Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123

 
Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
Bachelor of Science
   (Applied Social Sciences)

     First Year Student
  Handbook Academic Year
        2018 - 2019
___________________________________________________________

             Programme Code: GY123
___________________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Programme General Information ...................................................................... 2
     Programme Outline ......................................................................................... 2
     Progression to Year Two ................................................................................... 2
     Our Vision for the Programme........................................................................... 2
     Student Representative.................................................................................... 2
     Programme Announcements and Information Forums .......................................... 2
     Email Policy .................................................................................................... 2
     Communicating with Academic Staff .................................................................. 3
     Student Welfare .............................................................................................. 3
     Student Attendance at Lecturers, Tutorials and Seminars ..................................... 3
     Student Absences ........................................................................................... 3
     Student Code of Conduct ................................................................................. 3
  Key Programme Personnel............................................................................ 4
  First Year Academic Calendar 2018 - 2019...................................................... 5
     Semester One (2018) ...................................................................................... 5
     Semester Two (2019) ...................................................................................... 5
     Social Event for Applied Social Sciences Students ................................................ 5
Year One Modules .......................................................................................... 6
  BSS1101 - Introduction to the Study of the Social Sciences .............................. 6
  SP158 – Introduction to Politics & Sociology ................................................... 8
  SP159 – Concepts and Practices of Politics & Sociology ................................... 10
  SP1100 - Practising Sociology and Politics .................................................... 12
  TI150 - Principles of Human Geography ....................................................... 14
  TI151 - Principles of Physical Geography ...................................................... 16
  TI1100/TI1101 - Geography in Practice ........................................................ 18
  EC1110 - Introduction to Economic Policy ..................................................... 20
  PS 1102 - Psychology for Social Scientists .................................................... 22
  BSS1100 - Digital Citizenship...................................................................... 24
Frequently Asked Questions .......................................................................... 26
Year One - Semester One Timetable ............................................................... 28
Year One - Semester Two Timetable ............................................................... 29

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
Programme General Information

Programme Outline: The programme is a modular degree, combining core and
elective modules relating to social scientific research and study, as well as modules
that are strongly focussed on enhancing students’ contemporary skills and
employability. Students will be given a broad understanding of the Social Sciences in
years one and two, undertake career development and an internship with an NGO or
SME in year three, and choose a specific study pathway in year four that is most
appropriate to their planned career or further education opportunities.

Progression to Year Two: Students should note that this is a pass by module
progrogramme and students are, therefore, required to pass all programme modules
to progress to Year Two.

Our Vision for the Programme: This programme will have a contemporary focus
equipping students with relevant skills in the Social Sciences to advance their
preferred career choice, or to avail of further educational opportunities at Master’s
and Doctoral levels. Students will engage with and seek to address present-day
critical social, environmental and economic issues with creativity, innovation and
entrepreneurship in a cooperative and supportive learning environment.

Student Representative: Students are encouraged to have a collective voice in the
on-going design and running of the Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences)
programme. The student representative is a point person who conveys student
issues directly to the Programme Coordinator and/or Directors. Nominations for first
year Student Representatives are welcomed in the opening weeks of the term.
Announcements will also be made at introductory lectures in early September.

      A weekly programme work review will take place each Friday during the term
      in room AC201, Arts/Sciences Concourse, at 10am. This is an additional
      opportunity and forum for students to have their say in the running of the
      programme. This weekly meeting is also for students to assess and evaluate
      their workload and to seek assistance and advice from their peers and
      programme team.

Programme Announcements and Information Forums: Blackboard is an e-facility
to check on programme and module announcements, staff information, download
readings and lecture notes, upload all assessments, and obtain marks and grades.
THIS IS THE MAIN METHOD OF CUMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE PROGRAMME
COORDINATOR AND DIRECTORS AND ALL FIRST YEAR STUDENTS. YOU MUST
ENSURE THAT YOU HAVE ACCESS TO THE BLACKBOARD SYSTEM AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE AT THE BEGINNING OF SEMESTER ONE.

Email Policy: Please only use your nuigalway.ie email account for communicating
with all Schools, Disciplines and programme personnel. Mail from all other e-mail
addresses will not, normally, receive a response.

      Students are expected to regularly check their nuigalway.ie e-mail account for
      all announcements and notices.

      Students should also demonstrate courtesy and respect at all times when
      communication through their e-mail account. Please remember that you are
      in an academic environment and should address members of staff by their
      appropriate titles in all communications. Furthermore, when using your

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
nuigalway.ie e-mail account for any correspondences outside the university
      environment be mindful that you are representing the programme, the
      College of Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies, and the National University
      of Ireland Galway and communicate in a courteous and thoughtful manner
      that reflects well on yourself and the university.

Communicating with Academic Staff: For all communications with academic staff,
please make sure to consult all materials on School and Departmental webpages,
and Blackboard prior to e-mailing additional questions you may have. Also, please
make sure to e-mail in advance to arrange any meeting with staff members outside
of their stated consultation/office hours. When writing an e-mail to staff it is
important to be courteous, professional, and concise. For example, you should make
sure that your opening address conveys a professional tone; e.g. Dear, etc. If your
query is directed at teaching staff, please ensure that your e-mail includes your
name, student ID and the name/code of their class in which you are participating.
Please be aware that due to the large number of e-mails received by academic staff
on a daily basis you must allow sufficient time for them to respond. Finally, please
check your NUIG e-mail account regularly as this is the main way that university
staff and administration will contact you.

