Course Handbook Medical Sciences BSc (Hons) for entry 2018-19 May 2017 Dr Stan Ko School of Medicine Faculty of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences ...

 
Course Handbook Medical Sciences BSc (Hons) for entry 2018-19 May 2017 Dr Stan Ko School of Medicine Faculty of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences ...
Course Handbook
                    Medical Sciences BSc (Hons) for entry 2018-19
                                       May 2017
                                      Dr Stan Ko
                                 School of Medicine
                     Faculty of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences

         Please read this Handbook in conjunction with the University’s Student Handbook.

         All course materials, including lecture notes and other additional materials related to
         your course and provided to you, whether electronically or in hard copy, as part of
         your study, are the property of (or licensed to) UCLan and MUST not be distributed,
         sold, published, made available to others or copied other than for your personal study
         use unless you have gained written permission to do so from the Dean of School.
         This applies to the materials in their entirety and to any part of the materials.

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Course Handbook Medical Sciences BSc (Hons) for entry 2018-19 May 2017 Dr Stan Ko School of Medicine Faculty of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences ...
Contents
1.      Welcome to the course .................................................................................................. 4
     1.2 Course Team ............................................................................................................... 8
     1.3 Expertise of staff .......................................................................................................... 9
     1.4 Academic Advisor ........................................................................................................ 9
     1.5 Administration details................................................................................................... 9
     1.6 Communication............................................................................................................ 9
     1.7 External Examiner ..................................................................................................... 10
2. Structure of the course .................................................................................................... 10
     2.1 Overall structure ........................................................................................................ 10
     2.2 Modules available ...................................................................................................... 11
     2.3 Course requirements ................................................................................................. 12
     2.4 Module Registration Options...................................................................................... 12
     2.5 Study Time ................................................................................................................ 13
        2.5.1        Weekly timetable ........................................................................................... 13
        2.5.2        Expected hours of study ................................................................................ 13
3. Approaches to teaching and learning .............................................................................. 15
     3.1 Learning and teaching methods................................................................................. 15
     3.2 Study skills ................................................................................................................ 15
     3.3 Learning resources .................................................................................................... 15
        3.3.1 Learning Information Services (LIS) .................................................................... 15
        3.3.2 Electronic Resources .......................................................................................... 16
     3.4 Personal development planning................................................................................. 16
4. Student Support .............................................................................................................. 17
     4.1 Academic Advisors .................................................................................................... 18
     4.2 Students with disabilities............................................................................................ 18
5. Assessment .................................................................................................................... 19
     5.1 Assessment Strategy ................................................................................................. 19
     5.2 Notification of assignments and examination arrangements ...................................... 19
     5.3 Referencing ............................................................................................................... 20
     5.4 Confidential material .................................................................................................. 20
6. Classification of Awards .................................................................................................. 21
7. Student Feedback ........................................................................................................... 21
8. Appendices .................................................................................................................... 24
     8.1.a Medical Sciences BSc (Hons)................................................................................. 24
     8.2 Absence forms........................................................................................................... 34

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1. Welcome to the course
Welcome to the School of Medicine and to the Medical Sciences Bachelor of Science Honours
degree programme. The School is a hive of activity and had a diverse student and staff body,
creating an enriching environment in which to learn. We have state-of-the-art facilities;
including a clinical skills suite, a virtual dissection table and access to multiple anatomy
resource centres.

The science team and friendly, supportive and approachable as well as committed to nurturing
you into a successful candidate for the endeavour you pursue in the future. At the same time,
we also make sure that you are provided with the best of the support we can offer you during
the time you are on the course and that we are walking this journey with you in the next few
years. We wish you all the best of luck for the years ahead and that you would enjoy every
moment with us on the course.

All the best from the Head of School and the Medical Sciences BSc course team.

1.1 Rationale, aims and learning outcomes of the course
                   This programme is specifically designed for students who wish to pursue
                   further study on professional healthcare programmes; such as Medicine,
                   Physician Associate Studies or Dentistry. The course also consists of the
                   high standard of training in translational science so that it can become a
                   real asset to you if you wish to embark on postgraduate studies (MSc,
                   MPhil or PhD) as well as seeking employment opportunities in the
                   biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry.
The foundation year entry is designed to prepare you for study at undergraduate level by giving
you the foundation of scientific enquiry and data handling skills.

The aims of the Medical Sciences BSc course are:

 •    To produce resourceful, competent, clear-thinking graduates with professional
      knowledge, practical skills and experience in medical sciences relevant to medicine,
      dentistry, healthcare professions and industry.

 •    To develop skills in the areas of clinical and scientific research, clinical communication,
      use of IT and computer based tools, problem solving and lifelong transferable skills.

 •    To direct students to acquire knowledge and understanding of medical sciences and
      clinical skills within the context of medicine, dentistry and healthcare professions at
      BSc honours level.

