Composition Program Handbook 2019-2020 - NEW PALTZ State University of New York - SUNY New Paltz

 
Composition Program Handbook

           2019-2020

     State University of New York
             NEW PALTZ
The Composition Program
              Handbook

                         2019-2020

  Dedicated to our colleague Dr. Pauline Uchmanowicz, former
Composition Program Coordinator & Creative Writing Director, for
  her inspired teaching and mentorship of countless students.

                 Department of English
      Editors: Rachel E. Rigolino, Joann K. Deiudicibus, Matt Newcomb
                     Copy Editor: Joann K. Deiudicibus
       Copyright © 2019-2020 Department of English, SUNY New Paltz
STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ
                 THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH & THE COMPOSITION PROGRAM

                                          Vicki Tromanhauser
                                  Associate Professor of English, Chair

                                           Jacqueline George
                              Associate Professor of English, Deputy Chair

                                             Matt Newcomb
                    Associate Professor of English; Coordinator, Composition Program

                                           Rachel E. Rigolino
                           Lecturer; Coordinator, SWW Composition Program

                                          Joann K. Deiudicibus
                                  Staff Assistant, Composition Program

        Special thanks to Larry Carr, retired Lecturer, for his service to our first-year students!

                                            Acknowledgments
Previous editions of The Composition Handbook are a compilation of various booklets and handouts that
were created by faculty and by staff at SUNY New Paltz. The editors would like to acknowledge especially
the work of the following members of the New Paltz community:

                        Pam Atkins, Director of the Psychological Counseling Center
                 Victoria Ann Blythe, former Adjunct Instructor, English Department
                Pamela K. Bonsu, Assistant Director, Educational Opportunity Program
                         John Burdick, Adjunct Instructor, English Department
                          Arthur Cash, Professor Emeritus, English Department
                         Lisa Chase, Director, Educational Opportunity Program
                          Lynne Crockett, former Lecturer, English Department
                              David Eckbold, former Student, Composition I
                               Mary Fakler, Instructor, English Department
                         Marie Gabriel, Secretary Emeritus, English Department
                   Sarah Gardner, former Coordinator, Writing and Tutoring Center
                      Tom Impola, former Adjunct Instructor, English Department
                     Sharon Kahn, former Adjunct Instructor, English Department
                             Richard Kelder, Curriculum Coordinator, CADL
                    Beverly Lavergneau, former Director, Special Student Programs
                      Alice Matzdorf, former Counselor, Special Student Programs
                           Charles Norris, Esq. former Director of Law & Order
                          Rosa Lou Novi, former Instructor, English Department
                      F.X. Paz, Associate Professor Emeritus, English Department
                        Joan E. Perisse, Adjunct Instructor, English Department
                            Rachel E. Rigolino, Lecturer, English Department
                        Jan Zlotnik Schmidt, Distinguished Professor, English Department
                           Bruce Sillner, former Coordinator, Haggerty Institute
                        Robert Singleton, Adjunct Instructor, English Department
                       Karen Soll, former Adjunct Instructor, English Department
                     H.R. Stoneback, Distinguished Professor, English Department
                       Lyn Thoman, former Staff Assistant, Composition Program
                         Pauline Uchmanowicz, Professor, English Department;
                                former Coordinator, Composition Program
                         Robert Waugh, Professor Emeritus, English Department
                              Ethel Wesdorp, Secretary, English Department
 Margaret C. Winters, former Teaching Assistant, Department of English; Editor 1993 and 1994 editions
     Fan Lan Ying, former Coordinator, Haggerty Institute, English as a Second Language Program
Composition Program Handbook
                             Table of Contents
At-A-Glance Top-10 List: Composition Program Policies
At-A-Glance: Transfer and Accreditation

Part One: The Essentials
Curricular Objectives of the Composition Program                  8
Composition Program Overview                                      9
Composition I                                                     10
Writing & Rhetoric                                                13
Supplemental Writing Workshop & ESL/SWW Courses                   15
Advanced Writing & Rhetoric                                       16
Program Policies: Academic Integrity, Assignments, & Attendance   19

Part Two: Writing and Revising Effectively
Effective Writing: Process & Characteristics                      21
Checklist for Revising or Evaluating an Essay                     24
The Ten Most Troublesome Grammar Errors                           25
Preparing the Final Copy of Your Essay                            27

Part Three: Support Services
Educational Opportunity Program                                   28
Center for Student Success                                        29
Haggerty English Language Pathways Program                        30
Support Services for Students with Disabilities                   30
The Psychological Counseling Center                               31

Appendix: Placement and Proficiency Testing
Placement and Proficiency                                         32
Composition Program Assessment of Writing Skills                  33
Composition Program Abbreviated Writing Rubric                    34
SUNY NEW PALTZ DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH TOP 10
                  COMPOSITION POLICY LIST
        Composing texts involves complicated processes of analyzing a situation, thinking critically about
        options, and stylistically creating and revising material in the proper format. Because of the
        importance and complexity of writing for academic, business, and personal settings, SUNY New
        Paltz requires two distinct writing courses that ALL students must complete—Composition I
        (ENG 160) and Writing & Rhetoric (ENG 170) or its course equivalent Advanced Writing & Rhetoric
        (ENG 206). Students placed into Composition I upon matriculation at SUNY - New Paltz must begin
        the course sequence in their first semester, and complete all required Composition courses within
        their first year. Students placed into Writing & Rhetoric or the Advanced version of this course (via
        our placement rubric, transfer course or AP credit, for example) must complete the course within
        the first year of matriculation at SUNY New Paltz. The first course teaches more general stylistic,
        mechanical, rhetorical, and analytical skills while the second teaches more advanced argument
        and research skills. Students eligible for Advanced Writing & Rhetoric are interested in literature
        and writing.

