Graduate Administration Program Handbook for Coursework

 
Graduate Administration Program

       Handbook for Coursework
                         2017-2018

                     Providence College
                  One Cunningham Square
                Providence, RI 02918-0001
                            ~
 Dr. Brian McCadden - Dean, School of Professional Studies
Dr. Diane DiSanto - Director, Graduate Administration Program
                       (401) 865-2881
                  ddisanto@providence.edu
Table of Contents

The Mission of Providence College       .      .      .      .       .   .    iii

The Mission of Providence College Administration Program     .       .   .    iv

Overview of Graduate Administration Program .         .      .       .   .    v

Policies and Procedures       .         .      .      .      .       .   .    1

Course Descriptions    .      .         .      .      .      .       .   .    3

Organization of Administration Program         .      .      .       .   .    5

Alignment of Coursework to RISEL Standards            .      .       .   .    6

Expectations for Coursework .           .      .      .      .       .   .    9

Coursework Documentation      .         .      .      .      .       .   .    10

Field Experiences      .      .         .      .      .      .       .   .    12

Assessments in Strand II      .         .      .      .      .       .   .    13

Appendices   .        .      .       .        .      .       .       .   .    15
   A. Standards for Educational Leadership in Rhode Island               16
   B. National Policy Board for Educational Administration Standards .   23
   C. International Society for Technology in Education      .       .   28
   D. Classification of Cities and Towns in Rhode Island     .       .   31
   E. Rubric for Oral Presentations     .      .      .      .       .   32
   F. Rubric for Reflection   .         .      .      .      .       .   33
   G. Rubric for Writing      .         .      .      .      .       .   34
   H. Coursework Cover Sheet            .      .      .      .       .   35
   I.   Field Experience Cover Sheet    .      .      .      .       .   36
   J. Strand II Evaluation: Mid-point .        .      .      .       .   37
   K. Strand II Evaluation: Final       .      .      .      .           39
The Mission of Providence College

Providence College is a Catholic, Dominican, liberal arts institution of higher education and a
community committed to academic excellence in pursuit of the truth, growth in virtue, and
service of God and neighbor.

History
Providence College was founded in 1917 by the Dominican Friars at the invitation of Bishop
Harkins to provide a Catholic education in the arts and sciences.

Faith and Reason
Providence College is confident in the appeal of reason, believes that human beings are disposed
to know the truth, and trusts in the power of grace to enlighten minds, open hearts, and transform
lives. Providence College maintains that the pursuit of truth has intrinsic value, that faith and
reason are compatible and complementary means to its discovery, and that the search for truth is
the basis for dialogue with others and critical engagement with the world.

Academic Excellence
Providence College is committed to academic excellence, and holds itself to the highest standards
in teaching, learning, and scholarship. Its core curriculum addresses key questions of human
existence, including life’s meaning and purpose, and stresses the importance of moral and ethical
reasoning, aesthetic appreciation, and understanding the natural world, other cultures, and diverse
traditions. Providence College honors academic freedom, promotes critical thinking and engaged
learning, and encourages a pedagogy of disputed questions.

Community and Diversity
Providence College seeks to reflect the rich diversity of the human family. Following the example
of St. Dominic, who extended a loving embrace to all, it welcomes qualified men and women of
every background and affirms the God-given dignity, freedom, and equality of each person.
Providence College promotes the common good, the human flourishing of each member of the
campus community, and service of neighbors near and far.

Veritas and Providence
Providence College brings the eight-hundred-year-old Dominican ideal of veritas to the issues
and challenges of today. It seeks to share the fruits of contemplation in an increasingly global and
diverse society, and to praise and bless all that is good and vital in human endeavors. Providence
College supports the Dominican mission of preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ to a new
generation of students and helping them discover God’s providence in their lives.