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The course learning outcomes are:

 At the end of the course you will have knowledge and understanding of:

  •    integrate knowledge from core subjects, such as medical science topics, clinical skills
       and communications and research skills for the synthesis of solutions for problems

  •    evaluate the impacts of the design and use of pharmaceutics for the treatment of
       pathophysiological conditions

  •    demonstrate the proficiency in essential clinical skills and basic understanding of
       various aspects of healthcare provision for effective communication with patients

  •    conduct laboratory-based work safely following health and safety guidelines

  •    describe the contribution of scientific research to advances in medical practice,
       recognising current limitations and the impact of healthcare sciences on public health
       services

  •    explain the foundations of scientific topics, including the structure and function of
       cells, tissues and organ systems in health and disease and the role of biomolecules
       and biochemical mechanisms

  •    demonstrate English language proficiency skills and communicate accurately and
       succinctly using appropriate medical and scientific terminology

 At the end of the course you will have obtained the following skills and be able to:

              •    apply knowledge of core subjects to clinical practice and scientific
                   advancement relating to medicine, dentistry and other healthcare-related
                   professions

              •    plan, develop, manage, evaluate and prioritise tasks and projects

              •    synthesis of solutions for problems using appropriate intellectual, technical
                   and clinical knowledge and skills

              •    comprehend their role in the contribution to the well-being of the public and
                   take part in assisting such proceedings

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•    summarise and analyse scientific results and critically interpret data
 At the end of the course you will be able to:

      •   apply knowledge skills and competences to hypothesis testing and systematic
          analysis

      •   formulate and produce creative and innovative technical solutions to problems by
          applying principles in core subjects

      •   reflect on applications of medical sciences to the advancement of clinical medicine,
          dentistry and healthcare-related professions

      •   evaluate alternative solutions to clinical practice

      •   integrate contemporary topics in medical sciences to the healthcare and industrial
          settings

      •   process and interpret scientific data and demonstrate confidence with related
          numerical skills

 During the course you will also develop transferable skills and be able to:

      •    communicate ideas accurately, persuasively and succinctly in writing, orally and in
           a variety of media

      •    work independently on processes associated with medical developments and
           demonstrate a high level of professional and ethical conduct

      •    perform effectively in a team, and identify team characteristics

      •    locate and critically use information from a variety of sources

      •    manage resources and time effectively

      •    undertake personal development planning towards autonomous learning

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1.2 Course Team
The Course Team is made up of colleagues with expertise in teaching medical sciences
alongside clinical academics from a range of different specialties.

Executive Dean of the College of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences:

Professor StJohn Crean                         Email: SCrean@uclan.ac.uk

Head of School of Medicine:

Professor Cathy Jackson                        Email: cjackson19@uclan.ac.uk

     Staff                            Role

     Dr Stan Ko                       Programme Lead

     Dr Katy Wareing                  Deputy Programme Lead, Student Support Lead

     Dr Allyson Clelland              Lecturer in Medical Sciences (Physiology)

     Dr Elaine Browne                 Lecturer in Medical Sciences (Cell Biology)

     Dr Christina Daniel              Senior Lecturer in Clinical Skills

                                      Head of Phase 1 MBBS, Lecturer in Medical Sciences
     Dr Andy Ginty
                                      (Anatomy)

     Dr Sue Jamieson                  Senior Lecturer in Medical Sciences (Physiology)

     Dr Jorge Garcia-Lara             Senior Lecturer in Medical Sciences (Microbiology)

     Dr Jamal Nasir                   Senior Lecturer in Medical Sciences (Cell Biology and Genetics)

     Dr Robert Sims                   Lecturer in Medical Sciences (Pharmacology)

     Dr Temba Mudariki                Lecturer in Medical Sciences

     Dr Eric Bater                    Senior Lecturer in Primary Care

     Dawn Sawyer                      Physician Associate Lecturer

     Matthew Mustain                  Physician Associate Lecturer

     Venus Alae-Carew                 Lecturer in Investigative Skills

     Hilary Elizabeth
                                      Lecturer in English
     Katherine Ross

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Further details of additional members of the Course Team and academic staff in the School
of Medicine can be found at: http://www.uclan.ac.uk/schools/medicine/index.php
1.3 Expertise of staff
A key strength of the course is the diversity and skill-sets of the staff who teach on it. There is
a wide range of both scientific and clinical doctors, those who specialise in teaching and those
who have excellent research portfolios. The combination of staff enables us to provide a
holistic team who can support each student on their individual path through the course.

1.4 Academic Advisor
You will be assigned an Academic Advisor who will provide additional academic support during
the year. They will be the first point of call for many of the questions that you might have during
the year. Your Academic Advisor will be able to help you with personal development, including
developing skills in self-awareness, reflection and action planning.

You will receive information on Academic Advisor allocation when you start your induction
week activities. There are scheduled meetings throughout the academic year but you can
also make arrangements to see your Academic Advisor if you need any help. Further details
on the role of your Academic Advisor and also the Pastoral Tutor can be found in section 4.

1.5 Administration details
          Course Administration Service provides academic administration support for
          students and staff and are located in the following hubs which open from 8.45am
          until 5.15pm Monday to Thursday and until 4.00pm on Fridays. The hub can provide
general assistance and advice regarding specific processes such as extenuating
circumstances, extensions and appeals.

Allen Building
Medicine
Dentistry
telephone: 01772 895566
email: AllenHub@uclan.ac.uk

Samuel Lindow Building
West Lakes Campus
Moor Road, Cumbria
telephone: 01946 517200
email: AllenHub@uclan.ac.uk

1.6 Communication
                            The University expects you to use your UCLan email address and check
                            regularly for messages from staff. If you send us email messages from
                            other addresses they risk being filtered out as potential spam and
                            discarded unread.

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Together with this Student Handbook you will receive other relevant study handbooks which
will be placed in the Student Office on Blackboard. Over the duration of your course we will
also send out regular emails related to course issues and events within the School. The School
will also use the notifications area on Blackboard to keep students up to date with general
events and news items.

