle results, and will be published online Saturday evening after the results are finalized.

The HPP Relay and Vampire–O will be mass starts. Starts for Barebones event and Maize-O will be a punch start, with no pre-set start times. Electronic Timing System: SI The SPORTident (SI) punching and timing system will be used for all events. Competitors who do not own their own timing stick will be required to rent one from the organizers or purchase one from the O-Store. Competitors who are renting SI sticks will find them in their registration packages. Touchless timing will also be available for competitors using SIAC timing sticks. Each control on the course will have a flag, a control unit and a manual punch along with a control code on top of the unit.

SI sticks must be cleared and checked before each race. Once on course, a short beep and red light flash indicate confirmation that the competitor’s SI stick has registered. If confirmation is not received, competitors must use the manual punch and mark one of the “R” boxes on their map. Inform a finish official after the race if you have used a manual punch.

Competitor Risk and Responsibility Competitors must sign the event waiver, acknowledging they are participating at their own risk. Competitors must take their own safety precautions and are responsible for injuries that may occur to them during the races as well as accidents on the way to and from an event. Open fires and smoking are prohibited in all competition areas. Every competitor must carry a whistle while on course. Whistles will be for sale at the Registration Desk and the O-Store, and should be used by anybody requiring urgent help due to injury or distress. Competitors are encouraged to assist anyone who is injured, has blown their whistle, and requires physical assistance.

All maps/control descriptions specify a “safety bearing”, which will guide lost competitors to a major trail, road or the finish arena.

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Competitors must download at the download station after they reach the finish even if they do not complete their course. This is VERY important as this is how we know you are back safely and will not need to search for you in the forest. Dogs and Drones Only working dogs are permitted in the arena and on course. It is forbidden to fly a drone at all events. Fair Play All competitors shall behave with fairness and honesty.

Attempts to gain any information related to the courses, beyond that provided by the organizer, is prohibited before and during the competition. It is not permitted to bring previous orienteering maps of the competition area to the event. Team officials and spectators are not allowed to enter the competition terrain before and during the competition.

Everyone must follow the routes specified by the organizers to reach the Event Arena and Start. Competitors are not allowed to re-enter the competition area after they have finished their race and before course closure without the permission of the controller. Please respect local residents, private property, fences and walls at all times. A competitor who breaks any rule, or who benefits from the breaking of any rule, may be disqualified. GPS and GoPros® As per IOF Foot O rule 21.4, competitors shall not use or carry telecommunication equipment between entering the start area and reaching the finish of a race, unless the equipment has been approved by the organizer prior to the event.

GPS-enabled devices (watches etc.) can be carried provided that they have no map display and are not used for navigation purposes (IOF Foot O Rules 21.4). It is permitted to use a Go-Pro® or other similar recording device while on course. All such devices must be surrendered to an official at the download station in the finish chute. The devices will be labelled and available for pick-up at the Event Centre after the last competitor has started. Medical and Safety First Aid personnel will be present in the arena at all events. Whistles: All competitors are required to carry a whistle for safety purposes.

Three long blasts of a whistle indicate a competitor in need of assistance. Whistles will be available for purchase at the registration desk. Clothing: Full body cover is recommended for the Middle and Long distance competitions, including long sleeves to protect the arms from bushes.

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Natural Hazards: While competitors are very unlikely to encounter any animals during the competition, ticks carrying Lyme Disease may be encountered. Normal precautions should be taken to avoid picking up ticks while on the course, and should be supplemented by a careful post-race examination. O-Store The O-Store carries a wide range of orienteering supplies and will be set up in the arena at the O-Fest Long event and the Middle and Long Canadian Championship events.

Volunteers We are seeking volunteers for several functions during the competitions.

Please consider donating a bit of your time during the week – you can sign up online at https://signup.com/client/invitation2/secure/2676624/false#/invitation or speak to any official at the O-Fest or COC Registration Desk. Thank you!

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 PART ONE: OTTAWA O-FEST Saturday – Sunday, July 20-21 The Ottawa O-Fest will once again offer its favourite combination of a Middle event, followed the next day by a chase-start Long event. If you haven’t participated in a chase-start event before here’s how it works: on the first day (the Middle event) starts will be pre-assigned as is regularly done for pre-registration events. On the second day (the Long event) start times will be assigned based on results (by course, not category) of the Middle. The fastest person from the Middle will start first; if the second person was 20 seconds behind in the middle, they will start 20 seconds later.

This means that the first person across the finish line (for each course) has the fastest combined time for Saturday and Sunday. O-Fest awards will be based on the combined Middle-Long total time.

Ottawa O-Fest Officials Function Person in Charge Event Director Anne Teutsch Registration Nadine Cybulski Start Chief Mary-Ellen Connolly Finish Chief Eric Teutsch Volunteer Coordinator Anne Teutsch Website Bruce Glen Middle Event - Saturday, July 20, 1 pm The O-Fest Middle event will be in a completely new area that we are very excited about in far east-end Ottawa. Nestled next to the Chapel Hill community in Orleans, the forest has trails and creeks that have created nice ravines for themselves. This is a gorgeous open, feature-rich forest with a distinct lack of the rocky ground that most Ottawa areas forests are known for.

