COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES

COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES

COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 1 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version COURSE DESIGN PROCEDURES Date first approved: 19 January 2016 Date of effect: 19 January 2016 Date last amended: (refer Version Control Table) 7 October 2016 Date of Next Review: January 2018 First Approved by: Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Custodian title & e- mail address: Director, Academic Quality and Standards quality@uow.edu.au Author: Course Management Coordinator, Academic Quality and Standards Unit Responsible Division & Unit: Academic Quality and Standards Unit Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Portfolio Supporting documents, procedures & forms of this policy: Admissions Rules and Admissions Procedures Assessment of New Collaborative Delivery Procedures Collaborative Delivery of a UOW Course Policy Collaborative Delivery Review Procedures Collaborative Delivery – Subject Quality Assurance Procedures Course Policy and Course Review Procedures Course and Subject Approval Procedures – New Courses and Significant Amendments to Existing Courses and Less Significant Amendments to Existing Courses Credit for Prior Learning Policy CRICOS Management and Administration Procedures Delegations of Authority Policy English Language Policy General Course Rules Joint and Dual Awards Policy UOW Assessment and Feedback Principles UOW Quality and Standards Framework for Learning and Teaching UOW Curriculum Model (as approved by Academic Senate in September 2014) University of Wollongong Strategic Plan Relevant Legislation & External Documents: Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011 (Cth) Higher Education Standards Framework Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Commonwealth) Australian Qualifications Framework Standards – Commission for Academic Accreditation, UAE Audience: Public – accessible to anyone

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 2 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Submit your feedback on this policy document using the Policy Feedback Facility.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 3 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Contents 1 Introduction / Background 5 2 Scope / Purpose 5 3 Definitions 6 4 Design Matters Related to Qualification Levels and Types 10 5 Course Names and Course Codes 12 6 Course Naming Abbreviations and Post-Nominals 13 7 Course Duration and Volume of Learning 13 8 Course Admission 14 9 Qualification Pathways, Articulation and Credit Arrangements 14 10 Delivery Mode(s), Delivery Location(s) and Delivery Session(s) 16 11 The UOW Curriculum Model 17 12 Course Structure 17 13 Principles for Assurance of Learning 19 14 Subjects and Credit Points 20 15 Principles for Double Badging Subjects 21 16 Principles for Zero Credit Point Subjects 22 17 Academic and English Language Skills 23 18 Cross Counting of Subjects 23 19 General Elective Subjects / General Elective Schedule 23 20 Roles & Responsibilities 23 21 Version Control and Change History 25 Appendix 1: AQF Qualification Type and Qualification Level (Level 7 and above) 26

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 4 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Appendix 2: Similarities and Differences between Joint and Dual Awards (Refer to TEQSA Guidance Materials) 27 Appendix 3: Course Names – AQF Level 7 and above 28 Appendix 4: Course Abbreviations 30 Appendix 5: Other Course Descriptor Abbreviations 31 Appendix 6: Field of Study Abbreviations 32 Appendix 7: Business Rules for Credit Points and EFTSL 37 Appendix 8: Bachelor Pass Degree 39 Appendix 9: Bachelor Double Degree 42 Appendix 10: Bachelor Honours Degree 46 Appendix 11: Graduate Certificate 51 Appendix 12: Graduate Diploma 54 Appendix 13: Masters Degree (Coursework) 57 Appendix 14: Masters Degree (Research) 61 Appendix 15: Doctoral Degree 64 Appendix 16: Table – Guide on the Use of Double Badged Subjects 67 Appendix 17: Principles of Equivalence 68

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 5 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Introduction / Background 1 Course design at UOW supports the overall strategic goals for learning and the student 1. experience. Course design supports the University’s strategic objectives of student-centred, 2. challenging, high standard, technology-rich learning environment that develops all students for their graduate roles in society and the global workplace; and The Course Design Procedures have been developed to assist in: 3.

providing information and guidance for designing, developing and/or a. amending a course at the University of Wollongong; and ensuring that course naming, course structure and course content for all UOW b. Qualifications (AQF award and non-award courses) meet the requirements as set out in the General Course Rules. Scope / Purpose 2 The Course Design Procedures operate in conjunction with the General Course Rules, 1. the Course Policy and the Course Review Procedures. These procedures apply to all UOW courses (award and non-award) including all 2.

courses that are approved by UOW and delivered by third party providers at onshore and offshore delivery locations.

