BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 1 Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update 2010 - 2011 BUILDING MOMENTUM Measuring, monitoring and reporting LOW CARBON OXFORD

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

2 Table of Contents Foreword 3 Executive Summary 4 Introduction 6 City of Oxford Emissions 8 Buildings – Commercial and Industrial 10 Transport 19 Domestic 24 Recommendations 33 Appendix 1: Low Carbon Oxford Charter 35 Appendix 2: List of Low Carbon Oxford Pathfinders 36 Appendix 3: Summary Data from Pathfinders 38 Acknowledgements. This report was commissioned by Oxford City Council on behalf of Low Carbon Oxford.

It was written by Emma Alexander, Katie King and Julia Patrick with input from a range of Low Carbon Oxford Pathfinders. It was edited by Jo Colwell, Ian Halliday, Paul Robinson and Jenny Carr of Oxford City Council. The design work is by Nicky Downes. Photographs were supplied by MINI Plant Oxford, Oxford Brookes University, CAG Oxfordshire, Oxford Bus Company, Oxfordshire County Council, Lucy Properties, Oxford City Council and Low Carbon West Oxford Building Momentum is an important step for Low Carbon Oxford. This report allows us to better understand CO2 emissions in Oxford and by doing this to take concerted and effective action together.

In a very short time Low Carbon Oxford has succeeded in bringing together 29 Pathfinders who represent a significant proportion of the carbon emissions from Oxford City in order to collaborate in taking action to move towards a sustainable future for the city. LCO is an important and groundbreaking initiative of which we can all be proud. This report is an important start; it provides an initial CO2 emissions baseline for Pathfinders and begins to show trends in carbon emissions. Instead of relying on national statistics we have worked with individual Pathfinders to gather data about what the picture on emissions really looks like on the ground in Oxford.

Alongside the measuring, monitoring and reporting, captured here are some wonderful case studies showcasing examples of best practice in carbon reduction in Oxford from the great work that Pathfinders are doing. My real hope is that this will inspire others to action.

We are building momentum for positive change and I congratulate all the Pathfinder organisations who feature in this report. DR BARBARA HAMMOND Director, Low Carbon Oxford Foreword

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

2 Table of Contents Foreword 3 Executive Summary 4 Introduction 6 City of Oxford Emissions 8 Buildings – Commercial and Industrial 10 Transport 19 Domestic 24 Recommendations 33 Appendix 1: Low Carbon Oxford Charter 35 Appendix 2: List of Low Carbon Oxford Pathfinders 36 Appendix 3: Summary Data from Pathfinders 38 Acknowledgements. This report was commissioned by Oxford City Council on behalf of Low Carbon Oxford.

It was written by Emma Alexander, Katie King and Julia Patrick with input from a range of Low Carbon Oxford Pathfinders. It was edited by Jo Colwell, Ian Halliday, Paul Robinson and Jenny Carr of Oxford City Council. The design work is by Nicky Downes. Photographs were supplied by MINI Plant Oxford, Oxford Brookes University, CAG Oxfordshire, Oxford Bus Company, Oxfordshire County Council, Lucy Properties, Oxford City Council and Low Carbon West Oxford Building Momentum is an important step for Low Carbon Oxford. This report allows us to better understand CO2 emissions in Oxford and by doing this to take concerted and effective action together.

In a very short time Low Carbon Oxford has succeeded in bringing together 29 Pathfinders who represent a significant proportion of the carbon emissions from Oxford City in order to collaborate in taking action to move towards a sustainable future for the city. LCO is an important and groundbreaking initiative of which we can all be proud. This report is an important start; it provides an initial CO2 emissions baseline for Pathfinders and begins to show trends in carbon emissions. Instead of relying on national statistics we have worked with individual Pathfinders to gather data about what the picture on emissions really looks like on the ground in Oxford.

Alongside the measuring, monitoring and reporting, captured here are some wonderful case studies showcasing examples of best practice in carbon reduction in Oxford from the great work that Pathfinders are doing. My real hope is that this will inspire others to action.

We are building momentum for positive change and I congratulate all the Pathfinder organisations who feature in this report. DR BARBARA HAMMOND Director, Low Carbon Oxford Foreword

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 4 5 Background The Low Carbon Oxford (LCO) programme was launched in October 2010 with 15 Pathfinder organisations initially signed up 1 . As momentum grew in the first year, membership increased to 25 organisations representing a large proportion of Oxford City’s carbon emissions.

In this report we present data on Pathfinders’ CO2 emissions for the first time. This report is a starting point. It provides an initial CO2 emissions baseline for Pathfinders and begins to show trends in carbon emissions. As LCO was only launched in October 2010, this report presents a baseline and reports on progress for a limited number of Pathfinders. In future years we will be able to report on progress for the majority of Pathfinders and show the impact that LCO is having on carbon emissions in the City.

We are proud to have reached this point. As well as presenting data, this report is about celebrating achievements and showcasing examples of best practice in carbon reduction in Oxford. We hope that it will inspire others to get involved in this collective movement to reduce the carbon footprint of Oxford City. We recognise that there are some limitations to the data collection process and we aim to improve this in future years. Summary of key trends Data from the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) tells us that the City of Oxford emissions are generally declining over time, showing an 11% reduction from 2005 to 2009.

They also suggest that, in the industrial and commercial sector, emissions from electricity are more volatile and will need to be addressed to hit 2020 targets.