Location and Embargo Area (see map below) Arena: Chapel Hill Park, Forest Valley Drive Parking will be on the street or nearby parking lots in the local area, within easy walking distance of the arena.

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Washrooms: portable toilets at the arena. Distance to Start: Courses 1 and 2 have a 900 metre walk from the arena on residential street sidewalks. Courses 3 to 11 have a 500 metre walk to the start on residential street sidewalks and pathways. Map: Chapel Hill is a new map, mapped by Jeff Teutsch in 2018-19 to ISOM standards.

Course Setter: Bill Anderson Controller: Gord Hunter Race-Kits / Information Desk: 10:30 to 4:00 Starts: 1:00 to 2:15 (approx.) Course closes: 2 hours after last start (approx. 4:15 pm) Middle Classes & Recommended Winning Times (RWT) Course # Classes Technical Difficulty Scale RWT (min) Length (km) No. of Controls Climb (m) 1 M10 F10 Open1 1 1:7500 20 - 25 2.8 15 20 2 M11-12 F11-12 Open 2 2 1:7500 20 - 25 2.8 15 20 3 M13-14 M15-16S F13-14 F15-16S Open 3 3 1:10000 20 - 25 2.7 13 45 4 M15-16 F15-16 Open 4 3 1:10000 25 - 30 2.8 14 60 5 M75+ M80+ M85+ M90+ F75+ F80+ F8+ F90+ Open 5 4 1:7500 30 - 35 2.5 10 50 6 M17-20S F17-20S F55+ F65+ Open 6 5 1:7500 30 - 35 2.7 12 50 7 M65+ F45+ 5 1:7500 30 - 35 2.8 12 55 8 M55+ F17-18 F21S F35+ 5 1:10000 30 - 35 3.2 12 70 9 M17-18 M21S M45+ F19-20 5 1:10000 30 - 35 3.6 14 60 10 M19-20 M35+ F21E 5 1:10000 30 - 35 3.8 15 80 11 M21E 5 1:10000 30 - 35 4.5 21 110

2019 Canadian Orienteering Championships

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Long Event – Sunday, July 21, 10 am The O-Fest Long event will be held on another new map, in another newly discovered forest – the Larose Forest east of Ottawa, just north of the town of Limoges. Location and Embargo Area Arena: immediately adjacent to the parking lot, P1 at Larose Forest Parking: at Larose Forest P1 on Indian Creek Road. Washrooms: portable toilets at the arena. Distance to Start: There will be a 600 metre walk to the start along Indian Creek Road for all courses.

Map: Larose Forest is a new map, mapped by Stefan Bergstrom in 2018-19 to ISOM standards.

Course Setter: Mark Gibbard Controller: Richard Guttormson Race-Kits / Information Desk: 8:30 to 2:00 Starts: see table below Course closes: 3 hours after last start (approx. 2:15 pm) Course First start Chase Start cut-off Start interval after cut-off Your Middle finish (minutes behind first on your course) Your Long start time 1 to 5 10:00 20 minutes 30 seconds 11 min 23 sec 10:11:23 24 min 57 sec after 10:20, in 30 second intervals Mispunch, DNF, or DNS after 10:20, in 30 second intervals 6 to 11 10:30 50 minutes 30 seconds 31 min 12 sec 11:01:12 53 min 19 sec After 11:20, in 30 second intervals Mispunch, DNF, or DNS After 11:20, in 30 second intervals

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Awards: Ceremony will take place at the arena as soon as possible after the long event. Awards will be presented to first, second and third place in all age classes for the combined time of the Middle and Long events. Mapper’s Notes One hundred years ago the Larose forest was a sandy desert after farming failed in the poor soil. In 1928 reforestation started and today we can see the result with a cathedral of giant red pine covering the area. In the last decade the United Counties of Prescott-Russell have turned the forest into a great recreation resource.

A grid of forest trails are used for dog-sledding, ski-joring and cross-country skiing in the winter, and in the summer for horse riding. A dense trail network of winding mountain bike trails criss-cross the forest. The forest is a flat plateau intersected by several steep ravines that will test the orienteers’ stamina. The area is very flat with lots of trails but otherwise devoid of features. The map has no rock features, no boulders, no cliffs, something unique for the Ottawa area. The ravines will test leg strength going both down and up very steep slopes. Some parts of the map have a detailed topography of re-entrants and ridges, especially in the west side sloping down to Indian Creek.

