Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia

 
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan
                         2014 - 2017

Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Document Control Page

Document Information

                                                        Information
TRIM File Number                                        04/02/04
Document Owner                                          Andrew Millen
Last Update                                             June 2014

Document History

Version                            Issue Date                           Changes
0.1                                December 2013                        Draft
0.2                                February 2014                        Final Draft
0.3                                March 2014                           Final Draft Plan to CMT & Forum
1.0                                June 2014                            Council Approved

Document Approvals

Role                                                    Name
Document Owner                                          Andrew Millen
Manager                                                 Andrew Millen
General Manager                                         Garry Healy
Adopted by Council                                      June 2014

          Mildura Rural City Council               ii
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
CONTENTS

Domestic animal management plans .................................................................................. - 1 -
      68A     Councils to prepare domestic animal management plans ............................... - 1 -
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. - 2 -
1.0 ..... TRAINING OF AUTHORISED OFFICERS .............................................................. - 5 -
  1.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................... - 5 -
  1.2      Our Future Plans .................................................................................................. - 6 -
2.0 ..... REGISTRATION AND IDENTIFICATION ............................................................... - 7 -
  2.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................... - 7 -
  2.2      State Government Acts, Council Local Laws, Policies and Procedures ............. - 11 -
  2.3      Our Current Education / Promotion Activities ..................................................... - 11 -
  2.4      Our current Compliance Activities ...................................................................... - 12 -
  2.5      Summary ............................................................................................................ - 12 -
  2.6      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 12 -
3.0 ..... NUISANCE DOGS AND CATS ............................................................................. - 14 -
  3.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................. - 14 -
  3.2. Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures .................... - 17 -
  3.3      Our current Education/Promotion Activities ........................................................ - 18 -
  3.4      Our current Compliance Activities ...................................................................... - 19 -
  3.5      Summary ............................................................................................................ - 19 -
  3.6      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 20 -
4.0 ..... DOG ATTACKS ..................................................................................................... - 21 -
  4.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................. - 21 -
  4.2      Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures .................... - 22 -
  4.3      Our current Education/Promotion Activities ........................................................ - 23 -
  4.4      Our current Compliance Activities ...................................................................... - 23 -
  4.5      Summary ............................................................................................................ - 23 -
  4.6      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 24 -
5.0 ..... DANGEROUS, MENACING AND RESTRICTED BREED DOGS......................... - 25 -
  5.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................. - 25 -
  5.2      Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures .................... - 25 -
  5.3      Our current Education/Promotion Activities ........................................................ - 29 -
  5.4      Our current Compliance Activities ...................................................................... - 29 -
  5.5      Summary ............................................................................................................ - 29 -
  5.6      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 30 -
6.0 ..... OVERPOPULATION AND HIGH EUTHANASIA ................................................... - 31 -
  6.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................. - 31 -
  6.2      Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures .................... - 33 -
  6.3      Our current Education/Promotion Activities ........................................................ - 35 -
  6.4      Our current Compliance Activities ...................................................................... - 35 -
  6.5      Summary ............................................................................................................ - 35 -
  6.6      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 36 -
7.0 ..... DOMESTIC ANIMAL BUSINESSES ..................................................................... - 38 -
  7.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................. - 38 -
  7.2      Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures .................... - 38 -
  7.3      Our current Education/Promotion Activities ........................................................ - 38 -
  7.4      Our current Compliance Activities ...................................................................... - 38 -
  7.5      Summary ............................................................................................................ - 39 -
  7.6      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 39 -
8.0 ..... OTHER MATTERS ................................................................................................ - 40 -
  8.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data .................................................................. - 40 -
  8.2      Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures .................... - 40 -
  8.3      Our current Education/Promotion Activities ........................................................ - 41 -
  8.4      Our current Compliance Activities ...................................................................... - 41 -

                                                                   i
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

  8.5      Summary ............................................................................................................ - 42 -
  8.6      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 42 -
9.0 ..... ANNUAL REVIEW OF PLAN AND ANNUAL REPORTING .................................. - 43 -
  9.1      Our Plans ............................................................................................................ - 43 -

     Mildura Rural City Council                                    ii
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic animal management plans

Under Section 68A of the Domestic Animals Act, every Council must prepare a domestic
animal management plan, as follows:
   68A Councils to prepare domestic animal management plans
         (1) Every Council must, in consultation with the Secretary (of the Department of
             Environment and Primary Industries), prepare at 4 year intervals a domestic
             animal management plan.
         (2) A domestic animal management plan prepared by a Council must—
              (a) set out a method for evaluating whether the animal control services
                   provided by the Council in its municipal district are adequate to give effect
                   to the requirements of this Act and the regulations; and
              (b) Outline programs for the training of authorised officers to ensure that they
                   can properly administer and enforce the requirements of this Act in the
                   Council's municipal district; and
              (c) Outline programs, services and strategies which the Council intends to
                   pursue in its municipal district—
                       (i) to promote and encourage the responsible ownership of dogs and
                           cats; and
                      (ii) to ensure that people comply with this Act, the regulations and any
                           related legislation; and
                     (iii) to minimise the risk of attacks by dogs on people and animals; and
                     (iv) to address any over-population and high euthanasia rates for dogs
                           and cats; and
                      (v) to encourage the registration and identification of dogs and cats; and
                     (vi) to minimise the potential for dogs and cats to create a nuisance; and
                    (vii) to effectively identify all dangerous dogs, menacing dogs and
                           restricted breed dogs in that district and to ensure that those dogs
                           are kept in compliance with this Act and the regulations; and
              (d) Provide for the review of existing orders made under this Act and local
                   laws that relate to the Council's municipal district with a view to
                   determining whether further orders or local laws dealing with the
                   management of dogs and cats in the municipal district are desirable; and
              (e) Provide for the review of any other matters related to the management of
                   dogs and cats in the Council's municipal district that it thinks necessary;
                   and
               (f) Provide for the periodic evaluation of any program, service, strategy or
                   review outlined under the plan.
         (3) Every Council must—
              (a) Review its domestic animal management plan annually and, if
                   appropriate, amend the plan; and
              (b) Provide the Secretary with a copy of the plan and any amendments to the
                   plan; and
              (c) Publish an evaluation of its implementation of the plan in its annual report.