Student Welfare: We recognise that students may, at times, have particular
difficulties that impact upon their capacity to complete their studies to the best of
their ability. Every effort will be made to accommodate individual circumstances, and
we would encourage you in this regard to communicate your situation to us if you
feel we can be of assistance. You should also be aware of the wide range of student
support services available to you on campus, whose role is also to help students
fulfil their potential both academically and personally. Details on these student
services are available on the following link: www.nuigalway.ie/student_services.

Student Attendance at Lecturers, Tutorials and Seminars: STUDENT ATTENDANCE
IS COMPULOSARY AT ALL SCHEDULED LECTURES, TUTORIALS AND SEMINARS,
WITHOUT EXCEPTION. This is a full-time degree programme and students must view
their studies as a full-time commitment and preform to the best of their ability.

Student Absences: If your absence from lectures or programme activities is due to
illness, a medical certificate should be submitted to Ms. Catherine McCurry, College
of Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies, Office 217A, First Floor, Arts Millennium
Building. If your absence relates to other circumstances, it is your responsibility to
communicate in a timely way with your module co-ordinator, and/or with the
relevant year co-ordinator or Dr Mike Hynes, First Year Programme Coordinator. If
you are experiencing difficulties in keeping up with course work during the year for
whatever reason you are strongly encouraged to let us know about this while there
is time to offer constructive advice and assistance. If we are not aware of issues
until towards the end of a module it is usually very difficult at that stage to provide
practical support. You will find that we are very approachable and willing to be
accommodating and in making your situation known to us we will regard you as
having acted in a mature and responsible way. It is our wish to see you perform to
the best of your ability and enjoy the entire programme of study.

Student Code of Conduct: AS A STUDENT, YOU ALSO HAVE RESPONSIBILITIES IN
RELATION TO CONDUCT ON AND OFF CAMPUS. The University has outlined a
comprehensive explanatory statement in this regard, which we would urge you to
read and be familiar with. Once you accept a place as a student at NUIG you are
automatically bound by its code of conduct (see www.nuigalway.ie/codeofconduct).

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
Key Programme Personnel

First Year Programme Coordinator
                                   Dr Mike Hynes
                                   Room 323, 2nd Floor, Áras Moyola
                                   School of Political Science & Sociology
                                   National University of Ireland Galway
Email address:                     mike.hynes@nuigalway.ie
Phone:                             +353 91 49 5104
Office Hours:                      Tuesday 3pm to 4pm
                                   Wednesday 3pm to 4pm

Programme Director
                                   Dr Frances Fahy
                                   Room 106, Arts Science Concourse
                                   Discipline of Geography
                                   National University of Ireland Galway
Email address:                     frances.fahy@nuigalway.ie
Phone:                             +353 91 49 2315
Office Hours:                      By appointment

Second Year Programme
Coordinator (Semester One)
                                   Dr Richard Scriven
                                   Room 110, Block ‘T’
                                   Discipline of Geography
                                   National University of Ireland Galway
Email address:                     richard.scriven@nuigalway.ie
Phone:                             TBC
Office Hours:                      Monday 3pm to 5pm.

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
First Year Academic Calendar 2018 - 2019

Semester One (2018)

Orientation 1st Years         Monday 3rd September 2018 – Friday 7th September
                              2018
Start of Teaching All Years   Monday 10th September 2018
End of Teaching All Years     Saturday 1st December 2018
Study Week                    Monday 3rd December 2018 – Saturday 8th
                              December 2018
Semester One Exams Start      Monday 10th December 2018
Semester One Exams            Friday 21st December 2018
Finish

Christmas Holidays            Saturday 22nd December 2018 to
                              Sunday 14th January 2019

Semester Two (2019)

Start of Teaching All Years   Monday 15th January 2019
End of Teaching All Years     Saturday 6th April 2019
Study Week                    Thursday 11th April 2019 – Thursday 18th April 2019
Easter                        Good Friday 19th April 2019 – Easter Monday 22nd
                              April 2019
Semester Two Exams Start      Tuesday 23rd April 2019
Semester two Exams Finish     Friday 10th May 2019

Autumn Repeat Exams           Tuesday 6th August 2019 to
                              Friday 16th August 2019
Easter: Good Friday 19th April 2019 - Easter Monday 22nd April 2019
Bank Holidays: Monday 29th October 2018/Monday 18th March 2019 (St Patrick’s
Day Holiday)/Monday 6th May 2019/Monday 3th June 2019/Monday 5th August
2019

Social Event for Applied Social Sciences Students

         All first & second year students of GY123 - the Bachelor of Sciences
(Applied Social Sciences) programme - will meet their peers, the Programme
Coordinators, Directors and some of the programme teaching staff at a get-
together in the Thomas Hardiman Building, Room G011 on Wednesday 12th
September 2018 from 4pm to 6pm.

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
Year One Modules

BSS1101 - Introduction to the Study of the Social Sciences

Semester                           One
Times                              Thursday 2pm to 3:50pm
Room                               IT202, Information Technology Building
Course Leader                      Dr Gary Goggins
                                   School of Geography and Archaeology
E-mail                             gary.goggins@nuigalway.ie
Phone                              TBC
Office Hours                       TBC.
Module Description
This interdisciplinary module provides an introduction to the full spectrum of human
behaviour, from geography, sociology, political sciences, psychology to economics.
The module will introduce students to ideas and debates on contemporary society
and will focus on a number of key areas at the centre of life in Ireland and the EU.
The first section will explore changing cultures within our society through an analysis
of contemporary ‘consumer society’. The issue of identity and difference will be the
focus of the second section of the module. This will draw on topics of population
change and migration in an Irish and European context. Using contemporary case
studies the final section will examine ‘order’ and ‘disorder’ within societies and it will
explore the participation and relationship society has to politics.