Please use this guide to be sure you meet your Composition requirements.
   1.  Composition I and Writing & Rhetoric are taken in a two-semester sequence upon matriculation to
       complete the university’s Composition requirement. If, FOR ANY REASON, the Composition
       courses are taken out of sequence, this does not provide exemption status for Composition I. Both
       courses cover specific writing techniques and skills and are not redundant syllabi. CLEP scores
       must be received before the student matriculates; AP and IB scores must be received within the
       first week of classes of the semester that the student matriculates.
   2. No student may take more than one Composition course at a time to satisfy the Composition
       requirement.
   3. No student may withdraw from Composition without proof of medical/extenuating circumstances.
   4. Attending the library session is mandatory to comply with the Information Literacy requirment. If
       a student is absent from the library session, they must make arrangements to make up the session.
   5. Any student with a disability should register with the Disability Resource Center to determine
       eligibility; then, they should notify instructors immediately by providing DRC documentation for
       proper arrangements can be made as per the Americans with Disabilities Act.
   6. An attendance requirement is in effect in all Composition courses with grade reductions beginning
       with the third unexcused absence. Missing more than two class meetings will reduce a grade in
       this course by 1/3 of a letter grade per absence through six absences. Three late arrivals constitute
       an absence. A seventh unexcused absence is grounds for a failing grade.
   7. A student must prepare and submit a passing portfolio at the end of our courses. A student who
       has exceeded the number of absences permitted, who has not completed all the work required, or
       who has not earned a passing grade (D or better) prior to the final exam may not submit a portfolio.
   8. Some students with weak writing skills may need more than one semester to pass composition
       courses. If a student fails Composition I or Writing & Rhetoric because their writing is too weak to
       pass (but is not failing due to excessive absence or inability to complete at least 60% of the
       assignments) a Repeat (“R”) grade may be granted. An “R” grade will not affect a student’s
       cumulative average, jeopardize tenure at the college, or endanger financial aid. An “R” grade
       requires the student to repeat the course the following semester. The student then is assigned the
       grade earned in the repeated class.
   9. In some cases, students who submit Composition I portfolios will be given a provisional pass. This
       means that the student must immediately enroll in a section of Writing & Rhetoric Supplemental
       Writing Workshop (SWW). If a student elects NOT to enroll in an SWW section of Writing & Rhetoric,
       the student will receive an “R” and must repeat Composition I. Conversely, those students who
       demonstrate particularly sophisticated writing skills may be recommended to enroll in Advanced
       Writing & Rhetoric if they wish.
   10. Statement on Academic Integrity: “Students are expected to maintain the highest standards of
       honesty in their academic work. Cheating, forgery, and plagiarism are serious offences, and
       students found guilty of any form of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary action” (Faculty
       Handbook, p. 33).
       Plagiarism is the unacknowledged (intentional or unintentional) use of summary, paraphrase,
       direct quotation, language, statistics, or ideas from articles or other information sources,
       including the Internet. Cases of plagiarism must be reported to the Department of English Chair
       and the Academic Dean.
SUNY NEW PALTZ COMPOSITION PROGRAM TRANSFER &
                  ACCREDITION POLICIES
Under specific circumstances, you may qualify for Composition exemption or transfer credit.
Composition I:
   1. Transfer students who have taken a Composition course at another college may submit transcripts
       to Transfer Advising for review. These must be received at the mid-point of the first semester the
       student matriculates (please check for specific deadline date with Transfer Advising).
   2. If a student receives a score of 3, 4, or 5 on either the Language or Literature AP exams, the student
       may receive Composition I credit. Transfer Advising must receive the official transcript within the
       first week of the semester that the student matriculates for the student to register for Writing &
       Rhetoric.
   3. If a student receives a score of 70 or above on the CLEP exam (the College Composition Exam
       only, NOT the Composition Modular Exam), the student may be exempt from Composition I. CLEP
       scores must be received prior to matriculation.
   4. If a student earns a 5 or higher in English through the International Baccalaureate Program, the
       student may be exempt from Composition I. IB scores must be received prior to matriculation.
   5. If a student earns high school grades and scores on the SAT that meet the standards listed in the
       Composition Placement Rubric, the student may be exempt from Composition I.
   6. Students who, after a significant time, are returning to college may submit a portfolio of work that
       must include samples of expository, argument, and informational essays. This material may
       include professional writing (i.e., work that the returning student may have completed in the
       workplace). One essay must have at least three sources cited in MLA format.

Writing & Rhetoric:
    7. Writing & Rhetoric emphasizes academic argument, rhetoric, and research and is not redundant
        with Composition I. Unless a student has completed the Composition I and Writing & Rhetoric
        sequence from an accredited college, only under exceptional circumstances may exemption be
        granted from Writing & Rhetoric.
    8. If a student has successfully received exemption for the Composition I requirement and has not
        successfully passed a Writing & Rhetoric course (either Writing & Rhetoric is not offered at the
        prior institution of study or the student has not passed a course comparable to SUNY New Paltz’s
        Writing & Rhetoric), the student must complete Writing & Rhetoric within the first year of
        study. An exemption for Composition I does not indicate an exemption for Writing & Rhetoric.
    9. If a transfer student has completed a similar course elsewhere that meets Writing & Rhetoric
        objectives, then the student must submit, before the end of the first week of classes, the
        following to the Composition Program:
             a. Official description and syllabus for the course in question;
             b. Transcript from original college that notes the grade for the course in question;
             c. Portfolio of work (often 20-25 pages) completed for the writing course comparable to Writing
                 & Rhetoric that includes a properly documented research paper (typically 6-8 pages) and
                 three other academic essays (3-5 pages) from the course in question.
                 If appropriate, the Composition Program will ask each student seeking exemption to write
                 a timed essay in our office.
    10. Any student denied exemption is required to register for the appropriate level of Composition as
        soon as possible. Completion of the Composition sequence is mandatory to graduate.

                   FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:
                 Joann K. Deiudicibus, Assistant, Composition Program
                    (deiudicj@newpaltz.edu) 845.257.2727, JFT 702
PART ONE:

       THE ESSENTIALS
Composition Program Curricular Objectives

Overall, courses offered by the Composition Program assist students in developing the
capacities to think critically and to expand their depth of knowledge in order to become lifelong
learners as well as productive citizens and members of their society.

In particular, students who complete courses in Composition should be able to:

      Write well-developed, well-organized personal, academic, and professional essays in
       different rhetorical situations (i.e., for different purposes, occasions, and audiences)
       using a variety of rhetorical modes (e.g., description, narration, exposition, and
       particularly argument and interpretation).