Your timetable of UCLan scheduled activity can be accessed via the Student Portal:
https://portal.uclan.ac.uk/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp . Unfortunately, on occasion, we may
have to cancel lectures at short notice because of staff illness etc. If there is a late cancellation
we will endeavour to inform you by e-mail and text and arrange an alternative lecture.

You may book appointments with lecturers through Starfish if you need any module support
(Starfish will not be available at the West Lakes campus, appointments can be made by liaising
with staff directly).

1.7 External Examiner
The University has appointed an External Examiner to your course to ensure that the
standards of your course are comparable to those provided at other higher education
institutions in the UK. The School will also send a sample of student coursework to the
external examiner(s) for external moderation purposes, once it has been marked and internally
moderated by the course tutors. The sample will include work awarded the highest and lowest
marks and awarded marks in the middle range.

The name of the External Examiner, their position and home institution will be available on
Blackboard. If you wish to make contact with an External Examiner, you should do this through
your Head of Programme and not directly. External Examiner reports will be made available
to you via Staff Student Liaison Committee meetings and electronically via Blackboard.

The external examiner for this course is:

Dr Nessar Ahmed, Manchester Metropolitan University.

2. Structure of the course
                  2.1 Overall structure
                  The Medical Sciences BSc programme consists of three stages of academic
                  development. The first stage (Year 1) focuses on building a basic science
                  foundation to prepare students for the progression onto further years of the
                  course. The second stage (Year 2) modules provide the opportunities for
students to understand the underlying principles of pathological conditions. Students also
start learning the basic skills in designing and conducting research projects, paving the way
to the research elements in the third year. The clinical communication and medical skills
module is purposely included to prepare students with the skills and aptitude for applications
to professional courses such as graduate entry medicine, dentistry, or physician associate
programmes. The third year of this course comprises modules which allow students to explore
the principles of both pharmacological and therapeutic applications to pathological processes,
together with a strong focus on research skills.

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The course duration is 3 years if entering without the Foundation Program or 4 years if entering
via the Foundation Program.

The course is also available over two years (excluding foundation entry), via an accelerated
route.

In order to receive the honours degree students must achieve a total of 360 credits during
years 1, 2 and 3 of the course. The classification of the award is based on a weighted average
percentage mark from all level 5 and level 6 modules with a ratio of 3:7 respectively. Therefore,
the year 1 of the course must be passed, but does not contribute to the final award, the year
2 of the course constitutes 30% of the final award, and the final year of the course constitutes
70% of the final award.

The classification of a degree is as follows:

     •   70 - 100% First Class Honours
     •   60 - 69% Upper Second Class Honours
     •   50 - 59% Lower Second Class Honours
     •   40 - 49% Third Class Honours

2.2 Modules available
Each module is a self-contained block of learning with defined aims, learning outcomes and
assessment. A standard module is worth 20 credits. It equates to the learning activity
expected from one sixth of a full-time undergraduate year. Modules may be developed as half
or double modules with credit allocated up to a maximum of 120 credits per module.

There are no optional modules for this course.

 Year               Module            Module Title                                  Credit
 (standard          Code                                                            rating
 route)

 3                  XY3240            Research Project                                  30

                    XY3280            Medical Pharmacology and Therapeutics             30

                    XY3120            Molecular Medicine                                30
                    XY3290            Neuroscience                                      30
 2                  XY2010            Immunology                                        30
                    XY2140            Anatomy and Physiology II                         30
                    XY2040            Research in Medical Sciences                      30
                    XY2230            Clinical Communication and Medical Skills         30

 1                  XY1110            Integrated Medical Sciences                       60
                    XY1030            Medical Microbiology                              20
                    XY1040            Anatomy and Physiology                            40
                    XY1004            Scientific Communication                          20

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0                  XY1005            Case Study Approach to Scientific Problem          40
                                      Solving
                    XYC001            Biological and Chemical Systems                    20
                    XYC002            Body Systems                                       20
                    XYC003            Investigative Skills using Mathematics             20
                    EF1501            English for Professional & Academic                20
                    EF1502            English for Professional & Academic                20
                                      Development 2
                    EF1337            English for Medical Sciences                       20

If you are studying the programme via the accelerated route you will study 180 credits per
year.

The Programme Specification which details the programme and modules in more depth can
be found in the appendices; 8.1.a Medical Sciences BSc (Hons) and can also be found on the
Course page on the UCLan web site.

2.3 Course requirements
                 Entry requirements for this course can be found here:

                        http://www.uclan.ac.uk/courses/bsc_hons_medical_sciences.php

                        Progression is dependent on passing all modules each year with a
                        minimum of 40%.

BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences is the target award that you have enrolled upon. Upon
successful completion of study at level 3, students will automatically progress to study at levels
4-6 at UCLan’s main campus in Preston to complete their honours degree study.

Students who successfully complete the Foundation Year Entry modules but who chose not
to progress on to a degree course at UCLan will be offered their transcript with all module
grades; however there is no exit award.

2.4 Module Registration Options
Discussions about your progression through the course normally take place in February each
year. It is an opportunity for you to make plans for your study over the next academic year.
The course team will tell you about the various modules / combinations available and you will
both agree on the most appropriate (and legal) course of study for you. Progression is
dependent on passing all modules each year with a minimum of 40%.