                                                 iii
The Mission of Providence College Administration Program
The Providence College Graduate Administration Program is dedicated to developing high
quality professional leaders for twenty-first century public or private schools at all levels and in
varied geographic locales. We affirm the dignity and uniqueness of all individuals, recognize that
diversity is our strength, and commit to ethics, equity and excellence for all children.
Within this context, the mission of the Providence College Administration Program is

...to prepare school administrators who possess the competencies to lead school communities
 that demonstrate continuous student improvement and inspire life-long learning.
Preparing Administrators Based on Standards and Competencies
High performing certified teachers who emerge as teacher/leaders in their schools possess a solid
foundation for principal preparation. The school leader must become highly competent in the
knowledge, dispositions and skills articulated in the Rhode Island Standards for Educational
Leaders (2008), the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (2015), and the International
Society for Technology in Education (2012). As candidates read, research, discuss, share, write,
and reflect upon leadership theory, they internalize the elements of best practice and apply those
principles in fieldwork experiences.

Leading the School Community
With competencies and confidence gained in project-based work, future principals begin their
leadership journey. In the twenty-first century, leading requires innovation to transform schools
from mediocrity to excellence, from low performing to high performing. To promote change,
leaders must possess a vision that embraces inclusivity, diversity, and equity. ALL stakeholders
within the school family––students, parents, teachers, staff, socio-political representatives and the
community at large—must engage in the transformation process together.

Demonstrating and Inspiring All Stakeholders
Establishing one vision of success for all children is imperative. To perpetuate itself, success
must be demonstrated, observable, measurable, and ultimately, infectious. A true leader will
inspire all members of the learning community, welcome questions and challenges, celebrate
small steps, transform failure into opportunity, and affirm the needs of the individual within the
whole. A leader’s genuine respect for all members of the learning community prompts the same
response from others. Parents will model by instilling the value of school in their children.
Teachers will know they can take risks. The community will step forward. Children will succeed.

Driving Success for All
The principal’s essential goal as leader is continuous student improvement. Academic
achievement, however, is not enough. Far more must happen in the life and mind of the child.
When learning becomes fulfilling, gratification instills hope beyond the harsh reality of
circumstances. When talent is identified, a passion is awakened that can be nurtured. When love
of learning is realized, new paths are accessible for creative exploration. These factors will
exponentially drive achievement. Success for ALL children in ALL schools is non-negotiable and
the galvanizing force behind exceptional principals.

This is the goal of the Providence College Graduate Administration Program and the
commitment of the faculty.

                                                 iv
Overview of the Graduate Administration Program

The Master’s in Administration Program at Providence College is a 36-hour credit program
consisting of 30 credits of coursework, a 6 credit internship, two major portfolio presentations,
and a culminating summative evaluation that includes a comprehensive presentation. The
program is designed so candidates can complete all requirements over the course of three or more
academic years (up to 5 years allowed). Courses focus on three sets of standards:
     Standards for Educational Leadership in Rhode Island 2008 (RISEL), Appendix A
     Professional Standards for Educational Leaders 2015 (PSEL), Appendix B
     International Society for Technology in Education Standards for Administrators 2009
         (ISTE), Appendix C
By addressing these standards through coursework, candidates develop the knowledge, skills and
dispositions of a school leader, apply those competencies in field projects, and gain proficiency in
a two semester school-based internship.

Strand I of the Administration Program consists of two courses, one in research and one in
technology. Understanding research, applying appropriate methodology, and using technology in
multiple ways (i.e. classroom, office/administration, school improvement, and communication)
are integral to all coursework and essential in the principal’s everyday life. Candidates begin
compiling their Coursework Portfolio (CWP) in this strand. The reflective process is a major
component of the program and is emphasized throughout the program.

Strand II consists of eight courses that focus on the skills and competencies that potential
principals need to be “ready” to assume their first position upon graduation. Those skills set the
benchmark for best practice across a wide range of performance areas from daily management to
visionary planning. Strand II includes a midpoint portfolio assessment after completing five
courses to determine: (1) progress toward acquiring the knowledge and dispositions set forth in
the standards, (2) readiness for moving forward in the program, and (3) need for additional
supports.

The next major assessment comes as a transition point between Strand II and Strand III.
Candidates present their completed CWP and an in-depth self-assessment to a team of three, the
director and two intern supervisors. This assessment piece serves as the basis for the development
of the candidate’s Individual Learning Plan (ILP), the first step in the internship process, which
begins Strand III.