Pathfinder data in the commercial and industrial sector show how Pathfinders significantly impact Oxford’s carbon footprint. In 2009 LCO Pathfinders represented just under half of the Industrial and Commercial Footprint in Oxford and 9% of the total Oxford transport footprint (the latter to be expected because Pathfinders are mostly reporting only fleet and business miles). Of the nine organisations that reported data for 2010 and 2011, all of them reported a reduction in both gas and electricity 2 (due to the timescales involved in reporting not all Pathfinders were able to report on gas and electricity consumption for 2011).

This is extremely encouraging and demonstrates that even at this early stage Pathfinders are reducing their CO2 emissions and contributing to reducing the carbon footprint of Oxford. Of the four Pathfinders that provided transport data for 2010 and 2011, two reported a reduction in CO2 emissions 3 . Taking action Pathfinders are implementing a great number and variety of actions, only some of which we are able to highlight in this report. In future years we will report on further examples of best practice and will report in more detail on the CO2 savings from these individual initiatives. We found that for the majority of Pathfinders, carbon emissions have an impact on business decisions and a significant proportion of Pathfinders are publicly reporting emissions, demonstrating openness and willing to share performance.

Households and communities Measuring energy consumption and emissions in the domestic sector is carried out at national level by DECC 4 (the dataset formerly used for indicator NI 186). In Oxford, we are starting to see initiatives in communities and in the private and social rented sectors to measure energy use and carbon emissions in a systematic way, and use these measurements to inform and drive carbon reductions at a local level. In the Domestic section we therefore discuss specific initiatives from the six Pathfinder organisations representing the sector: Lucy Properties (private rental sector), A2Dominion (housing association), Oxford City Council (social housing), Low Carbon West Oxford (local community charity), West Oxford Community Renewables, WOCoRe (local community renewable energy enterprise) and The Community Action Group, CAG (network of local voluntary groups in Oxfordshire engaging in carbon reduction activities).

  • Executive Summary 1 2Degrees, A2Dominion, B&Q, Blake Lapthorn, Grafton plc (Buildbase), Low Carbon West Oxford, Marks and Spencer, MINI Plant Oxford, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford City Council, Oxfordshire County Council, Serco, Stagecoach, Unipart and University of Oxford 2 Oxford City Council -10.9%, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust -5.6%, Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action -11.5%, Oxford County Council (excluding schools) -10.4% Oxford County Council Schools -15.5%, The Oxford Bus Company - 8.1%, Unipart Group -17.7%, MINI Plant Oxford -12.4% and Linacre College -11.9% 3 Oxford City Council and Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action The benefits of sharing and collaboration One of the key benefits of being involved in LCO is that Pathfinders are able to share examples of best practice and initiatives with one-another and across different sectors. We hope the case studies within this report inspire others to get involved and be part of this exciting project to reduce the carbon footprint of Oxford. How to get involved If you would like to find out more about LCO and get involved, please visit our website, www.lowcarbonoxford.org or contact Jennifer Carr on 01865 252564 or email lowcarbonoxford@oxford.gov.uk. 4 The NI 186 indicator data set was developed by government to support local authority carbon reduction, providing a nationally consistent data set with a 2005 baseline. Although the national indicators are no longer used to monitor local authority performance by central government the dataset is still published annually by DECC. The data provides estimates of emissions from industrial and commercial, domestic and road transport but excludes aviation, shipping, ETS sites and motorways because these are not considered to be within the influence of local authorities. “
  • The Hub and Low Carbon Oxford pushed forward this idea ofcollaboration and how to work with the limited resources. We’re now working a lot closer than before which I think it great. It’s really, really important because everyone has got limited funding, limited resources [and] limited time.” LCO Pathfinder
BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 4 5 Background The Low Carbon Oxford (LCO) programme was launched in October 2010 with 15 Pathfinder organisations initially signed up 1 . As momentum grew in the first year, membership increased to 25 organisations representing a large proportion of Oxford City’s carbon emissions. In this report we present data on Pathfinders’ CO2 emissions for the first time. This report is a starting point. It provides an initial CO2 emissions baseline for Pathfinders and begins to show trends in carbon emissions.

As LCO was only launched in October 2010, this report presents a baseline and reports on progress for a limited number of Pathfinders. In future years we will be able to report on progress for the majority of Pathfinders and show the impact that LCO is having on carbon emissions in the City.

We are proud to have reached this point. As well as presenting data, this report is about celebrating achievements and showcasing examples of best practice in carbon reduction in Oxford. We hope that it will inspire others to get involved in this collective movement to reduce the carbon footprint of Oxford City. We recognise that there are some limitations to the data collection process and we aim to improve this in future years. Summary of key trends Data from the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) tells us that the City of Oxford emissions are generally declining over time, showing an 11% reduction from 2005 to 2009.

They also suggest that, in the industrial and commercial sector, emissions from electricity are more volatile and will need to be addressed to hit 2020 targets.

Pathfinder data in the commercial and industrial sector show how Pathfinders significantly impact Oxford’s carbon footprint. In 2009 LCO Pathfinders represented just under half of the Industrial and Commercial Footprint in Oxford and 9% of the total Oxford transport footprint (the latter to be expected because Pathfinders are mostly reporting only fleet and business miles). Of the nine organisations that reported data for 2010 and 2011, all of them reported a reduction in both gas and electricity 2 (due to the timescales involved in reporting not all Pathfinders were able to report on gas and electricity consumption for 2011).

