COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES

COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES

COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 1 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES Date first approved: 19 January 2016 Date of effect: 19 January 2016 Date last amended: (refer Version Control Table) 7 October 2016 Date of Next Review: January 2018 First Approved by: Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Custodian title & e- mail address: Director, Academic Quality and Standards quality@uow.edu.au Author: Course Management Coordinator, Academic Quality and Standards Unit Responsible Division & Unit: Academic Quality and Standards Unit Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Portfolio Supporting documents, procedures & forms of this policy: Admissions Rules and Admissions Procedures Assessment of New Collaborative Delivery Procedures Collaborative Delivery of a UOW Course Policy Collaborative Delivery Review Procedures Collaborative Delivery – Subject Quality Assurance Procedures Course Policy and Course Review Procedures Course and Subject Approval Procedures – New Courses and Significant Amendments to Existing Courses and Less Significant Amendments to Existing Courses Credit for Prior Learning Policy CRICOS Management and Administration Procedures Delegations of Authority Policy English Language Policy General Course Rules Joint and Dual Awards Policy UOW Assessment and Feedback Principles UOW Quality and Standards Framework for Learning and Teaching UOW Curriculum Model (as approved by Academic Senate in September 2014) University of Wollongong Strategic Plan Relevant Legislation & External Documents: Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011 (Cth) Higher Education Standards Framework Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Commonwealth) Australian Qualifications Framework Standards – Commission for Academic Accreditation, UAE Audience: Public – accessible to anyone

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UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 3 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Contents 1 Introduction / Background 5 2 Scope / Purpose 5 3 Definitions 6 4 Design Matters Related to Qualification Levels and Types 10 5 Course Names and Course Codes 12 6 Course Naming Abbreviations and Post-Nominals 13 7 Course Duration and Volume of Learning 13 8 Course Admission 14 9 Qualification Pathways, Articulation and Credit Arrangements 14 10 Delivery Mode(s), Delivery Location(s) and Delivery Session(s) 16 11 The UOW Curriculum Model 17 12 Course Structure 17 13 Principles for Assurance of Learning 19 14 Subjects and Credit Points 20 15 Principles for Double Badging Subjects 21 16 Principles for Zero Credit Point Subjects 22 17 Academic and English Language Skills 23 18 Cross Counting of Subjects 23 19 General Elective Subjects / General Elective Schedule 23 20 Roles & Responsibilities 23 21 Version Control and Change History 25 Appendix 1: AQF Qualification Type and Qualification Level (Level 7 and above) 26

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 4 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Appendix 2: Similarities and Differences between Joint and Dual Awards (Refer to TEQSA Guidance Materials) 27 Appendix 3: Course Names – AQF Level 7 and above 28 Appendix 4: Course Abbreviations 30 Appendix 5: Other Course Descriptor Abbreviations 31 Appendix 6: Field of Study Abbreviations 32 Appendix 7: Business Rules for Credit Points and EFTSL 37 Appendix 8: Bachelor Pass Degree 39 Appendix 9: Bachelor Double Degree 42 Appendix 10: Bachelor Honours Degree 46 Appendix 11: Graduate Certificate 51 Appendix 12: Graduate Diploma 54 Appendix 13: Masters Degree (Coursework) 57 Appendix 14: Masters Degree (Research) 61 Appendix 15: Doctoral Degree 64 Appendix 16: Table – Guide on the Use of Double Badged Subjects 67 Appendix 17: Principles of Equivalence 68

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 5 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Introduction / Background 1 Course design at UOW supports the overall strategic goals for learning and the student 1. experience. Course design supports the University’s strategic objectives of student-centred, 2. challenging, high standard, technology-rich learning environment that develops all students for their graduate roles in society and the global workplace; and The Course Design Procedures have been developed to assist in: 3.

providing information and guidance for designing, developing and/or a. amending a course at the University of Wollongong; and ensuring that course naming, course structure and course content for all UOW b. Qualifications (AQF award and non-award courses) meet the requirements as set out in the General Course Rules. Scope / Purpose 2 The Course Design Procedures operate in conjunction with the General Course Rules, 1. the Course Policy and the Course Review Procedures. These procedures apply to all UOW courses (award and non-award) including all 2.

courses that are approved by UOW and delivered by third party providers at onshore and offshore delivery locations.