      Understand and practice composing processes (i.e., gathering, shaping, drafting,
       revising, editing, and proofreading) and be able to transfer these skills to effectively read
       and critique their own writing as well as that of others.

      Use critical thinking and reasoning skills to analyze, to infer, to synthesize, to interpret,
       and to evaluate effectively, including information, arguments (i.e., premise, deductive
       and inductive reasoning, forms of appeal, and forms of evidence), and literary works as
       well as to argue effectively (i.e., to develop a position, reasons, evidence, and warrants)
       when presenting information or analyzing and interpreting texts.

      Conduct and document research (i.e., develop a research topic and search strategy; use
       general or specialized databases; use Internet search engines; locate, retrieve, and
       evaluate information sources; organize, synthesize, and evaluate information; construct
       a bibliography; cite information sources used in-text for summary, paraphrase, direct
       quotation, and ideas; and follow guidelines for academic integrity governing use of
       primary and secondary sources).

      Improve oral presentation skills (i.e., to present expressive, informative, or persuasive
       speeches) and critique the oral discourse of members of diverse learning communities.

      Continue to develop writing, critical thinking, critical reading, research, documentation,
       and speaking skills in discipline-specific classes beyond Composition classes (e.g., in a
       writing-intensive course in their selected majors).

      Remain conversant in developing texts, technologies, composing strategies (including
       those requiring computer skills), and standards recognized in the field of Rhetoric and
       Composition Studies.

      Initiate reading, writing, and speaking experiences independent of course work (e.g.,
       read self-selected works for pleasure, intellectual enrichment, or critical investigation
       and examination; attend, perform, or participate in public forums, such as poetry or
       fiction reading or a research conference; or submit writing to campus or professional
       publications).
Composition Program Overview
COMPOSITION PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The Composition Program consists of Composition I, Writing & Rhetoric (formerly titled
Composition II), as well as SWW and ESL/SWW versions of these courses. We offer Advanced
Writing & Rhetoric (formerly titled Composition II) for students interested in English and
writing, as well as Intermediate Composition, a Writing Intensive course designed for transfer
students.

Students are required to complete two composition courses (Comp I and Writing & Rhetoric):
this is a college requirement for graduation and holds for all majors; other English courses will
not substitute for them. Students who earn a score of 3 or better on an Advanced Placement in
English Exam may be exempted from Composition I. Those with a 4 or 5 are then are placed in
Advanced Writing & Rhetoric , if possible.

Students must take their Composition courses in a two-step sequence: first, Composition I;
second, Writing & Rhetoric. Composition I stresses the composing process, emphasizes
reflection about writing itself, and moves from expressive to expository and persuasive writing;
i.e., from writing for self to writing to inform and influence others. The course concentrates on
writing modes, genres, and situations; it also considers forms of writing required in courses
across the disciplines. Writing & Rhetoric stresses the development of critical and analytic
thinking and is devoted to a discussion of research and argumentation, focusing on the
discourse around a specific current topic framed as a Wicked Question. Both Composition I
and Writing & Rhetoric include critical analysis of largely non-fiction texts.

Supplemental Writing Workshop
Students who score levels 1-2 on the placement scale for Composition will be required to enroll
in specially designated sections of Composition I entitled Composition I-Supplemental Writing
Workshops (SWW). Students placed into these sections must take these sections. A companion
course will be offered in the second semester, and students who are successful in the first will
be urged to continue their requirements in Writing & Rhetoric SWW. (This curricular initiative
is the result of a collaboration of the Educational Opportunity Program, The Center for Student
Success, the Haggerty English Language Pathway Program, and the English Department.)
These sections will be composed of the regular class sessions, a one-hour non-credit
supplemental writing workshop, and required tutoring. Through these supplemental forms of
instruction and tutorial assistance students will gain the skills needed to succeed in the
course. Composition I and Writing & Rhetoric SWW courses count as regular first-year
Composition courses.

Composition I and Writing & Rhetoric ESL/SWW courses are designed for students whose
primary language is other than English. Composition I and Writing & Rhetoric ESL/SWW
courses count as regular first-year Composition courses. These courses are designed for
students still making a transition from their native language to English. Some students who
have weak writing and language backgrounds, however, may need more than one semester to
pass the course; they will be able to receive an “R” grade and repeat the course (without
hurting their GPA) the following term.

Students interested in literature who have demonstrated expertise in writing on the
departmental placement examination are placed into General Honors English; students also
may enter the General Honors English sequence by referral. The curriculum of the General
Honors English sequence is quite different from Composition I and Writing & Rhetoric. The
courses focus on analysis and in-depth discussion of literary texts while requiring a
substantive amount of writing.
CATALOG DESCRIPTIONS

ENG160 COMPOSITION I (3)
Training in critical reading, the process of composing, academic forms of writing, and computer
literacy. Movement from expressive to expository writing. Papers assigned to develop particular
writing techniques. A first-semester English course. Restrictions: Undergraduate; Students
cannot elect the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade option for this course

ENG170 WRITING & RHETORIC (4)
Training in rhetorical situation analysis and argument writing. Focus on research, critical
analysis, and academic genres. Oral presentation and library components. Papers assigned to
develop collection and integration of materials, evidence-based analysis, and argument
invention. Prerequisites: English Placement Level 4 or ENG160 Minimum Grade of D-

ENG206 ADVANCED WRITING & RHETORIC (4)
Training in rhetorical situation analysis and argument writing. Designed for intellectually
curious and industrious students with demonstrated writing proficiency. Focus on research,
critical analysis, and academic genres. Oral presentation and library components. Meets basic
communication requirement. Prerequisites: ENG205 Minimum Grade of B or English
Placement Level 5

ENG207 INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION (4)
A Writing Intensive course designed to prepare students for college writing assignments in
various disciplines. Offers opportunities to enhance critical reading, writing, and thinking
skills. (This course is primarily a Writing & Rhetoric equivalent-course designed for transfer
students with some writing experience.)