For Foundation Entry students:

BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences

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Upon successful completion of study at level 3, students will automatically progress to study
at levels 4-6 at UCLan’s main campus in Preston to complete their honours degree study.

In addition, successful completion of the level 3 programme may allow students to apply for
entry on to other programmes of study offered by UCLan and this may be explored with the
course leader during progression.

Alternative progression opportunities are detailed within the programme specification within
the appendix.

If you are struggling with any elements of the course, or feel that you may need additional
support, you can contact the Student Support Lead in confidence;
Dr Katy Wareing kwareing2@uclan.ac.uk

2.5 Study Time
2.5.1 Weekly timetable
A timetable will be available once you have enrolled on the programme, through the student
portal

Term dates

Term dates are published on Blackboard.

2.5.2 Expected hours of study
20 credits is a standard module size and equals 200 notional learning hours, which includes
both taught classes and self-directed study. Many lectures, workshops and practical sessions
require preparatory work prior to attendance and this must be completed. Students are also
recommended to carry out additional reading outside the reading list and lecture materials
provided. We will provide guidance to coursework submissions whether they are formative or
summative but it’s recommended that students should adopt a proactive approach to their
time management to ensure both the quality of work produced and a timely submission.

You may be expected to attend classes up to 5 days a week, however, where possible classes
will be timetabled in a manner to enable you to maximise your self-directed learning. Study
days typically start at 09:00 and end at 17:00 although it may be required that you attend
outside of these hours. A detailed timetable of study days will be made available during your
induction day on the programme. You should turn up at least five minutes before any teaching
sessions or scheduled events to allow timely execution of the teaching activities by the tutor.
Given the volume of traffic in and surrounding the campus area (as well as on public transport),
students are advised to allow extra time for their journeys should it apply.

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2.5.3 Attendance Requirements

                        You are required to attend all timetabled learning activities for each
                        module.

Absence

Leave of Absence
Exceptional requests for leave of absence must be made to your Academic Advisor by
completing a Notification of Absence form in advance (except in unforeseen circumstances)
of the event (copy attached as appendix 8.2) and submitted to the Programme Director.
Neither the Head of the School of Medicine nor the Programme Director can exempt students
from their obligations except in exceptional circumstances. Unauthorised leave is a
disciplinary matter that may lead to a referral to the Assessment Board. Please note that
absence due to caring for a sick child or relative, or taking them to a medical appointment, is
considered to be Leave of Absence, not sick leave.

Other Absence, e.g. Illness
Notification of absence (including illness) from any part of the course of study or any
examination must be notified to:
Allen Hub
Telephone: 01772 895587
Email: allenhubattendance@uclan.ac.uk

By no later than 09.00hrs on the day in question.

Upon your return to study, you must complete a Notification of Absence form (in appendix
8.2).

Absence through illness for periods longer than five consecutive days must also be supported
by a medical certificate authorised by a medical practitioner and should be submitted to the
Allen Hub Reception.

Self-certification of illness (i.e. without a medical certificate) is NOT valid for:

         •    Absence through illness for more than five consecutive days
         •    Absence from examinations
         •    Self-certification cannot be accepted if submitted more than two weeks following
              the date of illness.

It is important to consult your general practitioner (GP) at the time of sickness, as retrospective
certification is not generally acceptable to Boards of Examiners.

If you have not gained the required authorisation for leave of absence, or do not respond to
communications from the University and if you are absent for two weeks or more, you may be
deemed to have withdrawn from the course. If this is the case, then the date of withdrawal will
be recorded as the last day of attendance.

Attendance at all timetabled sessions on the Preston campus is monitored electronically using
the Student Attendance Monitoring system (SAM) and you can check your attendance record
via myUCLan. Each time you are asked to enter your details on SAM you must remember that
the University has a responsibility to keep information up to date and that you must only

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enter your own details on the system. To enter any other names would result in inaccurate
records and be dishonest. Any student who is found to make false entries can be disciplined
under the student guide to regulations.

If you forget your card or notice that for any reason the electronic scanners do not register
your card you should report to the Allen Hub reception desk (the same day) and complete the
slips available to notify the SAM administrator so that your attendance record can be manually
updated.

For international students, there is a responsibility under the Visas and Immigration (UKVI)
Points Based System (PBS) - you MUST attend your course of study regularly; under PBS,
UCLan is obliged to tell UKVI if you withdraw from a course, defer or suspend your studies, or
if you fail to attend the course regularly.

3. Approaches to teaching and learning

3.1 Learning and teaching methods
A variety of teaching and learning methods are used throughout the course. The primary aim
of each teaching session is to help you achieve the expected learning outcomes. In order to
do so, our course team has specifically designed the learning and teaching activities in these
sessions so that you will be able to develop your knowledge and skills accordingly. Learning
and teaching sessions can take various forms such as lectures, tutorials, practicals, seminars
or group work sessions.

