Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance

 
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Gambling Harm
Awareness Week
   2018 Toolkit
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Welcome to your
Gambling Harm
Awareness Week Toolkit
You don’t need to use all the tools provided in this kit.
Just grab the bits that enhance what you’re already doing.
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
In this guide you will find:
Key Messages                                            2

Ideas for your community initiatives                    4

Evaluation survey                                      6

Media opportunities                                     8
 - Tips for approaching media                            8
 - Tips for spokespeople                                 9
 - Media advisory template                              11

Advertising your event/initiative on local radio        13

Promoting your event with community posters            13

Images for your use                                     14
 - Put time into whānau visuals                         14
 - Facebook cover images                                14
 - Email signatures                                     14
 - Facebook event images and icons                      14

Facebook tips                                           15
 - Communicating with at-risk gamblers                  16
 - Boosting posts                                       17
 - Measuring success                                    17
 - More ideas for facebook content                      18
 - Creating a Facebook event page                       20

Q&A                                                     21

Contact details for the Health Promotion Agency (HPA)   22

                                         1
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Getting the Message out
There are lots of ways to get key messages out to your local community. You might simply
incorporate these into your events - through your MC and/or key staff on the ground. They will
also be useful for any media activities and promotion you are doing.

Remember, the more we promote consistent messages, the more people are likely to hear them.

Key Messages
•	It’s likely that 186,000 Kiwis are experiencing a level of gambling-related harm1, but even so,
   it’s often hidden from view.

•	This Gambling Harm Awareness Week (3-9 September 2018), we’re encouraging people to
   “take time out from gambling and put time into whānau [or aiga/fāmili]”.

•	Taking time out for activities with loved ones like fishing or sharing kai is a practical way to
   beat gambling harm.

•	Gambling can start out as fun, but there is a point for everyone where it can become ‘unfun’.
   Gambling harm can escalate quickly, damaging relationships, whānau, finances and hopes
   for the future.

•	To get involved in Gambling Harm Awareness Week and to find out about community events
   in your area go to the Choice Not Chance Facebook page.

•	Now’s also a good time to take the quiz at ChoiceNotChance.org.nz to see whether your
   gambling is still just for fun.

•	Look out for the early signs of gambling harm. These include ‘trying to win back your
   losses’, ‘hiding gambling from others’, or ‘feeling guilty about gambling’.

•	If your gambling is starting to become unfun, there are heaps of ways to get help. The
   Gambling Helpline team can be contacted anytime on 0800 654 655 or text them on 8006.

	There are also FREE face-to-face help and support services available in your local
  community. For free counselling services go to ChoiceNotChance.org.nz/face-to-face

                                                 2
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Facts about Gambling Harm in New Zealand1
•	The Choice Not Chance campaign prompts people to think about their situation and asks “is
   your gambling still just for fun?”

•	People are invited to take an easy quiz to check whether their gambling is OK on
   ChoiceNotChance.org.nz

• F
   orty five thousand New Zealanders have already taken the quiz (since August 2014),
  with just under three quarters of these discovering they could be at risk2.

•	Around 186,000 people in New Zealand are personally affected by gambling harm. Sixty-one
   thousand people are gambling with moderate or more serious levels of harm; equivalent to
   the entire population of Rotorua. A further 125,000 people are likely to be experiencing at
   least some level of harm (and are at-risk of more severe harm in the future); equivalent to
   the population of Dunedin.

•	People who regularly bet on pokies, sports or racing are most at risk:

    - O
       ne-out-of-two (49%) who use pokies at least monthly are likely to be experiencing a
      level of harm.

    - O
       ne-out-of-four people (26%) who bet on sports or racing at least monthly are likely to
      be experiencing a level harm.

• A
   round one-in-ten people who buy Lotteries Commission products at least monthly are
  likely to be experiencing a level of harm3.

•	People who participate in multiple types of gambling, are more likely to be experiencing
   harm4.

•	Māori, Pacific and Asian gamblers are disproportionately affected by gambling harm. One-
   in-seven Māori and Pacific people and one-in-nine Asian people who have gambled in the
   past year are likely to be experiencing a level of harm.

