Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

Completing the 2011 Canada Census A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS Vancouver Community College April 2011 lrehnby@vcc.ca

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

About this kit The next Census of Canada is currently underway. The census date is May 10, 2011, and every household in Canada is required to complete it within 10 days. Statistics Canada provides great materials for teachers. You can download the materials free of charge from http://census2011.gc.ca/ccr02/ccr02_000-eng.htm. They are also provided as an attachment to this kit. This kit focuses on ESL students; specifically, preparing students to complete the census for their own families. The kit is available in print for photocopying. A PDF version is also available by email. All of the Census materials can be downloaded from http://census2011.gc.ca/ Lorraine Rehnby, Vancouver Community College lrehnby@vcc.ca

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

Contents FOR THE TEACHER: How to help your students complete the census . . 4 FOR THE TEACHER, from Statistics Canada: About the Census . 6 Main activity Biography of Dung Nguyen . . 7 Biography of Sami Shirazi . . 8 Biography of Claudio Mendez . 9 Step A: Telephone and address . . 10 Steps B and C: Persons living at the address . . 12 Step D: Farm operators . . 16 Step E: Basic population information . 17 Blanks for the main activity . . 27 Additional activities Class census . 33 Census word search . . 34 Census in your first country . 35 Family tree . . 36

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

4 FOR THE TEACHER How to help your students complete the Census First, make sure that the student is the person in the household who should complete the census. One access code was sent to each household (some received just the access code; others received the access code and the paper questionnaire), and only one person in each household should complete the census. If a student is certain that no-one in the household received the access code, and they do not have a census form, they should call 1.877.777.2011 (help in 44 languages). Next, having carefully reviewed both the paper and on-line census, it is strongly recommended that ESL students complete the on-line survey during class time. Put simply, the on-line survey is much easier to use: for example, the on-line tool recalls the names of the people in the household and asks question about them by name, which is much easier to follow. The on-line form is also much faster to complete. Finally, the census is recommended for classroom time because it provides an excellent ESL teaching opportunity. This kit provides the materials needed to understand how to complete the form, and builds on the opportunity with additional lessons.

How to use this kit while assisting students to complete the census The questions in this kit are the same as the print form and on-line questionnaire, in the same order — but they look different. This kit was developed using preliminary materials sent out by Statistics Canada earlier this year. The materials, and translations in 33 languages, are available at http://census2011.gc.ca/ Printed form On-line form recommended for ESL students

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

5 How long does it take to complete the census? There are about 15 questions in the main census. An instructor should be able to have all students complete the census within a 50-minute period. What if my student is selected to do the additional “Household Survey”? The additional “Household Survey” is long and complicated. It is unlikely that a teacher will be able to assist students to complete it within a 50-minute period. Students can get started, and choose to finish it later (the on-line version allows users to exit and then pick up where they left off later on). Students who are selected to complete the “Household Survey” should call 1.877.777.2011 for assistance in their first language. Help is available in 44 languages, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Teachers may want to take a moment to stress that Statistics Canada does not share information with other government agencies. Students may be apprehensive to answer questions about family members, their past addresses, their income, their childcare costs, etc. You may want to print out basic information about the purpose of the census, in students’ home language, from http://census2011.gc.ca/ccr05/ccr05_000-eng.htm Parting thoughts: First, do the census yourself. Teachers may find it helpful to complete the on-line and/or paper census for their own households before teaching students how to do it during class time. Especially with the paper questionnaire, it is easy to get confused (was my son person 4, or was that my daughter)?

The census serves many purposes in Canada, and is an excellent teaching opportunity. Enjoy!

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

6 FOR THE TEACHER, FROM STATISTICS CANADA About the Census Every five years Statistics Canada conducts a census. The next Census of Canada will take place on May 10, 2011. Why is the census important? When you complete your census questionnaire you are providing important information that will be used in making decisions—for your neighbourhood, your community, your province, and the country as a whole. Communities depend on census information when planning for new schools, roads, waterworks, public transit, and police and fire services. Town planners use census information on households and families to plan current and future housing needs, health care, and day-care centres. Population estimates obtained from the census are used to allocate transfer payments from the federal government to the provinces and territories and from the provinces to municipalities. As a decennial census, data from the 2011 Census will be used to determine the number of Members of Parliament.