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
Key Course Themes
Consumer Society
We will explore changing cultures within our society through an analysis of
contemporary ‘consumer society’

Population & Migration and Identity & Difference
The issue of identity, difference and culture will be the focus of the second and third
section of the module. It will draw on case studies of population change and
migration in an Irish and European context

Order & Disorder
The final section will examine ‘order’ and ‘disorder’ within societies. This set of
lectures will focus on change and flux within administrations and in particular EU
structures and it will explore the participation and relationship society has to politics
in particular.
Module Aims
      Provide students with a firm foundation and understanding of what studying
       the Social Sciences entails
      Introducing the subjects and disciplines within the Social Sciences
      Students will explore changing cultures within our society through an analysis
       of contemporary ‘consumer society’
      The issue of identity and difference will be the focus of the second and third
       section of the module. It will draw on case studies of population change and
       migration in an Irish and European context
      The final section will examine ‘order’ and ‘disorder’ within societies and it will
       explore the participation and relationship society has to politics.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
    Identify key issues and debates at the centre of life in Ireland and the EU
    Demonstrate an understanding about how social scientists investigate and
      answer questions about society
    Write in a way that explores, synthesises and critiques academic material
    Effectively communicate information and arguments in a variety of forms.
Module Assessment
The module will be assessed by:
   a) An end-of-semester 2,000 word essay (50%)
   b) Group presentation (40%), for which 20% will be awarded for presentation
      and 20% for individual written reflection
   c) 10% continuous assessment.
Key Reading Material
      Hunt, E. F., & Colander, D. C. (1984) Social Science: An introduction to the
       study of society, 15 Ed., Macmillan Publishers Co: New York
      Isaacs, S. (2016) European Social Problems, Routledge: London
      Smart, B. (2010) Consumer Society, Sage Publishing: London.

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
SP158 – Introduction to Politics & Sociology

Semester                            One
Times & Rooms                       Monday 10am to 10:50am (Kirwan Theatre)
                                    Tuesday 12noon to 12:50pm (O’Flaherty Theatre)
                                    Friday 12noon to 12:50pm (O’Flaherty Theatre)
First Year Programme                Dr Brendan Flynn
Coordinators                        Room 316, 2nd Floor, Áras Moyola
                                    brendan.flynn@nuigalway.ie
                                    Dr Judith O’Connell
                                    Room 319, 2nd Floor, Áras Moyola
                                    judith.oconnell@nuigalway.ie
Module Lecturers                    Dr Brendan Flynn
                                    Dr. Niall O’Dochartaigh
                                    Dr. Cormac Forkan
                                    Dr. Stacey Scriver.
Module Description
The School of Political Science and Sociology is unique in Ireland for offering two
academic disciplines in a fully integrated way. Political Science is the systematic
study of political life, political activity or behaviour, as well as basic political concepts
such as freedom, democracy, and equality. It combines elements of history,
economics, and philosophy but has its own unique approach and style. Sociology is
the study of society, social issues, and social activities or practices. It includes a
factual dimension in the collection and critique of social facts and trends, together
with a more critical and theoretical literature which reflects on the general nature of

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Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) First Year Student Handbook Academic Year 2018 2019 - Programme Code: GY123
society, social order, and social problems. Both disciplines aim to provide detailed
factual information about the nature of social and political life in our societies, but
they also try to generate deeper arguments and analysis about why our societies are
the way they are, and if they could be improved. This module provides an
introduction to basic concepts in political science and sociology, Irish society and
politics, political sociology, and political and social theory and practice.
Module Aims
      To introduce students to the concepts and theories used in the study of
       contemporary politics and society (e.g. society, state, modernity, power,
       identity,   freedom,    equality,  government,     democracy,    capitalism,
       environmentalism, globalisation)
      To present key areas in political science and sociology. Students are
       introduced to core ideas and arguments and learn how to analyse political and
       social phenomena from disciplinary perspectives.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able:
      To demonstrate knowledge of the key assumptions, ideas, concepts, values,
       and practices of politics and sociology and to apply political and sociological
       knowledge to the analysis of core debates on contemporary issues,
       controversies, and problems, locally and globally
      To appreciate the complementary disciplines of political science and sociology
       as they critically engage with the formation and transformation of political
       and social ideas, actions, and institutions of state and society
      To acquire academic skills such as critical reading and analysis, using
       different material sources as research tools, oral presentation, report writing,
       and competent use of academic language and concepts.
Module Assessment
This is a large lecture-based module assessed solely by an end-of-semester 50
multiple-choice question (MCQ) examination.

Key Reading Material
      EITHER First Year Sociological and Political Studies – Sociology Textbook
       (2013). Compiled by Vesna Malesevic. Harlow: Pearson.
           o OR Macionis, J. J. and Plummer, K (2011/2008) Sociology. A Global
              Introduction, 5th/4th edition. Harlow: Pearson 301 MAC (5th edition
              also available as e-book)
      Tovey, H. Share, P. Corcoran, M (2007/2003) A Sociology of Ireland, 3rd/2nd
       editions. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan. 301.09417 TOV
      Coakley, J. and Gallagher, M. (eds.) (2010/2005) Politics in the Republic of
       Ireland, 5th/4th edition. London: Routledge. 320.9417 POL (4th edition also
       available as e-book)
      Heywood, A. (2012/2007/2003) Political Ideologies, 5th/4th/3rd edition. New
       York: Palgrave-Macmillan. 320.5 HEY.