This is extremely encouraging and demonstrates that even at this early stage Pathfinders are reducing their CO2 emissions and contributing to reducing the carbon footprint of Oxford. Of the four Pathfinders that provided transport data for 2010 and 2011, two reported a reduction in CO2 emissions 3 . Taking action Pathfinders are implementing a great number and variety of actions, only some of which we are able to highlight in this report. In future years we will report on further examples of best practice and will report in more detail on the CO2 savings from these individual initiatives. We found that for the majority of Pathfinders, carbon emissions have an impact on business decisions and a significant proportion of Pathfinders are publicly reporting emissions, demonstrating openness and willing to share performance.

Households and communities Measuring energy consumption and emissions in the domestic sector is carried out at national level by DECC 4 (the dataset formerly used for indicator NI 186). In Oxford, we are starting to see initiatives in communities and in the private and social rented sectors to measure energy use and carbon emissions in a systematic way, and use these measurements to inform and drive carbon reductions at a local level. In the Domestic section we therefore discuss specific initiatives from the six Pathfinder organisations representing the sector: Lucy Properties (private rental sector), A2Dominion (housing association), Oxford City Council (social housing), Low Carbon West Oxford (local community charity), West Oxford Community Renewables, WOCoRe (local community renewable energy enterprise) and The Community Action Group, CAG (network of local voluntary groups in Oxfordshire engaging in carbon reduction activities).

  • Executive Summary 1 2Degrees, A2Dominion, B&Q, Blake Lapthorn, Grafton plc (Buildbase), Low Carbon West Oxford, Marks and Spencer, MINI Plant Oxford, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford City Council, Oxfordshire County Council, Serco, Stagecoach, Unipart and University of Oxford 2 Oxford City Council -10.9%, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust -5.6%, Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action -11.5%, Oxford County Council (excluding schools) -10.4% Oxford County Council Schools -15.5%, The Oxford Bus Company - 8.1%, Unipart Group -17.7%, MINI Plant Oxford -12.4% and Linacre College -11.9% 3 Oxford City Council and Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action The benefits of sharing and collaboration One of the key benefits of being involved in LCO is that Pathfinders are able to share examples of best practice and initiatives with one-another and across different sectors. We hope the case studies within this report inspire others to get involved and be part of this exciting project to reduce the carbon footprint of Oxford. How to get involved If you would like to find out more about LCO and get involved, please visit our website, www.lowcarbonoxford.org or contact Jennifer Carr on 01865 252564 or email lowcarbonoxford@oxford.gov.uk. 4 The NI 186 indicator data set was developed by government to support local authority carbon reduction, providing a nationally consistent data set with a 2005 baseline. Although the national indicators are no longer used to monitor local authority performance by central government the dataset is still published annually by DECC. The data provides estimates of emissions from industrial and commercial, domestic and road transport but excludes aviation, shipping, ETS sites and motorways because these are not considered to be within the influence of local authorities. “
  • The Hub and Low Carbon Oxford pushed forward this idea ofcollaboration and how to work with the limited resources. We’re now working a lot closer than before which I think it great. It’s really, really important because everyone has got limited funding, limited resources [and] limited time.” LCO Pathfinder
BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting
BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 6 7 Low Carbon Oxford (LCO) brings together private, public and non-profit organisations in a programme of collaboration, with the aim of reducing the City of Oxford’s carbon footprint. LCO members, or Pathfinders, have signed up to a Charter (see appendix 1) with the following commitments:
  • Collaborate to reduce our carbon footprints across our sites and operations in Oxford City by a minimum of 3% average, every year, for at least the next ten years;
  • Create a low carbon, sustainable economy in the Oxford area which will be an example to cities across the country;
  • Collaborate on creating more green jobs, increased prosperity and opportunity for all;
  • Support a programme of best practice sharing and piloting of sustainable innovations;
  • Report each year on the progress we are making.
  • The LCO programme was launched in October 2010 with 15 Pathfinder organisations initially signed up 5 . As momentum grew in the first year, membership increased to 25 organisations (see appendix 1) representing a large proportion of Oxford City carbon emissions. In this report we present data on Pathfinders’ CO2 emissions for the first time. In order to realise the Charter commitments, Low Carbon Oxford needs to develop into a strategy that will deliver 40% carbon reductions against the 2005 baseline by 2020. Targets to 2020 are shown in the box below, based on DECC Local Authority data 6 . Low Carbon Oxford – Targets for 40% reduction by 2020
  • Industrial and commercial footprint
  • Businesses to work individually and collectively to reduce the industrial and commercial footprint from 563,000 tonnes of CO2 in 2005 to 338,000 tonnes in 2020.
  • Domestic footprint
  • Households to work individually and as part of their communities to reduce the domestic footprint from 308,000 tonnes of CO2 in 2005 to 185,000 tonnes in 2020. This target means that:
  • Either one third of the City housing stock of 63,000 houses has to be retrofitted to achieve 80% reductions in carbon emissions by 2020;
  • Or the whole stock of 63,000 houses has to be retrofitted to achieve 40% reductions in carbon emissions by 2020. Transport footprint
  • City and County Councils to work with key actors to reduce road transport emissions from 145,000 tonnes of CO2 in 2005 to 87,000 tonnes in 2020.
  • 5 Degrees, A2Dominion, B&Q, Blake Lapthorn, Grafton plc (Buildbase), Low Carbon West Oxford, Marks and Spencer, MINI Plant Oxford, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford City Council, Oxfordshire County Council, Serco, Stagecoach, Unipart and University of Oxford. 6 “Emissions within the scope of influence of Local Authorities for 2005-2009”, previously NI 186 data. Introduction Latest data for 2009 shows that CO2 emissions are 11% lower than in 2005, an average 2.7% reduction per year, with each category contributing as follows:
  • The industrial and commercial footprint is 10% lower than 2005 although the emissions have been fairly volatile with emissions in 2006 and 2008 higher than the 2005 baseline year;
  • The domestic footprint is 15% lower and shows a consistent tracking down;
  • The transport footprint is 8% lower than in 2005.