Course design is supported by and operates in conjunction with the following 3. procedures: Course and Subject Approval Procedures – New Courses and Significant a. Amendments to Existing Courses; Course and Subject Approval Procedures – Less Significant Amendments to b. Existing Courses; Course Review Procedures; c. AQF Validation Procedures (only in relation to courses suspended as of 2015 d.

without being AQF validated but later reactivated); and AQF Implementation Procedures (only in relation to courses suspended as of e. 2015 without being AQF validated but later reactivated). The course design provisions relating to qualification pathways and recognition of 4. equivalence in content and learning outcomes, and the governing principles and processes are addressed in the Credit for Prior Learning Policy and accompanying procedures. All new UOW courses must adhere to the relevant provisions of the Course Design 5.

Procedures. All existing UOW courses that are not in conformity with UOW Course Design 6.

Procedures must be reviewed and re-designed to meet the Course Design Principles

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 6 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version when next under review in accordance with the Course Review Schedule determined under the Course Review Procedures. Course Variations for Offshore Delivery Locations All UOW courses must be delivered in accordance with their approved structure 7. applicable for the relevant delivery location (taking into account, in the case of offshore locations, the Principles of Equivalence – see Appendix 17) unless academic approval is granted by the Delegated Authority to vary course requirements for an individual student.

Courses, major study areas, specialisations and individual subjects that are offered at 8. both the University of Wollongong onshore and offshore must have equivalent course, major study and subject learning outcomes having regard to the Principles of Equivalence. Particular requirements imposed by relevant local higher education accreditation 9. agencies may be approved as variations to the course, major study or to subjects by the Delegated Authority. Definitions 3 Word/Term Definition 100 level subject A subject at first year undergraduate level. 200 level subject A subject at second year undergraduate level.

300 level subject A subject at third year undergraduate level. 400 level subject A subject at fourth year undergraduate level. 600 level subject A subject at graduate entry undergraduate level. 800 and 900 level subjects Subjects at postgraduate level. Assurance of learning The quality assurance processes by which the University ensures that graduates of a course achieve stated educational outcomes. Award course A course recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework and approved by the Delegated Authority as an award or degree offered at the University of Wollongong. An award course leads to a higher education award as detailed in the General Course Rules.

AQF The Australian Qualifications Framework. AQF Levels An indication of the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement. AQF levels

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 7 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version An indication of the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement. AQF levels criteria describe the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement for each AQF level. CAA Commission for Academic Accreditation is the government-run institutional licensure and degree accreditation organization for private universities and their academic programmes in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Capstone Experience An experience through which students are given an opportunity to integrate existing knowledge, consolidate skills, apply existing knowledge and skills, reflect on and evaluate their actions and develop their graduate or professional identity in an authentic setting. It may involve coursework, work-experience, a research or creative project, work placement, internship or professional practice. A capstone experience may be a subject, part of a subject or designed across several subjects in a course. The associated assessments often assure the attainment of one or more Course Learning Outcomes.

Capstone Subject A subject that is designed to offer a capstone experience. Contextualisation The adaptation of one or more elements of a subject to increase its relevance to the location and cultural context where the course is being delivered.

Core Subject A core subject is a compulsory subject that must be completed in order to meet the requirements of a course, major study or minor study. Co-requisite Subject A subject which must be passed previously or taken concurrently with the subject for which it is prescribed. Customisation The alignment of subject design and materials with its students’ profile to promote effective learning for that cohort of students. Course a program of study consisting of a combination of subjects and other requirements, whether leading to a specific higher education award or not.

Credit The value assigned for the recognition of equivalence in content and learning outcomes between different types of learning and/ or qualifications.

Credit points Credit points are defined as the number value attached to a subject that indicates the study load. Course structure Refers to the specific program of subjects which a student undertakes to

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 8 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Refers to the specific program of subjects which a student undertakes to meet the requirements of a course as specified in the Course Handbook for the year the course was commenced. Curriculum design The designing and sequencing of learning activities, learning support, resources and assessment tasks that enable a student to attain the specified Course Learning Outcomes.

Delegated Authority A person or body granted decision-making authority as detailed in the Delegations of Authority Policy.

Delivery Mode A description of the way teaching and learning activities are carried out to support and enable learning. Double Badged Subject A duplicate version of a subject originally designed for delivery as part of an AQF qualification type (typically a Bachelor Pass degree) that is created for delivery as part of a different, usually higher, AQF qualification type (typically a postgraduate qualification type). Double Degree Double degree is an approved course leading to the conferral of two degrees as separate awards upon a student who has complied with the course requirements for double degrees and the two individual course requirements inclusively.