Who is included in the census? The census includes every person living in Canada, as well as Canadians who are abroad, either on a military base, attached to a diplomatic mission, or at sea or in port aboard Canadian- registered merchant vessels. Persons in Canada including those holding a temporary resident permit, study permit or work permit, and their dependents, are also part of the census. The 2011 Census online Starting in May 2011, households can choose the convenience of completing their census questionnaire online. It is an easy, secure and convenient option that can be used anywhere, anytime. No pre-registration or lengthy download processes are required.

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

7 Biography of Dung Nguyen Dung is 52 years old. She was born on April 14, 1959 in Nha Trang, Vietnam, and came to Canada eight years ago with her family. Dung lives in Burnaby in a two-bedroom apartment. She studies English at VCC at night and works weekdays in a restaurant. Her husband Xuan works in Vietnam, but he comes back to Canada two or three times a year to see his family. The Nguyens have two children. Their 22-year-old daughter Phuong studies at the University of Victoria. She lives on campus. She comes back home for the weekend twice a month, and she lives at home during the summer. Her English is very good, but she still speaks Vietnamese with her family. Their 26-year-old son Tuan is married, and lives with his wife Mai in Vancouver. They have a two-year-old son. They speak Vietnamese to their son. On Saturday nights, Dung babysits her grandson at her home. Dung’s address is #306 – 7232 Barnet Rd, Burnaby, BC V5A 1E2. Her phone number is 778 - 878 - 6399.

Her family’s birth dates are: Dung Xuan Phuong Tuan Mai grandson 14/04/59 11/06/57 19/06/88 12/01/85 27/05/88 28/10/09

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

8 Biography of Sami Shirazi Sami comes from Tehran, Iran. He was born on August 8, 1963. He came to Canada seven years ago with his wife Azar and son Reza. He opened an Iranian grocery store. Sami and Azar divorced two years ago. Reza is now eight years old and lives with his mom during the week, and lives with his dad on the weekends. Sami’s younger brother Soheil came to Canada two years ago with his wife Lila, who works on a farm. Their daughter Marjan was born five months ago. Soheil, his wife and daughter live with Sami. They rent a three-bedroom house in East Vancouver. Soheil works with his brother at his grocery store. He studies at VCC in Level 3, and he speaks English at work.

On Census Day (May 10th), Sami was on a three-week vacation in Iran to see his parents. Sami’s address is 1745 Cotton Street, Vancouver, BC, V5N 4A4. His telephone number is 604 - 873 - 2957. His family’s birth dates are: Sami Azar Reza Soheil Lila Marjan 08/08/63 07/12/67 01/04/03 18/04/69 09/02/75 12/01/11

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

9 Biography of Claudio Mendez Claudio was born in Acajutla, El Salvador on March 21, 1975. He came to Vancouver 5 years ago. He started a house painting company 4 years ago. He has three employees. He met Angela Kelly two years ago. Claudio and Angela bought a house last year. They want to get married in September. She has two young boys Aiden (4) and Max (6) from a previous marriage. Her children spend one week with their dad, and then one week with their mom. On Census Day, the kids were at their dad’s house. The children only speak English. Angela, Claudio and the kids used to live with Angela’s father Bill. But, he got sick and moved into a nursing home seven months ago. They all want the grandfather to come home soon. Right now Adriana, an international student from Brazil, is renting the grandfather’s room. Her first language is Portuguese, but she can speak Spanish with Claudio when she has trouble with English.