The ILP outlines the hands-on leadership experiences agreed to by both the clinical educator
(mentoring principal) and clinical supervisor (college professor). Candidates demonstrate their
competencies through these responsibilities and initiatives. In addition to these primary clinicians,
students gain experiences with other administrators who practice in settings that differ from the
interns’ teaching levels (elementary, middle and secondary) and geographical locales (urban core,
urban ring and suburban).

The internship culminates in a summative evaluation of knowledge, skills and competencies that
includes a major comprehensive demonstration. In this project, each intern identifies an authentic
problem in his/her school placement and creates a viable plan to address the issue, utilizing best
practice to improve teaching and learning. This plan, presented to a team of three faculty
members, requires proficiency in critical thinking, oral and written communication, problem
solving, technology, and leadership ability.

                                                 v
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Acceptance into the Program
Candidates formally begin the program at three intervals per year:
     Students accepted in the March 15th application group begin the program in Summer 1
        and/or Summer 2.
     Students accepted in the July 15th application group begin the program in the Fall
        Semester.
     Students accepted in the November 15th application group begin the program in the
        Spring Semester.
A required orientation to the program will be conducted by the director for each of the above
groups. Candidates will be notified of the date and time in their acceptance letter.

Notification of Superintendent and Principal
The district superintendent and school principal, who initially affirmed each candidate’s
leadership potential in a reference will be notified of the candidate’s acceptance. The program
seeks to engage the candidate’s administrative team in providing leadership opportunities and
support outside of coursework. Examples of support include placement on committees and/or
chair positions; making presentations to faculty, parents, school committee as appropriate;
brainstorming significant situations that occur in real time; and any opportunities that arise in the
daily operations of a school.

Length of Program
Candidates must complete all requirements of the M.Ed. Program within five years. Exceptions
may be granted because of extenuating circumstances (illness, accident, etc.). Requests for an
extension or leave of absence must be made in writing.

Course Sequence
Strand I of the Administration Program consists of two courses (6 credits) which are prerequisites
for all Strand II courses. No candidate may take more than two courses before being accepted into
the program. All ten courses (30 credits) are prerequisites to Strand III, that is, the internship.

Course Grades
Candidates are required to maintain a “B” average in all coursework, develop a portfolio that
demonstrates mastery of the RISEL Standards which is assessed once at the midpoint and then
again at the end of coursework. During the internship, a second portfolio is required as well as a
concluding final Comprehensive Presentation.

Course Grade of Incomplete
Candidates who receive a grade of Incomplete at the end of a semester must complete required
coursework within one year. If the one-year deadline is not met, the candidate must re-register
for the course.

Transfer of Credits
No more than six credits may be transferred into the program.

Praxis Exam
Taking the Praxis Exam, that is, the School Leadership Licensure Assessment (SLLA) is a
requirement for the M.Ed. Degree in Administration.

                                                  1
Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)
All candidates are expected to bring their own device to class unless otherwise directed by the
professor.

Email Address
All candidates must use their PC email addresses to communicate with instructors and staff.
Candidates are expected to check their PC email account and are held responsible for notices and
due dates communicated through the PC account.

Application for Graduation
Candidates must apply to receive their degree and/or to participate in the graduation ceremony.
   1. Students may choose to participate or not to participate in the graduation ceremony. All
       students, regardless of choice, must apply to graduate to receive their degrees.
   2. Once the application is received in the Dean’s office, candidate names are reviewed for
       clearance. Students who have not completed all courses and program requirements are
       placed on “degree hold.” The director will certify their degree and release their diplomas
       at a later date when all requirements are documented.
   3. Degrees are conferred in December (no ceremony) and May (with or without ceremony).
   4. Candidates must take the Praxis exam before graduation. Passing the Praxis is required
       for RI Department of Education certification. Out of state students may substitute their
       state-testing requirement for the Praxis.

Written Format
American Psychological Association (APA) format is required for all citations, references, and
formal research papers.

                                                2
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Following is a description of each course in the Graduate Administration Program.

 EDU 501- Fundamentals of Research
 Explores the methods of scientific inquiry, including analysis of educational research methods
 in formulation of problems, observation, case study, sampling, questionnaire, and statistical
 applications. Required for all graduate students in education.

 EDU 504- Supervision/Personnel Problems in Education
 Problems involved in selecting teachers, clerical, and maintenance staffs, as well as recruiting,
 selecting, training, and retaining are explored. Relations between administrators and school
 committees to various policy-making bodies are also covered.