                                              ‐1‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

INTRODUCTION
Location of Mildura Rural City Council and Population Information:

                                                   Average annual population growth rate 2011 to
                                                                      2031

    Local Government Area
    Location: 500 km north-west of
    Melbourne
    Area (2011): 22,330 km2
    Pop. Density (2011): 2.5 person’s per
    km2
    Major Centres: Mildura; Red Cliffs;
    Merbein; Ouyen

Mildura Rural City Council (Council) is located in the far North-West of the state and is
approximately 543 km from Melbourne/Victoria with its borders comprising of Swan Hill Rural
City Council, West Wimmera, Hindmarsh, Yarriambiack and Buloke local government areas.

Mildura is located at the junction of three states – Victoria, New South Wales and South
Australia. Council area covers approximately 10% of the state of Victoria and, as at 9th
August 2011 has a population of approximately 50,9791. The population is expected to
continue to grow into the future, at an estimated 0.8%2 per annum, estimated to reach
64,2883 by 2031.

This document will guide domestic animal management by the Council for the next three
years (2014-2017). The Plan identifies strategies and actions to implement the vision, aims
and objectives for animal management and contains recommendations for a wide range of
actions to be undertaken by the Council in a programmed approach during this time. These
actions will enable Council to maintain a balance between the competing interests of animal
management and to accommodate new requirements.

Council provides services that maximise the social, economic and environmental benefits to
the people of Mildura’s Municipality. Animal management has become more diverse and
demanding due to the introduction of various Acts and Orders. Knowledge of both human
and animal behaviour is a must for those working in this field. There is growing recognition
that enforcement of laws will not, on its own, result in lasting, voluntary changes in
behaviours and needs to be supplemented by a range of non-regulatory approaches such as
public education.

1
  Australian Bureau of Statistics - census 2011 (Mildura {RC}, Vic, Local Government Area)
2
  Department of Planning and Community Development, Victoria in Future (2012)
3
  Department of Planning and Community Development, Victoria in Future (2012)

      Mildura Rural City Council                ‐2‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

There is now considerable evidence to support our understanding of the benefits from
owning pets. This implies a potential new role for Council in harnessing the benefits of animal
and pet ownership or at least maintaining the ability of the community to continue to own
animals or pets. In this environment, it is essential that Council take a strategic approach to
managing animals and pets in its community.

This Plan will provide Council with a sound basis and direction from which it can plan, co-
ordinate and make future decisions to meet the needs of the community for the years to
come.

Every year the Council Local Laws department receives approximately 1800 - 1900 requests
relating to animal control and management issues. The majority of requests are comprised
of:
     dogs at large/roaming
     barking dogs
     stray cats
     animal welfare issues
     dogs rushing and attacking.

Pets are widely recognised for their physical and mental health benefits, their positive impact
in the development of children’s social skills and self esteem, and their importance as
companions for single individuals and the aged. Along with the positive impact that animals
have on humans, there are accompanying challenges such as:
     noise and nuisance behaviour
     aggression, and
     the problem of stray or unwanted animals.

Traditionally, pet owners in rural areas of our municipality do not seem to find animals at
large or roaming an issue. Council recognises the need to look at ways of changing this
thinking so as to reduce the occurrence of attacks on people, animals and livestock.

The purpose of the Domestic Animal Management Plan is to describe the current situation in
terms of:
     data and context
     rules, regulations, laws and policies
     education and promotional activities
     compliance and
     future plans.

The Domestic Animal Management Plan focuses on key animal management practices
within our municipality which includes:
     registration and identification of domestic animals
     nuisance animals
     dog attacks
     dangerous, menacing or restricted breeds
     overpopulation and euthanasia
     a review of:
           o domestic animal businesses within our municipality
           o training and development of our local laws officers
           o future reviews of the Domestic Animal Management Plan.

   Mildura Rural City Council                ‐3‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

The process that has been applied in developing the Animal Management Plan involves
several steps:
           1. The development of the Draft Animal Management Plan
           2. The community is asked to comment and/or make submission on the draft
               plan:
                    comments and submissions will be open for a period of one month
                    the draft plan will be available in hard copy from each of Council’s
                      Customer Service Centres/Public Libraries and Council Website
           3. The community submissions that have been received are complied and
               considered
           4. Draft Animal Management Plan is sent to Council for adoption

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

                                 Chief Executive Officer
                                 MILDURA RURAL CITY
                                        COUNCIL

                                   DEVELOPMENT
                                SERVICES DEPARTMENT

                                      MANAGER
                                DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

                                     LOCAL LAWS
                                DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

X1 – LOCAL LAW CO-              X6 - LOCAL LAW OFFICERS             X1 - POUND SUPERVISOR
    ORDINATOR

   Mildura Rural City Council             ‐4‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

1.0      TRAINING OF AUTHORISED OFFICERS

Domestic Animals Act 1994, Section 68(A)(2)(b) Outlines programs for the training of
authorised officers to ensure that they can properly administer and enforce the requirements
of this Act in the Council's municipal district

1.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data

Mildura Rural City Council has eight (8) authorised Local Laws Officers that cover an area of
22,330 square kilometres.

As of June 2013 there were the following registered within our municipality:
     7135 dogs
     1261 cats
     One (1) Council Pound
     Five (5) registered domestic animal businesses consisting of:
           o two (2) Pet Shops
           o three (3) Boarding Kennels.

Training
A variety of training is offered and provided for all Council Authorised Officers; training
options are reviewed annually to ensure they are relevant and up to date.

Training options include:
     animal handling courses
     Certificates 2, 3 and 4 in Local Government
     investigation and statement taking courses
     prosecution courses
     information technology courses and industry related seminars
     conferences and briefings from:
           o the Department of Environment and Primary Industries
           o Australian Institute of Animal Management Inc (AIAM)
           o Warner Institute of Business and
           o other relevant Associations.

All Council Local Laws Officers have or are in the process of obtaining:
     Certificate III and IV in Local Government
     Certificate IV Statutory Compliance & Animal Control Program
     Continuous on the job training.