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SP159 – Concepts and Practices of Politics & Sociology

Semester                            Two
Times & Rooms                       Monday 10am to 10:50am (Kirwan Theatre)
                                    Tuesday 12noon to 12:50pm (IT250 Information
                                    Technology Building)
                                    Friday 12noon to 12:50pm (O’Flaherty Theatre)
First Year Programme                Dr Brendan Flynn
Coordinators                        Room 316, 2nd Floor, Áras Moyola
                                    brendan.flynn@nuigalway.ie
                                    Dr Judith O’Connell
                                    Room 319, 2nd Floor, Áras Moyola
                                    judith.oconnell@nuigalway.ie
Module Lecturers                    Dr Su-ming Khoo
                                    Dr Stacey Scriver
                                    Dr Kevin Ryan
                                    Dr. Anita Naughton
                                    Dr. Allyn Fives.
Module Description
The School of Political Science and Sociology is unique in Ireland for offering two
academic disciplines in a fully integrated way. Political Science is the systematic
study of political life, political activity or behaviour, as well as basic political concepts
such as freedom, democracy, and equality. It combines elements of history,
economics, and philosophy but has its own unique approach and style. Sociology is
the study of society, social issues, and social activities or practices. It includes a

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factual dimension in the collection and critique of social facts and trends, together
with a more critical and theoretical literature which reflects on the general nature of
society, social order, and social problems. Both disciplines aim to provide detailed
factual information about the nature of social and political life in our societies, but
they also try to generate deeper arguments and analysis about why our societies are
the way they are, and if they could be improved. This module continues to provide
an introduction to basic concepts in political science and sociology, Irish society and
politics, political sociology, and political and social theory and practice.
Module Aims
      To introduce students to the concepts and theories used in the study of
       contemporary politics and society (e.g. society, state, modernity, power,
       identity,   freedom,    equality,  government,     democracy,    capitalism,
       environmentalism, globalisation)
      To present key areas in political science and sociology. Students are
       introduced to core ideas and arguments and learn how to analyse political and
       social phenomena from disciplinary perspectives.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able:
    To demonstrate knowledge of the key assumptions, ideas, concepts, values,
      and practices of politics and sociology and to apply political and sociological
      knowledge to the analysis of core debates on contemporary issues,
      controversies, and problems, locally and globally
    To appreciate the complementary disciplines of political science and sociology
      as they critically engage with the formation and transformation of political
      and social ideas, actions, and institutions of state and society
    To acquire academic skills such as critical reading and analysis, using
      different material sources as research tools, oral presentation, report writing,
      and competent use of academic language and concepts.
Module Assessment
This is a large lecture-based module assessed solely by an end-of-semester 50
multiple-choice question (MCQ) examination.

Key Reading Material
      EITHER First Year Sociological and Political Studies – Sociology Textbook
       (2013). Compiled by Vesna Malesevic. Harlow: Pearson.
           o OR Macionis, J. J. and Plummer, K (2011/2008) Sociology. A Global
              Introduction, 5th/4th edition. Harlow: Pearson 301 MAC (5th edition
              also available as e-book)
      Tovey, H. Share, P. Corcoran, M (2007/2003) A Sociology of Ireland, 3rd/2nd
       editions. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan. 301.09417 TOV
      Coakley, J. and Gallagher, M. (eds.) (2010/2005) Politics in the Republic of
       Ireland, 5th/4th edition. London: Routledge. 320.9417 POL (4th edition also
       available as e-book)
      Heywood, A. (2012/2007/2003) Political Ideologies, 5th/4th/3rd edition. New
       York: Palgrave-Macmillan. 320.5 HEY.

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SP1100 - Practising Sociology and Politics

Semesters                        One and Two
Times                            Monday 11am to 12:50pm
                                 Thursday 10am to 11:50am
Room                             Room 333, 2nd Floor
                                 Áras Moyola
Seminar Tutors/Facilitators      Dr Mike Hynes
Office Hours                     Tuesday 3pm to 4pm
                                 Wednesday 3pm to 4pm.

Module Description
This seminar series is designed to promote inquiry based learning, to enhance
practical scholarship skills while engaging with real world problems. Students work
in small groups under the guidance of a seminar tutor/facilitator. Students are
introduced to critical reading, taking effective notes, gathering information and using
the library, online sources and Blackboard, working in groups, giving presentations,
preparing and writing essays, using academic language, referencing, and revising
and taking exams, preparing for future subject and career choices. There is an
explicit focus on linking academic content and skills training, for example through
the use of sociological and political science texts in skills training sessions.
Module Aims
Despite the challenges of global diversity and the pervasiveness of conflict, human
beings are also disposed to act co-operatively and collectively, seeking solutions to
problems. A core theme in sociology and political science concerns how and why
societies change, and what alternatives might be possible? This module encourages
students to explore the links between sociological and political perspectives in

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relation to real world issues and puzzles in small group seminars designed as
student-centred learning environments. The module will provide students the
opportunity to develop academic skills: i.e. reading texts critically, taking effective
notes, gathering information and using the library, using the internet as a research
tool, completing assignments and working in groups, giving presentations, preparing
and writing essays, using academic language, revising for and taking exams, and
preparing for future subject and career choices.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
    Critically read and assess Sociological and Political Science texts
    Prepare and effectively deliver an in-class presentation, supported by visual
      aids (e.g. PowerPoint, Prezi)
    Write short reports and summaries of readings
    Write well-structured and coherent essays that meet academic standards
    Use diverse tools and sources for information gathering (e.g. books, journal
      articles, online sources)
    Effectively utilise Blackboard as a learning tool
    Actively participate in small-group sessions and in-class discussions.
Module Assessment
The module will be assessed as follows
   a) Student participation (12 hours per semester, 1% each)
   b) Four in-class assignments (2 per semester, 500 words each, 4% each)
   c) Two presentations (1 per semester, 15 minutes, 10% each)
   d) Two essays (1 per semester, 2,000 words, and 20% each).