SUNY Basic Communication and Information Management
Learning Outcomes

The following General Education Learning Outcomes are a foundation of our Writing &
Rhetoric and Advanced Writing & Rhetoric courses, in addition to the Student Learning
Outcomes specific to each course.

      Students will produce coherent texts within common college-level written forms.
      Students will demonstrate the ability to revise and improve such texts.
      Students will research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting
       details.
      Students will develop proficiency in oral discourse.
      Students will evaluate an oral presentation according to established criteria.
      Students will perform the basic operations of personal computer use.
      Students will understand and use basic research techniques.
      Students will locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of
       sources.
Composition I

Composition I develops students’ abilities to write grammatical and coherent sentences and to
develop ideas fully and in an organized fashion. The course will develop students’ abilities to
produce distinctive pieces of writing based upon individual thinking and experience. It also will
stress and lead students through the composing process as they develop better understanding
of their own writing processes. This orientation requires that students write and revise.
Revision skills are stressed as students practice different writing strategies in successive drafts.
This process also includes discussion of selected readings and written responses to them.
Students completing the course will be capable of producing expressive, expository, and
argumentative writing as well as other papers reflecting a variety of approaches to thinking and
writing. In short, all Composition I classes concentrate on the development of critical thinking
and reading, the process of writing, and forms of academic prose to promote effective
communication skills.

Composition I Course Objectives
By semester’s end, students will demonstrate the ability to
   1. Write well in different rhetorical situations and modes, i.e., for different purposes,
       occasions, and audiences.
   2. Understand and reflect on key concepts about writing and rhetoric (style, exigence,
       voice, invention, etc.).
   3. Craft well-developed, well-organized, clear, and grammatical sentences, paragraphs,
       and essays.
   4. Think and write as college students (reflecting, observing, explaining, comparing,
       summarizing, synthesizing, analyzing, evaluating, and interpreting).
   5. Approach writing as a process (planning, shaping, drafting, revising, and editing).
   6. Critique one’s own writing and the writing of others through reflection on important
       concepts and issues in composition studies.
   7. Evaluate sources of information using criteria such as currency, authority, objectivity,
       accuracy, specificity, and relevance.
   8. Use information ethically and legally.
   9. Develop oral presentation skills.
   10. Develop computer and library information literacy skills.

Composition I Writing Requirements and Suggested Grade Distribution
      Four take-home essays of approximately 750-1000 words each                   60% (or more)
      An in-class timed essay/midterm                                              5%
      Quizzes and informal writing exercises                                       10%
      Reader-response journal or Blackboard posts                                  10%
      Oral component                                                                5%
      Class participation and attendance                                            5%
      Participation in library skills workshop                                      5%
      In-class timed essay/final                                                    P/F
      Portfolio                                                                     P/F

Course Exiting Requirements
In order to fulfill the university requirement students must earn a course grade of D or better
and are required to submit portfolios of their work for review by Composition Program faculty.
Each portfolio includes a required final-exit essay, which must be prepared on Common Final
Exam Day as scheduled by the university.
No student passes Composition I without submitting a satisfactory portfolio. To be eligible to
submit portfolios, students must demonstrate competency in grammar and usage through an
editing exercise. No student who has exceeded the number of absences permitted in the course,
or who has not completed all the work required in the course, or who has not earned a passing
grade (D or better) as of the day of the final-exit assessment will be allowed to submit a
portfolio. Faculty portfolio reading partners (instructors are paired or work in groups) will
review borderline cases (a minimum of 5 portfolios per section) to determine placement into
ENG 170/Writing & Rhetoric.

Portfolios are considered passing if they are deemed a level 4 on the placement and proficiency
scale (see “Placement and Proficiency Standards” rubric). Portfolios that do not contain the
required work (see below) are not reviewed. Students whose portfolios receive a failing grade
receive a Repeat (R) grade and must repeat the course. There are no additional procedures of
appeal.

Students who are not eligible to submit a final portfolio and who are not failing the course or
earning a D- because of poor work, excessive absence, or inability to complete the requirements
also may be assigned an “R” instead of a D- or F, if the instructor chooses to do so; i.e., the R
grade may be assigned to students who have done their best but are still failing (or nearly so)
the course. This grade does not affect a student’s cumulative average or endanger financial aid.
The student will repeat the course the following semester, and the final grade will be based on
the work done in the repeated course.

The Portfolio

The final course portfolio will be created digitally on Hawksites and will consist of the
following:

      Two revised papers, one of which demonstrates argumentative writing, introductory
       research, and basic proficiency in MLA documentation methods.
      Drafts of the two final papers included in the portfolio to show improvement through
       revision and editing
      A cover letter—a final reflective statement in which the student articulates the writing
       processes for the essays therein, and reflects on progress in the course
Writing & Rhetoric

Writing & Rhetoric continues the development of writing skills begun in Composition I. The
course reviews as necessary basic writing principles: grammar, sentence structure, and style; it
also emphasizes writing cogent, coherent prose. The course focuses, however, more intensively
on the development of critical thinking and reasoning abilities, stressing the skills needed to
interpret, to evaluate, and to synthesize information. Other emphases of the course are
discussion and critical interpretation of a body of rhetorical works. Special attention is paid to
research techniques, methods of argumentation, and critical reading skills. There are required
oral presentation and library skills components in Writing & Rhetoric.

Writing & Rhetoric Wicked Problems/Questions
Designed as a first-year seminar, each section of Writing & Rhetoric is organized around a topic
selected by individual instructors, phrased as a Wicked Problem or Question. This approach
shifts the course toward considerations of design, multimodal writing, and practical innovation.

Definition
As per the Wicked Problems: Problems Worth Solving website, a wicked problem
is
       a social or cultural problem that is difficult or impossible to solve for as many as four
       reasons: incomplete or contradictory knowledge, the number of people and opinions
       involved, the large economic burden, and the interconnected nature of these problems
       with other problems. Poverty is linked with education, nutrition with poverty, the
       economy with nutrition, and so on.

No single person or discipline can address one of these problems (and we are working with
students going into many disciplines), and much of the work toward solutions depends on
communication processes, persuasive language, and thoughtful research (all of which are
concerns for Composition). For example: For example, “What Should We Eat?”