As the economy picks up and once many of the easiest measures have been implemented, collaboration under LCO’s Energy Efficiency Forum and similar initiatives will become increasingly important to maintain these trends and to meet the 2020 targets. In the LCO ‘one year on’ report published in 2011, LCO made a commitment to set up a Measuring, Monitoring and Reporting process and to produce the first report presenting data on Pathfinders CO2 emissions. In this report, for the first time, we present data from 12 Pathfinders representing just under 50% of the industrial and commercial CO2 emissions and eight Pathfinders representing CO2 emissions from road transport across the City.

This report is a starting point. It provides a bottom-up CO2 emissions baseline for Pathfinders and begins to show trends in carbon emissions. As LCO was only launched in October 2010, this report presents a baseline and reports on progress for a limited number of Pathfinders. In future years we will be able to report on progress for the majority of Pathfinders and show the impact that LCO is having on carbon emissions in the City. We recognise that there are some limitations to the data collection process and we will improve on this in future years.

  • We are proud to have reached this point. As well as presenting data, this report is about celebrating achievements and showcasing examples of best practice in carbon reduction in Oxford. We hope that it will inspire others to get involved in this collective movement to reduce the carbon footprint of Oxford City. The data and information we have collected is presented and analysed in the following pages. We have highlighted examples of successful carbon reduction activities across all sectors and this report starts to build a picture of the impact that organisations, communities and households can have in reducing the carbon footprint of Oxford. We have included some quotes that Pathfinders have made and hope that these inspire others to get involved. The data presented in the following pages was gathered from Pathfinders via a questionnaire and feedback event. Our analysis is split into four sections: 1.
  • Summary of carbon emissions for the City of Oxford (DECC dataset); 2.
  • Non-domestic buildings: CO2 emissions related to energy consumed in the form of gas and electricity in commercial, industrial and public sector buildings; 3.
  • Transport: CO2 emissions from fuel consumed by road transport; 4.
  • Domestic: CO2 emissions from housing and local communities.

Each of these areas is discussed in turn in the following sections. -40% BY 2020

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting
BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 6 7 Low Carbon Oxford (LCO) brings together private, public and non-profit organisations in a programme of collaboration, with the aim of reducing the City of Oxford’s carbon footprint. LCO members, or Pathfinders, have signed up to a Charter (see appendix 1) with the following commitments:
  • Collaborate to reduce our carbon footprints across our sites and operations in Oxford City by a minimum of 3% average, every year, for at least the next ten years;
  • Create a low carbon, sustainable economy in the Oxford area which will be an example to cities across the country;
  • Collaborate on creating more green jobs, increased prosperity and opportunity for all;
  • Support a programme of best practice sharing and piloting of sustainable innovations;
  • Report each year on the progress we are making.
  • The LCO programme was launched in October 2010 with 15 Pathfinder organisations initially signed up 5 . As momentum grew in the first year, membership increased to 25 organisations (see appendix 1) representing a large proportion of Oxford City carbon emissions. In this report we present data on Pathfinders’ CO2 emissions for the first time. In order to realise the Charter commitments, Low Carbon Oxford needs to develop into a strategy that will deliver 40% carbon reductions against the 2005 baseline by 2020. Targets to 2020 are shown in the box below, based on DECC Local Authority data 6 . Low Carbon Oxford – Targets for 40% reduction by 2020
  • Industrial and commercial footprint
  • Businesses to work individually and collectively to reduce the industrial and commercial footprint from 563,000 tonnes of CO2 in 2005 to 338,000 tonnes in 2020.
  • Domestic footprint
  • Households to work individually and as part of their communities to reduce the domestic footprint from 308,000 tonnes of CO2 in 2005 to 185,000 tonnes in 2020. This target means that:
  • Either one third of the City housing stock of 63,000 houses has to be retrofitted to achieve 80% reductions in carbon emissions by 2020;
  • Or the whole stock of 63,000 houses has to be retrofitted to achieve 40% reductions in carbon emissions by 2020. Transport footprint
  • City and County Councils to work with key actors to reduce road transport emissions from 145,000 tonnes of CO2 in 2005 to 87,000 tonnes in 2020.
  • 5 Degrees, A2Dominion, B&Q, Blake Lapthorn, Grafton plc (Buildbase), Low Carbon West Oxford, Marks and Spencer, MINI Plant Oxford, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford City Council, Oxfordshire County Council, Serco, Stagecoach, Unipart and University of Oxford. 6 “Emissions within the scope of influence of Local Authorities for 2005-2009”, previously NI 186 data. Introduction Latest data for 2009 shows that CO2 emissions are 11% lower than in 2005, an average 2.7% reduction per year, with each category contributing as follows:
  • The industrial and commercial footprint is 10% lower than 2005 although the emissions have been fairly volatile with emissions in 2006 and 2008 higher than the 2005 baseline year;
  • The domestic footprint is 15% lower and shows a consistent tracking down;
  • The transport footprint is 8% lower than in 2005.