 EDU 505- School Law
 Selected principles of constitutional, statutory, and common law affecting schools will be
 studied. Cases will be used to trace the foundations of school law, the implementation of court
 decisions, as well as the emergence of key legal concepts that are a basis for legal decisions
 rendered today. Additionally, students will analyze current legal issues and situations which
 administrators face throughout the school year.

 EDU 508- Program Evaluation- Systems Approach to School Improvement
 Focuses on how principals and administrators can assess programs to improve teaching and
 learning within their schools. Attention given to academic research published in the field,
 project evaluations conducted by outside evaluators and visiting teams, and practitioner
 research performed by instructional and administrative staff in a school using self-reflective
 inquiry strategies. Students explore system methods that transform the traditional school into a
 learning community by fostering a cycle of continuous growth as part of the school culture.

 EDU 512- School-Community Relations
 Examines the relative effects of school, family, social background, and community on student
 outcomes. Objective is to confront the major challenge facing American education in the 21st
 century: how to structure schools so as to maximize both equality and achievement. This
 requires training in data-driven decision making, which is central to statewide systematic
 initiatives in place throughout the country.

 EDU 513- Supervision of Instruction
 An exploration of social and psychological theories as they relate to supervision and evaluation
 systems. Emphasis on the analysis, planning, and feedback in management of objective
 context. The role of the instructional leader, techniques of supervision, methods to evaluate
 instruction, and strategies to initiate change will be addressed.

 EDU 516- School Finance
 A detailed examination of the sound business management practices affecting the operation of
 the educational enterprise. Special emphasis on making and presenting school budgets and
 related budgetary procedures.

                                                 3
EDU 522- The Organization and Administration of Schools
This course explores how principals manage the resources of time, space and personnel to
maximize student learning. Attention given to how the organization and operations of the
school promote a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment. Students analyze policies
and procedures at each level (elementary, middle and secondary) such as classroom
management, documentation of critical situations, emergency protocols, consistency and
routine, time management and more.

EDU 532- Curriculum Design and Construction
Focuses on the improvement of curriculum, teaching, and learning. Emphasis given to the
major phases of curriculum improvement: planning, development, implementation, and
evaluation in the K-12 educational setting. Students employ action-research and problem-based
learning strategies to conduct research on current curriculum, instruction, and assessment-
related problems and issues.

EDU 810- Data Analysis, Technology, and the Principal
Explores school data-collection Web sites and analyzes this data for potential school leaders to
make data-driven decisions about improving their schools. Using technology as the medium,
coupled with utilizing office productivity software, instruction will culminate with students
creating and demonstrating a tangible product that will promote teaching and learning for all
stakeholders within the school community.

EDU 530/ EDU 536- Internship in Administration
Field experience in a school where the intern develops the proficiencies of a beginning school
principal. The intern participates in and documents administrative experiences to meet
International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards and Rhode Island
Standards for Educational Leadership (RISEL). The intern works under the supervision of both
a school principal and college supervisor. Participation in seminars held at the College allow
for peer reflection and sharing of experiences. Portfolios document the intern’s authentic
performances. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

                                               4
ORGANIZATION OF ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM

Strand 1
Once formally accepted into the program, candidates take the following two courses:
EDU 501 Fundamentals of Research
EDU 810 Technology, Data Analysis and the Principal

This content is integrated into all other coursework. Understanding, interpreting and developing
action research are required skills for a principal. Using technology effectively is essential to
every aspect of a leader’s responsibilities from classroom instruction, efficiently completing
administrative tasks, or communicating with multiple audiences.

Strand II
Strand II consists of the following eight (8) courses that focus on more of the skills and
competencies that potential principals need when assuming their first position. These skills set the
benchmark for best practice across a wide range of performance areas from daily management to
visionary planning:
EDU 504: Supervision of Personnel
EDU 505: School Law
EDU 508: Program Evaluation
EDU 512: School/Community Relations
EDU 513: Supervision of Instruction
EDU 516: School Finance
EDU 522: Organization and Administration of Schools
EDU 532: Curriculum Design and Construction

Strand III
Stand III consists of a full year of internship when enrolling in EDU 530 and EDU 536. These
courses may be taken in any order. The internship provides candidates with a multitude of
leadership experiences at various school and socio-economic levels.