Claudio’s address is 9508 120th St, Surrey, BC, V3V 4C1. His telephone number is 604 - 271 - 6302. The birth dates of the people at his house are: Claudio Angela Kelly Aiden Watts Max Watts William Kelly Adriana Lima Diaz 21/03/75 15/10/73 02/11/07 13/07/04 20/07/37 23/02/87

Completing the 2011 Canada Census - A CURRICULUM UNIT FOR ELSA STUDENTS

10 For Dung Nguyen 778 878 6399 7232 Barnet Road 306 Burnaby BC V5A 1E2 Step A: Telephone and address From Statistics Canada: STEP A – We need your telephone number to contact you should you forget to provide information on your questionnaire. We need your address to ensure that all dwellings are counted.

11 For Sami Shirazi For Claudio Mendez Step A: Telephone and address 604 873 2957 1745 Cotton Street Vancouver BC V5 N 4A4 9508 120th Street Surrey BC V3V 4C1 604 271 6302

12 Steps B and C: Persons living at the address From Statistics Canada: 1. WHOM TO INCLUDE IN STEP B • All persons who have their main residence at this address on May 10, 2011, including newborn babies, room-mates and persons who are temporarily away; • Canadian citizens, permanent residents (landed immigrants), persons asking for refugee status (refugee claimants), persons from another country with a work or study permit and family members living here with them; • Persons staying at this address temporarily on May 10, 2011 who have no main residence elsewhere. 2. WHERE TO INCLUDE PERSONS WITH MORE THAN ONE RESIDENCE • CHILDREN IN JOINT CUSTODY should be included in the home of the parent where they live most of the time. Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included in the home of the parent with whom they are staying on May 10, 2011.

• STUDENTS who return to live with their parents during the year should be included at their parents’ address, even if they live elsewhere while attending school or working at a summer job. • SPOUSES OR COMMON-LAW PARTNERS TEMPORARILY AWAY who stay elsewhere while working or studying should be listed at the main residence of their family, if they return periodically. • PERSONS IN AN INSTITUTION for less than six months (for example, in a home for the aged, a hospital or a prison) should be listed at their usual residence.

Special circumstances IF THIS ADDRESS IS:  a SECONDARY RESIDENCE (such as a cottage) for ALL PERSONS who stayed here on May 10, 2011 (all these persons have their main residence elsewhere in Canada), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your main residence address at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  a DWELLING OCCUPIED ONLY BY RESIDENTS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY VISITING CANADA (for example, on vacation or on a business trip), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your country of residence at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  the HOME OF A GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANOTHER COUNTRY (for example, embassy or high commission) and family members, mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and the country that you represent at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions. Name Telephone number -

13 For Dung Nguyen STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away. See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - IF THIS ADDRESS IS:  a SECONDARY RESIDENCE (such as a cottage) for ALL PERSONS who stayed here on May 10, 2011 (all these persons have their main residence elsewhere in Canada), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your main residence address at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.

 a DWELLING OCCUPIED ONLY BY RESIDENTS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY VISITING CANADA (for example, on vacation or on a business trip), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your country of residence at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  the HOME OF A GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANOTHER COUNTRY (for example, embassy or high commission) and family members, mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and the country that you represent at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions. Name Telephone number - No. and street, city, province or territory/country STEP C Did you leave anyone out of Step B because you were not sure the person should be listed? (For example, a person living at this address who has another home, a person temporarily away, etc.)  No  Yes Specify the name, the relationship and the reason. Name(s) and relationship Reason - 6 - STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away.

See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - Steps B and C: Persons living at the address Nguyen Nguyen Nguyen 3 Dung Xuan Phuong Notes Xuan Nguyen is counted. He works in Vietnam, but his “main residence” is with his family in Canada because he lives there sometimes.

Phuong Nguyen is counted. She is a student in Victoria, but her “main residence” is with her family in Vancouver because she lives with her mother sometimes. x

14 For Sami Shirazi STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away. See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - IF THIS ADDRESS IS:  a SECONDARY RESIDENCE (such as a cottage) for ALL PERSONS who stayed here on May 10, 2011 (all these persons have their main residence elsewhere in Canada), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your main residence address at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.

 a DWELLING OCCUPIED ONLY BY RESIDENTS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY VISITING CANADA (for example, on vacation or on a business trip), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your country of residence at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  the HOME OF A GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANOTHER COUNTRY (for example, embassy or high commission) and family members, mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and the country that you represent at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions. Name Telephone number - No. and street, city, province or territory/country STEP C Did you leave anyone out of Step B because you were not sure the person should be listed? (For example, a person living at this address who has another home, a person temporarily away, etc.)  No  Yes Specify the name, the relationship and the reason. Name(s) and relationship Reason - 6 - STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away.