As the economy picks up and once many of the easiest measures have been implemented, collaboration under LCO’s Energy Efficiency Forum and similar initiatives will become increasingly important to maintain these trends and to meet the 2020 targets. In the LCO ‘one year on’ report published in 2011, LCO made a commitment to set up a Measuring, Monitoring and Reporting process and to produce the first report presenting data on Pathfinders CO2 emissions. In this report, for the first time, we present data from 12 Pathfinders representing just under 50% of the industrial and commercial CO2 emissions and eight Pathfinders representing CO2 emissions from road transport across the City.

This report is a starting point. It provides a bottom-up CO2 emissions baseline for Pathfinders and begins to show trends in carbon emissions. As LCO was only launched in October 2010, this report presents a baseline and reports on progress for a limited number of Pathfinders. In future years we will be able to report on progress for the majority of Pathfinders and show the impact that LCO is having on carbon emissions in the City. We recognise that there are some limitations to the data collection process and we will improve on this in future years.

  • We are proud to have reached this point. As well as presenting data, this report is about celebrating achievements and showcasing examples of best practice in carbon reduction in Oxford. We hope that it will inspire others to get involved in this collective movement to reduce the carbon footprint of Oxford City. The data and information we have collected is presented and analysed in the following pages. We have highlighted examples of successful carbon reduction activities across all sectors and this report starts to build a picture of the impact that organisations, communities and households can have in reducing the carbon footprint of Oxford. We have included some quotes that Pathfinders have made and hope that these inspire others to get involved. The data presented in the following pages was gathered from Pathfinders via a questionnaire and feedback event. Our analysis is split into four sections: 1.
  • Summary of carbon emissions for the City of Oxford (DECC dataset); 2.
  • Non-domestic buildings: CO2 emissions related to energy consumed in the form of gas and electricity in commercial, industrial and public sector buildings; 3.
  • Transport: CO2 emissions from fuel consumed by road transport; 4.
  • Domestic: CO2 emissions from housing and local communities.

Each of these areas is discussed in turn in the following sections. -40% BY 2020

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 8 9 Oxford CO2 emissions (NI186 equivalent) DECC publishes the local CO2 emissions dataset 7 which provides a time-series of CO2 emissions from 2005 to 2009 split into Industrial & Commercial (non-domestic), Transport and Domestic emissions 8 . This dataset is equivalent to that previously used for National Indicator 186 9 . Oxford’s total emissions are shown in the graph in Figure 1.

This shows dominance by the Industrial and Commercial sector (56% in 2009) which also includes public sector emissions. It compares with a national average of 41% industrial and commercial emissions across all Local Authorities in the DECC dataset. Compared with the national average, Oxford therefore has a lower domestic contribution to the total and a significantly lower road transport contribution.

Emissions are generally declining over time, showing an 11% reduction from 2005 to 2009 equivalent to 2.7% per year. This compares with an overall reduction of 13% across all sectors nationally. The difference is due to slower reductions in the industrial and commercial sector than nationally. Reductions in the domestic sector in Oxford have been faster than nationally, and in transport they have been at the same rate. City of Oxford Emissions and the National Context Indicators of more recent change are available in the DECC sub-national gas and electricity consumption data which are also available for 2010.

The data show that total commercial and industrial gas consumption has reduced by 18.4% from 2005 to 2010 (and 0.8% from 2009 to 2010) but electricity usage has been more volatile and increased by 1.6% from 2005 to 2010 (and increased by 1.3% from 2009 to 2010). In the domestic sector gas consumption has reduced by 18.9% and electricity by 7.8% from 2005 to 2010 (gas reducing by 1.4% and electricity by 0.3% from 2009 to 2010). These data therefore show a mixed picture most likely the result of a number of factors which cannot be disaggregated. However, they suggest that, in the industrial and commercial sector in Oxford, emission from electricity will need to be tackled to maintain overall emission reduction trends and reach carbon reduction targets.

In future years, further data collection and analysis of trends, and a comparison of Pathfinder data with national data, will provide a clearer picture of the impact of LCO emissions reduction initiatives.

This additional data will feed into the wider work plan for the Oxford Low Emissions Strategy (LES). Oxford City Council is developing an integrated database of air quality and climate change emissions and an updated LES action plan for the city. The Pathfinders’ reported emissions and actions will be included within the database which will be used to monitor progress across all sectors in the city and provide further context for assessing the impact of LCO and its Pathfinders.   Figure 1 – Oxford CO2 emissions from DECC, 2009 7 http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/local_auth/co2_las/co2_las .aspx 8 These data are calculated from a combination of sub-national energy consumption data collated by DECC and estimates made as part of the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (www.naei.org.uk).

9 The NI 186 indicator data set was developed by government to support local authority carbon reduction, providing a nationally consistent data set with a 2005 baseline. Although the national indicators are no longer used to monitor local authority performance by central government the dataset is still published annually by DECC. The data provides estimates of emissions from industrial and commercial, domestic and road transport but excludes aviation, shipping, ETS sites and motorways because these are not considered to be within the influence of local authorities. City of Oxford Emissions and the National Context

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 8 9 Oxford CO2 emissions (NI186 equivalent) DECC publishes the local CO2 emissions dataset 7 which provides a time-series of CO2 emissions from 2005 to 2009 split into Industrial & Commercial (non-domestic), Transport and Domestic emissions 8 . This dataset is equivalent to that previously used for National Indicator 186 9 . Oxford’s total emissions are shown in the graph in Figure 1. This shows dominance by the Industrial and Commercial sector (56% in 2009) which also includes public sector emissions.