Annual performance reviews help to identify any skills and training gaps which are used to
plan future skills development.

      Mildura Rural City Council             ‐5‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014 2017 - Making this the most liveable, people friendly community in Australia
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

1.2        Our Future Plans

Objective 1: Maintain a detailed training register for individual officers.

Activity                                 When              Evaluation

A training register has been created     Personal          Annually reviewed to ensure
to record each officer‘s name,           Development       accuracy and to determine whether
completed training and additional        Plan (PDP) in     proposed training goals have been
training opportunities                   place at the      met for each officer
                                         start of
                                         employment

Objective 2: Ensure all authorised officers have completed their minimum training
             requirements within the first 12 months of commencing employment.

Activity                                 When              Evaluation

Identify minimum training                Start of          Progress is checked within the first
requirements for Local Law Officers      employment        six months of employment and
and document in individual Personal                        again at the twelve month interval.
Development Plans. Ensure that Cert
II in Local Government is completed
within the first 12 months of
employment.

Objective 3: Offer additional training opportunities for all Local Law Officer’s.

Activity                                 When              Evaluation

Identify additional training             Ongoing (as       Quarterly and annually reviewed as
opportunities e.g. prosecutions          training          part of ongoing performance review
training, conflict management, time      comes             by Local Law’s Coordinator
management, Investigation and Case       available)
management training                      Personal
                                         Development
                                         Plan currently
                                         in place

      Mildura Rural City Council              ‐6‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

2.0       REGISTRATION AND IDENTIFICATION

Domestic Animals Act 1994, Section 68A(2)(c)(v) Outlines            programs,  services   and
strategies to encourage the registration and identification of dogs and cats. Other applicable
sections of the Act would include Sections 68A(2)(a),(c)(i),(c)(ii),(d),(f).

2.1       Current Situation / Our Current Data

Responsible pet ownership begins from the moment a new animal is purchased or picked up.
When choosing a family pet, think carefully about the breed or type that will best suit your
family circumstances and your ability to give it the proper care it deserves. The basic care
requirements would include allocation of time for training, exercising and playing with your
pet on a weekly basis. A happy, healthy pet will be less likely to incur bad behaviours and
thus less likely to cause issues or problems. These first steps are a good start to helping you
meet your legal obligations as a pet owner.

Currently Council promotes responsible dog and cat ownership through the:-

         Enforcement of legal requirements like identification and registration
         Education of pet owners about:
              o animal welfare issues which include food, water, shelter, exercise, disease
                 prevention and parasite control
              o community issues which include roaming, nuisance, noise, faeces disposal
                 and environmental damage caused by dogs
         Promotion of desexing through reduced registration costs
         Programs and initiatives communicated to residents via letters and information packs,
          through Councils web page and in the Councils monthly ‘community matters’
          newsletter.

Current Objective:
Maximise the number of registered and identified domestic animals (pets) within our
municipality.

This objective is currently being achieved through a number of key initiatives which include:

Microchipping

All dogs and cats must be microchipped pursuant to the Domestic Animals Act 1994 prior to
registration. It is important to understand that:
     Microchipping does not replace the requirement of pet owners to register their pet
        with Council
     Residents are responsible for updating their contact details if they move or
        circumstances change.

Microchipping is a painless, once off procedure performed by a vet. A permanent microchip
is implanted into the loose skin (scruff) of a dog or cat’s neck providing the ability to identify
the pet and locate the owners through the updated contact details obtained when the
microchip is scanned.

On the 1st of May 2007 it became a mandatory requirement to microchip pets when
registering with Council. Veterinary exemptions may be obtained in exceptional
circumstances such as health.

      Mildura Rural City Council               ‐7‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Registration and Discounts

It is an offence under the Domestic Animals Act 1994, for a dog or cat not to be registered
within your local Council. From the age of three months, a pet owner must register their dog
or cat by the 10 of April each year. Council undertakes random registration door knocks on
an annual basis through the municipality to ensure compliance with current legislation.

The purpose of registration includes:
    encouraging responsible dog and cat management
    allowing lost dogs and cats to be reunited with their owners
    providing proof of ownership.

Discounted registration prices apply to:
    pensioner entire (non desexed) dog and cat
    desexed dog and cat
    pensioner desexed dog and cat.

Trend analysis shows that domestic animals generally end up at the Pound due to out of
date owner contact details. Once domestic animals arrive at the Pound, they are placed on
Councils Lost Animal web page. If the animal owners come forward, there are mandatory
regulations that need to be followed before the dogs and cats can be released from the
pound which includes:
    updating the owners contact details
    the dog or cat must be microchipped and registered with Council.

Council recommends that pet owners update their contact details with Council on an annual
basis through Council’s customer service department (03) 5018 8100.

Identification Tags

When registering your dog or cat, pet owners will receive animal ID tags to place on their
animal’s collar for identification purposes. Animal ID tags hold important owner contact
details that help Council to make contact with owners of lost pets quickly which saves:
    pets from the additional trauma of being placed in Councils pound for lengthy periods
        of time and
    pet owners the additional cost incurred from:
                      o        daily housing fees and
                      o        release fees

It is an offence under the Domestic Animals Act 1994, for a dog or cat not to wear a current
Council issued registration tag. To assist residents, Council offers a free service to replace
registration tags if they become unreadable (pet owners are responsible for the readability of
pet tags) or are lost.

For further information, please contact Council Customer Service on (03) 5018 8100.

   Mildura Rural City Council                ‐8‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Current Trends

DOGS - 1ST JULY 2012 TO 30TH JUNE 2013.