See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - Steps B and C: Persons living at the address Shirazi Shirazi Shirazi Shirazi 4 Sami Soheil Lila Marjan Notes Reza Shirazi is not counted because he lives with his mother most of the time. Soheil, Lila and Marjan are counted because they all usually live at this address. x

15 For Claudio Mendez STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away. See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - IF THIS ADDRESS IS:  a SECONDARY RESIDENCE (such as a cottage) for ALL PERSONS who stayed here on May 10, 2011 (all these persons have their main residence elsewhere in Canada), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your main residence address at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.

 a DWELLING OCCUPIED ONLY BY RESIDENTS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY VISITING CANADA (for example, on vacation or on a business trip), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your country of residence at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  the HOME OF A GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANOTHER COUNTRY (for example, embassy or high commission) and family members, mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and the country that you represent at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions. Name Telephone number - No. and street, city, province or territory/country STEP C Did you leave anyone out of Step B because you were not sure the person should be listed? (For example, a person living at this address who has another home, a person temporarily away, etc.)  No  Yes Specify the name, the relationship and the reason. Name(s) and relationship Reason - 6 - STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away.

See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - Steps B and C: Persons living at the address Mendez Kelly Lima Diaz 3 Claudio Angela Adriana Notes William (Bill) Kelly is not counted because he has lived in hospital for more than six months. Max and Aiden Watts are not counted because they live half-time at each parents’ house, and they are at their dad’s on May 10th, Census Day. Their dad will count the boys on his census. Adriana Lima Diaz is counted because she has a study permit, and it is her main address. A housemate or room mate is counted.

x

16 For all students Step D: Farm operators From Statistics Canada: STEP D – This step tells us if someone in your household operates a farm. It also ensures that we count all farms for the Census of Agriculture. STEP D 1. Is anyone listed in Step B a farm operator who produces at least one agricultural product intended for sale? (Crops, livestock, milk, poultry, eggs, greenhouse or nursery products, Christmas trees, sod, honey, bees, maple syrup products, furs, etc.) � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm?

� No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Notes None of our “sample” students is a farm operator, so they all answer “no” to this question. Sami Shirazi’s sister-in-law, Lila, works on a farm. But she is not a farm “operator.” x

17 Step E: Basic population information From Statistics Canada: STEP E – Copy the names from Step B, in order. • Questions 2 to 6 provide information about the living arrangements of people in Canada, family size, the number of children living with one parent or two parents, and the number of people who live alone. This information is used for planning social programs, such as Old Age Security and the Child Tax Benefit. It is also used by communities to plan services such as daycare centres, schools and senior citizens’ residences. • Questions 7, 8 and 9 provide information to determine the need for language services in English and French according to the Official Languages Act, and are used to implement programs that protect the rights of Canadians under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. • Question 10 ensures that each person is given the opportunity to make an informed decision about what happens to their personal census information. Only if you answer “Yes” to this question will your 2011 Census information be released in 92 years.

Statistics Canada provides the following activity, which includes helpful vocabulary for ESL teachers: Exercise 5 – Identifying family relationships This exercise uses a family tree that will help you to see how different people in a household are all represented in the census. By looking at the picture below, see if you can fill in the blanks on Pat’s family tree. Pat is Person 1. Person 1 can be male or female. Pat will fill in the questionnaire. This is Pat’s family tree. It shows the relationship of other people to Person 1. Fill in the blanks with a word from the list below (words may be used more than once): sister brother wife father daughter brother-in-law father-in-law son nephew sister-in-law niece 1. Jane is Pat’s 2. Ken is Pat’s 3. Cathy is Pat’s 4. Peter is Pat’s 5. Mary is Pat’s 6. Bob is Pat’s 7. Mr. Green is Pat’s

18 Dung Nguyen for herself Step E: Basic population information � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm? � No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm?