It compares with a national average of 41% industrial and commercial emissions across all Local Authorities in the DECC dataset. Compared with the national average, Oxford therefore has a lower domestic contribution to the total and a significantly lower road transport contribution.

Emissions are generally declining over time, showing an 11% reduction from 2005 to 2009 equivalent to 2.7% per year. This compares with an overall reduction of 13% across all sectors nationally. The difference is due to slower reductions in the industrial and commercial sector than nationally. Reductions in the domestic sector in Oxford have been faster than nationally, and in transport they have been at the same rate. City of Oxford Emissions and the National Context Indicators of more recent change are available in the DECC sub-national gas and electricity consumption data which are also available for 2010.

The data show that total commercial and industrial gas consumption has reduced by 18.4% from 2005 to 2010 (and 0.8% from 2009 to 2010) but electricity usage has been more volatile and increased by 1.6% from 2005 to 2010 (and increased by 1.3% from 2009 to 2010). In the domestic sector gas consumption has reduced by 18.9% and electricity by 7.8% from 2005 to 2010 (gas reducing by 1.4% and electricity by 0.3% from 2009 to 2010). These data therefore show a mixed picture most likely the result of a number of factors which cannot be disaggregated. However, they suggest that, in the industrial and commercial sector in Oxford, emission from electricity will need to be tackled to maintain overall emission reduction trends and reach carbon reduction targets.

In future years, further data collection and analysis of trends, and a comparison of Pathfinder data with national data, will provide a clearer picture of the impact of LCO emissions reduction initiatives.

This additional data will feed into the wider work plan for the Oxford Low Emissions Strategy (LES). Oxford City Council is developing an integrated database of air quality and climate change emissions and an updated LES action plan for the city. The Pathfinders’ reported emissions and actions will be included within the database which will be used to monitor progress across all sectors in the city and provide further context for assessing the impact of LCO and its Pathfinders.   Figure 1 – Oxford CO2 emissions from DECC, 2009 7 http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/local_auth/co2_las/co2_las .aspx 8 These data are calculated from a combination of sub-national energy consumption data collated by DECC and estimates made as part of the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (www.naei.org.uk).

9 The NI 186 indicator data set was developed by government to support local authority carbon reduction, providing a nationally consistent data set with a 2005 baseline. Although the national indicators are no longer used to monitor local authority performance by central government the dataset is still published annually by DECC. The data provides estimates of emissions from industrial and commercial, domestic and road transport but excludes aviation, shipping, ETS sites and motorways because these are not considered to be within the influence of local authorities. City of Oxford Emissions and the National Context

BUILDING MOMENTUM - Low Carbon Oxford One Year Update Measuring, monitoring and reporting

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 10 11 Gas 2010 Oxford commercial gas Electricity 2010 Oxford commercial electricity LCO share of Oxford’s carbon footprint Pathfinder data in the commercial and industrial sector show how Pathfinders significantly impact Oxford’s carbon footprint. In 2009 LCO Pathfinders represented just under half of the Industrial and Commercial Footprint in Oxford, see Figure 2. Absolute CO2 emissions for each organisation are shown in brackets. Figures 3 and 4 show that a higher proportion of gas consumption is represented by LCO Pathfinders than for electricity 10 .

For electricity, Pathfinders represent 46% of the total Oxford footprint and for gas, Pathfinders represent 63%. This is likely to be because Pathfinders represent some of the larger gas consuming businesses in Oxford, for example, due to the nature of its business, the MINI Plant Oxford is a large consumer of gas.

  • Buildings – Commercial and Industrial Figure 2 – Pathfinders contribution to commercial and Industrial energy CO2 emissions, 2009 10 Linacre College is not included in these charts, as data on energy consumption was unavailable.       Figure 3 – Pathfinders contribution to electricity consumption in Oxford, 2010 “
  • Much more inspiring and much more promising because it does bring business into that formula of community and local government.” LCO Pathfinder Commercial & industrial energy CO2 2009 Oxford commercial & industrial CO2 1 Oxford Brookes University (11194t) 2 Oxford City Council (5453t) 3 Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust (41692t) 4 Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action (7.7t) 5 Oxfordshire County Council (6041t) 6 Oxfordshire County Council schools (5712t) 7 The Oxford Bus Company (459t) 8 Unipart Group (6015t) 9 University of Oxford (68093t) 10 MINI Plant Oxford (96713t) 13 Linacare College (630t) KEY 1 Oxford Brookes University 2 Oxford City Council 3 Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust 4 Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action 5 Oxfordshire County Council 6 Oxfordshire County Council schools 7 The Oxford Bus Company 8 Unipart Group 9 University of Oxford 10 MINI Plant Oxford KEY Figure 4 – Pathfinders contribution to gas consumption in Oxford, 2010 1 Oxford Brookes University 2 Oxford City Council 3 Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust 4 Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action 5 Oxfordshire County Council 6 Oxfordshire County Council schools 7 The Oxford Bus Company 8 Unipart Group 9 University of Oxford 10 MINI Plant Oxford KEY

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 10 11 Gas 2010 Oxford commercial gas Electricity 2010 Oxford commercial electricity LCO share of Oxford’s carbon footprint Pathfinder data in the commercial and industrial sector show how Pathfinders significantly impact Oxford’s carbon footprint. In 2009 LCO Pathfinders represented just under half of the Industrial and Commercial Footprint in Oxford, see Figure 2. Absolute CO2 emissions for each organisation are shown in brackets. Figures 3 and 4 show that a higher proportion of gas consumption is represented by LCO Pathfinders than for electricity 10 .