Key Reading Material
      EITHER First Year Sociological and Political Studies – Sociology Textbook
       (2013). Compiled by Vesna Malesevic. Harlow: Pearson
           o OR Macionis, J. J. and Plummer, K (2011/2008) Sociology. A Global
              Introduction, 5th/4th edition. Harlow: Pearson 301 MAC (5th edition
              also available as e-book)
      Tovey, H. Share, P. Corcoran, M (2007/2003) A Sociology of Ireland, 3rd/2nd
       editions. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan. 301.09417 TOV
      Coakley, J. and Gallagher, M. (eds.) (2010/2005) Politics in the Republic of
       Ireland, 5th/4th edition. London: Routledge. 320.9417 POL (4th edition also
       available as e-book)
      Heywood, A. (2012/2007/2003) Political Ideologies, 5th/4th/3rd edition. New
       York: Palgrave-Macmillan. 320.5 HEY.

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TI150 - Principles of Human Geography

Semester                         One
Times and Rooms                  Monday 3pm to 3:50pm (O’hEocha Theatre)
                                 Tuesday 5pm to 5:50pm (Anderson Theatre)
                                 Wednesday 12noon to 12:50pm (O’Flaherty
                                 Theatre)
Course Leaders                   Prof Ulf Strohmayer
                                 Dept. of Geography
                                 Room 118, Arts/Science Building
                                 NUI Galway
                                 1BAGeography@nuigalway.ie
                                 Ext. 2373
Office Hours                     TBC.
Module Description
This module seeks to introduce problems, concepts and context within Human
Geography. Its focus is a contemporary one: it strives to illuminate the world of
today by exploring and analysing the origin of central issues that make the headlines
(or not) in the media and beyond. The module places lectures alongside the
information given in the textbook; for examination purposes, both are essential.
Major Themes Covered in the Module
      Cultural Geography
      Urban Geography
      Political Geography
      Environment and Society

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   Social Geography Economic Geographies
      Geographies of Advanced Economics
      Development Geographies.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
    Recognise and differentiate the key concepts within human geography
    Recognise and evaluate central issues and recent research within the field of
      human geography.
Module Assessment
The module will be assessed by
   a) 85% will be determined by an end-of-semester examination, i.e. 50 question
      Multiple Choice Question (MCQ)
   b) 15% will be determined by in-class participation (via Student Response
      Systems).
Workload
 Credit weighting:                        5 ECTS
 Lecture hours:                           30 hours
 Independent & Directed
                                          70 hours
 Learning (Non-contact):
 Total workload:                          100 hours.
Key Reading Material
Required readings for this module will be posted on Blackboard.

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TI151 - Principles of Physical Geography

Semester                       Two
Times & Rooms                  Monday 3pm to 3:50pm (Anderson Theatre)
                               Tuesday 5pm to 5:50pm (Anderson Theatre)
                               Wednesday 12noon to 12:50pm (O’Flaherty
                               Theatre)
Course Leaders                 Dr Audrey Morley
                               Room 109, Geography, Arts/Science Concourse
                               audrey.morley@nuigalway.ie
                               Ext. 4104
                               Dr Terry Morley
                               Room 102, Geography, Arts/Science Concourse
                               terry.morley@nuigalway.ie
                               Ext. 3897
Office Hours                   TBC.
Module Description
This module is designed to provide insight and understanding into the fundamental
concepts and principles of physical geography as an academic discipline. In doing
this, the module explores how the physical environment functions; how different
environmental systems interact and how the physical environment impacts on
human activities. The module explores the various components that make up these
environmental systems, such as the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and

                                                                       16 | P a g e
geosphere. In addition the module also provides some understanding of how these
fundamentals apply to Ireland and in so doing gives an insight into the richness of
the physical geography of Ireland.
Major Themes Covered in the Module
      The   Biosphere: Biography – species distribution and ecosystems
      The   atmosphere: Weather and Climate
      The   Hydrosphere: Rivers
      The   Geosphere: Coasts.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
      Identify major earth processes and landforms and how they influence climate
       and species distribution
      Recognise how physical geography data are presented within the scientific
       community
      Examine and apply relationships between physical processes and current
       societal issues (e.g., climate change, flooding, coastal management).
Module Assessment
The module will be assessed by
   a) 70% - end-of-semester 40 question Multiple Choice Question (MCQ)
      examination
   b) 15% - online quizzes via Blackboard
   c) 15% - in-class participation (via Student Response Systems).
Key Reading Material
      Peterson, Sack and Gabler. (2014). Fundamentals of Physical Geography.
       Second Edition. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

This text will be made available to students via an online e-book access through the
Hardiman Library.

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TI1100/TI1101 - Geography in Practice

Semester                          One and Two
Times                             TI1100/TI1101 will meet periodically during
                                  Wednesday lecture periods
                                  Support Sessions Mon & Wed from 4pm – 5pm
Course Leader                     Dr Valeria Ledwith
                                  Room 110, Geography, Arts/Science Concourse
E-mail                            GiP@nuigalway.ie
Phone                             Ext. 2372
Office Hours                      Wednesday 10am – 12noon (or by appointment).
Module Description
This module introduces first year geography students to a range of field-based
learning environments designed to enhance their learning experience and develop
their research competences. Supported by class-based teaching and technical
instruction, students undertake a series of themed tutorials and projects involving
observation and measurement techniques, geographical mapping, topographic and
geological data, and relevant methods of analysis and reporting.
Module Aims
      Provide students with basic skills for appropriate writing and literature citation
       in geography
      Introduce field components and provide students with field-based skills in
       both human and physical geographies
      Provide students with basic skills for mapping, data representation and
       Geographical Information System (GIS).