                                                                              CLAIMED
SPECIES REGISTERED DECLARED IMPOUNDED                                           BY    REHOUSED                      EUTHANASED
                                                                              OWNERS
  Dog                7135                   7                  938                  310               551                89

                                    Trend Analysis 2009/10 to 2012/13
                                                 DOGS

        8000
                       35
                     71
                    42
                  65

        7000
        6000
        5000
        4000
    #

        3000
        2000
                                                         93

                                                        8
                                                       10

                                                      93

                                                                                                  1
                                                                                                55
        1000
                                                                                0

                                                                                            8
                                                                          7

                                                                                                               5
                                                                              31

                                                                                          27
                                                                        24

                                                                                                             19

                                                                                                                    89
                                     7

                                           7

            0
                  Registered         Declared        Impounded*         Return to         Rehoused          Euthanased
                                                                         Owners
                                                                 Year

                                                      2009/2010        2012/2013

* Impounded data covers registration years which are from April to the end of March each year.
** All other data covers financial year data which includes the 1st of July to the end of June the following year

From financial year 2009/2010 to 2012/13:
    Registrations have increased by 9%
    The number of declared dangerous dogs have remained the same
    Impounds have dropped by 15%
    Return to Owners have increased by 26%
    Rehoused dogs has improved by 98%
    Euthanasia’s have dropped by 119%

     Mildura Rural City Council                            ‐9‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

CATS - JULY 2012 TO JUNE 2013.

                                                                CLAIMED
 SPECIES         REGISTERED             IMPOUNDED                 BY               REHOUSED EUTHANASED
                                                                OWNERS
     Cat               1261                    684                   28                  381                   187

                                    Trend Analysis 2009/10 to 2012/13
                                                 CATS

        2500
                      18
                    19

        2000

        1500
                             61
                           12
    #

        1000
                                           2
                                         79

                                                  4
                                                68

                                                                                                           5
                                                                                                         46
                                                                                            1
                                                                                          38
         500

                                                                                                                  7
                                                                                                                18
                                                                                    72
                                                                     28
                                                               19

            0
                    Registered          Impounded*        Return to Owners          Rehoused            Euthanased
                                                                   Year

                                                      2009/2010        2012/2013

* Impounded data covers registration years which are from April to the end of March each year.
** All other data covers financial year data which includes the 1st of July to the end of June the following year

From financial year 2009/2010 to 2012/13:
    Registrations have decreased by 52%
    Impounds have dropped by 16.5%
    Return to Owners have increased by 65%
    Rehoused cats has improved by 535%
    Euthanasia’s have dropped by 142%

     Mildura Rural City Council                           ‐ 10 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

2.2       State Government Acts, Council Local Laws, Policies and Procedures

         The Domestic Animals Act 1994 is a State Government Act pertaining to the
          Domestic Animal Management within the State of Victoria. Part two (2) of the
          Domestic Animals Act 1994 contains regulations and identification procedures and
          requirements for dogs and cats.

         Local Laws are a range of rules that Council enforces to ensure community safety
          and public order. All residents/ratepayers and visitors are responsible for complying
          with Council Local Laws.

          Local Law No 2, Part 2 outlines a range of rules regulating the keeping of animals.

          A permit will be required when:
               o More than two (2) dogs or cats are kept on one (1) property (Local Law 2.1
                   keeping of animals)
               o A litter of dogs or cats are more than twelve (12) weeks of age (Local Law
                   2.2 litter of animals)

         Council Polices and Procedures, Council uses a range of polices and procedures to
          help guide decision making and provide services for the community. Local Laws
          Officers are authorised to seize or impound unregistered dogs and cats under the
          Domestic Animals Act 1994. Council has policies and procedures; associated with the
          seizure and impounding of unregistered and/or unidentified dogs and cats (the
          Domestic Animals Act 1994).

2.3       Our Current Education / Promotion Activities
          Council’s current education and promotional activities include:-

         Advertising prior to registration due dates to remind and inform current and new pet
          owners about microchipping and registration requirements. The advertising mediums
          used includes:
                 o Councils Community News publication and website
                 o the local newspaper
                 o the local radio stations and
                 o the local TV stations
         Extensive, yearly doorknocking to inform and educate
         Extensive patrolling activity to inform and educate pet owners
         Sunraysia Animal Rehousing Group (S.A.R.G.) - Paws along the Murray Walk.
          Council uses this event to encourage pet owners to bring their dogs down to the river
          front to exercise, mix with other dog owners and at the same time provide discounted
          microchipping for their pets

      Mildura Rural City Council               ‐ 11 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

2.4        Our current Compliance Activities
           Council’s current compliance activities include:-

          Implementation of door knock program targeting unregistered animals between May
           to July each year
          Year round patrols of the municipality
          Publicising the requirement to register pets over the age of three months in the local
           paper
          Requiring impounded animals to be microchipped and registered prior to release
          Issuing notices and /or infringements for animals found unregistered
          Prosecuting owners of unregistered animals where infringements remain unpaid and
           animals remain unregistered
          Monitoring advertisements relating to animals for sale to ensure microchip numbers
           are provided
          Follow up checks regarding microchipping and registration on rehoused animals

2.5        Summary

Due to the mixture of education and enforcement tools used to inform pet owners of their
registration requirements, registrations of dogs within our municipality have been on a steady
increase where as the registrations of cats have decreased.

Over the next three years, Council anticipates having two Local Laws Officers out during May
to July, doing random door knocking and checking for unregistered dogs and cats. Future
targeted areas will include new subdivisions, past untargeted areas and small townships
outside the Mildura urban area but still within the borders of our municipality.

2.6        Our Plans

Objective 1: Improve the accuracy of the Council registration database by cross
             referencing with microchip registry database.

Activity                                    When               Evaluation

Improve accuracy of Council pet             Ongoing            Council’s pet registration database
registration database by contacting                            can be accurately cross referenced
microchip registries to obtain details                         with microchip registries
of microchipped dogs and cats in the
municipality                                                   Demonstrate increase in numbers of
                                                               pets registered with Council
Follow up on any anomalies                                     following microchip registry cross
                                                               referencing exercise

      Mildura Rural City Council                 ‐ 12 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Objective 2: Increase dog and cat registration numbers each year.