	By comparison, one-in-22 NZ European/Pakeha people who have gambled in the last year
  are likely to be experiencing a level of harm.

•	Gambling harm can negatively impact finances, damage relationships, disrupt work and
   study, and lead to emotional and psychological distress5.

• F
   riends and whānau are commonly affected. One-out-of-five New Zealand adults (22%)
  have been affected at some time in their lives by their own gambling or the gambling of
  others.

1	Thimasarn-Anwar, T., Squire, H., Trowland, H. & Martin, G. (2017). Gambling report: Results from the 2016 Health and Lifestyles Survey.
   Wellington: Health Promotion AgencyResearch and Evaluation Unit. 2	Google Analytics for ChoiceNotChance.org.nz

3   Health and Lifestyles Survey 2016.

4   Health and Lifestyles Survey 2016.

5	Central Queensland University and Auckland University of Technology (2017). Measuring the Burden of Gambling Harm in New Zealand.
   Wellington: Ministry of Health.

                                                                      3
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Ideas for your community initiatives
          Encourage gamblers and their families to spend quality
          time together to help beat gambling harm
          There are lots of ideas to get started at
          ChoiceNotChance.org.nz/activities

          Host family activities at your event
          Gambling Harm services around the country are organising fun ways
          to engage people at GHAW related events.

          Ideas include:
          •   dance competitions             •   food
          •   music                          •   movies
          •   wheel of misfortune            •   face-painting
          •   jenga tower competitions       •   sports games
          •   quizzes                        •   poetry
          •   colouring-in competition

          You could also use props provided by Choice Not Chance in previous years.

          Whānau photo frames
          Choice Not Chance is sending out whānau photo frames to Gambling
          Harm services.

          We can also arrange for a photograher to attend your event. If you
          would like a whānau fun frame and a photographer to attend please
          email m.stewart@hpa.org.nz (subject to availability).

          How it works:
          •	Ask event goers to step inside the frame and “show us what fun
             looks like in your family”.
          • Snap a photo.
          •	Give each family a flyer (these include public facing GHAW
             messages and will be supplied with the frame).
          •	This is a great ice breaker for your service, and can be used as a
             way to link to the national theme.
          •	After your event the photographer will upload the photos to the
             Choice Not Chance Facebook page.
          •	This allows families to see themselves on Facebook and enter the
             national competition for further prizes.

                                  4
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Gift Voucher Prizes
                                                                                          If you order a Whānau Photo Frame, Choice Not Chance will send a $50
                                                                                          Voucher to the event organiser (subject to availability).

                                                                                          This prize can be used as an incentive for families to participate in the
                                                                                          photo frame or to get involved in other activities you may be running.

                                                                                          Get behind the national Facebook competition!
                                                                                          From 3 to 17 September 2018, Choice Not Chance will be running a
                                                                                          promotion on its Facebook page, encouraging people to take time out
                                                                                          from gambling and to put time into whānau/aiga/fāmili.

                                                                                          The page will suggest ways to put time into family and then encourage
                       E OF EVENT>>
                                                                                          families to share their experiences as photos and comments.
      
                                                                                          There are multiple ways to get prizes with our new competition:
                                                ER>>
               RE, SECOND           CAN BE ADDED
                                                 IF NEEDE
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Evaluation Survey
On the next page we’ve provided a short survey that could be used
to help evaluate the success of your GHAW initiative or event.

        Print off as many copies of page 7 as you’ll
        need and give them to your event attendees.

                                 6
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Thanks for agreeing to fill out this short survey.
1. What things did you find out from us today about gambling harm?

2. Where could you seek help if someone you know needed help with a gambling issue?

3. How likely are you to share this information with someone you know?
        Very likely to share immediately
        Very likely to share within the next week
        Might share
        Not likely

That’s it, thanks!

Thanks for agreeing to fill out this short survey.
1. What things did you find out from us today about gambling harm?

2. Where could you seek help if someone you know needed help with a gambling issue?

3. How likely are you to share this information with someone you know?
        Very likely to share immediately
        Very likely to share within the next week
        Might share
        Not likely

That’s it, thanks!
Gambling Harm Awareness Week - 2018 Toolkit - Choice Not Chance
Media opportunities – tips for
approaching media
If you have heaps of experience interacting with journalists and media outlets, you can skip this
section. If you want to brush up your skills and get your organisation and your messages into
the media, here are some handy tips.