3.2 Study skills
During the first year on the course, the Personal Development Plan module will consist of
tutorial sessions designed to help you adapt to the UK higher education learning and teaching
styles. You will also acquire life-long learning skills such as information gathering and filtering,
evaluation and problem solving. The transition to higher education is a big leap for many
students who have just finished their A levels or other foundation training programmes. We
will provide help and guidance to make sure that you settle in well for your time with us on the
programme. Further onto the programme, you will be expected to adopt a more proactive
approach to your learning with the support from your tutors who will always to be there to
provide guidance. Additionally, UCLan offers a range of services to support study skills
development, which can be found using the following link:

WISER: http://www.uclan.ac.uk/students/study/wiser/index.php

3.3 Learning resources
               3.3.1 Learning Information Services (LIS)
               Extensive resources are available to support your studies provided by LIS –
               library and IT staff. Information technology (IT) is used throughout the course
               to support learning. The online eLearn (Blackboard) platform hosted at the
               university is the main repository of custom made learning materials, lecture

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notes and PowerPoint presentations. eLearn (Blackboard) acts as a gateway to online
resources such as medical journals, professional bodies and selected library resources.

The library resources provide access to up to date books and journals. The library has
extensive opening hours (including 24/7 opening during term time).

LIS school liaison staff provide induction activities for students during the course, such as
searching the scientific literature. They also provide one to one advice to students. Take
advantage of the free training sessions designed to enable you to gain all the skills you need
for your research and study.

3.3.2 Electronic Resources
LIS provide access to a huge range of electronic resources – e-journals and databases,
e-books, images and texts.

We have invested in a significant portfolio of e-books and e-journal available through EBSCO
to provide full-text coverage of over 260 journals in the fields of medicine and dentistry.
Guidance on how to use this service will be given during your induction session.

The school manages its e-learning environment proactively to provide a constant up to date
repository of course material. eLearn (Blackboard) gives access to lecture and practical
resources, handbooks, video recordings of lectures and timetables. It acts as a one-stop-shop
for information about the course and a site for students to interact.

3.4 Personal development planning
Personal Development Planning (PDP) is:

    •    Reflection on learning, performance, and achievement.
    •    Planning for personal, educational, and career development.

PDP involves review and reflection of academic study, together with the exploration of extra-
curricular activities and career planning. It results in an understanding and ownership of
learning. PDP will be incorporated within the Medical Sciences Programme design. Students
will be given ample opportunity for reflection on learning, performance and achievement and
for planning for personal, educational and career development.

PDP will be located within the curriculum, which is translated into teaching and learning
activities. The modules will include learning activities which will allow for planning, goal setting,
recording, reflection and evaluation through a range of activities. PDP activities will be
encouraged and monitored by tutors during various tutorials, individual assignment, and group
work and project activities contained within and outside the modules. Meetings will be
arranged each semester with designated tutors.

Since learning is a lifelong process the work in PDP is not assessed. There are many
similarities to work-based learning, and Continued Professional Development (CPD) - which
is required for membership of professional societies. The skills developed in PDP form key

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components of employability; such as self-reflection, recording, target setting, action planning
and monitoring.

3.5 Preparing for your career
                During the time on the course, you will continuously be developing your
                scientific and personal calibre through teaching sessions as well as from the
                training provided in the PDP sessions. Starting from your second year, your
                programme lead and academic advisors will focus on how to assist you
                personally to achieve your goals by helping you analyse your strengths and
                weaknesses. Tutors will also help you review how you apply your
understanding of both your quality and requirements set by the institutions you wish to either
study or seek employment from, whether it is for entry onto graduate entry medicine, dentistry,
physician associate and other professional study programmes, further research-based study
or career opportunities. Advice will also be provided with regard to where to find further
information on your chosen pathway.

Relevant PDP tutors will offer bespoke one-to-one support to students based upon their
choices of career pathways, their academic performance and capacity and their commitment
to study. This may include support in gaining appropriate requirements for applications to
professional healthcare courses; such as graduate entry medicine. Please note that
progression onto professional healthcare courses requires a high level of academic
achievement, and students will only be encouraged to take on extracurricular work if they have
demonstrated both the capability and commitment to do this.

4. Student Support
At the start of the course you will be allocated an Academic Advisor who will, where possible,
continue in that role throughout the three years. S/he will help to monitor and aid your
development as you progress through your training and can be a point of first contact for any
queries that may arise. All Academic Advisors undergo training to prepare them for the role,
and are likely to undertake this role for a number of students.

A wide range of support is available to all students. In the first instance students may wish to
contact their Academic Advisor, or alternatively the Pastoral Tutor or the Student Support
Lead for Medical Sciences BSc.

The  is a central Student Information Centre and your first point of contact. You can obtain
information on a wide range of topics including Council Tax Exemption Certificates, Bank and
Confirmation of Study Letters, Printing and Printer Credit, UCLan Cards and the  shop.
Staff in the Allen Hub can also help to direct and advise you on matters specific to your
programme of study.

Pastoral Tutor

The school has a Pastoral Tutor who will be able to give advice on a wide range of non-
academic issues which you feel may be impacting on your studies or which you would like
help with. They will be able to provide a confidential listening service and guidance in a number

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of areas. You are able to arrange a meeting with the Pastoral Tutor yourself at any time, but
you may also be guided to make an appointment by your Academic Advisor if they think you
are struggling, or having problems which may be impacting on your studies. Any information
that you share with the Pastoral Tutor will not be shared with other staff without your
knowledge and in most cases your consent. Information will only be shared without your
consent if it is felt that your safety or the safety of others would be at risk if it were not. The
Pastoral Tutor is not involved in your assessment or in making decisions about whether or not
you may progress in the course. If you are applying for extenuating circumstances the Pastoral
Tutor is there to support you through the process.