Most of the area has open forest with fast running. Mapped vegetation is usually light green with only a few areas of thicker vegetation. The vertical green stripes on the map usually indicate areas with branches left on the ground after logging that slow the running. There are many “rides”, tractor trails seen as linear openings in the vegetation after logging. These rides are usually not mapped, with a few exceptions where there are obvious tracks or openings on the ground. The map has some unusual mapped features.

a) There are several circular earth walls on the map. In the terrain they are about a meter high, usually with a ditch on the outside. Sometime the earth wall has been turned into a mountain bike trail and in those instances only the trail is mapped. On the map you then see a trail making a small circle or oval. The earth walls were built in an attempt to contain a tree disease many years ago. Examples of earth wall circles

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 b) There are many vegetation boundaries (a row or circle of black dots) on the map, which indicate the borders or clearings in the giant red pines.

At eye level you may not see any difference from surrounding vegetation but if you look way up towards the top of the giant red pines you will see the opening in the canopy and notice the vegetation change. The map is to ISOM 2017 standard with 5 meter contours, mapped in spring and summer 2019. Enjoy! Stephan Bergstrom, Ottawa Orienteering Club Mapper

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Long Classes & Recommended Winning Times (RWT) Course # Classes Technical Difficulty Scale RWT (min) Length (km) No. of Controls Climb (m) 1 M10 F10 Open1 1 1:7500 30-35 2.1 12 15 2 M11-12 F11-12 Open 2 2 1:7500 30-35 2.4 11 15 3 M13-14 M15-16S F13-14 F15-16S Open 3 3 1:10000 30-35 3.2 10 30 4 M15-16 F15-16 Open 4 3 1:10000 50-55 4.0 13 30 5 M75+ M80+ M85+ M90+ F75+ F80+ F85+ F90+ Open 5 4 1:7500 45-50 2.4 12 25 6 M17-20S F17-20S F55+ F65+ Open 6 5 1:10000 50-55 3.8 12 75 7 M65+ F45+ 5 1:10000 50-55 5.5 18 65 8 M55+ F17-18 F21S F35+ 5 1:10000 55-60 6.7 16 95 9 M17-18 M21S M45+ F19-20 5 1:10000 55-60 7.9 19 100 10 M19-20 M35+ F21E 5 1:10000 90-100 9.0 20 110 11 M21E 5 1:15000 90-100 10.5 22 145 General Information Accommodation There are numerous hotels between the east end of Ottawa and Orleans, and there is a campground near Limoges, close to the site of the Long and HPP Relay events.

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 PART TWO: MID-WEEK EVENTS Azimut Laurentides Junior Orienteering Camp – Sunday, July 21 - Friday, July 26 Morin Heights, QC Co-ordinator: Anna Fichman Information and Details: http://azimutoc.ca/news/azimut-laurentides-junior-orienteering-camp-2019/ Please note that non-Canadian juniors are welcome; separate registration for all participants is required. HPP Fundraiser Relay – Monday, July 22 Larose Forest, ON 10:00 am The HPP Fundraiser will take place in Larose Forest, the same location as the Ottawa O-Fest Long event the day before. Arena and parking location, along with the map, will also be the same one as for the Long event.

This year’s fundraiser will be a relay – we encourage everyone to come, have fun and support your Canadian High Performance athletes. Come with a team, or let us find teammates for you!

Officials Function Person in Charge Event Director Nevin French Course Setter Pia Blake, Jennifer MacKeigan Controller Jan MacKeigan Registration Nadine Cybulski Start Chief TBD Finish Chief Eric Teutsch Volunteer Coordinator Nevin French Website Bruce Glen Map Stefan Bergstrom Details * 3 person relay teams, all coed * categories: Junior U17, Open: 17-44, Masters: 45+ * women run 2nd leg in Open * forked courses for Open and Masters * registration: Register at the Registration / Information Desk * registration deadline: course closing at Sunday Long

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Special Mapping Workshop: Immediately after the HPP Relay, Stefan Bergstrom, Chair of Orienteering Canada’s Mapping Committee, will host a mapping workshop at the site of the Relay in Larose Forest.

Everyone from experienced mappers to people interested in learning to map are encouraged to join for an afternoon of sharing ideas and techniques. Vampire O - Tuesday, July 23 Sommet Morin-Heights, QC Information and details: http://coc2019.ca/wp/vampire-o/ Orienteering for fun at night with a vampire theme and special rules. This is a Score-O team event with a mass start at dusk. Time limit is one hour. The team that brings back the punch card with the most points wins. One team is randomly chosen as “vampires”. They use a red flashlight to tag another team and rob them of their punch card, and make the tagged team the “vampires” in their turn.

The new vampires tag the next team and this continues until time is up. Winners get the brightest awards, and many more teams get fun flashy prizes.