Activity                                When             Evaluation

Ensure all seized and impounded         Prior to every   Review annual increase in
animals are microchipped and            animal           registration numbers
registered prior to release             released from
                                        the Animal       Review number of dogs and cats
                                        Shelter          being seized and impounded that
                                                         are not registered

Increased promotion of registration     Prior to 10th    Review local media campaigns to
requirements in the local media         April each       ensure registration is advertised and
                                        year             promoted at least annually

                                                         Consistent and constant information
                                                         available on Councils website

To encourage the registration of dogs   Ongoing          Review and report on annual
and cats within the municipality                         increase in registration numbers of
                                                         dogs and cats

    Mildura Rural City Council              ‐ 13 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

3.0      NUISANCE DOGS AND CATS

Domestic Animals Act 1994, Section 68A(2)(c)(vi) outlines programs, services and strategies
to minimise the potential for dogs and cats to create a nuisance. Other applicable sections of
the Act would include Sections 68A(2)(a),(c)(i),(c)(ii),(d),(f)

3.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data

Nuisance behaviours include:

Noise (mostly barking dogs)

Complaints to Council regarding noise have been on the increase over the last few years. In
an attempt to assist residents and reduce complaints, the Local Law’s department have
developed information brochures that they supply to residents regarding noise nuisances.
Council suggests that residents speak to the animal owners of barking dogs in the first
instance before reporting the incident to Council. It is Council’s experience that the vast
majority of noise complaints, involve animal owners being unaware of the nuisance/issue that
their pets are causing and are happy to look at ways of reducing the unwanted behaviour. In
most instances, people do not want to confront the owners of nuisance animals and prefer to
remain anonymous. All complainants’ to Council are kept confidential and are only for
Council’s use.

Council has a standard operating procedure for barking dog complaints to ensure that all
complaints received are handled in a consistent manner by authorised officers. The
procedure steps out the required processes involved to investigate the complaint, liaise with
the dog owner and surrounding neighbours and feedback to the complainant.

Noise, such as barking, will only be considered a nuisance if it is persistent enough to disrupt
resident’s peace, comfort, convenience or quality of life. Once Council receives a barking
dog complaint, Council will send out a Local Law’s Officer to visit the owner of the barking
dog to inform them of their legal requirements and offer some suggestions on how to stop
excessive barking.

The process for dealing with nuisance animals (mostly barking dogs) tries to balance the
interests and rights of both the dog owner and the complainant. Some cases may require the
complainant and dog owner to keep a logbook of the noise (barking dates and times) to
assist in the investigation. After a couple of complaints, Council authorised officers door
knock neighbouring property’s to see if it is affecting more than just the complainant before
deciding on further action such as the issuing of a barking dog infringement. In Council’s
experience, the majority of cases are resolved after the first complaint.

Statistics show that the majority of cases that involve dogs being a nuisance is a direct result
of boredom or being visually stimulated by people walking their dogs past the property, cats
on the fence or clouds in the sky. These issues can be addressed through:
             training
             provision of toys
             blocking the visual stimulus (if possible) or
             increasing a dogs exercise time.

      Mildura Rural City Council             ‐ 14 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Wandering at Large (WAL)

Wandering at Large complaints reported to Council have decreased over the last four (4)
years. The major reasons for wandering at large nuisance dogs is due to gates being left
open or inappropriate fencing that makes it easy for dogs to jump over, dig under or push
over or through the existing fencing. In Councils experience most complainants do not want
to confront the owners of nuisance animals and prefer to remain anonymous. All
complainants’ to Council are kept confidential and are only for Council’s use.

It is against the law for:
             Dogs to wander the streets because they can cause vehicle accidents,
                 damage property, intimidate the public and knock down young children or the
                 elderly. If a dog is found “at large” and seized by Council, it may be taken to
                 the Council Pound and the owners could receive an infringement (fine) plus
                 be liable for pound fees
             A member of the public to pick up a stray dog and keep it in their custody. The
                 public have a duty of responsibility to return the stray dog to its owner, contact
                 Council or take it to the Council Pound. If a member of the public contact
                 Council to pick up a stray dog, the animal must be kept secured on either a
                 leash or in an enclosed space or else Council officers will not attend the
                 request
             To walk a pet without being leashed. Council Local Laws Officers may give
                 out on the spot infringements (fines) if caught.

Aggressive dogs

There have been instances where residents have had issues with pets entering their property
that they were unable to contain due to aggression or inability to catch the pet. Upon request,
Council has dog traps available for hire to the public and there are local pet and recreation
stores that hire out cat traps.

If you see or come across an aggressive dog, do not approach it or put yourself in harms
way. Contact Council so that a trained Local Laws Officer may seize the dog.

The public are welcome to ring the Council after hours on 5018 8100 and select the Animal
Emergency option.

Dog Faeces/Litter

Failure by pet owners to pick up after their dogs is irresponsible and has proven difficult to
enforce. Council is reviewing its approach to dog faeces litter to incorporate strategies to
educate, enforce and ultimately reduce the volume of dog litter found through the
municipality. Dog litter is not just an inconvenience and eyesore, but can be hazardous.

    Mildura Rural City Council                 ‐ 15 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Cruelty to Animals (unnecessary harm)

There are many forms of animal cruelty. Some of the more identifiable forms of animal
cruelty include:
             Neglect (lack of food and water)
             Failure to seek veterinary care
             Dog Fighting
             Beating, abusing, terrifying, or tormenting an animal
             Confining, tethering or transporting an animal in a way that is inappropriate for
                the animal’s welfare
             Abandoning or releasing an animal unreasonably

In the circumstances of an animal cruelty complaint, a Local Laws Officer will inspect the
property where the animal is located and make a decision on whether to seize the animal,
seek veterinary assistance (depending on the animals condition or situation) or otherwise.

NUISANCE STATS
FROM JULY 2012 TO JUNE 2013.