              Local print media. These include daily newspapers, online newspapers, or the
              free weekly community papers. You can get your information into the newspaper
              via a media release, a story or interview that the journalist prepares, a Letter to
              the Editor or by contributing to a column.

              Local broadcast media. These can include regional television and radio
              (commercial, community, Iwi, Pacific and student) channels.

Contacting your local media
Determine the ‘news’ item and the right local ‘angle’ – what angle can you take to make an
interesting story – what is new, unusual, going to happen? Who will be there?

Create a photo opportunity with local people – line up a local family, sports personality,
community leader who is willing to speak with media. Make sure they understand the key
messages you want to be communicated.

Write a media release – this will help you focus your key messages, dates and details before
speaking to any journalists. We have provided key messages for you to use.

Make initial contact with the local newspaper and/or radio station – consider which
presenter or reporter may be more interested in promoting your activity. It’s best to phone a
week or two beforehand – this gives the reporter plenty of time to organise the story.

Follow up – after you’ve spoken to the reporter initially, email your media release with the
details.

Appoint a spokesperson – the spokesperson will need to know the details of the event and
the key messages, and they will need to make themselves readily available to take media calls.
Have your key messages prepared and be able to express them clearly. The spokesperson will
need to keep their answers brief and to the point. Try not to reel off lots of facts and figures;
personal stories or experiences are more likely to engage an audience.

                                                8
Tips for media spokespeople2
1.	Develop a message: Knowing what you want to communicate during an interview
    is essential. Jot down the three most important phrases or sentences you want to
    communicate to the audience. Preparing beforehand allows you to focus on shaping it as a
    sound bite during the interview, as opposed to having to develop your message and sound
    bite on the spot. Any more than three key messages and you’ll find it hard to get them
    across naturally.

2.	Repeat, repeat, repeat: You should articulate at least one of your messages in every
    answer. You shouldn’t parrot them back verbatim, but should communicate the central idea
    of a message in each response.

3.	Transition: There’s no such thing as the “perfect” question. It’s your job as a spokesperson
    to transition, or “bridge,” from their question to your message. To help you do that, you can
    use a line such as, “The most important thing to remember is…” or, “Well, what we’re seeing
    here is….”

5.	Speak everyday language: You may think you sound more credible if you speak with
    big, jargon-filled words. You won’t – those words just erect a barrier between you and
    the audience. When speaking with general audiences, use words a 12-year-old would
    understand.

4.	Don’t “bury your lead”: When answering a question, don’t lead up to your conclusion.
    Give the most interesting part of your answer, or your “lead,” first. If you have additional
    time, you can go back and provide more context – but if you don’t start with your lead, the
    reporter may cut you off before you get a chance to state it at all.

5.	Be your most engaging self: This sounds like clichéd advice, but it’s not. Most new
    spokespeople think they have to bury their most engaging traits in order to come across
    looking like an “official” or “credible” spokesperson. They usually just look boring instead.
    Be your passionate self. Gesture. Convey warmth and smile when appropriate.

6.	Speak 10 percent louder than usual: If you go on television and speak at your usual
    volume, you will probably sound monotone (this doesn’t apply to professional wrestlers or
    other unusually loud people). For most of us, TV has a “muting” effect, meaning you have to
    speak a bit louder just to sound like you usually do. Plus, the boost of volume usually helps
    animate your body language.

7.	Watch your tone: If you feel defensive, you will look defensive. Instead of greeting tough
    questions with panic, welcome them as opportunities to correct the record.

	Instead of thinking, “Oh, no! Here comes a tough question!” think, “I’m delighted you’re
  giving me this opportunity to correct that misconception.” Even if you don’t have a perfect
  answer, the audience will be more inclined to believe a response from a spokesperson who
  doesn’t come across as defensive.

2	Retrieved from http://www.mrmediatraining.com/2011/02/22/nine-things-new-spokespersons-need-to-know/

                                                               9
8. C
    onsider the other side of the argument - Always try and consider the other side of the
   argument, and have answers prepared in case it is put to you.