This event is hosted by Azimut Laurentides and is on the site of the Junior Orienteering Camp. Event Director and Course Setter: Philippe Coté-Jacques Map: created in 2019. Map scale 1:5000; Contour interval 5m Registration: 7 pm Mass Start: 8 pm Course Close: 9 pm Location and Embargo Camping Morin-Heights 185 Rue Allen, Morin-Heights, QC J0R 1H0 https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ca mping+et+cabines+du+Sommet+Morin+H eights Parking 185 Rue Allen, Morin-Heights, QC J0R 1H0 https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ca mping+et+cabines+du+Sommet+Morin+H eights

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Azimut Barebones – Wednesday, July 24 Parc Basler, Morin-Heights, QC Information and Details: http://coc2019.ca/wp/azimut-barebones/ This event takes place on terrain fairly similar to Kinadapt, so is a great warm up for the COC Middle and Long races.

We call it “Barebones” because the event has few formalities: you’ll register and start whenever you are ready. Classic courses: novice, intermediate, short advanced, long advanced, so suitable for experienced runners as well as newcomers and families.

Event Director: Anna Fichman Course Setter: Thomas Kneubühler Map: created in 2019. Map scale 1:5000; Contour interval 5m Registration: 9 – 10:30 am Starts: 9 – 11 am Courses Close: 1 pm Location and Embargo Registration, information, download, results, toilets, showers located at 27 Rue Bellevue, Morin-Heights, QC J0R 1H0 https://drive.google.com/open?id=1PyTLw6V5Ma7U3gu01yBYXuKPp3lHzHK9&usp=shar ing Parking: at the Parc Basler lot and near the Chalet Bellevue

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Orienteering Canada AGM and Conference – Thursday July 25 Ski Morin-Heights Chalet, 2nd floor 231 Rue Allen, Morin-Heights, QC Orienteering Canada’s annual Conference and AGM is scheduled for Thursday, July 25, a day off from orienteering.

We hope you will join us for some interesting presentations and discussions.In addition, on Monday, July 22 there will be a mapping workshop at Larose Forest, after the HPP Fundraiser Relay. Schedule Date / Location Time Activity Monday July 22 Larose Forest, P1 1:00 - 3:00 pm On Site Mapping Workshop Thursday July 25 Ski Morin Heights Chalet, 2nd Floor 231 Rue Allen Morin Heights QC 11:00 – 11:50 am Growing Mapping in Canada 12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch 1:00 – 1:50 pm Map Reading Theory 2:00 – 2:50 pm Navigating Healthy Eating 3:00 – 4:00 pm Orienteering Canada AGM Session Details On Site Mapping Workshop - led by Stefan Bergstrom, (Orienteering Canada’s Mapping Committee Chair) this workshop is an opportunity for experienced and new mappers alike to come together and share.

Anyone who is interested in mapping will enjoy this chance to talk maps and mapping while out in the terrain, on a map.

Growing Mapping in Canada – a follow-up to the Monday mapping workshop, this indoor session will focus on a discussion of growing mapping in Canada – recruiting and training mappers so we have the skills and people resources within our own country for creating orienteering maps of the highest quality. Map Reading Theory – a presentation by Jeff Teutsch (Navigation Sports) on the theory of map reading for orienteering. Learn about various models for map reading and how you can use them to improve your orienteering skills. This presentation is relevant to all levels of orienteer. Navigating Healthy Eating - Lori Heron, Registered Dietitian, shares insights into healthy eating for all of us.

How do we eat well and stay hydrated to help us be our best in sport and in life? Annual General Meeting. Each Provincial or Territorial Orienteering Association (PTOA) is represented by one delegate at Orienteering Canada’s AGM. Anyone is welcome to attend as an observer.

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Maize-O-Mais - Friday July 26 Ferme Guy Rivest, 1305 Chemin Laliberté, Rawdon, QC Information and Details: http://coc2019.ca/wp/maize-o-mais/ This event will be held on Friday, the same day as the COC sprint event, in the late afternoon. The course will be situated in a huge corn maze the size of 8.5 soccer fields! Event Director and Course Setter: Dmitri Golovanov Map: Scale: 1:2,500 The area is a corn field. The corn is mapped as olive green. The passages are about 2 m wide. Courses and Classes Two courses are offered, 2.2 km with 13 controls or 3.8 km with 17 controls.

The length is calculated using the best probable route.

Registration: 4:45-6:30 pm Starts: 5-6:30 pm Courses Close 7:30 pm Location https://www.google.ca/maps/@46.0541164,-73.6274001,15.75z?hl=en

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 PART THREE: CANADIAN CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS Friday – Sunday, July 26-28 COC Officials and Organizing Committee Function Person in Charge Event Director Dmitri Golovanov Course Setter Sprint Scott Bohle Course Setter Middle Andrew Cornett Course Setter Long Greg Balter Controller Bruce Glen Registration Nadine Cybulski Start Chief Janet Findlay Finish Chief Eric Teutsch Volunteer Coordinator Lina Gavrilova Website Bruce Glen Bulletin Editor Janet Findlay START PROCEDURE FOR CANADIAN CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS Every event will have a Quiet Start procedure.