� No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - . 3. DATE OF BIRTH AND AGE Day Month Year Age Example: 2 3 0 2 1 9 7 4 3 7 If exact date is not known, enter best estimate. For children under the age of 1, enter 0. Day Month Year Age 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.

page 1 of 3 Nguyen Dung 14 x 04 1959 52 x

19 Dung Nguyen for herself page 2 of 3 Step E: Basic population information 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.  Yes  No - 8 - 6. RELATIONSHIP TO PERSON 1 For each person usually living here, describe his or her relationship to Person 1. Mark or specify one response only.

Adopted children should be considered sons and daughters. Children in joint custody should be included in the home of the parent where they live most of the time. Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included in the home of the parent with whom they are staying on May 10, 2011. For all children, please consider the relationship to Person 1 and Person 2. If none of the choices apply, specify this person’s relationship to Person 1 under “Other”. Examples of “Other” relationships to Person 1: • brother-in-law or sister-in-law • niece or nephew • grandfather or grandmother • room-mate’s son or daughter • lodger’s husband or wife • employee • etc. PERSON 1  PERSON 1 PERSON 2  Opposite-sex husband or wife of Person 1  Opposite-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Same-sex married spouse of Person 1  Same-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Son or daughter of Person 1 only  Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1  Grandchild of Person 1  Father or mother of Person 1  Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1  Brother or sister of Person 1  Foster child  Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify PERSON 3, etc.

� Son or daughter of both Persons 1 and 2 � Son or daughter of Person 1 only � Son or daughter of Person 2 only � Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1 � Grandchild of Person 1 � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to condu Mark one circle only. � English only � French only x x

20 Dung Nguyen for herself page 3 of 3 Step E: Basic population information � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only. � English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 - 9. What is the language that this person first learned at home in childhood and still understands?

If this person no longer understands the first language learned, indicate the second language learned. � English � French Other — Specify If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person. 10. This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire. Only if you mark “YES” to this question will your census responses and family history be part of the historical record of Canada. A “YES” means your census responses will be available to family members and historical researchers, 92 years after the 2011 Census, in 2103.

If you mark “NO” or leave the answer blank, your census responses will never be made available to future generations. Does this person agree to make his or her 2011 Census information available in 2103 (92 years after the census)? � Yes � No � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only.

� English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 - x Vietnamese x Vietnamese x

21 Sami Shirazi for person 2 page 1 of 3 Step E: Basic population information � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm? � No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm?

� No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - . 3. DATE OF BIRTH AND AGE Day Month Year Age Example: 2 3 0 2 1 9 7 4 3 7 If exact date is not known, enter best estimate. For children under the age of 1, enter 0. Day Month Year Age 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.

Shirazi Soheil x 18 04 1969 42 x

22 Sami Shirazi for person 2 page 2 of 3 Step E: Basic population information 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.  Yes  No - 8 - 6. RELATIONSHIP TO PERSON 1 For each person usually living here, describe his or her relationship to Person 1. Mark or specify one response only.

Adopted children should be considered sons and daughters. Children in joint custody should be included in the home of the parent where they live most of the time. Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included in the home of the parent with whom they are staying on May 10, 2011. For all children, please consider the relationship to Person 1 and Person 2. If none of the choices apply, specify this person’s relationship to Person 1 under “Other”. Examples of “Other” relationships to Person 1: • brother-in-law or sister-in-law • niece or nephew • grandfather or grandmother • room-mate’s son or daughter • lodger’s husband or wife • employee • etc. PERSON 1  PERSON 1 PERSON 2  Opposite-sex husband or wife of Person 1  Opposite-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Same-sex married spouse of Person 1  Same-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Son or daughter of Person 1 only  Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1  Grandchild of Person 1  Father or mother of Person 1  Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1  Brother or sister of Person 1  Foster child  Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify PERSON 3, etc.