4.1 Academic Advisors
             Academic Advisors will provide support and advice in the following areas:

                   •        Making the transition to different methods of teaching and learning
                   •        Academic progress
                   •        Assessments
                   •        Study skills

Academic advisor meetings will be scheduled throughout the academic year but you can
always approach your academic advisor whenever you wish to receive help from them.
Scheduled meetings last for approximately 15 to 20 minutes. All the matters discussed will be
documented and if any needs are identified, your academic advisor will work with you to
synthesis solutions. Students are expected to complete the relevant progressions forms
before scheduled meetings and be prepared to discuss the content with their Academic
Advisor.

4.2 Students with disabilities
If you have a disability that may affect your studies, please either contact the Disability
Advisory Service - disability@uclan.ac.uk or let your Academic Advisor or the Pastoral Tutor
know as soon as possible. The University will make reasonable adjustments to accommodate
your needs and to provide appropriate support for you to complete your studies successfully.
Where necessary, you will be asked for evidence to help identify appropriate adjustments.

Should you need any advice regarding our processes, or have any issues relating to a
disability or specific learning difficulty, then please contact the School of Medicine Equality
and Diversity Lead / Disability Coordinator, Dr Katy Wareing - kwareing2@uclan.ac.uk for
further advice and support.

4.3 Students’ Union
The Students’ Union offers thousands of volunteering opportunities ranging from
representative to other leadership roles. We also advertise paid work and employ student staff
on a variety of roles. You can find out more information on our website:
http://www.uclansu.co.uk/.

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5. Assessment
                   All our assessments are based on both the teaching materials delivered and
                   extra reading or learning activities as indicated by your tutors. We take a
                   blended assessment approach so that you will be performing various
                   activities in parallel to sitting unseen exams. These assessment activities
                   include poster and oral presentations, coursework submissions and
                   objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE). The School of Medicine
                   uses a computer-based written examination format (Maxexam ®) and we
have a designated examinations officer looking after the arrangement and quality assurance
of all the assessments carried out in the School. Please note that all modules will be assessed.
You are expected to attempt all required assessments for each module for which you are
registered, and to do so at the times scheduled unless authorised extensions, special
arrangements for disability, or extenuating circumstances allow you to defer your assessment.
For further details about assessment please refer to the Student Guide to Assessment which
will be given to you when you commence the programme and will be available via Blackboard.
You may also wish to refer to the University Regulations relating to assessment.

5.1 Assessment Strategy
All assessment (examination and coursework submissions) is looked after by the School’s
Board of Assessment and its sub-committee chaired by the Head of School and the Professor
of Medical Education, respectively. We encourage blended assessments using a variety of
assessment methods to ensure that the learning outcomes are evaluated appropriately and
accurately.

There are two types of assessments which serve different purposes in the learning and
teaching environment:

Formative assessments are for your feedback only and allow you to gauge your own
progress through the programme. These will be detailed within the individual module
handbooks.

Summative assessments are either graded or recorded as “pass / fail” and must be
completed successfully for you to progress through the course.

There is a strong emphasis on student feedback, which we encourage students to review
and reflect on in order to continue to develop key transferrable skills.

5.2 Notification of assignments and examination arrangements
Notifications for assessments and coursework submission will be announced via Blackboard
and by notification from the module leads. However, we strongly suggest you keep a record
of all the assessment and coursework submission dates and keep them updated if necessary.

Course work is submitted electronically to enable it to be checked through various processes
to ensure that it is a piece of original work. You will be given advice on how to do this. Feedback
on the work is also given electronically within a timescale of 15 working days. Word counts
specified for a particular assignment are to be taken at +/- 10%.

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5.3 Referencing
For all written essays, assignments and for research reports you will be expected to reference
correctly. The main purposes of referencing are as follows:

•   Acknowledge the sources of information that you have used

•   Indicate to the reader the range and scope of your literature review

•   Enable the reader to find the sources easily and quickly

For all assignments we will expect you to use the referencing system under which the author
and date of publication appear in brackets in the body of the text and a reference list at the
end of the document contains all of the journals, books, etc. that are referenced in the text.
The format of this reference list should be the same as that used by the subset of Harvard
referencing; American Psychological Association (APA) 6th Edition -

http://www.files.ithuta.net/OpenJournals/SAJIP/Authors/APA%20reference%20style%20guid
e.pdf

Further details on the use of referencing, and the avoidance of plagiarism, will be provided
during the course and further details can be found on the student services webpages so please
do familiarise yourselves with this information.

5.4 Confidential material
Please remember your ethical, professional and legal responsibilities to respect confidentiality
and maintain the anonymity of individuals and organisations within any assignments
submitted. It is especially important that you ensure that any volunteer or patient data is
anonymised or removed from all work submitted as part of your taught programme.

5.5 Cheating, plagiarism, collusion or re-presentation
Please refer to the information included in section 6.6 of the University Student Handbook for
full definitions. The University uses an online Assessment Tool called Turnitin. A pseudo-
Turnitin assignment will be set up using the School space on Blackboard to allow students to
check as many drafts as the system allows before their final submission to the ‘official’ Turnitin
assignment. Students are required to self-submit their own assignment on Turnitin and will
be given access to the Originality Reports arising from each submission. In operating Turnitin,
Schools must take steps to ensure that the University’s requirement for all summative
assessment to be marked anonymously is not undermined and therefore Turnitin reports
should either be anonymised or considered separately from marking. Turnitin may also be
used to assist with plagiarism detection and collusion, where there is suspicion about
individual piece(s) of work.