The beginning of the Quiet Zone will be posted at the Pre-Call Up line; competitors are requested to respect this zone throughout the entire start area. It is the competitor's responsibility to know their assigned start time and to arrive on time. The start crew will not call out for late or missing starters. There will be a separate line for late starters (see section below). Competitors must have their race bib, SI timing stick, whistle and compass when they arrive for their start. There will be a limited stock of whistles available for those who do not have them. Competitors are responsible for clearing and checking their SI stick.

Clear and Check will be located at the PreCall Up line.

The digital clocks in the start area will show the actual start time (rather the real time). Be prepared to present yourself to the start official at the Pre-Call Up line when the clock shows your start time.

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Regular Starters At the Pre-Call Up line, an official will check each competitor’s name, verify their bib number and confirm that each competitor has a whistle. Competitors without a bib, SI stick, or whistle will not be permitted to start (a limited stock of whistles will be available). At T-3 minutes, an official will check each competitor’s bib number, SI number, and confirm that their SI stick has been cleared.

At T-2 minutes, competitors will pick-up the appropriate loose control description. These will be clearly labelled by Class.

Competitors in Classes F10, F11-12, M 10, M11-12, Open1 and Open 2 will have the choice between English language control descriptions and IOF symbolic control descriptions. At T-1 minutes, competitors will be sectioned by class: a - M/F 10, M/F 11-12, M-F 13/14 and M/F 15-16 competitors will proceed in a separate chute to their appropriate map box and write their name on the back of the top map. They will then be permitted to flip their map over and review their course. The start clock will beep once at T-10 seconds. The start countdown will be indicated by a series of 6 beeps at -5 to 0 seconds.

At the last (long) beep the competitor’s race time begins. The competitor is responsible for ensuring that they have the correct map for their class; b – all other competitors will proceed to the map pick up zone and find their appropriate map box. Competitors will write their name on the back of the top map but will leave the map face down in the map box. The start clock will beep once at T-10 seconds. The start countdown will be indicated by a series of 6 beeps at -5 to 0 seconds. At the last (long) beep the competitor’s race time begins and the competitor can take the map from the map bin.

The competitor is responsible for ensuring that they have the correct map for their class.

All competitors must follow the marked route to the start point which is indicated by a triangle on the competition map, and by a control stand and flag in the terrain. There is no SI unit at the start flag; competitors will NOT punch at the start triangle. Late Starters Competitors arriving at the pre-call up line after their pre-assigned time must check in with an official. If possible, they will be directed to the appropriate section of the regular start chute and will start normally. Otherwise, they will be directed to the Late Start chute.

Regardless of which chute they are directed to, they are responsible for clearing and checking their SI stick at the Pre-Call Up line.

If directed to the Late Start chute, a Late Start official will check their bib, SI number, whistle and confirm that their SI stick has been cleared. A loose control description and the competition map will be handed to the

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 competitor by the official. It is the competitor's responsibility to check that they receive the correct map and control description. The competitor will start when told to do so, using a punch Start (IOF Foot O Rule 22.9). The official will also record the actual starting time. The results of competitors who start late will be based on their original, assigned start time (with no time compensation). Only if their lateness is the fault of the organizer will their actual race time be used (IOF Foot O Rule 22.10).

If upon arrival at the late start line the competitor is less than half the start interval after their assigned start time*, they will be allowed to start immediately.

If the competitor arrives more than half the start interval after their assigned start time, they must wait until the half start interval after the next starter. This is to ensure that a late starter does not interfere with, or start too close to, someone on the same course. Any competitor who starts late, whether through their own fault or otherwise, should not discuss this with the start officials. Instead, if the competitor believes the organizer is responsible, they should make a complaint at the Event Centre within 30 minutes of finishing the race (see Complaints and Protests). *e.g. A competitor is late for their assigned start time at 10:20:00: they proceed through the late start lane.

If they arrive at the start line before 10:20:30 (Sprint), 10:21:00 (Middle) or 10:21:30 (Long), they can start immediately (after punching the Start unit). If they arrive at the start line later than these listed times, they will be permitted to start at 10:21:30 (Sprint), 10:23:00 (Middle) or 10:24:30 (Long), after punching the Start unit.

Open Starters Competitors in the Open categories do not have assigned start times, but must start within the Open start window listed for each event. They must clear and check their SI sticks near the Pre-Call Up line, and then proceed to the Open/Late Start chute and follow the instructions of the start crew. All competitors in the Open/Late start have an SI unit at the start line that must be punched when crossing the start line. FINISH PROCEDURE The route from the last control to the Finish control will be marked. After punching the Finish control competitors will surrender their maps and proceed directly to the Download station.

All competitors must download even if they did not complete their course. Each competitor will receive a printout of their split times along with confirmation that all controls have been punched in the correct order.

Maps will be available after the last competitor has started their course. Competitors using rented SI sticks are requested to return them to the Finish team after their final race. Results will be displayed near the finish area and also will be available online at http://results.coc2019.ca.