Internship is performance based. These future leaders are expected to demonstrate the skills and
competencies necessary to be highly effective administrators in their first positions upon
graduation. Specific expectations and requirements are found in the Internship Handbook.

                                                 5
ALIGNMENT OF COURSEWORK TO RISEL STANDARDS
Candidates are introduced to the RISEL standards at their orientation to the program immediately
following acceptance into the program. These standards are the foundation upon which the
program is developed. The RISEL standards enhance the skills of school leaders and combine
leadership with effective educational processes and valued outcomes. To achieve the RISEL
standards, candidates are expected to be highly proficient in the use and application of
technology. The ISTE standards for administrators delineate the competencies that candidates
must master over the course of the program. The goal is to integrate appropriate technologies to
maximize teaching and learning as well as to apply technology to enhance their own
administrative practice and productivity.

With each course requirement or activity, candidates write a thorough rationale explaining how
the assignment addresses specific standards and indicators. Students, during coursework, are also
exposed to the PSEL standards to broaden their knowledge.

                                                6
Standards                                 501 504     505 508     512     513    516    522   532   810
                                                              Res Persl   Law Eval.   S/Com   Instr. Finc   OrgAd Curr. Tech.
Standard 1: Mission, Vision, and Goals
Educational leaders ensure student achievement by guiding
the development, articulation, implementation, and
sustenance of a shared vision of learning and setting high
expectations for each student.
Element 1A: Mission, Vision and Goals                         X     X      X           X       X      X      X      X
              for Teaching and Learning
Element 2B: Shared Commitments to Implement the                                        X       X      X      X      X
              Mission, Vision and Goals
Element 1C: Continuous Improvement toward the                 X                 X      X       X      X      X      X     X
              Mission, Vision, and Goals

Standard 2: Learning and Teaching
Education leaders ensure the achievement and success of
each student by monitoring and continuously improving
learning and teaching.
Element 2A: Building a professional culture                   X     X      X    X              X             X      X     X
Element 2B: Rigorous Curriculum and Instruction               X                 X              X             X      X     X
Element 2C: Assessment and Accountability                                       X              X             X      X

Standard 3: Managing Organizational
              Systems and Safety
Education leaders ensure the success of each student by
supervising and managing organizational systems and
resources for a safe/ high performing learning environment.
Element 3A: Protecting the Welfare and Safety of                    X      X    X      X                     X      X
               Students and Staff
Element 3B: Aligning and Obtaining Human Resources                  X      X    X              X      X      X
Element 3C: Aligning and Obtaining Fiscal Resources                                    X              X      X            X
Element 3D: Managing Operational Systems                                   X                          X      X            X

                                                                     7
Standards                                  501 504     505 508     512     513    516    522   532   810
                                                                Res Persl   Law Eval.   S/Com   Instr. Finc   OrgAd Curr. Tech.
Standard 4: Collaborating with Key Stakeholders
Education leaders ensure the success of each student by
collaborating with stakeholders to respond to diverse
community interests and needs and to mobilize community
resources that improve student achievement.
Element 4A: Collaborate with Families and Other                                   X      X              X      X      X     X
              Community Members
Element 4B: Community Interest and Needs                                     X    X      X              X      X
Element 4C: Maximizing Community Resources                                   X           X              X      X

Standard 5: Ethics and Integrity
Education leaders ensure the success of each student by
modeling personal development, ethical behavior and
acting with integrity.
Element 5A: Maintains Ethical and Legal                               X      X    X              X      X      X      X     X
              Standards of the Profession
Element 5B: Personal Values and Beliefs                         X     X      X    X      X       X      X      X      X     X
Element 5C: Maintain high standards for self and others         X     X      X                   X      X      X      X     X

Standard 6: The Education System
Education leaders ensure the success of each student by
influencing interrelated educational systems of political,
social, economic, legal, and cultural contexts in response to
needs of their students.
Element 6A: Professional Influence                              X     X      X                          X      X
Element 6B: Managing Local Decisions within the Larger                       X    X      X       X      X      X      X     X
              Educational Policy Environment
Element 6C: Policy Engagement                                                X                          X      X            X

                                                                       8
EXPECTATIONS FOR COURSEWORK
School principals must be proficient in three skills that cross all content areas, are reflected in all
standards, and impact all aspects of administrative effectiveness:
     Oral Communication
     Written Communication
     Self-Reflection

Principals constantly provide and receive information orally, in writing, or via technology. The
administrator also gathers information in more subtle ways, that is, through actions, behavior,
emotions, and verbal/non-verbal cues. Developing new and varied means of communication is
lifelong and a skill that an administrator will perpetually improve.