9. Q
    uestions to ask the journalist beforehand – they might not give you a list of questions
   but they should give you an idea of the topics and angle that they are planning to take,
   which can help you to be as prepared as possible:
   • Who is doing the interview?
   • Is it live or pre-recorded?
   • How long will the piece be?
   • Who else will be interviewed?
   • What’s the angle?
   • What are the questions?

10.	Nothing is 100% off the record. Once the mic is live or the camera switched on you are
     being recorded. Whatever you say — anywhere — can follow you around endlessly and
     perhaps disastrously. If you don’t know the answer to a question, say so.

11. Appearance. How you look and how you behave on screen can have a big impact on how
     your message is received by the audience.

	Dress appropriately and have your hair in a style that projects the image you want for your
  organisation. Often this comes down to stereotypes – a corporate spokesperson should
  probably be suited and booted, but the spokesperson for a charity is more likely to be
  smart-casual.

	For a TV interview there are few outfit tips which will help you to come across better on
  screen. Try to avoid wearing all black or all white and fussy patterns. These can cause
  problems for cameras, so ideally stick with block colours. If you wear glasses we would
  recommend keeping them on – you might feel you look better without them, but if you start
  squinting in to the camera you might regret not wearing them.

	Finally, if you’re offered make-up always it’s best to say yes. And if you’re not offered make-
  up take some face powder with you to the interview. That goes for men as well as women!
  Studio lights can get very hot. This is the best way to avoid a shiny face.

12. Enjoy yourself - The most important thing to remember when taking part in a broadcast
     interview is to enjoy yourself, so have confidence in yourself and your answers and have a
     good time.

                                                10
Media advisory – here’s a
draft template to let media
know about your GHAW event

                                                IES TO
          E: [E VE N T N AM E] ENCOURAGES FAMIL
     TITL                                            HARM
                E O UT  TO GE TH ER TO BEAT GAMBLING
     TAKE TI  M
                                                                    e [insert
               na m e] is invit in g  th e  whole family to our fre
     [Service                                                           . The
                   , to be  he ld   on  [d ay, date, time] at [location]
     event name]                                                            rries
                        Ga m  bl in g  Ha  rm  Aw areness Week, which ca
     event is part of                                            time into
             em e of “Tak e  tim  e ou  t from gambling, put
      the th
     whānau”.
                                                                            [list exciting
                 ca  n  lo ok  fo rw   ar d to  free activities including
     Families
                                       ’s in it for them].
     activities. Explain what
                                                                                    rs
                            sp  ok  es pe  rs on ] sa ys   “186,000 New Zealande
     [Insert name        of                                                             ,
                              pe   rie nc  in g a  le ve l of gambling related harm
     are likely to be ex                                               sitive ways for
              s of te n  hi dd en   . Th is  event will promote po
      but it’
                                        ing harm.”
      families to beat gambl
                                                                               what fun
                        al so ge   t  an  op  po rtu  nity to show everyone
       People wi     ll                                                           photo
                          th eir fa   m ily  by  ge tti ng involved in whānau
       looks like in
       frames.
                                                                      me]
           r m  ed  ia  en  qu iri es  pl ease contact: [insert na
        Fo

                       G am bl in g H ar m Aw areness Week
         Background on
                                                                                   ed
                                  of en  te rta in m en t, but it can have unwant
         Gambling is a form                                              au, finances
                ue nc es  th at  ca n da   m  age relationships, whān
         conseq
                                     re.
         and hopes for the futu
                                                                               eness
                        r  th is ye ar ’s  na tio nal Gambling Harm Awar
         The theme   fo                                                         put
                            pt em  be r)  is “ta ke tim  e out from gambling,
         Week (3 to 9 Se
                                     a/fāmili.”
         time into whānau/aiag