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Light refreshments will be available for finishers after the download. All competitors must download whether or not they complete their course. This is a safety procedure to confirm that all participants are off the course.

Competitors who miss one or more controls, do not punch the controls in the correct order, or exceed the maximum time on course will be disqualified. Complaints and Protests Complaints must be made to a member of the Event Committee at the Registration/Information Desk. Members of the Event Committee are Stephan Bergstrom (IOF advisor), Bruce Glen (O300 controller), and Jeff Teutsch (Canadian National Team coach).

There is no fee to lodge a complaint. Complaints must be registered within 30 minutes of a competitor finishing their course and/or within 15 minutes of the posting of provisional results. The committee will make a decision and notify the complainant as soon as possible. If the complainant is not satisfied with the committee’s decision, a protest may be lodged. Protests must be delivered in writing to the Event Committee on a form available at the Registration/Information Desk within one hour of the posting of the provisional results. There will be a fee of $40 CAD to lodge a protest; the fee will be refunded if the protest is upheld.

COC Sprint Event – Friday, July 26, 10 am Parc Nature de Laval, 901 avenue du Parc, Laval, QC (20 km north of Montreal) Embargo Area – this area is out of bounds for competitors, team officials, coaches, family members, and all other persons who, through familiarity with the terrain, might influence results of the competition. Training sessions may not take place in this area, and existing maps of the embargo area may not be taken into the arena on the day of the event. The embargo is in effect until the finish of the competition.

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Officials Function Person in Charge Course Setter Scott Bohle Controller Bruce Glen Map Dmitri Golovanov Access and Parking - parking in the park is limited and some of the lots are part of the embargo area.

Free parking is available on the south side of Boulevard de la Concorde Est behind the Aréna Yvon-Chartrand. If that lot is full there is more parking in the Ecole Georges-Vanier lot behind the arena lot. If using public transit, take the Montreal Metro Orange line to Cartier station and then change to bus 48 to Park Nature (33 minute bus ride).

Washrooms – located in the St-Vincent swimming pool near the Arena Yvon-Chartrand. There is also access to dressing rooms and showers at no charge. There is a fee to use the swimming pool. There are additional washrooms in the hockey arena near the second parking lot. Arena and Distance to Start – The arena location is marked on the diagram below. Please consider this a preliminary map, as some locations may change. The start will be approximately 300 m. from the arena.

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Maps & Terrain Centre de la Nature de Laval is a green space that was developed on the site of an old quarry just north of Montreal.

Laval has put a lot of attractions into the park which makes it an interesting area for families and sprints. There will be no water provided on the course but there are many water fountains throughout the park. The map has been converted to the ISSOM 2019 standard. Map scale: 1:4000; Contour interval: 2 m; Map size: 8.5 x 14 inches Course Time Limit 1 hr.

Since the map has used the ISSOM 2019 standard, which will not be in effect until January 2020, please note the following important differences from the current ISSOM 2007: 1. Vegetation density: 3 levels are used in the 2019 standard: dense, middle and light. Dense vegetation (dark green) is defined as impassable and shall not be passed through, even if it is practically possible. The vegetation that may be passed through is shown as middle density green, even if it could be very slow, ie less than 20% of open forest speed.

2. The new retaining wall symbol is used for walls that are seen only from one side.

Half-dots point to the lower level. Other map notes: - the black cross symbol (man-made object) represents a playground object or permanent picnic table; - a blue square represents a drinking fountain. The site was last used for orienteering in 2017 for a Ramblers club meet. A copy of the previous version of the map is available at http://www.ramblersoc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/laval.jpg Classes & Recommended Winning Times (RWT) Course # Classes RWT (min) Length (km) Climb (m) Controls 1 M10 F10 Open 1 12-15 1.5 15 13 2 M11-12 M13-14 M15-16S F11-12 F13-14 F15-16S Open 2 12-15 1.8 20 13 3 M75 M80 M85 M90 F75 F80 F85 F90 Open 3 12-15 1.7 20 11 4 M17-20S M65 F17-20S F45 F55 F65 Open 4 12-15 3.0 30 20 5 M15-16 M55 F15-16 F17-18 F19-20 F21S F21E F35 Open 5 12-15 3.1 30 20 6 M17-18 M19-20 M21S M21E M35 M45 12-15 (15+ for M45) 3.9 40 26

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Sprint Course Setter’s Notes Although the site of the Laval Nature Park was once a remote quarry in farmland, it is now an extensively utilized major metropolitan park. Only small remnants of the original hard wood forest remain and the park is now dominated by a range of gardens, playgrounds, mock villages, ski runs, lakes, pétanque pitches, amphitheaters, art installations, animal pastures, and swimming pools. If this diversity isn’t sufficient for orienteering complexity, there are also steep bluffs, water “towers”, and a plethora of trees, thickets, and fences.