      BARKING                      (Wandering at Large)                  Cruelty to                Dog Poo (Faeces)
     COMPLAINTS                          WAL                              Animals                    Complaints

              241                            130                                57                            12

                           NUSIANCE STAT TRENDS 2009/10 to 2012/13

        300
                       9
                     27

                               1
                             24

        250
                                                  2
                                                21

        200

        150
                                                         0
    #

                                                       13

        100
                                                                                     57
                                                                           38

         50
                                                                                                              12
                                                                                                      5

          0
                Barking Com plaints           Wandering at            Cruelty to Anim als       Dog Poo Com plaints
                                              Large(WAL)

                                                                Year

                                                      2009/2010       2012/2013

** All data covers financial year data which includes the 1st of July to the end of June the following year

     Mildura Rural City Council                           ‐ 16 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Reasons why dogs bark can include:
          Territorial
          Playfulness
          Provoked intentionally or unintentionally by humans, wildlife or other
            domesticated pets
          Hunger or thirst
          Boredom
          Neglect
          Sickness or poor diet
          Attention seeking or communication
          Lack of space or exercise
          Separation anxiety

The preferable approach to the problem of barking dogs is prevention. There are several
ways prevention can be assisted, including:
            Dogs should be engaged in training or puppy school at a young age to
              prevent them from learning the nuisance barking habit
            Exercise and attention
            Avoiding spoiling
            Provision of a kennel to provide shelter and warmth for a pet
            Provision of a large, raw bone to draw their attention for long period of time
            Moving the pet to the backyard or away from the direct line of vision from
              people walking past
            Mental stimulation

Making a complaint to Council
When making any legitimate complaint to Council you will be required to:
      • give your contact details (Name, Address & Phone number)
      • keep a record of all incidents, such as how often a dog barks and for how long (e.g.
      time, how long).

3.2.   Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

Community Local Law, local Law #2 regarding Nuisances
           o 2.3 Nuisances
For the purposes of this clause, “owner”, in relation to an animal, shall have the same
meaning as “owner” under the provisions of the Domestic Animals Act 1994. Each owner and
each occupier of any land where any animal or bird is kept must ensure that the keeping of
the animal or bird does not create a nuisance.
Penalty: 2 penalty units

Each owner or occupier of land where an animal or bird is kept must ensure all litter, refuse
and rubbish associated with the keeping of the animal or bird is disposed of in a way that
does not create any nuisance.
Penalty: 2 penalty units

   Mildura Rural City Council               ‐ 17 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

The owner of a dog that defecates:
          o The owner of a dog that defecates in a Park, in or on a Road that contains a
              constructed Footpath or maintained nature-strip, or any walking path or
              shared Footpath or any other Public Place that has constructed surfaces or
              equipment or fixtures provided for the enjoyment of the public must remove
              the faeces and deposit it as litter in a lawful manner.
              Penalty: 2 penalty units4

         Process to ensure a consistency for capturing and securing dogs and cats minimising
          risk to animal’s property and staff.5
         Process to ensure residents receive accurate legal advice and response to barking
          dog problems.6

3.3       Our current Education/Promotion Activities

Council provides information and education to residents regarding nuisance dogs. In the
instances of barking dogs, Council uses a combination of proactive and reactive strategies to
assist residents with this issue.

One of the reactive strategies is to provide suggestions and information to owners of
nuisance barking dogs regarding barking hindrance devices such as:
           Barking dog collars (citronella/electronic)
           Pet safe Outdoor Ultrasonic Bark Control Devices
           Introduction of lifetime registration tags

One of the Councils proactive strategies regarding nuisance barking dogs is for Local Law
Officers to hold education sessions at schools within our municipality regarding the different
types of techniques that can be used to reduce this type of nuisance behaviour.

Another proactive strategy of Council is to provide information kits to the public.

4
  Mildura Rural City Council, Community Local Law, Local Law No. 2
5
  Mildura Rural City Council, Procedural Guidelines (Capture and Securing Dog and Cat Procedure).
6
  Mildura Rural City Council, Procedural Guidelines (Barking Dog Procedure).

      Mildura Rural City Council               ‐ 18 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

3.4       Our current Compliance Activities

Councils current compliance activities include:-

         Patrols throughout the year
         Doorknocking program to identify unregistered animals
         Annual issue of registration notices
         Cat traps are used throughout our Council to reduce the numbers of feral cats and
          domestic cats wandering at Large
         Registration of animals released from the Pound

3.5       Summary

Council has experienced a steady increase in barking dog complaints over the last couple of
years. As the township is expanding with new and often smaller subdivisions there has been
a steady increase in the density of living (residents living closer to one another). Coupled
with an increase in pet ownerships, Council is expecting the noise complaints to continue to
rise in the future.

As an approach to deal with increased barking dog complaints, Council is planning on
delivering dog barking brochures to high problem/complaint areas, provides information via
Councils website and encourages pet owners to attend information sessions conducted by
Council and rehousing groups e.g.: Sunraysia Animal Rehousing Group.

      Mildura Rural City Council             ‐ 19 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

3.6        Our Plans

Objective 1: Improve information to the public via mail outs and on Councils website
             regarding nuisance issues.

Activity                               When            Evaluation

Provide education material about       Material        Compare the number of nuisance
nuisance issues on the Council         updated every   complainants to the previous year
website e.g. Barking dogs, dogs and    12 months,
cats wandering at large, dogs          starting July   Material reviewed & updated
rushing, etc                           2014
                                                       Media releases completed

Objective 2: Reduce dog litter (faeces) by up to 50% by 2017.

Activity                               When            Evaluation

Distribution of extra bins with free   Annual review   Compare the number of complaints
dog poo bag dispensers within the      each year       at the end of each financial year and
municipality each year                 Ongoing         evaluate feedback from the public

                                                       New bin locations recorded

Make available portable dog litter     Ongoing         Compare the number of complaints
bags to attach to dog leashes to                       at the end of each financial year
clean up after their animal/s
                                                       Evaluate feedback from the public

                                       Annually        Evaluate the number of bags that
                                                       have been distributed

      Mildura Rural City Council           ‐ 20 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

4.0      DOG ATTACKS

68A(2)(c)(iii) Outline programs, services and strategies to minimise the risk of attacks by
dogs on people and animals - also addresses 68A(2)(a),(c)(i),(c)(ii),(d),(f)

4.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data

Authorised Council Local Law Officers institute a thorough investigation for dog attacks which
includes:
     Taking statements from all parties involved
     Obtaining vet reports, medical reports and photographs and
     Providing a report based on the investigation together with recommendations

Possible courses of action Council can choose include:
    Infringements (where non-serious injuries sustained - minor attack)
    Menacing/Dangerous Dog Declaration
    Prosecution in Magistrates‘ Court
    Seek destruction/compensation orders by a Magistrate
    Seek mediation between parties
    Written warning
    No action

Where serious injuries have occurred to a person or another animal and there is enough
evidence to form a prosecution (as defined by the Domestic Animals Act 1994), Council may
decide to have the matter heard in the Magistrate‘s Court.