Even when communication is effective, problem solving requires analyzing information,
connecting it to knowledge and experiences, and assessing the impact of action on others.
Hence, sound decision-making depends on the skill of reflection. Reflection is another lifelong
process and a high priority in the administrative program.

Faculty have developed three rubrics to address oral presentations, writing and reflection
(Appendices E,F,G). These rubrics will assist in communicating the importance of these skills
and provide coherence within the program. Each instructor will discuss the rubrics with students
and apply them appropriately given their content and instructional strategies

                                                   9
COURSEWORK DOCUMENTATION
A major component of all courses is the development of a Coursework Portfolio (CWP).
Compilation of the CWP begins in the first course. CWP process is adapted from Jon Mueller’s
Authentic Assessment Toolbox (http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/portfolios.htm).

Cover Sheet
The coursework cover sheet (Appendix H) must be completed and attached to each assignment
submitted to a professor. The form indicates the correlation of the standards to the work and
explains the rationale for that correlation.

Coursework Portfolio
The primary reasons for creating a CWP are to reflect on work, to engage in self-assessment and
to set goals for improving future work. The portfolio serves several purposes:
          To show growth or change over time, to develop process skills such as self-
             assessment and goal-setting, to identify strengths and weaknesses, and to track the
             development of performances.
          To showcase accomplishments, to identify best or most important work, and to
             communicate aptitude as a future leader.
          To evaluate progress towards meeting the RISEL and ISTE standards and to assess,
             plan and set goals for the internship.

Candidates are responsible throughout the program for selecting, storing and organizing work in
the CWP that meets the three purposes for the portfolio.

The CWP must include the following:
       Three work samples per RISEL standard (18 documents)
       A minimum of 6 of the 18 documents must also demonstrate integration of the ISTE
         standards.
       The following types of work should be represented within the 18 documents:
               o Major coursework projects
               o Field experiences
               o Research (theoretical or action-based)
               o Case study
               o Reflections
               o Book critiques/reviews
               o Final examinations
               o Presentations (Power Point, Prezi, etc.)

A reflection must be attached to each work sample in the CWP. Base reflections on one or more
of the following points:
           What are the strengths of this work? Weaknesses?
           If you had additional time, how would you improve upon this piece?
           I am pleased that I put significant effort into …
           Why is this piece of work your most important, best, or favorite?
           How does this work provide evidence of your growth in…
           This piece demonstrates the specific knowledge/skills I developed.
           What technology skill(s) have you acquired and used when completing this piece?

                                               10
   How does your previous level of proficiency upon entry into the program compare
             with your current level?

Over the period of ten courses, the CWP should include work samples that respond to each of the
above points. Candidates will place work samples with attached reflections in the CWP at the
completion of each course. Digitized portfolios for the college are being explored. Students
should maintain their work electronically and be ready to present it digitally as well as in hard
copy. Instructors may have specific instructions about how to submit work in their respective
courses. Each syllabus will be available on Sakai.

                                               11
FIELD EXPERIENCES
Hands-on real-world experiences that integrate theory with practice occur throughout coursework
in the form of field work. In this apprentice-like process, students log experiences in the field,
reflect on those experiences, and discuss them with student colleagues under the guidance of
course professors. The discussion and reflection add depth to these experiences as students draw
comparisons or find contradictions in the underlying elements of a variety of projects.