The musical tastes in the park are catered to with a set “musical” stairs and a community piano. Mapping this diversity is a singular evolving challenge, and since being quarantined the park has been hit by a major ice storm along with the ubiquitous emerald ash borer. No less a challenge has been course setting in such a heavily used park. After the original design was formulated a day camp was erected at our start, and during a recent visit just 7 days, ago the finishing pitch was dominated and filled by tents for a beer festival. At one stage one of the final controls looked to be either the Sleiman or the Labatts tent/tap.

Remarkably all of this in now gone with little trace of the tents, beer, or food stands remaining. We are able to provide some hopefully interesting and challenging courses for the Sprint. You will find the terrain underfoot firm with good running, with climb being only a minor feature of these courses.

Particular notes: 1. Please stay out of the gardens. These are marked olive green and thus out of bounds, but the park has specifically asked us to remind everyone of this; 2. There are bleachers or sets seats around the amphitheater and the sports fields. These are marked with thin black lines; 3. There are several bike paths through the park and all of the courses cross at least one of these. Please follow the marked/streamed finish chute as this chute parallels one of the bike paths. Scott Bohle, Course Setter Bruce Glen, Controller

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 COC Middle & Long Events – Sat-Sun, July 27-28 Kinadapt Centre, 1800 Laurin, Rawdon, J0K 1S0 (80 km north of Montreal) Embargo Area Parking Along the road to the Kinadapt building.

Washrooms Portable toilets will be situated along the road near the arena. Directions to Kinadapt http://coc2019.ca/wp/kinadapt/

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Middle and Long Arena Layout Maps & Terrain The Middle and Long events will use a new map of the Kinadapt Sport Centre, an outdoor activity center located just east of the town of Rawdon, about 80 km. north of Montreal. During the summer there are approximately 80 dogs on site; they occupy an area near the base building which is mapped out of bounds. Even if you’re a dog lover please avoid this area during the races; if you hear barking use it as a navigation tool!

The surrounding terrain is quite rugged, with areas of rocky surfaces and dense forest.

Exercise caution while moving on rough surfaces; slopes can be slippery when wet. Poison ivy may be encountered in a few areas. There are many cliffs, the highest of which is 110m. Cliffs mapped as passable are 1 – 2 m high, with various degrees of slope and shape. Impassable cliffs (mapped with a thicker black line) are 2 – 10m high. As some are high and potentially dangerous, please stay away from the edges. Good route choices should not go via dangerous cliffs.

A couple of small rivers are located in deep ravines with steep slopes. Although they are crossable they are not the best route choices. Water features (marshes, streams) may be a little different than mapped, depending on the amount of the rainfall leading up to the event. There are many trails on the property. Some smaller mapped trails may be indistinct, while other mapped trails have blue or red tape markers. Some former logging roads that have not been used recently may be overgrown and are mapped with a “narrow ride” symbol.

The highest point on the map is approximately 240m above sea level and overlooks the city of Montreal.

Emergency bearing is west. The area had one previous orienteering event, a snowshoe score O. The map was a winter edition based on preliminary data and had limited field checking. It is available here: http://coc2019.ca/wp/wpcontent/uploads/2019/07/HuskyO.pdf

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Middle Course Saturday, July 27, 10 am Map scale 1:10,000 or 1:7500 (see chart below) Contour interval: 5 m; Map size: 8.5 x 11 inches Distance from Arena to Start: approximately 600 m There will be limited water provided on the course. Course Time Limit: 90 minutes Officials Function Person in Charge Course Setter Andrew Cornett Controller Bruce Glen Map Dmitri Golovanov Classes & Recommended Winning Times (RWT) Course # Classes Scale RWT (min) Course Length (km) Climb (m) Water Stops Controls 1 M10 F10 Open1 1:7500 25 2.5 40 1 14 2 M11-12 F11-12 Open 2 1:7500 25 2.4 60 - 10 3 M13-14 M15-16S F13-14 F15-16S Open 3 1:10000 25 2.5 55 1 11 4 M15-16 F15-16 Open 4 1:10000 30 2.7 65 1 12 5 M75 M80 F75 Open 5 1:7500 30 1.7 40 1 10 5X M85 M90 F80 F85 F90 1:7500 30 1.1 30 2 9 6 M17-20S F17-20S F55 F65 Open 6 1:7500 35 2.3 55 1 11 7 M65 F45 Open 7 1:7500 35 2.7 80 1 13 8 M55 F35 Open 8 1:10000 35 3.3 130 1 14 9 M45 F17-18 F21S Open 9 1:10000 35 3.7 160 1 17 10 M17-18 M21S M35 F19-20 F21E 1:10000 35 3.9 165 1 17 11 M19-20 M21E 1:10000 35 4.7 180 1 19

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Middle Distance Course Setter’s Notes Rawdon and the Kinadapt Centre are located in the Laurentian Uplands (Laurentides en Francais), remnants of a very old mountain range extending across southern Quebec from the Gatineau River to the Saguenay Fjord. The Laurentian Uplands contains very old rocks deposited before the Cambrian Period 540 million years ago. The mapped area around the Kinadapt Centre spans several large hills and the valleys between them. A high percentage of the mapped terrain is forested, although there are also some open fields near the Kinadapt Centre.