� Son or daughter of both Persons 1 and 2 � Son or daughter of Person 1 only � Son or daughter of Person 2 only � Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1 � Grandchild of Person 1 � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to condu Mark one circle only. � English only � French only x x

23 Sami Shirazi for person 2 page 3 of 3 Step E: Basic population information � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only. � English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 - 9. What is the language that this person first learned at home in childhood and still understands?

If this person no longer understands the first language learned, indicate the second language learned. � English � French Other — Specify If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person. 10. This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire. Only if you mark “YES” to this question will your census responses and family history be part of the historical record of Canada. A “YES” means your census responses will be available to family members and historical researchers, 92 years after the 2011 Census, in 2103.

If you mark “NO” or leave the answer blank, your census responses will never be made available to future generations. Does this person agree to make his or her 2011 Census information available in 2103 (92 years after the census)? � Yes � No � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only.

� English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 - x Persian x Persian x x

24 Claudio Mendez for person 3 page 1 of 3 Step E: Basic population information � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm? � No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm?

� No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - . 3. DATE OF BIRTH AND AGE Day Month Year Age Example: 2 3 0 2 1 9 7 4 3 7 If exact date is not known, enter best estimate. For children under the age of 1, enter 0. Day Month Year Age 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.

23 02 1987 24 x Mendez Claudio x

25 Claudio Mendez for person 3 page 2 of 3 Step E: Basic population information 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.  Yes  No - 8 - 6. RELATIONSHIP TO PERSON 1 For each person usually living here, describe his or her relationship to Person 1. Mark or specify one response only.

Adopted children should be considered sons and daughters. Children in joint custody should be included in the home of the parent where they live most of the time. Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included in the home of the parent with whom they are staying on May 10, 2011. For all children, please consider the relationship to Person 1 and Person 2. If none of the choices apply, specify this person’s relationship to Person 1 under “Other”. Examples of “Other” relationships to Person 1: • brother-in-law or sister-in-law • niece or nephew • grandfather or grandmother • room-mate’s son or daughter • lodger’s husband or wife • employee • etc. PERSON 1  PERSON 1 PERSON 2  Opposite-sex husband or wife of Person 1  Opposite-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Same-sex married spouse of Person 1  Same-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Son or daughter of Person 1 only  Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1  Grandchild of Person 1  Father or mother of Person 1  Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1  Brother or sister of Person 1  Foster child  Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify PERSON 3, etc.

� Son or daughter of both Persons 1 and 2 � Son or daughter of Person 1 only � Son or daughter of Person 2 only � Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1 � Grandchild of Person 1 � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to condu Mark one circle only. � English only � French only x x

26 Claudio Mendez for person 3 page 3 of 3 Step E: Basic population information � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only. � English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 - 9. What is the language that this person first learned at home in childhood and still understands?

If this person no longer understands the first language learned, indicate the second language learned. � English � French Other — Specify If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person. 10. This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire. Only if you mark “YES” to this question will your census responses and family history be part of the historical record of Canada. A “YES” means your census responses will be available to family members and historical researchers, 92 years after the 2011 Census, in 2103.

If you mark “NO” or leave the answer blank, your census responses will never be made available to future generations. Does this person agree to make his or her 2011 Census information available in 2103 (92 years after the census)? � Yes � No � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only.

� English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 - x x Portuguese x Spanish

27 For Dung Nguyen Step A: Telephone and address Special circumstances IF THIS ADDRESS IS:  a SECONDARY RESIDENCE (such as a cottage) for ALL PERSONS who stayed here on May 10, 2011 (all these persons have their main residence elsewhere in Canada), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your main residence address at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  a DWELLING OCCUPIED ONLY BY RESIDENTS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY VISITING CANADA (for example, on vacation or on a business trip), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your country of residence at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  the HOME OF A GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANOTHER COUNTRY (for example, embassy or high commission) and family members, mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and the country that you represent at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions. Name Telephone number - No. and street, city, province or territory/country