                                              11
Throughout th
                          e week people
         gambling. Wh                       will be asked
                         ether it’s goin                     to prioritise w
                                          g fo r                                 hānau over
        somewhere n                              a walk, sharing
                       ew, putting tim                               kai or explori
       difference.                        e into whānau                                ng
                                                            can make a h
                                                                               uge
      Evidence show
                       s that spendin
      rewarding act                      g time with yo
                      ivities togethe                     ur loved one
                                       r is a powerfu                         and sharing
     further harm                                       l w ay  to protect the
                    .                                                              m from
    If you can’t m
                    ake it to [even
   can go to the                     t name] but st
                    Choice Not Ch                     ill want to ge
                                     a n ce                              t involved, yo
   suggestions fo                           Facebook page                                 u
                    r fun family a                            .  N o t o n ly w ill you find
   own experien                      ctivities, you’l
                   ces through co                    l also be invit
                                     mments and                         e d  to share your
                                                     photos.
  Seeking help
   People can ch
                  eck whether th
   on ChoiceNotC                   eir gambling
                   hance.org.nz                 is OK by takin
                                                                 g an easy quiz
   The friendly G
                  ambling Help
  by calling 080                line team can
                 0 654 655 or                  be contacted
                              texting 8006.                     24/7 for free
  There are als
                o FREE face-t
 in your local               o-face help a
               community. To                nd support se
                               fi nd out about              rvices availab
go to ChoiceN                                  lo                             le
                otChance.org                      cal counselling
details here].               .nz/face-to-fa                          se rv ices
                                             ce or go to [lis
                                                              t local service

                                             12
Advertising your event or
initiative on local radio
If you’ve informed the HPA team that you want your event advertised on local radio, HPA will
send you a draft script to promote your event.

Once approved, these scripts will be used by local DJ’s to promote your event. These will be run
on local radio stations, which could include Mai FM, Flava, local Māori or Pacific stations and
others as available.

The Choice Not Chance budget for radio advertising is limited, so you may also like to run your
own event promotion /PR in local media.

We’ve provided some tips for creating media opportunities on the page 8.

Promoting your event
with community posters
Once you’ve supplied your event details to HPA, we can tailor posters to promote your event.
HPA will then send you 50x A3 posters to put up in your community. We suggest displaying
these in shops or community notice boards (please ensure you get permission to put them
up first).

                                            T>>
Images for your use
We’ve created images, email signatures and social media ideas to support your messages in
print, emails or social media.

 Items                                     Download here

Put time into whānau visuals
Choose from options in English/Māori,
Samoan or Tongan
                                              Put time into    Put time into    Put time into
                                               whanau.jpg       famili.jpg        aiga.jpg

Facebook cover images                                 Cover 1.jpg               Cover 2.jpg
Choose from these images and upload
your favourite as your new cover image                Cover 3.jpg               Cover 4.jpg
on your organisation’s Facebook page.
                                                      Cover 5.jpg               Cover 6.jpg

                                                      Cover 7.jpg               Cover 8.jpg

                                                      Cover 9.jpg               Cover 10.jpg

                                                      Cover 11.jpg              Cover 12.jpg

Email Signatures – put these at the                           TakeTimeOut Signature. jpg
bottom of your work email signature!                          (use in the lead up to Gambling
                                                              Harm Awareness Week)
Campaign-specific messages or images can be used in email signatures. Instructions for
inserting images as email signatures depends on the email provider – if you are using
Microsoft Outlook, instructions can be found in here and instructions for Gmail are here.

Facebook event images and icons                       Event 1.jpg               Event 2.jpg
for your Facebook events.
                                                      Event 3.jpg               Event 4.jpg
See the Facebook tips section
for more info.
                                                      Event 5.jpg               Event 6.jpg

                                                      Event 7.jpg               Event 8.jpg

                                                      Event 9.jpg               Event 10.jpg

                                               14
Tips for using Facebook to promote
your messages or initiative
The Choice Not Chance team is happy to promote your event on its Facebook page. (Please
contact HPA for details). We are able to specifically target the Facebook promotion to reach
your local community.

You may also want to run your own promotions of Facebook. To help, we have provided
the following tips...

Why Facebook?
Facebook is used by more than 80% of Kiwis every week. You can either post on your own
Facebook page or ask other organisations to post your content.

What and how often to post
The types of content you can add to Facebook are:

• Text posts (use sparingly)

•	Images with text (these typically perform better that text only posts. HPA have provided
   sample images for your use in the previous section)

• Polls - ask your audience a question!