A Minor Attack is where there is no evidence of broken skin.

A Major Attack is where the skin has been broken.

It is important to ring Council immediately after an attack so that a Local Laws Officer can
attend and assist to the situation in a timely manner.

Statistics regarding dog attacks over the last four years.

COMPLAINT        Aug 2009 - 2010    Aug 2010 - 2011      Aug 2011 - 2012      Aug 2012 - 2013

Dog Attacks             82                  66                   53                      63
  (Total)

  Minor                 31                  11                   11                      19

  Major                 51                  55                   42                      44

In the last couple of years dog attacks have reduced by 23%. The reduction may be
attributed to the introduction of the Local Law requiring all dogs in the CBD, Council
Parks/Reserves and Residential Areas to be on a leash at all times.

      Mildura Rural City Council             ‐ 21 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

4.2        Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

          Community Local Law, local Law #2 regarding Nuisances
              2.3 Nuisances

          Community Local Law #2 - regarding the keeping of Animals
               Part 2, 2.1 keeping of Animals
           A person must not, without a permit:-
                     a) Keep or allow to be kept more than four different types of animals on
                        any one property at any time; or
                     b) Keep or allow to be kept any more animals or types of animals than set
                        out in the following table:-

                                                  MAXIMUM NUMBERS
          TYPE OF ANIMAL        PROPERTY AREA NOT               PROPERTY AREA
                                  EXCEEDING 0.5              EXCEEDING 0.5 HECTARE
                                    HECTARE

               Dogs                        2                              2

In determining whether to grant a permit for the keeping of animals where the number
exceeds that set out in the Table, the Council must take into account:
            the zoning of the property
            the proximity to adjoining properties
            the amenity of the area
            the type and additional numbers of animals to be kept
            the likely effects on the owners or occupiers of adjoining properties
            the adequacy of animal shelters
            the effect on the property's drainage
            any other matter relevant to the circumstances associated with the
               application.

Clause 2.1 does not apply where a planning permit has been obtained for a property used for
the purposes of animal boarding or breeding or where the occupier is licensed in accordance
with the Wildlife Act 1975, or where the occupier is a member of a breeding or racing
organisation which is approved by the Council. Dogs kept for working stock on land
exceeding twenty (20) hectares are not covered by clause 2.1.
Penalty: 5 penalty units for any breach of the Local Law.

Any person may apply for a permit to house more than two dogs per property. An application
form is available from Councils Local Laws department which contains information regarding
the:
            name of applicant
            address where animals are to be kept
            how many animals to be housed on the property
            the names and descriptions of each animal
            signed and dated by applicant, date
            contact phone numbers

      Mildura Rural City Council               ‐ 22 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

The owner applying for the permit pays a Fee to Council and then a Local Laws Officer will
door knock the neighbouring property’s to see if anyone objects to them having more than
the legal limit. Council also takes into account the number and frequency of previous animal
complaints regarding the applicant.

If there are no objections and there have been no complaints regarding the animals, the
permit can be determined. If an applicant breaks the conditions of the permit or Council starts
to get complaints regarding the animals, Council holds the right to cancel the permit at any
time and the animal owner has to reduce the animals back to the maximum number of two
dogs per property.

4.3       Our current Education/Promotion Activities

Council currently undertakes the following education and promotional activities in support of
dog attack issues:
    Information regarding dog attacks is available at Council offices and on the Council
       website
    Educational talks at Schools, T.A.F.E. and Local Service groups (Lions, Rotary,
       APEX etc) regarding responsible pet ownership/what to do if a dog attack occurs
    Animal rehousing group; Sunraysia Animal Rehousing Group (S.A.R.G.) conducts
       educational talks to community groups e.g. (Scout groups and local schools)

4.4       Our current Compliance Activities

Council is responsible for a number of compliance activities, which include:

         Council responds to reports of aggressive dogs and dog attacks immediately. This
          service includes a 24 hour emergency call out service
         Seizing and holding dogs pending investigation/prosecution into a dog attack
         Increased patrols
         Proactive patrols of parks and streets in an attempt to reduced wandering dogs
         Issuing infringements for minor attacks
         Issuing infringements for wandering dogs
         All reported dog attacks within Council are recorded
         Seizing impounded dogs in circumstances where the owner’s property is believed to
          be unsecured
         Follow up of seized animals due to being unsecured to ensure that the dog has been
          secured and applying infringements if applicable.

4.5       Summary

Serious dog attacks remain a major risk for Council despite the fact that they do not occur
regularly. Statistically, dog attacks occur predominately in and around the family home
including the footpath at the front of dog owner’s properties.

Council’s procedure for dealing with dog attacks is regarded as high priority. Local Law
Officers respond immediately to ensure minimal risk to the community.

Residents should be aware that every dog has the capacity to attack or bite and that children
should be supervised around dogs at all times. Dog owners should be made aware of the
potential implications if their dog is involved in an attack. Implications could include:
    On the spot Infringements

      Mildura Rural City Council             ‐ 23 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

          Destruction of the dog/s
          Declaring the dog ‘Dangerous’ (Animal to be housed in a caged area on property,
           muzzled when walking in public, etc)
          Prosecution for a major dog attack

4.6        Our Plans

Objective 1: Improve resident awareness of safety around dogs.

Activity                                 When           Evaluation

Publicise key dog attack prevention      Annually       Number of reported dog attacks -
messages (e.g. confinement of dogs                      Minor/major
to property, on leash laws etc)
through media articles, mail outs and
website information

Establish at the pound a facility that   September      Facility funded and established
can facilitate education and             2014           MOU completed by facility users
awareness programs                                      Education and training programs
                                                        established

Objective 2: Minimise the incidence of dog attacks in the community.