For electricity, Pathfinders represent 46% of the total Oxford footprint and for gas, Pathfinders represent 63%. This is likely to be because Pathfinders represent some of the larger gas consuming businesses in Oxford, for example, due to the nature of its business, the MINI Plant Oxford is a large consumer of gas.

  • Buildings – Commercial and Industrial Figure 2 – Pathfinders contribution to commercial and Industrial energy CO2 emissions, 2009 10 Linacre College is not included in these charts, as data on energy consumption was unavailable.       Figure 3 – Pathfinders contribution to electricity consumption in Oxford, 2010 “
  • Much more inspiring and much more promising because it does bring business into that formula of community and local government.” LCO Pathfinder Commercial & industrial energy CO2 2009 Oxford commercial & industrial CO2 1 Oxford Brookes University (11194t) 2 Oxford City Council (5453t) 3 Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust (41692t) 4 Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action (7.7t) 5 Oxfordshire County Council (6041t) 6 Oxfordshire County Council schools (5712t) 7 The Oxford Bus Company (459t) 8 Unipart Group (6015t) 9 University of Oxford (68093t) 10 MINI Plant Oxford (96713t) 13 Linacare College (630t) KEY 1 Oxford Brookes University 2 Oxford City Council 3 Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust 4 Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action 5 Oxfordshire County Council 6 Oxfordshire County Council schools 7 The Oxford Bus Company 8 Unipart Group 9 University of Oxford 10 MINI Plant Oxford KEY Figure 4 – Pathfinders contribution to gas consumption in Oxford, 2010 1 Oxford Brookes University 2 Oxford City Council 3 Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust 4 Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action 5 Oxfordshire County Council 6 Oxfordshire County Council schools 7 The Oxford Bus Company 8 Unipart Group 9 University of Oxford 10 MINI Plant Oxford KEY

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 12 13 Table 1 – Percentage change in Pathfinder’s contribution to commercial and industrial buildings CO2 emissions 2010 to 2011 and tonnes of CO2 produced in 2009, 2010 and 2011 Based on the data collected thus far we are not yet in a position to directly compare the above emissions savings with the data for Oxford City available in the DECC NI186 dataset. This is because DECC data are not yet available for 2011 and the Pathfinders data cannot yet be corrected for the weather related increases in 2010 (without more detailed understanding of the proportion of gas used for heating).

However it can be suggested that 2009 to 2010 increases in gas emissions are likely to be mostly related to weather factors and that this trend is likely to be reversed in 2011 across the City, illustrated by the data above and also shown in the provisional national data for the UK, published earlier this year by DECC 12 .

2009 to 2010 increases in Pathfinder electricity emissions mirror DECC Oxford City data and may again suggest electricity emissions as an area to target, with figures for 2010 to 2011 showing movement in the right direction. Again, further data collection and analysis of trends over more years will provide a clearer picture of the impact of emissions reduction initiatives. Reporting in future years could be further improved by asking Pathfinders to provide more commentary on data trends, for example to relate any energy consumption trends to economic growth and business changes. The reporting process should include more in depth dialogue between Pathfinders to discuss data trends and factors that may influence these.

We may also wish to correct data for weather influences. This would give context to the emissions changes and account for influences other than energy efficiency initiatives, and generally allow more meaningful interpretation of data.

Similarly, whilst the 3% yearly reduction target is an important benchmark for Pathfinders, LCO is likely to gain more meaningful indications of success over slightly longer time periods, for example every three years. Emerging trends Of the eight organisations that reported data for 2010 and 2011, all of them reported a reduction in both gas and electricity (due to the timescales involved in reporting not all Pathfinders were able to report on gas and electricity consumption for 2011). This is extremely encouraging and demonstrates that even at this early stage Pathfinders are reducing their CO2 emissions and contributing to reducing the carbon footprint of Oxford.

Case study 1 gives an example of how MINI Plant Oxford is reducing carbon by identifying ‘enablers’ in its production process, case study 2 shows how Oxford City Council has reduced its carbon emissions by putting carbon reduction at the heart of everything they do and case study 3 shows how Oxford Brookes University has reduced carbon emissions through embracing corporate responsibility as a core value and implementing a strong governance structure. Table 1 shows these emerging trends in more detail: of the eight organisations that provided data for 2010 and 2011, all of them reported a reduction in CO2 emissions 11 , despite several of them reporting increases between 2009 and 2010 (the year before LCO began,) likely to be because of the cold start and end to 2010.

Whilst it is difficult to draw many conclusions Buildbase Oxford Brookes University Oxford City Council Oxford University Hopsitals NHS Trust Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action Oxfordshire County Council Oxfordshire County Council - schools The Oxford Bus Company Unipart Group University of Oxford MINI Plant Oxford B&Q LInacre College Pathfinder Percentage change in CO2 2010 - 2011 Tonnes of CO2 2011 Tonnes of CO2 2010 Tonnes of CO2 2009 -10.9 -5.6 -11.5 -10.4 -15.5 -8.1 -12.4 -11.9 Data for 2011 only Data for 2009 and 2010 only -17.7 Data for 2011 only 4,579 41,616 7.0 5244 5112 445 n/a 496 448 n/a 5,817 99,152 5,141 44,083 7.9 5852 6048 484 68,567 563 n/a 10,717 7070 86,809 5453 41,692 7.7 6041 5712 459 68,093 630 n/a 11,194 6,015 96,713 11 Oxford City Council -10.9%, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust -5.6%, Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action -11.5%, Oxfordshire County Council -10.4%, Oxfordshire County Council Schools -15.5%, The Oxford Bus Company - 8.1%, Unipart Group -17.7%, MINI Plant Oxford -12.4% and Linacre College -11.9% at this stage due to the short data trends being analysed, this shows a positive trend in the right direction.