The forest is mostly mature and features a mix of deciduous and coniferous trees, with broadleaf trees dominant in some areas, and coniferous trees dominant in other areas. Visibility and runability are variable – good/fast in some areas, less so in others. Considerable effort has been made to ensure that the map reflects the relative runability as much as possible. The mapped area includes a dense trail network that is used primarily for dog-sledding in winter, but also for hiking and biking in summer. In addition to the contours and numerous topographic features, the terrain boasts many cliffs and boulders of all types and sizes.

Smaller boulders and cliffs (less than 1m in height) are not mapped. The steeper slopes can be quite rugged and rocky, which can impact running speed and may influence route choice. The area also features some streams, ponds and marshes, particularly in low-lying areas. On competition weekend, the marshes may be a bit smaller or larger than mapped, depending on the amount of rainfall leading up to the event. Some of the trails tend to get muddy in wet weather. Mosquitoes have eased off somewhat, but are still numerous in damper, shadier areas.

The middle distance courses have been set to exploit some of the best woods in the area, and provide a good test of technical orienteering skills, particularly detailed navigation through complex terrain. Runners who are able to adjust their speed and adapt their technique on the fly to suit variations in the complexity of the terrain and the navigational challenge should be rewarded. The properties of each course are summarized in the following table. All 12 middle distance courses will use a single start located 600m (straight line distance) from the arena. The mandatory marked route from the arena to the middle start is ~850m long with 20-25m climb, all along either a gravel road or trails.

The start triangle is located beside a trail ~35m beyond the timed start line. Course 1 features marked routes (marked with ribbons hanging from tree branches) in two locations. The first marked route will guide course 1 runners past the start triangle onto a trail towards their first control. The second marked route highlights an indistinct trail between controls 3 and 4. Runners on course 1 (and all other courses) should prepare for sections of muddy trail.

Courses 5, 5x, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11 cross the private gravel road that is only used to access the Kinadapt Centre, at one of two crossing points. Runners on course 1 will follow the road for ~50m where it terminates at the Kinadapt Centre. Very few vehicles are expected to be travelling along this road during the competition. Marshals will be stationed where course 1 turns onto the road and at both crossing points, and will do their best to slow down and stop any vehicles that wish to pass until it is safe for them to do so. However, competitors are ultimately responsible for their own safety and are reminded to check both ways for moving vehicles before crossing the gravel road.

Runners on course 1 are reminded to watch out for vehicles and strongly advised to walk or run along the edge of the road without crossing over to the other side.

Courses 9 – 11 include a marked route along the edge of the arena to a spectator control, where loud, enthusiastic and boisterous cheering is definitely encouraged! Finally, since there will be well over 100 controls set up in the terrain, runners are advised and encouraged to check control codes before dibbling!! Andrew Cornett, Course Setter; Bruce Glen, Controller

Canadian Orienteering Championships 2019 Long Course Sunday, July 28, 10 am Map scale 1:10,000; Courses 9, 10, 11 - 1:15000; Courses 1, 2, 5 & 5X - 1:7500 Contour interval: 5 m; Map size: 8.5 x 11 inches Distance from Arena to Start: approximately 200 m.

Course Time Limit: 3 hrs. Officials Function Person in Charge Course Setter Greg Balter (USA) Controller Bruce Glen Map Dmitri Golovanov Classes & Probable Winning Times (PWT) Course # Classes Scale PWT (min) Course Length (km) Climb (m) Water Stops Controls 1 M10 F10 Open1 1:7500 28 3.1 70 2 16 2 M11-12 F11-12 Open 2 1:7500 31 3.1 85 1 10 3 M13-14 M15-16S F13-14 F15-16S Open 3 1:10000 35 3.4 95 2+1 12 4 M15-16 F15-16 Open 4 1:10000 55 4.4 190 0+4 10 5 M75 M80 F75 Open 5 1:7500 49 3.2 40 2+2 9 5X M85 M90 F80 F85 F90 1:7500 40 2.0 70 2+2 8 6 M17-20S F17-20S F55 F65 Open 6 1:10000 56 4.2 190 0+2 11 7 M65 F45 Open 7 1:10000 60 4.9 170 2+2 15 8 M55 F17-18 F21S F35 Open 8 1:10000 65 6.3 270 1+2 13 9 F19-20 1:15000 72 7.1 280 3+2 18 9A M17-18 M21S M45 Open 9 1:10000 72 7.1 280 3+2 18 10 M19-20 M35 F21E 1:15000 100 9.9 380 4+2 17 11 M21E 1:15000 100 11.4 480 5+2 19

You can also read