Course design is supported by and operates in conjunction with the following 3. procedures: Course and Subject Approval Procedures – New Courses and Significant a. Amendments to Existing Courses; Course and Subject Approval Procedures – Less Significant Amendments to b. Existing Courses; Course Review Procedures; c. AQF Validation Procedures (only in relation to courses suspended as of 2015 d.

without being AQF validated but later reactivated); and AQF Implementation Procedures (only in relation to courses suspended as of e. 2015 without being AQF validated but later reactivated). The course design provisions relating to qualification pathways and recognition of 4. equivalence in content and learning outcomes, and the governing principles and processes are addressed in the Credit for Prior Learning Policy and accompanying procedures. All new UOW courses must adhere to the relevant provisions of the Course Design 5.

Procedures. All existing UOW courses that are not in conformity with UOW Course Design 6.

Procedures must be reviewed and re-designed to meet the Course Design Principles

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 6 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version when next under review in accordance with the Course Review Schedule determined under the Course Review Procedures. Course Variations for Offshore Delivery Locations All UOW courses must be delivered in accordance with their approved structure 7. applicable for the relevant delivery location (taking into account, in the case of offshore locations, the Principles of Equivalence – see Appendix 17) unless academic approval is granted by the Delegated Authority to vary course requirements for an individual student.

Courses, major study areas, specialisations and individual subjects that are offered at 8. both the University of Wollongong onshore and offshore must have equivalent course, major study and subject learning outcomes having regard to the Principles of Equivalence. Particular requirements imposed by relevant local higher education accreditation 9. agencies may be approved as variations to the course, major study or to subjects by the Delegated Authority. Definitions 3 Word/Term Definition 100 level subject A subject at first year undergraduate level. 200 level subject A subject at second year undergraduate level.

300 level subject A subject at third year undergraduate level. 400 level subject A subject at fourth year undergraduate level. 600 level subject A subject at graduate entry undergraduate level. 800 and 900 level subjects Subjects at postgraduate level. Assurance of learning The quality assurance processes by which the University ensures that graduates of a course achieve stated educational outcomes. Award course A course recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework and approved by the Delegated Authority as an award or degree offered at the University of Wollongong. An award course leads to a higher education award as detailed in the General Course Rules.

AQF The Australian Qualifications Framework. AQF Levels An indication of the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement. AQF levels

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 7 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version An indication of the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement. AQF levels criteria describe the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement for each AQF level. CAA Commission for Academic Accreditation is the government-run institutional licensure and degree accreditation organization for private universities and their academic programmes in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Capstone Experience An experience through which students are given an opportunity to integrate existing knowledge, consolidate skills, apply existing knowledge and skills, reflect on and evaluate their actions and develop their graduate or professional identity in an authentic setting. It may involve coursework, work-experience, a research or creative project, work placement, internship or professional practice. A capstone experience may be a subject, part of a subject or designed across several subjects in a course. The associated assessments often assure the attainment of one or more Course Learning Outcomes.

Capstone Subject A subject that is designed to offer a capstone experience. Contextualisation The adaptation of one or more elements of a subject to increase its relevance to the location and cultural context where the course is being delivered.

Core Subject A core subject is a compulsory subject that must be completed in order to meet the requirements of a course, major study or minor study. Co-requisite Subject A subject which must be passed previously or taken concurrently with the subject for which it is prescribed. Customisation The alignment of subject design and materials with its students’ profile to promote effective learning for that cohort of students. Course a program of study consisting of a combination of subjects and other requirements, whether leading to a specific higher education award or not.

Credit The value assigned for the recognition of equivalence in content and learning outcomes between different types of learning and/ or qualifications.

Credit points Credit points are defined as the number value attached to a subject that indicates the study load. Course structure Refers to the specific program of subjects which a student undertakes to

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 8 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Refers to the specific program of subjects which a student undertakes to meet the requirements of a course as specified in the Course Handbook for the year the course was commenced. Curriculum design The designing and sequencing of learning activities, learning support, resources and assessment tasks that enable a student to attain the specified Course Learning Outcomes.