                                                                              18 | P a g e
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
    Comprehend a range of observation and sampling techniques
    Identify relevant primary and secondary sources of geographical data
    Compile reports and essays in a well-structured and coherent way and in line
      with appropriate academic conventions
    Identify geographical phenomena in a field-based context
    Recognise the significance of a geographical perspective for research
    Demonstrate familiarity with relevant equipment and technical supports for
      fieldwork in geography.
Practical & Associated Lecture Outline, Content, and Module Assessment
A separate exercise handbook is provided to students (electronically via Blackboard)
during the first week of classes.This contains information and instructions for all the
module exercises. Beginning in Week 3, students will be introduced to exercises
during the Wednesday lecture (see lecture schedule for relevant module). This will
be followed by THREE drop-in tutorials prior to the submission deadline (see GiP
handbook for details). CÉIM sessions on Thursday from 12noon to 12:50pm can also
be used for help with completion of exercises.

Students will complete 10 exercises (5 each semester). Your final mark in this
module is reliant on the timely completion of these tutorials.

Students submit all tutorial assessments via a Turnitin link OR online quiz on
Blackboard.

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EC1110 - Introduction to Economic Policy

Semester                        One
Times                           Tuesday 9am to 10:50am
Room                            CA107 & G018
Course Leader                   Stephen McNena
                                Room 233, St. Anthony’s, Cairnes Building
E-mail                          stephen.mcnena@nuigalway.ie
Phone                           Ext. 3053.
Module Description
This module explores, at an introductory level, the framework within which public
and social policy is formed and operates in Ireland. The central aim is to impart an
understanding of the constraints which frame public policy, and to enable structured
assessments of the impact of policy, especially economic policy. Students will cover
several public policies that have an impact on the economy, society and our lives.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
    Recognise the significance of public policy to the well-being of citizens
    Be more confident when analysing or debating public policy issues
    See both sides of a public policy argument or discussion
    Recognise the economic and social constraints involved in public policy issues
    Apply basic economic principles to various social policy issues, e.g. income
      inequality, minimum wages, housing, etc.
    Describe the economic and social rationale for State and EU intervention in
      various sectors of society.

                                                                          20 | P a g e
Module Assessment
The module will be assessed by
   a) Written end-of-semester examination (60%).
   b) Continuous assessment (40%).
Workload
Credit weighting:                          5 ECTS
Lecture hours:                             24 hours
Directed study, preparation for class:     24 hours
Assignments:                               13 hours
Preparation for in-class tests:            12 hours
Tests:                                     3 hours
Preparation for exam:                      24 hours
Total workload:                            100 hours
Key Reading Material
      Healy, S., Reynolds B. and Collins, M., eds. (2006) Social Policy in Ireland,
       Dublin: The Liffey Press
      Grada (1997) A Rocky Road: the Irish Economy since the 1920s, Manchester:
       Manchester University Press
      O’Hagan, J. and Newman, C., eds. (2014) The Economy of Ireland, Dublin:
       Gill Education. [ISBN 9780717159758].

                                                                          21 | P a g e
PS 1102 - Psychology for Social Scientists

Semester                        Two
Times                           Tuesday 9am to 10:50am
Room                            AC201, Arts Science Concourse
Course Leader                   TBC
E-mail                          TBC
Phone                           TBC
Office Hours                    TBC.
Module Description
Psychology is concerned with the scientific study of behaviour and mental processes.
The key goals of psychology are to understand and explain human behaviour and
ultimately to enhance the quality of people’s lives. The module will address key
paradigms and theories in Psychology and will review both historical perspectives
and more recent contemporary research on the human mind and behaviour.
Students will be introduced to the key factors and processes that influence
perceptions, thoughts, behaviours and emotions. The module is intended to be
broad in nature and will serve as an introduction to key areas in psychology
including neuroscience, social psychology, developmental psychology, learning,
cognitive psychology, social psychology and clinical psychology. Throughout the
module, students will be encouraged to think about theories and perspectives
provided on human behaviour and to reflect on the findings of psychological
research. Students will also be encouraged to reflect on psychological perspectives
of human behaviour and how it may vary from other disciplines.

                                                                          22 | P a g e
Module Aims
      Provide students with a practical overview of different services available on
       the internet, and other Information Communication Technologies (ICT), that
       can benefit better Social Scientific research and dissemination
      Explore safety, ethical and legal issues with regards to technology design,
       development and use
      Critically examine the advantages and limitations of the digital world
      Provides students with the opportunity to use a variety of online services to
       communicate, collaborate, interact, purchase, find information and study
       online safely and securely
      Facilitate and promote dialogue and discussion about online activities,
       particularly the appropriate and inappropriate use of social media.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be able to:
    Demonstrate an understanding of key psychological concepts that relate to
      the Social Sciences
    Critically reflect on the psychological perspectives underpinning the science of
      human behaviour and mental processes
    Assess the application of psychological theory and research in the Social
      Sciences to real world issue.
Module Assessment
The module will be assessed by
    End-of-semester essay (60%)
    Continuous assessment (40%).
Key Reading Material
      Gazzaniga, M., Heatherton, T., & Halpern, D. (2016) Psychological Science:
       International Student Edition, 5th Ed., Norton [ISBN:978039326313]
      Gleitman, H., Gross, J. & Reisberg, D. (2011) Psychology, 8th Ed., Norton
       London [ISBN: 9780393116823]
      Martin, G.N., Carlson, N.R. & Buskist, W. (2013) Psychology, 5th Ed., Pearson
       Harlow [ISBN: 9780273755524].