EFTSL Equivalent Full Time Study Load. Elective Subject An elective subject is a subject the selection of which is optional for students meeting course, major study or minor study requirements. Equivalent Two courses or two areas of major study or specialisations are equivalent when the structure of the course, major study or specialisation includes the same core subjects, has course, major or minor learning outcomes that share the same intent, and are assessed as being at the same level of the Australian Qualifications Framework. Flexible delivery A combination of online and face-to-face component where the face-to- face component is compulsory.

General Elective Schedule The General Elective Schedule is a list of undergraduate subjects that are open for enrolment by any undergraduate student, often to make up the total number of credit points required for their degree. Generic Learning Outcomes Transferable, non-discipline specific skills a graduate may achieve through learning that have application in study, work and life contexts. The four broad categories in the AQF are: fundamental skills;  

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 9 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version people skills;  thinking skills and  personal skills.

  Hybrid learning Optimally combines web-based and face-to-face teacher-student, student- student, student-resources and student-world interactions to achieve the learning outcomes of the subject or course. It uses a range of different tools to develop a deep understanding of content and focuses on learning as a social, collaborative experience. It is different to web- enhanced learning, which primarily uses traditional face-to-face pedagogies while supplementing them with some resources or activities on a Moodle site. Hybrid learning and blended learning are often used interchangeably in the teaching and learning literature.

UOW has chosen the term ‘hybrid’ learning to acknowledge the unique contributions different tools and processes make to learning, while recognising that effective combinations of different learning tools produce more than the sum of their parts.

Joint or Dual Awards A Joint Award involves the awarding of a single qualification which is jointly conferred by UOW and one or more higher education providers. Joint Awards typically involve close cooperation in curriculum development, design, organisation, course delivery, and assessment of learning outcomes as well as requirements necessary for awarding the qualification. (TEQSA 2013) A Dual Award involves UOW and another entity offering a course of study which results in two separate qualifications being conferred by the two institutions. A dual award may involve one AQF level, or two sequential AQF levels – for example, two Masters degrees or a Bachelor and Diploma award.

Dual awards may provide students with the opportunity to complete two awards in a shorter timeframe than if completed separately. (TEQSA 2013) Learning outcomes The expression of the set of knowledge skills and the application of the knowledge and skills a person has acquired and is able to demonstrate as a result of learning.

Major An approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have a minimum value of one third of the total degree requirements. A major in a Bachelor Degree is at least 48 credit points offered by one or more academic units. The title of the major shall appear on the testamur. Minor An approved combination of subjects which have a minimum value of 24 credit points offered by one or more academic units, of which 12 credit points should be at least 200 level or higher.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 10 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version An approved combination of subjects which have a minimum value of 24 credit points offered by one or more academic units, of which 12 credit points should be at least 200 level or higher.

The minor shall be recorded on the official academic transcript. Approved minor studies include those listed in Appendix 3 – Schedule of Minor Studies.

Nested qualification A qualification that includes articulation arrangements from a lower level qualification and/or into a higher level qualification to enable multiple entry and/or exit points. Non-award course A course or unit of study that is not recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework but approved by the delegated authority as a non- award course or subject offered at the University of Wollongong. On campus delivery mode Involves formal, recurring and compulsory face to face delivery (such as weekly lectures and/or tutorials and or/labs), and may be combined with the use of online mediums.

Pre-requisite subject A subject which must be completed satisfactorily before a specified other subject or subjects may be attempted. Principles of Equivalence Two courses or two areas of major study or specialisations are equivalent when the course, major study or specialisation is designed and delivered in conformity with the Principles of Equivalence as set out in Appendix 17. Program A combination of two or more courses, for example a Double Degree Program. Qualification Type Descriptors The set of statements that describes the learning outcomes of each of the AQF qualification types in terms of knowledge, skills and the application of knowledge and skills.

Session A period in which subjects may be offered. Standard sessions are defined as Autumn and Spring. Specialist Degree An award course that is designed to provide learning focussed on a specific field of study or discipline. Standard load One year of full-time study, equivalent to 48 credit points is a standard load. Student A person registered for a course. Subject A self-contained unit of study identified by a unique code. UOW University of Wollongong.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 11 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version UOWD University of Wollongong in Dubai.

Volume of Learning The notional duration of all activities required for the achievement of the learning outcomes specified for an AQF qualification type, expressed in equivalent full time years. Year A calendar year period of 12 months. Design Matters Related to Qualification Levels and Types 4 UOW Qualifications The following courses of study are offered by the University: 1.