28 For Dung Nguyen STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away. See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - IF THIS ADDRESS IS:  a SECONDARY RESIDENCE (such as a cottage) for ALL PERSONS who stayed here on May 10, 2011 (all these persons have their main residence elsewhere in Canada), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your main residence address at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.

 a DWELLING OCCUPIED ONLY BY RESIDENTS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY VISITING CANADA (for example, on vacation or on a business trip), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your country of residence at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.  the HOME OF A GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANOTHER COUNTRY (for example, embassy or high commission) and family members, mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and the country that you represent at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions. Name Telephone number - No. and street, city, province or territory/country STEP C Did you leave anyone out of Step B because you were not sure the person should be listed? (For example, a person living at this address who has another home, a person temporarily away, etc.)  No  Yes Specify the name, the relationship and the reason. Name(s) and relationship Reason - 6 - STEP B 1. How many persons usually live at this address as of May 10, 2011, including yourself? Include all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away.

See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, permanent residents, secondary residence, etc.). Number of persons 2. Including yourself, list below all persons who usually live here. Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children. Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address. FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4 Person 5 Person 6 Person 7 Person 8 Person 9 Person 10 - 4 - Steps B and C: Persons living at the address

29 For all students STEP D 1. Is anyone listed in Step B a farm operator who produces at least one agricultural product intended for sale? (Crops, livestock, milk, poultry, eggs, greenhouse or nursery products, Christmas trees, sod, honey, bees, maple syrup products, furs, etc.) � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm? � No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person.

PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - Step D: Farm operators

30 Claudio Mendez for person 3 page 1 of 3 Step E: Basic population information � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm? � No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - � No Go to Step E � Yes 2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm?

� No � Yes STEP E Copy the names in Step B to Question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7. Keep the same order. 1. NAME In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in Step B. Then answer the following questions for each person. PERSON 1 Family name Given name 2. SEX � Male � Female - 7 - . 3. DATE OF BIRTH AND AGE Day Month Year Age Example: 2 3 0 2 1 9 7 4 3 7 If exact date is not known, enter best estimate. For children under the age of 1, enter 0. Day Month Year Age 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.

31 Claudio Mendez for person 3 page 2 of 3 Step E: Basic population information 4. MARITAL STATUS Mark one circle only.  Never legally married  Legally married (and not separated)  Separated, but still legally married  Divorced  Widowed 5. Is this person living with a common-law partner? Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.  Yes  No - 8 - 6. RELATIONSHIP TO PERSON 1 For each person usually living here, describe his or her relationship to Person 1. Mark or specify one response only.

Adopted children should be considered sons and daughters. Children in joint custody should be included in the home of the parent where they live most of the time. Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included in the home of the parent with whom they are staying on May 10, 2011. For all children, please consider the relationship to Person 1 and Person 2. If none of the choices apply, specify this person’s relationship to Person 1 under “Other”. Examples of “Other” relationships to Person 1: • brother-in-law or sister-in-law • niece or nephew • grandfather or grandmother • room-mate’s son or daughter • lodger’s husband or wife • employee • etc. PERSON 1  PERSON 1 PERSON 2  Opposite-sex husband or wife of Person 1  Opposite-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Same-sex married spouse of Person 1  Same-sex common-law partner of Person 1  Son or daughter of Person 1 only  Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1  Grandchild of Person 1  Father or mother of Person 1  Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1  Brother or sister of Person 1  Foster child  Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify PERSON 3, etc.

� Son or daughter of both Persons 1 and 2 � Son or daughter of Person 1 only � Son or daughter of Person 2 only � Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1 � Grandchild of Person 1 � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to condu Mark one circle only. � English only � French only

32 Claudio Mendez for person 3 page 3 of 3 Step E: Basic population information � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only. � English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 - 9. What is the language that this person first learned at home in childhood and still understands?

If this person no longer understands the first language learned, indicate the second language learned. � English � French Other — Specify If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person. 10. This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire. Only if you mark “YES” to this question will your census responses and family history be part of the historical record of Canada. A “YES” means your census responses will be available to family members and historical researchers, 92 years after the 2011 Census, in 2103.