Examples and Resources
Any of the UN Sustainable Development Goals are options, and can be found here.

One free resource for learning more, can be found here: (wicked problems text - free online).

Writing & Rhetoric Course Objectives
By semester’s end, students will demonstrate the ability to:

   1. Identify and analyze two or more rhetorical situations, including constraints, audience
      needs, genre options, speaker roles, and other context.
   2. Develop a writing process that takes researched materials and ongoing conversations
      into account early and integrates those with original ideas and arguments.
   3. Craft sustained, logically-organized, stylistic, and grammatical sentences, paragraphs
      and essays—leading to significant writing in academic and professional genres.
   4. Analyze and evaluate arguments from multiple genres by considering aesthetic
      elements, rhetorical strategies, premises and assumptions, deductive and inductive
      reasoning, logical fallacies, and forms of evidence.
   5. Develop knowledge in at least one researched topic and use that knowledge to develop
      an evidence-based case to answer a research question of the student’s making.
   6. Deliver a source-based oral presentation with preparatory materials and visuals.
   7. Critique the content and delivery of at least one oral presentation.
8. Create a multimodal text, usefully combining words with sound, images, or other
       media.
   9. Select the best available information and use it ethically and legally, including
       practicing appropriate summary, quotation, and paraphrase.
   10. Transfer learned writing strategies to the writing for another course or context.
   11. Develop at least three strategies for taking an idea deeper and in new directions (stasis
       theory, freewriting, analogies, associative thinking, exploratory research, others).

Writing & Rhetoric Writing Requirements and Suggested Grade Distribution
      Two major projects with research, 1500-1800 words (examples are below) 40%
       -Researched argument
       -Revision portfolio with revision of previous work from class,
       attention to design, and a reflective letter
      Four minor papers, 400-800 words (which work toward the major papers) 30%
       These can include rhetorical analysis, narrative, description,
       literature review, extended definition, issue exploration, etc.
      Annotated Bibliography                                          5%
      Oral Presentation                                             10%
      Classroom citizenship and communication                         5%
       (includes class preparation and participation:
       verbal, online posts, in-class writings)
      Proposals/Outlines/Writing Homework                           10%
      Final Exam                                                     High Pass/Pass/Fail
      Portfolio (required for all students; may be graded            P/F
       As one of the two large course projects or as pass/fail)

Assignments & The Portfolio
The assignment structure for ENG170 includes 2 larger papers with two shorter
papers/assignments created to build up to each larger project in steps to encourage a focus on
writing process—that’s 2 large and 4 small in total. The digital portfolio (on Hawksites) can be
one of the two main projects in the course. Here are some assignment examples: a multi-genre
assignment (with several genres shown in the portfolio); a traditional research paper (with
materials like an annotated bibliography, proposal, executive summary, and research
question/problem definition as a few ideas for shorter materials as part of the portfolio); a
multimedia project, grant proposal, etc.

The ENG170 course portfolio will be created digitally on Hawksites and will consist of
the following:

       At least one piece of extended prose (5-page equivalent minimum)
      Significant research element (4-source minimum), but the sources may be integrated
       in whatever ways fit the specific project
      Multiple types, modes, or genres of writing (an annotated bibliography and a
       research paper count as different genres)
       An argument element with some form of credible, researched evidence
      Evidence of revision and drafting (a revision statement written by the student; clear,
       cohesive connections
      A self-reflection on the student’s growth as a writer, concept of writing, and future
       applications of writing skills learned in the course
Supplemental Writing Workshop
 Composition I SWW and ESL/SWW

This intensive Composition course includes a required weekly one-hour, non-credit writing
workshop and extra tutorial assistance. English as a Second Language/Supplemental Writing
Workshop sections of this course include two required, one-hour non-credit workshops and
required tutoring, as well.

Composition I SWW and ESL/SWW Course Objectives
The aims and objectives of Composition I SWW and ESL/SWW are the same as those for
Composition I. Additionally, satisfactory attendance and class participation during all required
contact hours (including attendance at the workshop and tutorial sessions) is mandatory.

Composition I SWW and ESL/SWW Writing Requirements and Suggested Grade
Distribution
The writing requirements and suggested grade distribution of Composition I SWW and
ESL/SWW are the same as those for Composition I.

Composition I SWW and ESL/SWW Course Exiting Requirements
The course exiting requirements for Composition I SWW and ESL/SWW are the same as those
for Composition I, including preparation and assessment of a portfolio of student work.

This intensive Composition course includes a required weekly one-hour, non-credit workshop
and required tutoring.

 Supplemental Writing Workshop
 Writing & Rhetoric SWW and ESL/SWW

Writing & Rhetoric SWW and ESL/SWW Course Objectives
The aims and objectives of Writing & Rhetoric SWW and ESL/SWW are the same as those for
Writing & Rhetoric. Additionally, satisfactory attendance and class participation during all
required contact hours (including attendance at the workshop and tutorial sessions) is
mandatory.

Writing & Rhetoric SWW and ESL/SWW Writing Requirements and Suggested
Grade Distribution
The writing requirements and suggested grade distribution of Writing & Rhetoric SWW, ESL
and ESL/SWW are the same as those for Writing & Rhetoric.
Advanced Writing & Rhetoric

Advanced Writing & Rhetoric sharpens students’ abilities to write grammatical and coherent
sentences and to develop ideas more fully and in an organized fashion. General Honors English
courses develop students’ abilities to write essays based upon selected readings and class
discussions. Special attention is paid to research techniques (including MLA documentation),
methods of argumentation, and critical reading skills. Additionally, students sharpen their
abilities to conduct literary analysis and interpretation. Students completing the course are
capable of producing expository, analytic, argument, and critical essays, as well as papers
reflecting a variety of approaches to thinking. There are oral presentation and library skills
components in Advanced Writing & Rhetoric.

Aims
        To acquaint students with selected texts of classic and modern literature.
        To emphasize the development of effective communication skills.