AQF qualifications (detailed in Appendix 1 AQF Qualification Type and a. Qualification Level (Level 7 and above)), being courses leading to the following higher education awards: Doctoral Degree i. Masters Degree (Research) ii. Masters Degree (Coursework) iii. Graduate Diploma iv. Graduate Certificate v. Bachelor Honours Degree vi. Bachelor Pass Degree vii. Other courses not leading to an AQF award. b. Cognate Courses Cognate courses are courses with similar names and content (e.g. Bachelor of 2. Commerce and Bachelor of Commerce (Dean’s Scholar)). The course structure for cognate courses must be designed to differentiate cognate courses from each other.

Distinguishing content may include: a core or capstone subject or subjects that is or are not available to students a.

undertaking the cognate course or that is or are only available to students in the cognate course as an elective subject(s); or setting the volume of learning for one course at a level higher than that for the b. cognate course, enabling students to undertake additional core and/or elective subjects. Dean’s Scholar, Scholar and Advanced Degrees Dean’s Scholar and Scholar courses are for use in conjunction with high demand 3. undergraduate courses, in order to attract high achieving students. Advanced undergraduate courses are for use when seeking to attract academically 4.

gifted student.

They are to be characterised by:

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 12 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Higher entry requirements; a. A more challenging curriculum, including exposure to research concepts and b. methods, research or project study and to advanced knowledge in the relevant discipline areas; Greater flexibility in the curriculum (including the opportunity to study subjects c. at a higher level sooner and the opportunity to undertake more credit points per semester); and Options for and encouragement for students to complete an honours award d.

(end on honours or, for 4 year programs, embedded honours). Advanced Masters courses are to be at least 96 credit points, with a minimum of 72 5. credit points (cp) at 900 level for a 96 cp course. Advanced Masters courses can be either broadening (where the course broadens’ a 6. student’s knowledge and/or skills across a new discipline or area of professional practice) or deepening (where the course deepens knowledge and/or skills in the same discipline or area of professional practice). Broadening Advanced Masters courses should provide students with the opportunity to undertake a broader range of elective subjects.

Joint and Dual Awards Courses and subjects may be designed and delivered with a variety of partner 7. institutions, either onshore and/or offshore as Joint or Dual Awards. All courses that lead to a Joint or Dual Award will be developed and approved in 8. accordance with the Joint and Dual Awards Policy. Testamurs for Joint Awards will be developed in accordance with the Joint and Dual Awards Policy. Non Award Courses Non-award study subjects and courses are offered by the University. These Non-award 9. subjects and courses may be designed for to maximise student’s potential and learning experience in a specific area that a.

may or may not be directly related to the discipline- specific course content (for example: academic and English Language and other communication skills development, Mentoring programs, Academic Information Skills); to provide the knowledge and skills that are determined to be critical to the course of study and assists in bridging the gap for students before they begin the course of study (for example, discipline bridging courses); to provide the knowledge and skills that are determined to be critical to the a b.

course of study and assists in bridging the gap for students before they begin the course of study (for example, discipline bridging subjects or courses); to provide research skills and which are embedded as part of a research degree c.

program for Level 10 AQF Qualification (for example: Research Methods, Research Principles, and Fundamentals of Research courses);

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 13 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version to provide formalised content and assessment but where the subject involves d. minimal resources from the University in terms of supervision, delivery, assessment etc.; or to provide professional development or special interest information for specific e. or general audiences. There is no defined or prescribed structure, content and other teaching and learning 10.

elements specified for these kinds of subjects and courses.

Short courses do not meet the AQF qualifications requirements and hence do not lead to or count towards a formal degree. Approval of non-award courses is regulated in the University’s course approval procedures. Principles of Equivalence The University offers award courses both onshore and offshore. Any UOW course or 11. area of major or minor study offered offshore should be equivalent to the course when offered onshore, having regard to the Principles of Equivalence (Appendix 17). Course Names and Course Codes 5 All courses must be named according to the UOW naming convention: 1.

Qualification Type a. Field of Study b. as set out in Appendix 4. A course title that contains an embedded descriptor that is not related to the field of 2. study or discipline in the course title (such as “Scholar”, “Dean’s Scholar” or “Advanced”) will only meet AQF requirements if the course has: distinct course learning outcomes; and a. distinguishing curriculum content to differentiate it from any cognate course. b. It is permissible to include a merit descriptor on a student’s testamur (for example, with 3.

Distinction, Class Honours II Division 1 etc.) to reflect the level of achievement of the student in the course.