• GIFs (animated images)

• Videos

• Sharing posts from other pages.

It’s a good idea to use a variety of content to keep your audience engaged. Two to three posts
per week is recommended as a maximum so you don’t bombard people.

Here are some general tips for writing engaging Facebook posts.

http://wersm.com/10-tips-to-write-engaging-facebook-posts/

                                               15
Creating content for at-risk gamblers and concerned
others on facebook
•	We’ve provided downloadable images to get you started with your Facebook activity (Images
   and digital content for you to use” section on page 6)

•	Write content in a way that reflects well on your organisation, but don’t be afraid to be
   colloquial. Consider how you want to come across, whether it be as a coach, mentor or
   friend.

•	Use a strengths-based, non-judgemental messaging. Avoid statements that might increase
   any stigma associated with gambling.

•	Asking questions / inviting responses is a great way to promote engagement, providing the
   questions are not difficult to answer.

•	Promoting ideas to take time out from gambling and put time into whānau is a positive way
   to protect people from gambling harm.

• Provide clear and practical advice for people to help others they are concerned about.

•	Promoting the ‘test your gambling’ quiz is a great way to get people to think about their
   gambling without being confrontational.

• Promoting help services is likely to increase the number of clicks to help-related websites.

•	Refrain from depicting any pokie screen animations or videos that include pokie sound
   effects. These graphics and sounds are known to trigger gambling urges.

•	If you are promoting events or activities via Facebook, ensure you include dates, times and
   location in your posts, or details on where to go for more information.

•	If you’re running competitions or want people do something, be clear with your ‘call to
   action’, eg. ‘Call your local gambling harm service on 0800 XXX YYY’ or ‘Take the quiz at
   ChoiceNotChance.org.nz’.

•	Add hashtags to your post emphasise your
   key messages and to help relate to your
   target audience. Choice Not Chance will be
   using the following hashtags for GHAW 2018:
   #TakeTimeOutFromGambling #PutTimeIntoWhanau
   #BeatGamblingHarm #WhanauOverEverything
   #PutTimeIntoAiga #PutTimeIntoFamili

                                                16
Monitor and moderate your Facebook page
•	Respond to comments. Check your Facebook page at least once a day in case any important
   comments or messages need responding to.

•	If a comment thread becomes negative it’s important to jump on the thread quickly to
   moderate the tone. For example, your page administrator could make a comment,

	“Hi guys, remember this page is here to help people who are affected by gambling
  harm. Please be considerate of others when posting on this page.”

•	If bullying or hate speech occurs on your post then take action promptly. Consider hiding
   the comments, or banning the offending user from your page.

•	You can prevent foul language on your page by going to your page ‘settings’ > ‘general’ >
   ‘page moderation’.

Boosting posts
Boosting a post is a way to ensure your content is seen by a wider audience. It is recommended
to ‘boost’ some of your posts. You can select who will see the post by selecting a location, age,
gender, and their interests.

Instructions on how to boost a post are available here.

Tip: If you’re posting an image that includes text, make sure that the text doesn’t take up more
than 20% of the image size. If your text occupies more than 20% of the image size you are likely
to get low levels of people being exposed to your ad or post.

You can test your image before publishing by using this tool:

https://www.facebook.com/ads/tools/text_overlay

The image should ideally be ‘OK’, but ‘low’ is still safe to run.

Measuring success
There are a range of ways to measure the success of a post such as:

• the amount of likes, comments or shares received

• measuring reactions

• analysing comments

• measuring reach

Details of how to use page insights can be found here.

Facebook has a suite of tutorials and instructions of how to use the site. If you want to learn
more, go to facebook.com/business/

                                                  17
More ideas for Facebook content
You might be interested in sharing additional material through your Facebook page during
Gambling Harm Awareness Week. Stuck for ideas or don’t have time to create your own? Here
are some you are welcome to share...

How pokies work – Choice Not Chance         ChoiceNotChance.org.nz/pokies
has created a fun interactive resource to
show people how pokies really work.
Why not share this with your network?

Guide to casino games – online              ChoiceNotChance.org.nz/casino
resource to find out how casinos really
work, plus tips to play it safe.