Delegated Authority A person or body granted decision-making authority as detailed in the Delegations of Authority Policy.

Delivery Mode A description of the way teaching and learning activities are carried out to support and enable learning. Double Badged Subject A duplicate version of a subject originally designed for delivery as part of an AQF qualification type (typically a Bachelor Pass degree) that is created for delivery as part of a different, usually higher, AQF qualification type (typically a postgraduate qualification type). Double Degree Double degree is an approved course leading to the conferral of two degrees as separate awards upon a student who has complied with the course requirements for double degrees and the two individual course requirements inclusively.

EFTSL Equivalent Full Time Study Load. Elective Subject An elective subject is a subject the selection of which is optional for students meeting course, major study or minor study requirements. Equivalent Two courses or two areas of major study or specialisations are equivalent when the structure of the course, major study or specialisation includes the same core subjects, has course, major or minor learning outcomes that share the same intent, and are assessed as being at the same level of the Australian Qualifications Framework. Flexible delivery A combination of online and face-to-face component where the face-to- face component is compulsory.

General Elective Schedule The General Elective Schedule is a list of undergraduate subjects that are open for enrolment by any undergraduate student, often to make up the total number of credit points required for their degree. Generic Learning Outcomes Transferable, non-discipline specific skills a graduate may achieve through learning that have application in study, work and life contexts. The four broad categories in the AQF are: fundamental skills;  

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 9 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version people skills;  thinking skills and  personal skills.

  Hybrid learning Optimally combines web-based and face-to-face teacher-student, student- student, student-resources and student-world interactions to achieve the learning outcomes of the subject or course. It uses a range of different tools to develop a deep understanding of content and focuses on learning as a social, collaborative experience. It is different to web- enhanced learning, which primarily uses traditional face-to-face pedagogies while supplementing them with some resources or activities on a Moodle site. Hybrid learning and blended learning are often used interchangeably in the teaching and learning literature.

UOW has chosen the term ‘hybrid’ learning to acknowledge the unique contributions different tools and processes make to learning, while recognising that effective combinations of different learning tools produce more than the sum of their parts.

Joint or Dual Awards A Joint Award involves the awarding of a single qualification which is jointly conferred by UOW and one or more higher education providers. Joint Awards typically involve close cooperation in curriculum development, design, organisation, course delivery, and assessment of learning outcomes as well as requirements necessary for awarding the qualification. (TEQSA 2013) A Dual Award involves UOW and another entity offering a course of study which results in two separate qualifications being conferred by the two institutions. A dual award may involve one AQF level, or two sequential AQF levels – for example, two Masters degrees or a Bachelor and Diploma award.

Dual awards may provide students with the opportunity to complete two awards in a shorter timeframe than if completed separately. (TEQSA 2013) Learning outcomes The expression of the set of knowledge skills and the application of the knowledge and skills a person has acquired and is able to demonstrate as a result of learning.

Major An approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have a minimum value of one third of the total degree requirements. A major in a Bachelor Degree is at least 48 credit points offered by one or more academic units. The title of the major shall appear on the testamur. Minor An approved combination of subjects which have a minimum value of 24 credit points offered by one or more academic units, of which 12 credit points should be at least 200 level or higher.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 10 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version An approved combination of subjects which have a minimum value of 24 credit points offered by one or more academic units, of which 12 credit points should be at least 200 level or higher.

The minor shall be recorded on the official academic transcript. Approved minor studies include those listed in Appendix 3 – Schedule of Minor Studies.

Nested qualification A qualification that includes articulation arrangements from a lower level qualification and/or into a higher level qualification to enable multiple entry and/or exit points. Non-award course A course or unit of study that is not recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework but approved by the delegated authority as a non- award course or subject offered at the University of Wollongong. On campus delivery mode Involves formal, recurring and compulsory face to face delivery (such as weekly lectures and/or tutorials and or/labs), and may be combined with the use of online mediums.

Pre-requisite subject A subject which must be completed satisfactorily before a specified other subject or subjects may be attempted. Principles of Equivalence Two courses or two areas of major study or specialisations are equivalent when the course, major study or specialisation is designed and delivered in conformity with the Principles of Equivalence as set out in Appendix 17. Program A combination of two or more courses, for example a Double Degree Program. Qualification Type Descriptors The set of statements that describes the learning outcomes of each of the AQF qualification types in terms of knowledge, skills and the application of knowledge and skills.