Merit descriptors cannot be included in qualification names as set out in Appendix 5. New courses are allocated a unique 3 or 4 digit course code by the Institutional 4. Research and Government Reporting Unit. This remains the course code for the duration of the course. Course codes cannot be reissued or reused under any circumstances. When a course is 5. discontinued the code is deactivated. Should a discontinued course be offered again with or without amendments, it is treated 6.

as a new course and hence a new code is issued. Course Naming Abbreviations and Post-Nominals 6 Courses and areas of major study must be named in accordance with the abbreviations 1. for courses, fields of study and other descriptors set out in Appendices 5 and 6.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 14 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Abbreviations are recorded in the Course Handbook and the Course Database and are 2. used by graduates as the post-nominal representation of their course qualification.

Course Duration and Volume of Learning 7 All award courses must have a course duration that meets AQF requirements. The 1. volume of learning table in the AQF identifies the notional duration of all activities required for the achievement of learning outcomes specified for a particular AQF qualification. It is expressed in equivalent full-time years. The specified duration of award courses at UOW is set out for each qualification type in 2.

Appendices 7 – 15. Students are able to complete their course in shorter time on the basis of approved study 3. at a higher study load than specified, or on the basis of credit. Credit Points and Equivalent Full-Time Study Loads For each course, the notional duration and the equivalent full-time study load are 4. calculated using credit points. Award courses involve students undertaking a standard load for the duration of the 5. course, taking in to account the work requirements for a subject. Certain professional graduate entry degree courses and double degree courses require a study load of greater than a standard load.

The credit point and equivalent full-time study load for UOW award course types across 6. different session patterns are listed in Appendix 7. These represent standard study loads. If a faculty proposes to exceed the standard study load, it must demonstrate that students are not disadvantaged or unduly inconvenienced in undertaking the course at the proposed load. Total Credit Points and Minimum and Maximum Specifications All UOW award courses must adhere to the specified minimum and maximum credit 7. point requirements for an award course at the relevant AQF level as set out in Appendices 8 – 15.

For double degree programs, the credit point savings listed in Appendices 8 – 15 are 8. maximums. The maximum saving will not be available in all double degree programs. For example: the number of credit points saved by a student may be limited by the prescribed a. structure of some degrees that form a strand of a double degree program; the saving may not be distributed across both single strands degrees and may be b. possible in relation to only one of them. The LLB component of a double degree that includes a Bachelor of Laws is defined as 9.

a 4 year component for purposes of course design and student load.

Any proposed double degree program must be designed having regard to minimising 10. any issues associated with delivery of the program (such as limits on resourcing or with combining two prescribed courses).

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 15 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Course Admission 8 Details of admission criteria must be specified for each course. Any variations in 1. admission criteria for different student cohorts and/or delivery sites must be specified. Different student cohorts may include: domestic or international applicants applying through UAC; a. domestic applicants applying by direct application; and/or b.

international applicants applying by direct application.

c. Course Entry Requirements Where relevant, admission requirements for different student cohorts (domestic, 1. international, contract) and/or delivery sites must be specified for each course, including: English language requirements; a. academic requirements; b. professional experience; and/or c. other selection criteria (written application, interview, audition, etc.). d. Admission criteria are approved at the point of approval of a course and thereafter 2.

determined on an ongoing basis in accordance with the Admissions Rules and the Admissions Procedures. Qualification Pathways, Articulation and Credit Arrangements 9 In designing an award course, there must be consideration given to the development of 1. qualification pathways and articulation arrangements for students to progress into and between qualification levels. These pathways must be detailed in course approval documentation for new courses. Qualification pathways should be horizontal across qualifications at the same level as 2.

well as vertical between qualifications at different levels.

Nested Qualifications Nested qualifications are qualifications that include articulated arrangements from a 3. lower level qualification into a higher level qualification to enable multiple entry and exit points. Each course of study within a nested set of qualifications leading to each AQF award, 4. must meet the requirements of the relevant Higher Education Standards Framework, including the specifications for each level of the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF).

A student who is admitted in the first instance only to a course at a lower AQF Level 5. and who completes a course successfully may be granted a defined amount of credit towards admission into the higher course. In a three-stage program (Figure 1), which contains exit points at the end of each stage, 6. this would typically entail one third credit being granted for completion of each level.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 16 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Figure 1 A student who is enrolled directly into the higher AQF Level course at the outset may 7.

proceed through the entire course, unless they decide to exit with a lower AQF Level qualification. Principles for Nested Qualifications Each course leading to a Graduate Certificate or a Graduate Diploma nested within a 8. Masters course must have specified learning outcomes for the relevant AQF Qualification Level and Qualification Type. Nested qualifications should clearly state how the learning outcomes for each nested course are assured, and show their distribution throughout the entire course.