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BSS1100 - Digital Citizenship

Semester                         One
Times                            Monday 4pm to 4:50pm
                                 Friday 11am to 11:50am
Room                             AC201, Arts Science Concourse
Course Leader                    Dr Mike Hynes
                                 Room 323, 2nd Floor, Áras Moyola
E-mail                           mike.hynes@nuigalway.ie
Phone                            Ext. 5104
Office Hours                     Tuesday 3pm to 4pm
                                 Wednesday 3pm to 4pm.
Module Description
The advances of technology, the impacts of social media, and the technological
trends influencing our everyday lives have resulted in the creation of an online
society, a global society. Just as we are citizens of our country, we are now citizens
of the online society and as such we need to learn how to use these technologies
appropriately. Moreover, we need to ensure that we learn how to use technology for
the betterment of ourselves as well as society as a whole. Now more than ever it is
crucial to understand our role as digital citizens in an ever-changing world. This
module will help students to navigate this world and equip them with the knowledge
required to be actively engaged in the digital community. It will also compare the
behaviours expected in a face-to-face community with those expressed online and
emphasise the importance of understanding the various technologies while
practising safe, legal and ethical behaviours online.
Module Aims

                                                                           24 | P a g e
   Provide students with a practical overview of different services available on
       the internet, and other Information Communication Technologies (ICT), that
       can benefit better Social Scientific research and dissemination
      Explore safety, ethical and legal issues with regards to technology design,
       development and use
      Critically examine the advantages and limitations of the digital world
      Provides students with the opportunity to use a variety of online services to
       communicate, collaborate, interact, purchase, find information and study
       online safely and securely
      Facilitate and promote dialogue and discussion about online activities,
       particularly the appropriate and inappropriate use of social media.
Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module students will be:
    Confident and capable users of Information Communication Technologies
      (ICT)
    Be literate in the language, symbols, and texts of digital technologies
    Use technologies to participate in educational, cultural, and economic
      activities in an ethical and legal way
    Use and develop critical thinking in cyberspace, be aware of ICT challenges
      and manage these effectively
    Demonstrate honesty and integrity and ethical behaviour in their use of ICT
      and respect the concepts of privacy and freedom of speech in a digital world.
Module Assessment
The module will be assessed by
      An end-of-semester blog post of at least 2,000 words, which should be
       accompanied by visual and audio material; this blog post is allocated 50% of
       the marks for the course. The latest date for submitting the post is 17th
       November 2017 (Session 11). This blog post will be peer-reviewed and
       posted online. Late submissions are subject to penalty.
      The remaining 50% of the marks derive from ‘teaching and learning’
       evaluation which is continuous throughout the course. This evaluation may
       include the setting up of an appropriate online career profile and the keeping
       of an online journal to assist the students understanding and learning. In
       addition, there will be weekly in-class presentations by students and practical
       use of online resources. Class attendance and participation will form a key
       part of the overall evaluation mark.
Key Reading Material
      Adams, A., and McCrindle, R. (2008). Pandora’s Box: Social and Professional
       Issues of the Information Age. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: John Wiles &
       Sons, Ltd. Location in James Hardiman Library: 303.4833 ADA.

Please Note
This module will overlap with elements of Library Training & Personal Development
which will be held weekly on Wednesday from 9am to 11am.

                                                                           25 | P a g e
Frequently Asked Questions

I’m not used to writing academic essays: how or where can I get help?

Students will receive direction and help by means of in-class tasks, assignments,
and essay structure advice, from their module/seminar tutors/teachers and fellow
students. Many small seminars are designed to develop a student’s academic writing
and guidelines are provided in relevant discipline handbooks. Further help is
available to all students in the form of the Academic Writing Centre (contact the
library directly or email writingcentre@nuigalway.ie).
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Do I need to stick to the word limit on my essays?

The word limits are given for a specific reason in each case so it is important to aim
for the particular word count instructed. Penalties will apply if the word count is
more than 10% below or above the word limit. These word limits relate to the main
text so exclude bibliography and footnotes.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Can I email assignments and essays?

No; email submission of examinable material is not accepted nor admissible. All
examinable materials are required to be uploaded through Turnitin on Blackboard
and a digital receipt, plus the relevant submission form, handed to the lecturer/tutor
on the proposed date.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How can I find out about Turnitin?

Information on Turnitin is available from your seminar or module tutors or by
following the link www.nuigalway.ie/teaching-with-technology/technologies/turnitin/.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What is Plagiarism and what is the policy?

Plagiarism means presenting the words of another writer as if they were your own.
It refers to stealing, without acknowledgement, from any other writer, including
fellow students. Copying another student’s essay is as reprehensible as plagiarising
a literary critic or a website. This is a serious matter, and if it is detected in your
essay it may result in an automatic failure mark. The way to avoid plagiarism is very
simple; always put quotation marks around someone else's words and credit them
to their source. Further information can be found at: www.nuigalway.ie/plagiarism/
and see www.nuigalway.ie/current_students/university_code_conduct/index.php.
For first year students, suspected cases of plagiarism will initially be referred to the
year coordinator and addressed as per internal policy. Cases may then be referred
onwards depending on the seriousness of the circumstances.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What is the procedure for querying my marks and grades?

Your first port-of-call is to make contact with your module tutor, teacher or lecturer.
There may well be issues that you are not considering when calculating your marks.
If you are still unhappy you may go directly to the programme coordinator (Dr Mike
Hynes) or either of the programme directors (Fr France Fahy and Dr Therese
Conway). If you are still unsatisfied you can appeal your mark directly to the College
of Arts, Social Science and Celtic Studies; Catherine McCurry is the direct contact in
this instance (email catherine.mccurry@nuigalway.ie).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                                                   26 | P a g e
What do I do if I run into difficulties with time to submit an assignment or essay?