  • 12 http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/stats/climate-change/4817-2011-uk-gre enhouse-gas-emissions-provisional-figur.pdf Data for 2009 and 2010 only 413 n/a n/a “
  • At least from my knowledge, and from the networks I was involved in so far, it’s not very often you have a network with the whole variety of companies, branches, businesses, public bodies, from a city council to a university, a hospital, a bus company, a car manufacturer: a wide range...but under a common goal. ” LCO Pathfinder

BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting BUILDING MOMENTUM: Measuring, monitoring and reporting 12 13 Table 1 – Percentage change in Pathfinder’s contribution to commercial and industrial buildings CO2 emissions 2010 to 2011 and tonnes of CO2 produced in 2009, 2010 and 2011 Based on the data collected thus far we are not yet in a position to directly compare the above emissions savings with the data for Oxford City available in the DECC NI186 dataset.

This is because DECC data are not yet available for 2011 and the Pathfinders data cannot yet be corrected for the weather related increases in 2010 (without more detailed understanding of the proportion of gas used for heating). However it can be suggested that 2009 to 2010 increases in gas emissions are likely to be mostly related to weather factors and that this trend is likely to be reversed in 2011 across the City, illustrated by the data above and also shown in the provisional national data for the UK, published earlier this year by DECC 12 .

2009 to 2010 increases in Pathfinder electricity emissions mirror DECC Oxford City data and may again suggest electricity emissions as an area to target, with figures for 2010 to 2011 showing movement in the right direction. Again, further data collection and analysis of trends over more years will provide a clearer picture of the impact of emissions reduction initiatives. Reporting in future years could be further improved by asking Pathfinders to provide more commentary on data trends, for example to relate any energy consumption trends to economic growth and business changes. The reporting process should include more in depth dialogue between Pathfinders to discuss data trends and factors that may influence these.

We may also wish to correct data for weather influences. This would give context to the emissions changes and account for influences other than energy efficiency initiatives, and generally allow more meaningful interpretation of data.

Similarly, whilst the 3% yearly reduction target is an important benchmark for Pathfinders, LCO is likely to gain more meaningful indications of success over slightly longer time periods, for example every three years. Emerging trends Of the eight organisations that reported data for 2010 and 2011, all of them reported a reduction in both gas and electricity (due to the timescales involved in reporting not all Pathfinders were able to report on gas and electricity consumption for 2011). This is extremely encouraging and demonstrates that even at this early stage Pathfinders are reducing their CO2 emissions and contributing to reducing the carbon footprint of Oxford.

Case study 1 gives an example of how MINI Plant Oxford is reducing carbon by identifying ‘enablers’ in its production process, case study 2 shows how Oxford City Council has reduced its carbon emissions by putting carbon reduction at the heart of everything they do and case study 3 shows how Oxford Brookes University has reduced carbon emissions through embracing corporate responsibility as a core value and implementing a strong governance structure. Table 1 shows these emerging trends in more detail: of the eight organisations that provided data for 2010 and 2011, all of them reported a reduction in CO2 emissions 11 , despite several of them reporting increases between 2009 and 2010 (the year before LCO began,) likely to be because of the cold start and end to 2010.

Whilst it is difficult to draw many conclusions Buildbase Oxford Brookes University Oxford City Council Oxford University Hopsitals NHS Trust Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action Oxfordshire County Council Oxfordshire County Council - schools The Oxford Bus Company Unipart Group University of Oxford MINI Plant Oxford B&Q LInacre College Pathfinder Percentage change in CO2 2010 - 2011 Tonnes of CO2 2011 Tonnes of CO2 2010 Tonnes of CO2 2009 -10.9 -5.6 -11.5 -10.4 -15.5 -8.1 -12.4 -11.9 Data for 2011 only Data for 2009 and 2010 only -17.7 Data for 2011 only 4,579 41,616 7.0 5244 5112 445 n/a 496 448 n/a 5,817 99,152 5,141 44,083 7.9 5852 6048 484 68,567 563 n/a 10,717 7070 86,809 5453 41,692 7.7 6041 5712 459 68,093 630 n/a 11,194 6,015 96,713 11 Oxford City Council -10.9%, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust -5.6%, Oxfordshire Community & Voluntary Action -11.5%, Oxfordshire County Council -10.4%, Oxfordshire County Council Schools -15.5%, The Oxford Bus Company - 8.1%, Unipart Group -17.7%, MINI Plant Oxford -12.4% and Linacre College -11.9% at this stage due to the short data trends being analysed, this shows a positive trend in the right direction.

  • 12 http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/stats/climate-change/4817-2011-uk-gre enhouse-gas-emissions-provisional-figur.pdf Data for 2009 and 2010 only 413 n/a n/a “
  • At least from my knowledge, and from the networks I was involved in so far, it’s not very often you have a network with the whole variety of companies, branches, businesses, public bodies, from a city council to a university, a hospital, a bus company, a car manufacturer: a wide range...but under a common goal. ” LCO Pathfinder
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