Credit for Prior Learning Credit for Prior Learning is available for students to have their prior educational and 9. career experience recognised towards meeting the course learning outcomes in their UOW course. It means students are able to seek a reduction in the length of their degree and cost of their degree, including tuition and living costs. In designing courses, consideration must be given to appropriate supporting credit 10. arrangements (including formal articulation arrangements) and other means for recognition of prior learning having regard to the principles and provisions as set out in the Credit for Prior Learning Procedures.

Delivery Mode(s), Delivery Location(s) and Delivery Session(s) 10 ESOS / CRICOS Requirements All courses offered to onshore international students on a student visa must meet 1. relevant requirements of the Education Services to Overseas Students Act 2000, with respect to their delivery mode, as set out in the CRICOS Management and Administration Procedures.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 17 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Standard 9.4 of the ESOS National Code provides that: 2.

An international student may be permitted to undertake no more than 25% of the a. student’s total course by distance and/or online learning. A provider must not enrol students exclusively in distance or online learning b. subjects in any compulsory session (e.g., Autumn or Spring Session / Trimester). On Campus and Flexible Delivery Modes The number of subjects available for on campus and/or flexible modes at each course 3.

level for each session must be set so as to enable international onshore students to comply with the requirements set out in 10.2 Delivery Location When designing a course, careful consideration must be given to the selection of 4. delivery locations (existing or new) taking account of the capacity of the University to provide an equivalent academic experience for students at the delivery location. Where a new delivery location is proposed for delivery of a course, in order to ensure 5. the systems needs, operational requirements and compliance requirements involved in delivery at the new location can be resolved, the proposing Faculty must facilitate wide consultation with central units before the course at the delivery location is approved.

Session of Offer and Session of Delivery All courses and subjects offered onshore should, where practicable, use the UOW 6.

approved standard sessions (Autumn, Spring, Summer and Trimesters 1, 2 and 3). NB: The onshore versions of Autumn and Spring sessions are different to the offshore Autumn and Spring sessions. Non-standard sessions can be used where there are sound pedagogical or logistical 7. reasons to do so. Creation of new non-standard sessions will be managed under the Sessions Management Policy (under development). Changes to existing sessions are managed through the Manager, Enrolments and UAC 8. Admissions. The UOW Curriculum Model 11 The UOW Curriculum Model sets out five transformative practices to maximise student 1.

success and build on and enhance UOW’s reputation for top quality teaching and learning. These are brought together in a whole-of-program approach. Curriculum Model Themes The UOW Curriculum Model Themes comprise a student learning experience that is: 2. Intellectually challenging; a. Research/enquiry based; b. Real world focused; and c. Technology enriched. d.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 18 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version UOW Curriculum Model Principles The UOW Curriculum Model Principles comprise: 3.

Transition; a. Synthesis; and b. Broadening. c. UOW Curriculum Model Transformative Practices A set of five Transformational Practices has been developed for integration into all 4. UOW coursework degrees: FYE@ UOW (First Year Experience); a. My Portfolio @ UOW; b.

Hybrid Learning @ UOW; c. Connection @ UOW; and d. Capstones @ UOW. e. All award courses must, on being proposed or being reviewed, incorporate in their 5. design the themes, principles and transformative practices of the UOW Curriculum Model. Course Structure 12 In order for an award course (and the majors or specialisations within it) to meet AQF 1. requirements, the University must ensure that each course that lead to a qualification located at Levels 7, 8, 9 or 10 of the AQF meet the corresponding specifications in the AQF for a course of that level and type, including: AQF Levels Criteria, a.

Qualification Type Descriptors, b. Volume of Learning, and c. Generic Learning Outcomes as detailed in the AQF. d. General Factors in Structuring an AQF Compliant Course For a course to meet AQF requirements, the following elements are required: 2. Course learning outcomes and subject learning outcomes are in place; a. Course learning outcomes are aligned with the relevant AQF qualification type b. descriptors (refer to Appendices 8 – 15); Assessment at the subject level demonstrably supports achievement of the c.

subject learning outcomes and, where applicable, the major study and course learning outcomes; The course has a volume of learning that, at a minimum, meets AQF d.

requirements for the relevant AQF level and qualification type;

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 19 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version The course learning outcomes incorporate achievement of the Generic Learning e. Outcomes detailed in the AQF; and The course has a course award title that is consistent with the AQF. f. Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes should be specific to the course of study, measurable, achievable 3. and, within the context of the volume of learning and the resources available, realistic. Course Learning Outcomes may be supplemented by Major and/or Specialisation 4.