Advanced Writing & Rhetoric Course Objectives
       By semester’s end, students will demonstrate the ability to:

    1. Identify and analyze varied rhetorical situations, including the elements of
    constraints, audience needs, genre options, speaker roles, media options, and other
    contextual factors.
    2. Understand and use rhetorical analysis as a means of interpreting texts,
    including {but not limited to) literary texts.
    3. Develop a writing process that takes researched materials and ongoing
    conversations into account early and integrates those with original ideas and
    arguments.
    4. Craft sustained, logically-organized, stylistic, and grammatical sentences,
    paragraphs and essays-leading to significant writing following the conventions of
    academic and professional genres.
    5. Analyze and evaluate arguments from multiple genres by considering aesthetic
    elements, rhetorical strategies, premises and assumptions, deductive and
    inductive reasoning, logical fallacies, and forms of evidence.
    6. Deliver a source-based oral presentation with preparatory materials and visuals
    and critique the content and delivery of at least one oral presentation.
    7. Select the best available information and use it ethically an d legally,
    including practicing appropriate summary, quotation, and paraphrase.
    8. Develop knowledge in at least one researched topic and synthesize information
    from multiple sources on that topic to develop an evidence-based case to answer a
    research question of the student's making.
     9. Understand style as a rhetorical decision based on the int errelat ionshi ps of
     readers, writers, and texts in specific contexts.
    10. Develop multiple strategies for taking an idea deeper and in new directions.
     (stasis theory, freewriting, analogies, associative thinking, exploratory research,
     others).
    11. Transfer learned writing strategies to the writing for another course or context.
Advanced Writing & Rhetoric Requirements and Suggested Grade Distribution
     A minimum of four take-home essays of approximately 750-1,000 words each   40%
     Reader-response journal/Discussion Board Responses                         20%
     A documented research essay of approximately 1,250 words                   20%
     An in-class final exam                                                     10%
     Class participation and attendance                                         10%
PROGRAM POLICIES: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY,
 ASSIGNMENTS, AND ATTENDANCE
*Statement on Academic Integrity
      “Students are expected to maintain the highest standards of honesty in their academic
      work. Cheating, forgery, and plagiarism are serious offences, and students found guilty
      of any form of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary action” (Faculty
      Handbook, p. 33).

Plagiarism is the unacknowledged (intentional or unintentional) use of summary,
paraphrase, direct quotation, language, statistics, or ideas from articles or other
information sources including the Internet. A student must cite according to the Modern
Language Association (MLA) format outlined in an updated handbook (2009 or later).

Faculty members must report in writing cases of cheating, plagiarism, or forgery to their
department chair and their academic dean. Students are expected to understand the principles
of ethical references and exhibit citation skills by the end of each composition course.

Three ways of correctly using information obtained in research are paraphrasing,
summarizing, and quoting (summarized from Simon and Schuster Handbook,
by Troyka & Hesse):

   1. Paraphrasing: a paraphrase makes a detailed restatement of someone else’s words; it is
      usually at least as long as the original. In the process you have to use your own words,
      not those of the source of your information; you cannot simply change a word or two in
      a sentence and leave the rest of it the same.

   2. Summarizing: a summary recounts the principal information in a passage the writer
      wishes to include. The main difference between it and a paraphrase is that it is much
      shorter: it reduces, condenses, and/or abbreviates the ideas in the source used.

   3. Quoting: a quotation is the exact words of an author and is always set off either by
      quotation marks or, in the case of long passages, by indentation from the left side of the
      margin.

Note: Even though no quotation marks are used in the case of paraphrases and summaries,
you must document the source of your information when summarizing and paraphrasing.
Document your source whether you paraphrase, summarize, or quote!

Do not forget to list each of your sources in the proper MLA format on your Works Cited page
at the end of each paper.

*Assignment Policy
Students must complete every major assignment (e.g., main essays/assignments, library
session, presentations) on the syllabus in order to successfully complete Composition I and
Writing & Rhetoric.
*Attendance Policy
Students are expected to attend every class and should notify instructors of potential absences
in advance whenever possible to better prepare for the next class and make alternate
arrangements for turning in work. Missing more than two class meetings will reduce the grade
in a composition course by 1/3 of a letter grade per absence through six absences as follows:

       3   absences = 1/3 grade deduction (A to A-, for instance)
       4   absences = 2/3 grade deduction (A to B+)
       5   absences = 1 full grade deduction (A to B)
       6   absences = 1 1/3 grade deduction (A to B-)
       7   or more absences will result in a failing grade for the semester.

The two “free” absences provide room for circumstances like illness, inclement weather, family
duties, and so forth. Please plan accordingly. Absences for reasons mandated by SUNY to
count as excused will not count against the total number. Every three tardy arrivals equal one
full absence. Tardy is defined as arriving after the instructor has begun class.

If there is a long-term situation, we will address it on a case-by-case basis in consultation with
the Composition Program. It is the student’s responsibility to provide any necessary supporting
medical documentation or other evidence of extenuating circumstances.

*Course Withdrawals
There are typically no withdrawals from Composition Program courses; these are required
first-year writing courses. If extenuating medical, personal, or family concerns arise, students
should speak to their instructors confidentially about possible exceptions.
PART TWO:

WRITING AND REVISING EFFECTIVELY
EFFECTIVE WRITING: PROCESS AND
 CHARACTERISTICS
THE COMPOSING PROCESS
One of the objectives of the Composition Program is to have students engage in a process of
composing. Writing requires more than the act of turning in the final draft; it involves
processes of critical thinking, creating, editing, and revising.

The Composition Program recognizes that the composing process varies from writer to writer,
from writing situation to writing situation. There are as many processes (outlining,
brainstorming, mapping, drafting) as there are students and writing situations (a laboratory
report, a research paper, and a personal essay). A unilateral process may not, therefore, be
described or prescribed. However, several distinct phases of the process may be isolated and
encouraged: Gathering, Shaping, Drafting, Revising, Editing, Proofreading, Reflecting.

Stage One: Gathering
The first stage of the writing process, gathering, takes place before writers begin their first
drafts. During this stage, writers generate ideas about subject matter; consider the appropriate
form with which to deliver their subject; and review their rhetorical situation, i.e., their
purpose, occasion, and audience. Strategies for gathering include brainstorming, taking notes,
listing, drawing on past readings and experiences, talking with others, clustering, mapping,
asking the journalist’s questions (i.e., who, what, when, where, why, and how), and using
modes of development to discover subject matter and approach.