How Lotto works – Try this interactive      ChoiceNotChance.org.nz/Lotto
game, designed to educate people about
the odds of winning Lotto.

                                               18
Online gambling – new online resource     ChoiceNotChance.org.nz/online
to show people the traps of online
gambling and how to stay safe.

Blurry line between gambling and
gaming – Parents should be aware that
some popular “free-to-play” games, apps
and websites may expose their kids to
gambling.

                                             19
Creating a facebook event page
If you’re running an event we recommend you create a Facebook page. Please supply the
URL for that event to HPA (see contact details page) so that the Choice Not Chance team
can promote your event too!

Tips for creating an event page
Many Gambling Harm Services use event pages on Facebook to help promote their events.
To create one:

1.	Click on “events” on the left hand side of your page. (If “events” is not in your list of tabs you
    can add it by going to your organisation’s page settings, clicking “edit settings”, then scroll
    to the bottom of the page. Click “Add a tab” and then add “events”).

2. Click “create event” and then fill out the details.

3.	Make sure to use an engaging photo for your main event cover image and add additional
    photos on the page to pique interest. The cover image should be friendly, eye-catching,
    warm and inviting. HPA have provided some draft cover images on the “Images and digital
    content for you to use” section of this document.

	Your photo appears differently across desktop and mobile so it should be 1920 x 1080 pixels
  (16:9 ratio) or larger with little or no text.

	It’s vital to ensure that no more than 20% of your event cover image is taken up by text.
  Any more than this, and your event is unlikely to be seen on people’s newsfeeds.

4.	Get people engaged. Run a Facebook poll! You should make an effort to get a conversation
    going on the event page. The more people who comment on your event page, the more
    impact it will have. Audiences often judge the importance of a Facebook event by their
    activity, so you want to get people involved as much as possible.

5. After the event you can update your content and images to share your success.

If after reading this you need help to create a Facebook event page, please contact HPA.

                                                  20
Q&A
How many people are affected by gambling harm in New Zealand?

Around 186,000 people in New Zealand are personally affected by gambling harm7.

Sixty-one thousand people are gambling with moderate or more serious levels of harm;
equivalent to the entire population of Rotorua. A further 125,000 people are likely to be
experiencing at least some level of harm (and are at-risk of more severe harm in the future);
equivalent to the population of Dunedin.

Friends and whānau are commonly affected too. One-out-of-five New Zealand adults (22%)
have been affected at some time in their lives by their own gambling or the gambling of others.

Who is most likely to be affected by gambling harm?

Everyone is vulnerable to harmful gambling. People who are regularly betting on pokies, sports
or racing are most at risk.

Māori, Pacific and Asian gamblers are disproportionately affected by gambling harm. One-in-
seven Māori and Pacific people and one-in-nine Asian people who have gambled in the past
year are likely to be experiencing a level of harm.

By comparison, one-in-22 NZ European/Pakeha people who have gambled in the last year are
likely to be experiencing a level of harm.

What are the most dangerous forms of gambling?

All forms of gambling can become harmful.

People who regularly bet on pokies, sports or racing are most at risk. One-out-of-two people
(49%) who use pokies at least monthly are likely to be experiencing a level of harm. One-out-
of-four people (26%) who bet on sports or racing at least monthly are likely to be experiencing
a level harm. Around one-in-ten people (10%) who buy Lotteries Commission products at least
monthly are likely to be experiencing a level of harm.

People who participate in multiple types of gambling, are more likely to be experiencing harm .

7	Thimasarn-Anwar, T., Squire, H., Trowland, H. & Martin, G. (2017). Gambling report: Results from the 2016 Health and Lifestyles Survey.
   Wellington: Health Promotion Agency Research and Evaluation Unit.

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Contact details
If you have any queries about this material, please contact us:

Health Promotion Agency – Choice not Chance
Micaela Stewart
Advisor, Minimising Gambling Harm
04 801 0961
m.stewart@hpa.org.nz

Campbell Moore
Senior Account Lead, Marketing and Communications
021 456 219
c.moore@hpa.org.nz

CNCXXX | AUG 2018
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