Learning Outcomes. The Course, Specialisation and/or Major Learning Outcomes must embed Australian 5. Qualifications Framework (AQF) level descriptors and, where they exist, discipline Threshold Learning Outcomes. Where applicable, professional accreditation requirements and requirements of 6. regulatory and disciplinary bodies are also embedded in the course learning outcomes. Major Study, Specialisation and Minor Study Credit Points A major study or specialisation must meet the minimum credit point requirements as set 7.

out in Appendices 8 – 15. A minor study must meet the minimum credit point requirement set out in Appendices 8.

8 – 15. A minor study may be available to all UOW students subject to the relevant course 9. requirements, by being listed on the Schedule of Minor Studies set out in the General Course Rules. Subjects and the AQF In order for subjects to be consistent with the AQF levels, and subject to the restrictions 10. as set out in the Appendices 8 – 15: subjects offered in AQF Level 7 and embedded AQF Level 8 undergraduate a.

courses will be at 100 Level, 200 Level and 300 and/or 400 Level; subjects offered in AQF Level 8 undergraduate end on honours courses will be b. at 400 Level or 800 Level; subjects offered in AQF Level 8 postgraduate courses will be at 400, 800 or c. 900 Level; and subjects offered in AQF Level 9 postgraduate courses will be at 800 or 900 d. Level. Due to limitations in the existing subject database, subjects offered in AQF Level 10 11. postgraduate courses will be designed to meet the requirements of Level 9 and Level 10 of the AQF but will be designated as 900 Level and, for the thesis subjects, will have the prefix THES.

A subject may be approved as a pre-requisite subject or a co-requisite subject provided 12. the Delegated Authority is satisfied there is academic justification for requiring students

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 20 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version enrolling in the subject for which the pre-requisite or co-requisite is prescribed to undertake the pre-requisite or co-requisite. Principles for Assurance of Learning 13 Assurance of learning involves a systematic process of: 1.

Identifying and developing expected course learning outcomes; a. designing courses in a whole of course approach to foster attainment of course b.

learning outcomes; collecting data about student attainment of course learning outcomes; c. reviewing and benchmarking this data; and d. continuously developing and improving courses and subjects. e. The purpose of Assurance of Learning is to ensure UOW graduates achieve the learning 2. outcomes we claim they will achieve. As well as contributing to the improvement of our courses, assurance of learning is also a way of demonstrating our accountability to students and external stakeholders. A well-developed Assurance of Learning process is characterised by: 3.

clear course learning outcomes, which are consistent with the level and field of a.

education of the qualification awarded and informed by national and/or international comparators; teaching and learning activities arranged to foster progressive and coherent b. achievement of expected learning outcomes; methods of assessment which are capable of confirming that students are c. achieving the course learning outcomes; judgements on assessments that reflect the level of student achievement; d. course review and improvement activities, including periodic comprehensive e.

reviews of all courses of study; review and improvement are informed by consideration of indirect measures of f. learning (graduate surveys, employers surveys, alumni feedback) and regular benchmarking; and evidence of the way in which this information (learning outcomes, student g. performance, indirect measures) influences teaching, learning and research by informing students, initiating curriculum change or developing teaching practice and resource development. These elements of an Assurance of Learning process characterise particular 4.

requirements of the Higher Education Standards Framework (2015).

Attaining Learning Outcomes Confirmation of student attainment of course learning outcomes will be provided 5. through the design of a set of assessments planned across the course.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 21 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version These assessments should include authentic and challenging tasks which offer students 6. rich opportunities to develop and integrate their learning. They are typically real-world focused and are ideal for inclusion in student portfolios. There should be at least one assessment that allow students to demonstrate attainment of 7.

each Course Learning Outcome (and, for courses with separate Specialisation or Major Learning Outcomes, each Specialisation or Major Learning Outcome).

Design and development of course, subjects and assessments should ideally take place 8. as collaborative and inclusive process with the course team. The design of assessment and feedback within a course should be in line with the UOW 9. Assessment and Feedback Principles. Subjects and Credit Points 14 For undergraduate and postgraduate coursework courses, in order to support cross 1.

disciplinary study and to simplify and make consistent the University’s subject structures, a subject must be designed with the following credit point values: 0 credit points (as a result of which no fee may be charged for students to a. undertake the subject); 2 credit points; b. 3 credit points; c. 6 credit points; d. 12 credit points; e. 18 credit points; f. 24 credit points; and g. 48 credit points. h. The standard credit point value for an undergraduate coursework or postgraduate 2. coursework subject is 6 credit points. Use of 2 and 3 credit point subjects should be exceptional and should not result in 3.

students being unduly inconvenienced in achieving the minimum number of credit points required to be eligible to graduate and/or declare a major study or minor study. Subjects of 12 credit points and above should be used to cater for study at greater depth 4. or for project based study. Where a new subject is designed, care should be taken to eliminate any potential 5. barriers associated with cross disciplinary study and prevent students having small shortfalls or over-runs in the credit points achieved to meet course requirements. The credit points should reflect the work requirements for a subject.