Activity                                 When           Evaluation

Education of key dog attack              Ongoing        Consider a community survey pre
prevention measures through media                       and post campaign, to measure any
articles, mail outs and website                         changes in knowledge about dog
information                                             attack prevention

Actively patrol areas to identify and    Ongoing        Media and information published
reduce roaming, unsecure and/or
unregistered dogs

      Mildura Rural City Council             ‐ 24 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

5.0      DANGEROUS, MENACING AND RESTRICTED BREED DOGS

68A(2)(c)(vii) Outline programs, services and strategies to effectively identify all dangerous
dogs, menacing dogs and restricted breed dogs in that district and to ensure that those dogs
are kept in compliance with this Act and the regulations
- also addresses 68A(2)(a),(c)(i),(c)(ii),(d),(f)

5.1      Current Situation / Our Current Data

The Domestic Animals Act 1994 defines restricted breed dogs as any one of the following
breeds:
    Japanese Tosa
    Fila Brasiliero
    Dogo Argentino
    Perro de Prasa Canario (or Presa Canario)
    American Pit Bull Terrier (or Pit Bull Terrier).

Declared dogs in Mildura Rural City Council as at July 2013

             Classification                  July 2013

         Restricted dog breeds                       2

            Menacing dogs                            0

       Declared dangerous dogs                       7

5.2      Our current Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

Council has developed policies and procedures to identify restricted breeds and to direct
action regarding dangerous and menacing and dogs by:
     Having a process associated with when:
            o dogs that are declared dangerous
            o a dog is declared menacing
            o a dog is declared to be of a restricted breed
     Having a policy associated with the issuing of permits to keep more than two
        restricted breeds on one premises
     Having a procedure to provide details of dangerous dogs on the (VDDR) Victorian
        Declared Dog Registry
     Ensuring that all dangerous dogs are registered in Councils Dangerous Dogs
        Register.
     Having a policy and procedure associated with the seizure and impounding of
        dangerous and restricted breed dogs
     Enforcement protocol associated with dangerous, menacing and restricted breed
        dogs (notices to comply, infringement notices, filing charges for prosecution)

      Mildura Rural City Council            ‐ 25 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

Declared dangerous dogs
A dangerous dog declaration has effect throughout Victoria, and it cannot be revoked,
amended or otherwise altered.

The definition of a dangerous dog under the Domestic Animals Act 1994 includes:
    A dog that is kept for the purpose of guarding non-residential premises
    A dog that has been trained to attack or bite a person
    A dog that has been trained to attack something when attached to or worn by a
       person

Dogs kept as guard dogs on non residential premises are defined as dangerous dogs under
the Domestic Animals Act 1994. For specific information on these dogs refer to the brochure
called ‘Things you should know about guard dogs on non-residential premises’.

The requirements for keeping declared dangerous dogs include:

1. Obligations on the owner to ensure members of the public are aware of the fact that their
   dog has been declared a dangerous dog

2. Taking measures to reduce the likelihood of anyone being attacked by their dog

3. Microchip identification

4. Desexing
    As of 10 April 2006, it is a requirement to desex all dangerous dogs, declared
      dangerous due to an attack
    If an owner of a recently declared dangerous dog due to an attack obtains a
      certificate from a veterinarian stating that the dog cannot be desexed for health
      reasons the dog will not be required to be desexed

5. Declared dangerous dogs must wear a prescribed collar at all times

Whilst a microchip is a permanent form of
identification it is not visible to the general
public and thus dangerous dogs are required
to wear a prescribed collar at all times.

The collar is specially designed to be visible
from a distance and reflective at night. This          Example of dangerous dog collars
means at all times, whether on the owners
property or not, a dangerous dog can be
recognised from a distance, warning a person
of the potential danger of the dog.

   Collars for dangerous dogs must:
    Consist of red stripes alternating with yellow stripes (25 mm in width and set
       diagonally to the rim of the collar at an angle of 45 degrees).
    be reflective in the dark
    be made of durable materials
    be securely fastened
    have a minimum width of:
           o 25 mm for a dog weighing less than 20 kgs
           o 40 mm for a dog weighing between 20 kgs and 40 kgs
           o 50 mm for a dog weighing more than 40 kg

    Mildura Rural City Council                ‐ 26 ‐
Domestic Animal Management Plan 2014-17

6. Houses that have dangerous dogs must be clearly signed.

A person with a valid reason to enter someone’s premises (e.g.
emergency services personnel) needs to know if there is a
dangerous dog present. The owner of a dangerous dog must
display prescribed warning signs at all entrances to the premises
where a dangerous dog is kept.

   This warning sign must:
       be square and at least 40 cm in height and width
       be made of durable metal
       have at least one colour that is reflective
       comply with the Domestic Animals regulations 2005

   For details of suppliers of dangerous dog warning signs, contact Council on (03) 5018
   8100, or phone the Department of Environment and Primary Industries Customer Service
   Centre on (03) 136 186.

7. Housing of dangerous dogs

   Dogs must be housed in a manner that they cannot escape (whether indoors or outdoors)
   and prevents them from injuring visitors. The dwelling and enclosure must be constructed
   in such a manner that a person cannot have access to them without the assistance by
   the occupier of the premises. The occupier of the premises of a dangerous dog must be
   18 years of age or over. The owner must also ensure there is an outdoor enclosure that
   must:
        be fully enclosed
        have a weatherproof sleeping area
        have a minimum floor area of ten square maters per dangerous dog
        have a minimum height of 1.8 meters
        have a minimum width of 1.8 meters
        contain walls, a floor, a drain, a roof and a gate which comply with the details
          below

   The walls of the enclosure must be fixed to the floor or constructed to be no more than 50
   mm from the floor. The walls, roof and gate of the enclosure must be constructed of:
       brick, timber, iron or similar materials
       chain mesh manufactured from 3.15mm wire to form a uniform 50mm mesh or
         weldmesh manufactured from 4mm wire with a maximum mesh spacing of 50 mm

   A combination of the above may be acceptable. The mesh size and construction detail is
   specified so that the enclosure will be escape proof and so that people, particularly small
   children, cannot fit body parts such as hands into the enclosures with the dog.

   The floor of the enclosure must be constructed of sealed concrete and be graded to a
   drain for the removal of effluent.

   The gate on the enclosure must contain a lock and it is a requirement that the enclosure
   is kept securely locked when the dog is in the pen.

   Mildura Rural City Council               ‐ 27 ‐
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