Stage Two: Shaping
During the second stage, shaping, writers plan their writings. They narrow or focus their
subject matter, further define form, clarify their rhetorical situation, begin to develop their
thesis, and determine how to organize and develop supporting statements. At this point, some
writers map ideas or create informal or formal outlines.

Stage Three: Drafting
The third stage of the writing process is drafting. Some writers compose at top speed,
discovering ideas and organizing topics and specifics as they draft. Other writers work from an
outline as they develop their writings. At this point writers consider not only focus, approach,
purpose, thesis and supporting points, but also development and organization. Writers may
reshape their thesis, alter points, delete information, add supporting information, and sharpen
and change wording. Some writers proceed paragraph by paragraph and revise and edit as they
draft. Other writers work through successive drafts, refining as they go.

Stage Four: Revising
During the fourth stage, revision, writers consider their relationships with their audiences and
ask themselves if they have conceptualized, organized, and developed points with their
audiences in mind, asking themselves if their drafts achieve their purposes. Revision often
necessitates the reconceptualization and clarification of ideas—the re-thinking of the piece.

Stage Five: Editing
During the fifth stage of the writing process, editing, writers sharpen presentation and clarity of
ideas. Writers may, for example, change word choice (usage and diction) and sentence
structure for clarity, emphasis, and variety.
Stage Six: Proofreading
Proofreading is the final stage of the writing process when writers check their final drafts for
typographical or spelling errors. They also check the manuscript form to make sure that it fits
the requirements of the assignment.

The English Department has developed a set of criteria by which student writing will be
evaluated in Composition I and WRITING & RHETORIC . These are the qualities that the
Department believes student writing should exhibit. Students should work to develop these
qualities in their writing throughout each semester.

 1. Your writing should have a central focus or purpose.
      The purpose of your writing should be clear.
      The writing should be unified by its central purpose or focus. The thesis of the
         writing should be clearly stated or implied and should provide a specific direction
         for the essay.
      Your writing should reflect an awareness of rhetorical situation, i.e., purpose,
         audience, and occasion.

 2. Your writing should be logically organized.
      Your writing should have a clear beginning, middle, and end.
      If your writing is an essay, it should include introductory, middle, and concluding
         paragraphs.
      If your writing is a paragraph, it should have appropriate paragraph structure.
      Sentences within a paragraph should be cohesive; i.e., sentences within a
         paragraph should fit together in a clear, logical sequence.

 3. Your writing should be developed.
      Your writing should have sufficient supporting information, i.e., assertions, details,
         examples, and illustrations.
      This supporting information should be specific, to the point, and relevant to the
         writing’s rhetorical situation.

 4. Your writing should demonstrate a command of diction, vocabulary, sentence sense,
    punctuation, and spelling. You should use appropriate language for your purpose and
    rhetorical situation.
          Your vocabulary should be well-suited to the context.
          Your word choice should be accurate, exact, and clear.
          Your style should fit the rhetorical situation.
          Your sentences should reflect a command of syntax within the range of standard
             written English.
          Your sentence structure should be correct, i.e., no run-on sentences or
             fragments.
          Your writing should be grammatically correct, i.e., appropriate subject-verb
             agreement, tense, usage, pronoun agreement, case, and reference.
          Your sentences should be punctuated correctly, i.e., correct usage of commas,
             semi-colons, colons, apostrophes, parenthesis, and periods.
          Your spelling should be accurate and correct.

       Please consult with your instructor and/or refer to the appropriate pages in your
       handbook for writers if you have any questions regarding language usage or writing
       mechanics.
Stage Seven: Reflecting
Reflecting is an essential part of the writing process and involves considering the emotional and
intellectual content, as well as deliberate authorial choices you make in response to various
rhetorical situations and audiences. Reflecting may occur throughout and at the end of various
points in the process, including after developing a thesis or a first draft, or after completing a
final work and considering possible methods of revision to improve upon it. This meta-cognitive
process will help you gain an awareness of strengths and things to continue to work on as you
practice skills and objectives for each assignment. It will also help you apply your writing skills
from one assignment to other activities and contexts. The reflection stage is essential in the
revision process and for solidifying learning from writing exercises. A reflection is often required
in the form of a letter for some of the main assignments and the portfolios in our courses.
CHECKLIST FOR REVISING OR EVALUATING AN
                 ESSAY
Purpose and Focus
      The purpose of the essay is clear.
      The essay’s thesis is stated clearly or implied and provides a clear direction for the
       essay.
      The essay is unified by its purpose and thesis.
      All topics are subordinate to the thesis; i.e., there are no irrelevant topics.
      The content of the essay fits the purpose.
      The writing reflects a sense of a rhetorical situation, i.e., purpose, audience, and
       occasion.

Organization
      The essay has a clear beginning, middle, and end, including carefully developed
       introductory and closing paragraphs.
      The essay has carefully developed body paragraphs.
      The sentences within each paragraph fit together in a clear, logical sequence; i.e., the
       paragraphs are cohesive.
      There are transitions between sentences within a paragraph, as well as between
       paragraphs.

Development
      The writing contains sufficient details and examples to support the main ideas.
      The details and examples are specific.
      The details and examples fit the purpose, audience, and occasion.

Sentence Sense, Style, and Spelling
      The writing is grammatically correct.
      Word choice is accurate, exact, and clear.
      Spelling is correct.
      The style fits the purpose, rhetorical situation, and thesis.
TOP 10 MOST TROUBLESOME
                         GRAMMAR ERRORS

Like poor spelling and misused punctuation, bad grammar interferes with comprehension and
gives the reader a negative impression of the writer’s capabilities. The following errors are
usually considered the most serious, and students should make a concentrated effort to
eliminate these fundamental mistakes from their writing. The following examples are from the
handbook, Writing: A Manual for the Digital Age, Second Edition, by Blakesley and Hoogeveen.
Some examples are excerpted from Simon & Schuster Handbook for Writers, Ninth Edition, by
Troyka and Hesse. The chapters listed below reference where to find detailed explanations of
these errors in Writing: A Manual for the Digital Age.