As a guide, each 6.

credit point approximates to 1.5 to 2 hours of work (in class and self-directed study) per week. Implementation

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 22 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Faculties with subjects that are 8 or 16 credit points in value must adopt the following 7. approach to meet the UOW approved standard credit point controls: Subjects that are core or capstones within a course or major study must be a. amended to align to the credit point controls in conjunction with the next course review or external re-accreditation process for that course or major study; Elective subjects must be amended to align to the credit points so as to minimise b.

any adverse impact to students; Subjects offered at offshore locations must be amended taking account of c. offshore accreditation requirements in consultation with offshore partners. All coursework subjects must be aligned to the credit point controls by 8. 31 December 2018 for the 2019 academic year. In aligning subjects, faculties may reduce content and assessment or increase content 9. and assessment to ensure the credit points consistent with the approved credit point controls. Principles for Double Badging Subjects 15 Double badging of a subject is typically achieved by changes to the subject learning 1.

outcomes and to assessment so that the second version of the double badged subject, as delivered, can cater to the needs of students studying at a different AQF Qualification Level. A core principle of course design for bachelors pass, bachelor honours, graduate 2. diploma and masters qualification types is to provide a curriculum that introduces, develops and assures learning. Double badged subjects should be kept to a minimum within a course 3. Double badged subjects should be designed to meet the requirements of students 4.

studying at the relevant qualification level and type for the course in which they are enrolled.

Double badging of undergraduate subjects as postgraduate subjects should occur only 5. with adjustments to subject learning outcomes and assessment to reflect their delivery at a higher level and for a higher qualification type in the AQF. Adjustments for postgraduate versions include: 6. Varying subject learning outcomes to meet the qualification type descriptors for a. Level 8 and Level 9 qualifications; Including additional content to provide greater breadth or depth of knowledge b.

to meet the qualification type descriptors for Level 8 and Level 9 qualifications and in line with the varied subject learning outcomes; and/or Setting more demanding assessment tasks to meet the qualification type c. descriptors for Level 8 and Level 9 qualifications and in line with the varied subject learning outcomes.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 23 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Exceptions Double badging of 400 level subjects as 800 level subjects may occur without 7.

modification to subject learning outcomes or assessment on the basis that the relevant qualifications (Bachelor Honours, Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma) sit at the same level of the AQF as set out in Appendix 16. This is provided that subjects are consistent with the relevant AQF qualifications levels 8.

and qualifications types. Double badging of 200 and 300 level subjects as 800 level subjects may occur without 9. alteration as set out in Appendix 16, (and therefore at the assurance level of a Level 7 Bachelor’s degree) but only if the subjects are: offered as foundation or introductory level subjects within a Masters course and a. provided that there are no more than 18cp of double badged subjects per 72 cp Master’s degree or 24cp of double badged subjects per 96 cp Master’s degree; or offered as part of a Level 8 qualification (but with a strict limit of 6cp in a b.

Graduate Certificate or 12cp in a Graduate Diploma).

In the case of higher degree research degrees double badging is restricted to 400 level 10. subjects being double badged as 800 level subjects, which may occur as outlined in clause 15(7). Principles for Zero Credit Point Subjects 16 Zero credit point subjects are permissible provided the subject is for one of the 1. following purposes: To maximise student’s potential and learning experience in a specific area that a. may not be directly related to the discipline specific course content (for example: academic and English language and other communication skills development, mentoring programs, Academic Information Skills).

To provide the knowledge and skills that are determined critical to the course of b.

study and assists in bridging the gap for students before they begin the course of study. To provide students with work experience and placement opportunities. c. To provide research skills and are embedded as part of a research degree d. program for Level 10 AQF Qualification (for example: Research Methods, Research Principles, and Fundamentals of Research). To provide formalised content and assessment but where the subject involves e. minimal resources from the University (supervision, delivery, assessment etc.). To provide for compulsory prerequisite content.

f. Academic and English Language Skills 17 To ensure UOW graduates have the communication skills to be competitive for the 1.

future employment, all UOW courses will explicitly enable and evidence