You are required to sign a declaration indicating that individual work submitted for an
assessment is your own.

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If you attempt to influence the standard of the award you obtain through cheating, plagiarism
or collusion, it will be considered as a serious academic and disciplinary offence as described
within the Academic Regulations and the Assessment Handbook .

    •    Cheating is any deliberate attempt to deceive and covers a range of offences described
         in the Assessment Handbook.

    •    Plagiarism describes copying from the works of another person without suitably
         attributing the published or unpublished works of others. This means that all quotes,
         ideas, opinions, music and images should be acknowledged and referenced within
         your assignments.

    •    Collusion is an attempt to deceive the examiners by disguising the true authorship of
         an assignment by copying, or imitating in close detail another student’s work - this
         includes with the other student’s consent and also when 2 or more students divide the
         elements of an assignment amongst themselves and copy one another’s answers. It
         does not include the normal situation in which you learn from your peers and share
         ideas, as this generates the knowledge and understanding necessary for each
         individual to independently undertake an assignment; nor should it be confused with
         group work on an assignment which is specifically authorised in the assignment brief.

    •    Re-presentation is an attempt to gain credit twice for the same piece of work.

The process of investigation and penalties which will be applied can be reviewed in the
Assessment Handbook. If an allegation is found to be proven then the appropriate penalty will
be implemented:

Contact the Students’ Union Advice and Representation Centre by emailing:
suadvice@uclan.ac.uk for support and guidance.
6. Classification of Awards
The University publishes the principles underpinning the way in which awards and results are
decided in Academic Regulations. Decisions about the overall classification of awards are
made by Assessment Boards through the application of the academic and relevant course
regulations.

7. Student Feedback
               You can play an important part in the process of improving the quality of this
               course through the feedback you give.

                In addition to the on-going discussion with the course team throughout the
                year, there are a range of mechanisms for you to feedback about your
                experience of teaching and learning. We aim to respond to your comments
and let you know of our plans for improvement. Students may wish to raise feedback with their
course representative to feed into the staff-student liaison committee (SSLC), by completing
mid- and end-semester surveys as well as completing the end of year Module Feedback
Questionnaires.

Past student feedback on the desirability for clinical sessions with live patients, e-journal
provision and improvements to material on blackboard have all resulted in actions that have
improved these features of our courses.

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7.1 Student Staff Liaison Committee meetings (SSLCs)
Details of the Protocol for the operation of SSLCs is included in section 8.2 of the University
Student Handbook.

SSLCs are attended by course representatives and the School of Medicine President. The
meetings are held on a regular basis and organised through the Allen Hub.

Course Representative
A course representative is a student who represents their fellow students’ views and opinions
to the course team, school, university and students’ union. Course representatives work
proactively and diplomatically to improve the academic and non-academic experiences of
students.

The role of a course representative is extremely beneficial to both students on your course
and the university. It enables students to have ownership of their student experience and voice
their opinions and share positive practice with the course team, primarily through the Student
Staff Liaison Committee Meetings (see below).

Course representatives will be elected every year. Alongside receiving recognition, support
and respect, being a course representative is a great opportunity to enhance your
employability skills. If you are interested in becoming a course representative and wish to find
out more about the role visit the Students’ Union website or email: coursereps@uclan.ac.uk.

School President

School Presidents meanwhile are annually elected representatives who voice the opinions of
students within each school. They communicate and engage with students in their school to
gain feedback and work in partnership with senior management to create positive change.
They are also trained to support and signpost course representatives where needed. If you
wish to know who your School President is or find out more about the role, please visit the
Students’ Union website or email: coursereps@uclan.ac.uk

The purpose of a SSLC meeting is to provide the opportunity for course representatives to
feedback to staff about the course, the overall student experience, and to inform developments
which will improve future courses.

The course team encourage student feedback in all areas and recognise that additional items
for discussion may also be raised at the meeting, such as:

    •    Update on actions completed since the last meeting
    •    Feedback about the previous year – discussion of external examiner’s report;
         outcomes of National / UCLan student surveys
    •    Review of enrolment / induction experience
    •    Course organisation and management (from each individual year group, and the
         course overall)
    •    Experience of modules - teaching, assessment, feedback
    •    Experience of academic support which may include e.g. Personal Development
         Planning, academic advisor arrangements
    •    Other aspects of University life relevant to student experience e.g. learning resources,
         IT, library
    •    Any other issues raised by students or staff

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The actions from these meetings will be addressed by the course team, or passed onto
appropriate bodies for consideration (e.g. the Library & Information Service, and Facilities
Management). SSLCs will also consider External Examiner reports and any staff issues that
may relate to the student body.

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8. Appendices

8.1 Programme Specification(s)

8.1.a Medical Sciences BSc (Hons)

                               UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL LANCASHIRE

                                      Programme Specification

 This Programme Specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme
 and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and
 demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided.

 Sources of information on the programme can be found in Section 17

     1. Awarding Institution / Body        University of Central Lancashire

     2. Teaching Institution               University of Central Lancashire, Preston campus
                                           Westlakes campus and Burnley campus
                                           Runshaw College (Foundation Entry year only)
     3. University                         School of Medicine
        Department/Centre

     4. External Accreditation

     5. Title of Final Award               BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences

     6. Modes of Attendance offered        Full-time

     7. a UCAS Code                        2G75

        b JACS Code                        A900 – Others in medicine & dentistry

     8. Subject Benchmarking               Biomedical science
        Group                              http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance
                                           /Pages/Subject-benchmark-statement-Biomedical-
                                           science.aspx
     9. Other external influences          None

     10. Date of production/revision       May 2017, July 2017, September 2018
         of this form

     11. Aims of the Programme

 •    To produce resourceful, competent, clear-thinking graduates with professional knowledge,
      practical skills and experience in medical sciences relevant to medicine, dentistry, healthcare
      professions and industry.