We all can run into difficulties from time-to-time so your first pot-of-call, again, is
your module tutor, teacher or lecturer BEFORE THE STATED DEADLINE. He/she may
be in a position to give you an extension on the submission of your assignment or
essay based on documented medical evidence or for other exceptional
circumstances. If this is not possible you should contact the School or Department
Year Coordinator (or indeed the Programme Coordinator Dr Mike Hynes) to make
your request. It is important to note that penalties may apply to such extension so
please consult the module handbook in each particular case.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Do I have to register for Blackboard?

Students are automatically enrolled on Blackboard once registered with the
University. Your courses will then appear once you log on with your username and
password. It is advisable to confirm your access to Blackboard before needing it for
important module information, online contributions, or deadlines. Further
information on Blackboard is available at nuigalway.blackboard.com/.
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I’m having a problem with my student online account or email account?

The Information Solutions and Services (ISS) Department provides support and
advice to students experiencing IT problems (see www.nuigalway.ie/information-
solutions-services/). Assistance is provided via the ticketing service and Helpdesk (at
servicedesk.nuigalway.ie/) or by ringing extension 5777. Please note, ISS are not in
a position to assist students with their personal computer & laptop problems.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Are there other types of supports for students?

Students are entitled to draw on the network of support services across the
University (please see www.nuigalway.ie/student_services/ for further information).
The Disability Support Service (see www.nuigalway.ie/disability/) promotes inclusive
practices throughout the campus community and are committed to the provision of
an equitable learning environment that will enable students become independent
learners and highly skilled graduates. The university also have a team of qualified
and experienced counsellors, psychologists and psychotherapists and information
about the Counselling Service is available at http://www.nuigalway.ie/counsellors/.
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Year One - Semester One Timetable

              Time/Period            Monday                  Tuesday                Wednesday                     Thursday                   Friday

                   9am                               EC1110 Introduction to
                                                         Economic Policy
                                                                                  Independent Study
                               SP158 Introduction to (check room in advance                                    SP1100 Practising        Programme Weekly
                  10am          Politics & Sociology        of class)*                                        Sociology and Politics   Work Review (AC201,
                                      (Kirwan)                                                                  (Room 333, Áras            Arts/Science)
                                SP1100 Practising                                                                    Moyola)              BSS1100 Digital
                  11am         Sociology and Politics                                                              Group Two            Citizenship (AC201,
                                 (Room 333, Áras                                                              Beginning 4th October         Arts/Science)
                                      Moyola)           SP158 Introduction to     TI150 Principles of                                  SP158 Introduction to
                 12noon             Group One            Politics & Sociology     Human Geography                                       Politics & Sociology
                               Beginning 1st October         (O'Flaherty)            (O’Flaherty)                 Geography                 (O'Flaherty)
                                                                                                                 CÉIM Sessions
                  1pm                                                             Library Training &
                                                          Group/Team Study      Personal Development
                                                                                  PC Suite, Block E
                  2pm                                                                               BSS1101 Introduction
                                                                                                    to the Social Sciences
                                 TI150 Principles of
                                                        Programme Coordinator Programme Coordinator (IT202, IT Building)
                  3pm            Human Geography
                                                              Office Hour           Office Hour
                                    (O’hEocha)
                                  BSS1100 Digital
                                                                                TI1100Geography in Practice
                  4pm           Citizenship (AC201,                                Support Session
                                    Arts/Science)
                                                                                                               Group/Team Study
                                                          TI150 Principles of
                  5pm           Group/Team Study          Human Geography
28 | Page

                                                             (Anderson)

                  6pm

            *11th Sept CA107; 18th/25th Sept & 2nd Oct G018; 9th Oct G017; 16th/23rd/30th Oct & 6th/13th/20th/27th Nov G018.
Year One - Semester Two Timetable

            Time/Period        Monday                     Tuesday                  Wednesday                     Thursday                      Friday

               9am                                  PS1102 Introduction to
                                                      Psychology for the   Personal Development
                           SP159 Concepts &            Social Sciences          Dates TBC
                                                                                                              SP1100 Practising
               10am       Practices in Politics &   (AC201, Arts/Science)                                                               Group/Team Study
                           Sociology (Kirwan)                                                                Sociology and Politics
                                                                                                               (Room 333, Áras
                           SP1100 Practising                                                                        Moyola)             Programme Weekly
               11am                                                                                               Group Two                Work Review
                          Sociology and Politics
                            (Room 333, Áras
                                 Moyola)              SP159 Concepts &          TI151 Principles of                                   SP159 Concepts & Practices in
              12noon           Group One             Practices in Politics &    Physical Geography                                        Politics & Sociology
                                                      Sociology (IT250)            (O’Flaherty)                  Geography                   (O’Flaherty)
                                                                                                                CÉIM Sessions
               1pm
                                                      Group/Team Study           Independent Study

               2pm
                                                                                                              Group/Team Study
                           TI151 Principles of
                                                    Programme Coordinator Programme Coordinator
               3pm         Physical Geography
                                                          Office Hour           Office Hour
                              (O eHoacha)

                                                                               TI1100Geography in Practice
               4pm                                                                Support Session
                             Set Aside for                                                                      Set Aside for
                            Service Learning         TI151 Principles of                                       Service Learning
               5pm                                   Physical Geography
29 | Page

                                                        (O’Flaherty)

               6pm
NOTES

        30 | P a g e
Further information on the Bachelor of Science (Applied Social Sciences) is available at www.ssrc.ie/bass

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