If you mark “NO” or leave the answer blank, your census responses will never be made available to future generations. Does this person agree to make his or her 2011 Census information available in 2103 (92 years after the census)? � Yes � No � Father or mother of Person 1 � Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1 � Brother or sister of Person 1 � Foster child � Room-mate, lodger or boarder Other — Specify 7. Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation? Mark one circle only.

� English only � French only � Both English and French � Neither English nor French 8. (a) What language does this person speak most often at home? � English � French Other — Specify (b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home? � No � Yes, English � Yes, French Yes, Other — Specify - 10 -

33 Interview 1 1. How many people live in your home? 2. What languages do you speak in your house? 3. How many people in your house are taking ESL classes? 4. Will you complete the census on May 10, 2011 for your family? 5. How do you feel about doing the census? 6. Do you have a question about the census you would like the teacher to answer? I’m excited. It will be fun. I’m worried that it will be difficult. It’s fine. I’m not worried about it. Class census Interview two of your classmates. Interview 2 1. How many people live in your home? 2. What languages do you speak in your house? 3. How many people in your house are taking ESL classes? 4. Will you complete the census on May 10, 2011 for your family? 5. How do you feel about doing the census?

6. Do you have a question about the census you would like the teacher to answer? I’m excited. It will be fun. I’m worried that it will be difficult. It’s fine. I’m not worried about it.

34 Census word search This activ 2011 Cen U.S. Cens Find and circle all these words. 1. L e 2. L é 3. E p 4. Q o 5. D l’ 1. T C 2. D 3. In q 4. W o 5. In a O S C E Y V F C D G E C R H Y N C O O N H A A N A I E O C P O I C O N N P I M T T U U R N I T T U A F N A I I S A O I E T S S D P N I Z R E L V C N D A I A C A A E D H G I Y U T U L T J L E N T O E N O M D E C U A P Y S N L I C N E E G R A P T N H W D S E O R T M G N T O S I S H M S U A N C I W E I P P D E M R C T S M G J A T O Q U E S T I O N N A I R E L N E V S S E R D D A N Q H D X U Y C A V I R P S T L U S E R D U N N P W L P B P J B J Y M I ADDRESS ENUMERATOR POPULATION CANADA FAMILY PRIVACY CENSUS GEOGRAPHY PROVINCES CITISENSHIP HOUSEHOLD QUESTIONNAIRE CONFIDENTIAL INTERNET RESULTS DATA OCCUPATION STATISTICS EDUCATION PLANNING from Statistics Canada

35 Census in your first country Write a few sentences about what you know or remember about the census in your first country. For example, in China a census was conducted in 1913, 1944, 1953, 1964, 1982, 1990, 2000, and 2010. In Iran, a census is taken every ten years. In India, the largest census in the world will be conducted in 2011, with enumerators visiting every household.

36 Family tree On a blank sheet of paper, draw your own family tree. For each person, give a description. Here is an example: Here is a glossary of words you might use. aunt: your father’s or mother’s sister brother: your male sibling brother-in-law: your spouse’s brother child: your offspring cousin: your aunt’s or uncle’s child common-law: partners who are not married dad: your male parent (informal) daughter: your female child daughter-in-law: your child’s wife father: your male parent grandchild: your child’s child granddaughter: your child’s female child grandfather: your father’s or mother’s father grandmother: your father’s or mother’s mother grandson: your child’s male child half-brother – your male sibling who shares only one biological parent half-sister – your female sibling who shares only one biological parent mother: your female parent mother-in-law: your spouse’s mother nephew: your bother’s or sister’s son niece: your brother’s or sister’s daughter parent: your mother or father sibling: your brother or sister sister: your female sibling sister-in-law: your spouse’s sister stepbrother: your non-biological male sibling through marriage stepfather: your non-biological male parent through marriage stepmother: your non-biological female parent through marriage stepsister: your non-biological female sibling through marriage son: your male child son-in-law: your child’s husband uncle: your father’s or mother’s brother wife: your female spouse

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