 •    To develop skills in the areas of clinical and scientific research, clinical communication, use of
      IT and computer based tools, problem solving and lifelong transferable skills.

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•    To direct students to acquire knowledge and understanding of medical sciences and clinical
      skills within the context of medicine, dentistry and healthcare professions at a level appropriate
      BSc Honours level.

     12. Learning Outcomes, Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

 A. Knowledge and Understanding

 Students will be able to

     A1. integrate knowledge from core subjects, such as medical science topics, clinical skills and
         communications and research skills for the synthesis of solutions for problems
     A2. evaluate the impacts of the design and use of pharmaceutics for the treatment of
         pathophysiological conditions
     A3. demonstrate the proficiency in essential clinical skills and basic understanding of various
         aspects of healthcare provision for effective communications with patients
     A4. conduct laboratory-based work safely following health and safety guidelines
     A5. describe the contribution of scientific research to advances in medical practice, recognising
         current limitations and the impact of healthcare sciences on public health services
     A6. explain the foundations of scientific topics, including the structure and function of cells,
        tissues and organ systems in health and disease and the role of biomolecules and
        biochemical mechanisms (foundation entry only)
     A7. demonstrate English language proficiency skills and communicate accurately and succinctly
        using appropriate medical and scientific terminology (foundation entry only)

 Teaching and Learning Methods
 These include lectures, seminars, debates, assignments, projects, case studies, presentations and
 clinical practical experience. Online resources are used through Blackboard and WileyPlus to
 support and enrich learning. For some subjects staff produce study booklets.

 Assessment methods
 Unseen examinations, assignments, project reports, oral and poster presentations, and objective-
 structured clinical examination (OSCE)

 B. Subject-specific skills
 Students will be able to
    B1. apply knowledge of core subjects to clinical practice and scientific advancement relating to
        medicine, dentistry and other healthcare-related professions
    B2. plan, develop, manage, evaluate and prioritise tasks and projects
    B3. synthesis of solutions for problems using appropriate intellectual, technical and clinical
        knowledge and skills
     B4. comprehend their role in the contribution to the well-being of the public and take parts in
         assisting such proceedings
     B5. summarise and analyse scientific results and critically interpret data (foundation entry only)

 Teaching and Learning Methods
 The teaching and learning methods will include lectures, group tutorials, debates, student centred
 learning, on-line resources, laboratory practicals, clinical practical experience

 Assessment methods
 These will include reports, presentations, case studies and assignments and examinations.

 C. Thinking Skills
 Students will be able to:

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C1. apply knowledge skills and competences to hypothesis testing and systematic analysis
     C2. formulate and produce creative and innovative technical solutions to problems by applying
         principles in core subjects
     C3. reflect on applications of medical sciences to the advancement of clinical medicine, dentistry
         and healthcare-related professions
     C4. evaluate alternative solutions to clinical practice
     C5. integrate contemporary topics in medical sciences to the healthcare and industrial settings
     C6. process and interpret scientific data and demonstrate confidence with related numerical
         skills (foundation entry only)

 Teaching and Learning Methods
 The teaching and learning methods will include formal lectures, seminars, student centred learning,
 and clinical practical activities. Analytical aspects of medical sciences and their applications to
 healthcare provision will also be developed. Thinking skills are developed throughout all modules.
 Students will develop these skills through a combination of review, reflection and coursework.

 Assessment methods
 These will include reports, presentations, case studies, assignments and formal examinations.

 D. Other skills relevant to employability and personal development
 Transferable Skills/Key Skills
      Students will be able to:
      D1. communicate ideas accurately, persuasively and succinctly in writing, orally and in a
          variety of media;
      D2. work independently on processes associated with medical developments and
          demonstrate a high level of professional and ethical conduct;
      D3. perform effectively in a team, and identify team characteristics;
      D4. locate and critically use information from a variety of sources;
      D5. manage resources and time effectively.
      D6. Undertake personal development planning towards autonomous learning (foundation
          entry only)

 Teaching and Learning Methods
     The teaching and learning method will include lectures, seminars, student centred learning,
     workshops and clinical practical activities. Analytical aspects will also be developed. Academic
     advisor and PDP sessions with be the mainstay of personal development, goal setting and
     employability as students transition into the undergraduate programme and in the later years
     through the BSc tutorial programme.

 Assessment methods
 These will include reports, presentations, case studies, assignments and examinations.

 Medical Sciences BSc (Hons) Programme Structure                          Awards and Credits

 Level        Module        Module Title                       Credit
              Code                                             rating
 6            XY3240        Research Project                      30      BSc (Hons) Medical
                                                                          Sciences
              XY3280        Medical Pharmacology and              30
                                                                          Requires 360 credits
                            Therapeutics
                                                                          including a minimum of 220
              XY3120        Molecular Medicine                    30
                                                                          at level 5 or above including
              XY3290        Neuroscience                          30      100 at level 6

                                                                          BSc Medical Sciences

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