Session A period in which subjects may be offered. Standard sessions are defined as Autumn and Spring. Specialist Degree An award course that is designed to provide learning focussed on a specific field of study or discipline. Standard load One year of full-time study, equivalent to 48 credit points is a standard load. Student A person registered for a course. Subject A self-contained unit of study identified by a unique code. UOW University of Wollongong.

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 11 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version UOWD University of Wollongong in Dubai.

Volume of Learning The notional duration of all activities required for the achievement of the learning outcomes specified for an AQF qualification type, expressed in equivalent full time years. Year A calendar year period of 12 months. Design Matters Related to Qualification Levels and Types 4 UOW Qualifications The following courses of study are offered by the University: 1.

AQF qualifications (detailed in Appendix 1 AQF Qualification Type and a. Qualification Level (Level 7 and above)), being courses leading to the following higher education awards: Doctoral Degree i. Masters Degree (Research) ii. Masters Degree (Coursework) iii. Graduate Diploma iv. Graduate Certificate v. Bachelor Honours Degree vi. Bachelor Pass Degree vii. Other courses not leading to an AQF award. b. Cognate Courses Cognate courses are courses with similar names and content (e.g. Bachelor of 2. Commerce and Bachelor of Commerce (Dean’s Scholar)). The course structure for cognate courses must be designed to differentiate cognate courses from each other.

Distinguishing content may include: a core or capstone subject or subjects that is or are not available to students a.

undertaking the cognate course or that is or are only available to students in the cognate course as an elective subject(s); or setting the volume of learning for one course at a level higher than that for the b. cognate course, enabling students to undertake additional core and/or elective subjects. Dean’s Scholar, Scholar and Advanced Degrees Dean’s Scholar and Scholar courses are for use in conjunction with high demand 3. undergraduate courses, in order to attract high achieving students. Advanced undergraduate courses are for use when seeking to attract academically 4.

gifted student.

They are to be characterised by:

UOW_ PRO_372 Course Design Procedures – January 2017 Page 12 of 71 Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled please refer to UOW website or intranet for latest version Higher entry requirements; a. A more challenging curriculum, including exposure to research concepts and b. methods, research or project study and to advanced knowledge in the relevant discipline areas; Greater flexibility in the curriculum (including the opportunity to study subjects c. at a higher level sooner and the opportunity to undertake more credit points per semester); and Options for and encouragement for students to complete an honours award d.

(end on honours or, for 4 year programs, embedded honours). Advanced Masters courses are to be at least 96 credit points, with a minimum of 72 5. credit points (cp) at 900 level for a 96 cp course. Advanced Masters courses can be either broadening (where the course broadens’ a 6. student’s knowledge and/or skills across a new discipline or area of professional practice) or deepening (where the course deepens knowledge and/or skills in the same discipline or area of professional practice). Broadening Advanced Masters courses should provide students with the opportunity to undertake a broader range of elective subjects.

Joint and Dual Awards Courses and subjects may be designed and delivered with a variety of partner 7. institutions, either onshore and/or offshore as Joint or Dual Awards. All courses that lead to a Joint or Dual Award will be developed and approved in 8. accordance with the Joint and Dual Awards Policy. Testamurs for Joint Awards will be developed in accordance with the Joint and Dual Awards Policy. Non Award Courses Non-award study subjects and courses are offered by the University. These Non-award 9. subjects and courses may be designed for to maximise student’s potential and learning experience in a specific area that a.

may or may not be directly related to the discipline- specific course content (for example: academic and English Language and other communication skills development, Mentoring programs, Academic Information Skills); to provide the knowledge and skills that are determined to be critical to the course of study and assists in bridging the gap for students before they begin the course of study (for example, discipline bridging courses); to provide the knowledge and skills that are determined to be critical to the a b.

course of study and assists in bridging the gap for students before they begin the course of study (for example, discipline bridging subjects or courses); to provide research skills and which are embedded as part of a research degree c.

program for Level 10 AQF Qualification (for example: Research Methods, Research Principles, and Fundamentals of Research courses);