1.     FRAGMENTS are incomplete sentences. Often, a sentence that is a fragment is missing
       the verb or main action word.

       Error: The stolen bicycle.
       Correction: The stolen bicycle reappeared.
       (Chapter 31.)

2.     COMMA SPLICES result from joining two complete sentences with a comma rather than
       using a period or a semi-colon.

       Error: No one would be more surprised than Mary Shelley at the idea most immediately
       evoked by the name Frankenstein, she intended her novel as a meditation on creativity,
       not creepy monsters.
       Correction: No one would be more surprised than Mary Shelley at the idea most
       immediately evoked by the name Frankenstein. She intended her novel as a meditation
       on creativity, not creepy monsters.
       (Chapter 32.)

3.     FUSED SENTENCES, commonly called RUN-ON SENTENCES, result when two
       complete sentences are put together as if they were one, with no punctuation between
       sentences.

       Error: Galileo recanted his confirmation that the Earth revolves around the Sun in
       return the Pope commuted his sentence to house arrest.
       Correction: Galileo recanted his confirmation that the Earth revolves around the Sun.
       In return, the Pope commuted his sentence to house arrest.
       (Chapter 32.)

4.     AGREEMENT: Errors in agreement result when the subject and verb of a sentence do
       not agree in number (singular or plural) or person (first, second, and third).

       Error: The vase of flowers are on the desk. (VASE is singular; ARE is plural.)
       Correction: The vase of flowers is on the desk.
       (Chapter 35.)

5.     VERB FORM: Errors in verb form occur when the verb form or tense is incorrect.
Error: This week I seen her Thursday, but she usually visits on Friday.
      Correction: This week I saw her Thursday, but she usually visits on Friday.
      (Chapter 34.)

 6.   PRONOUN ERRORS result when either the wrong pronoun case (subjective or objective)
      is used or the pronoun’s antecedent is not clear.

      Error: Me and John found an old sword in the rotting shed that was just as his
      grandfather had left it.
      Correction: John and I found an old sword in the rotting shed; the weapon was
      just as his grandfather had left it.

      Error: Charlotte brought Anne to the seashore to recuperate, but there she died. (Who
      died? Anne or Charlotte?)
      Correction: Charlotte brought Anne to the seashore to recuperate, but there Anne died.
      (Chapter 33.)

 7.   MIXED/FAULTY CONSTRUCTIONS occur when parts of a sentence do not relate
      coherently.

      Error: Driving past the school, the vandalism was apparent.
      (This means that the vandalism was doing the driving)
      Correction: Driving past the school, we saw the vandalism.

      Error: Because the great cattle drives lasted only a few decades, the mythology of the
      cowboy remains one of the most compelling in American life.
      Correction: Even though the great cattle drives lasted only a few decades, the
      mythology of the cowboy remains one of the most compelling in American life.
      (Chapter 26.)

 8.   SHIFTS: An unnecessary shift in person, number, or tense results in confusion and
      awkwardness.

      Error: If a person works hard, you can accomplish a great deal.
      (“a person” is in the third person, while “you” is in the second person)
      Correction: If a person works hard, he or she (or singular, non-binary they) can
      accomplish a great deal.
      (Chapters 33, 35.)

9.    PARALLELISM: Errors in parallelism result when the parts of the sentence are not
      grammatically balanced.

      Error: Whether drunk or when he was sober, he liked to pick a fight.
      Correction: Whether drunk or sober, he liked to pick a fight.
      (Chapter 25.)

      Error: Roger is interested in studying philosophy as in working.
      Correction: Roger is as interested in studying philosophy as he is in working.

10.   ADJECTIVES/ADVERBS: Sometimes adjectives are confused with adverbs, or an
      incorrect comparative or superlative is used.

      Error: This is a real poor paper, but I have seen some that are worser.
      Correction: This is a really poor paper, but I’ve seen some that are worse.
      (Chapters 30d, 30e; 36.)
PREPARING A FINAL COPY OF YOUR ESSAY
                   IN MLA STYLE

While it is true that our Composition Program stresses the writing process, there comes a time
when your essay must be handed in for a grade. Preparation of your essay’s final copy is very
important.

The Composition Program requires students to follow the MLA style guidelines for formatting
all papers. You should refer to The Little Seagull writing handbook, 3rd edition (required in all
Composition courses) for an example of how an essay is properly formatted, and for
instructions about following 8th edition MLA format In addition, you may visit Purdue Online
Writing Lab’s website.

The Modern Language Association (MLA) sets the conventions in English that we follow; the
rules are neither arbitrary nor self-made. Unless otherwise stated abide by the following for
every assignment you turn in:

      Use a high-quality printer and a standard, easily readable typeface, such as Times
       Roman, 12-point font.
      Use only white, 8½-by-11-inch paper of good quality.
      Except for page numbers, leave margins of one inch at the top and bottom and on both
       sides of the text.
      Indent the first word of a paragraph one-half inch (or five spaces) from the left margin.
      Indent set-off quotations one inch (or ten spaces) from the left margin.
      Double-space pages throughout, including quotations, notes, and the list of works
       cited.
      Do not create a title page. Instead, beginning one inch from the top of the first page and
       flush with the left margin, type your name, your instructor’s name, the course number
       and section, and the date on separate lines, double-spacing between the lines.
      Double-space also between the lines of the title, and double-space between the title and
       the first line of the text.
      Do not underline your title, put it in quotation marks, or type it in all capital letters.
      Number all pages consecutively throughout the paper, including the Works Cited page,
       in the upper right-hand corner, one-half inch from the top and flush with the right
       margin.
      Type your last name before the page number, as a precaution in case of misplaced
       pages.
      Proofread and correct your paper carefully before submitting it. You may make brief
       corrections on the page; write them neatly and legibly in ink directly above the lines
       involved, using carets to indicate where they go. Retype the page if corrections on any
       page are numerous or substantial.
      When documenting outside sources, create parenthetical in-text citations and a
       corresponding Works Cited page.
      Be sure to keep a copy of your paper drafts, graded versions, and final revision.
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