Two types of field experiences occur: (1) on-site, that is, in the candidate’s home school/district
and (2) off-site in a school outside the home district. Field experiences broaden candidates’
exposure to a variety of educational settings, cultures, and leadership styles. Those who teach in a
suburban district, for example, go to an urban or urban ring district; those who teach in secondary
schools visit elementary/middle schools and vice versa. (Appendix D)

These standards-based, site-specific activities provide candidates with increasing involvement
with multiple leaders and their staffs, students, parents and community members. Field
experiences occur at four levels of development: (1) observing (2) participating (3) leading with
oversight and (4) independent leading and responsibility (Martin et.al p. 9). Levels 1 and 2 are
primarily demonstrated during coursework and Levels 3 and 4 during the internship. Whenever
feasible, coursework instructors may move individual students to Levels 3 or 4. Following is an
example of a field experience:

In EDU 810 Technology, Data Analysis, and the Principal, candidates may attend a meeting
where school test data is presented to parents, faculty or school committee. This activity would be
at the observational level (Level 1) that is followed by a written reflection and class discussion.

In other cases, candidates may review their own school test data, analyze it, prepare, and deliver a
presentation of findings to the faculty, parents, or school committee in collaboration with their
principal. This raises the level of the experience to Level 3. The candidate takes responsibility for
the analysis, which is reviewed by the cooperating principal, and delivers the presentation
independently or in concert with the principal.

Instructors, with their students, decide what the appropriate field experiences are for each course,
including the type (on-site or off-site) and the level of experience.

                                                12
ASSESSMENTS IN STRAND II
Midpoint Coursework Assessment
The CWP is assessed after completion of five courses and is necessary to continue in the
program. This allows both the candidates and instructors to review:
    1. Progress toward acquiring the knowledge and dispositions set forth in the standards
    2. Readiness for moving forward in the program
    3. Need for additional supports

Students are responsible for notifying the Program Director when they have completed 15 credit
hours. Review includes the following:
     Writing a reflection on what your CWP reveals about you as a learner and as a potential
        leader at this point in the program.
     Addressing the piece in your CWP that you found the most valuable.
     Communicating particular standards/projects you would like the evaluators to know
        about the CWP.

Candidates lead this review of their CWP for the program director and one or more professors.
The review team completes the Strand II Midpoint Coursework Assessment. (Appendix J) The
team provides feedback to the candidates about their growth of knowledge and on-going
development of leadership skills and determines whether the candidate is ready to continue with
Strand II.

Final Coursework Assessment
The second assessment occurs when candidates have completed all coursework. This summative
assessment is presented to a faculty team that includes the program director, intern/clinical
supervisor(s) and faculty member (when available). This presentation determines readiness for
the internship (Strand III) and the initial direction of the Individual Learning Plan (ILP) at the
start of internship.

1. Candidates for the internship will review and analyze their CWP documents and then prepare a
self-reflective commentary noting the following points:
          What knowledge and theory have you acquired during your 10 courses?
          How, when, and where did you apply this knowledge and theory in your coursework?
          What was your level of performance during field experiences? [Think in terms of a
              gradual release model of leadership performances such as observing, participating,
              and leading independently (Martin, et al. p. 9).]
          Indicate the breath and depth of the work you have completed throughout the
              program.
          To what extent have you addressed each of the RISEL/ISTE Standards?
          What was your most powerful learning experience?
          In what standards are you lacking experience or confidence?
          Project where further growth and development are needed.

2. Candidates will use the information cited above (#1) to construct a visual/graphic
representation that provides evidence of the conclusions drawn in their self-reflective
commentary. Be creative! There is no one-way of completing this task. Use any technology tool
of your choice to create this visual/graphic representation.

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Final coursework presentation/assessment dates will be scheduled at the end of each semester, i.e.
May/June, August, December/January.

CWP Review/Assessment will occur at the completion of the candidate’s presentation.
Team members will review the CWP using the CWP Review and Assessment Form(Appendix
K). A discussion will occur after the presentation to highlight:
     Strengths and limitations of the candidates’ coursework and field experiences
     Strategies to continue growth and development of leadership skills and performances
     Personalized experiences and supplemental activities needed in the internship

The information generated through these assessments will become the foundation for the ILPs.
The ILPs ensure the continued development of the competencies, personalized to individual
interns who strive to become outstanding principal, ready to face the challenges of today’s
diversified learning communities in Rhode Island.

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APPENDICES

    15
Appendix A

                Standards for Educational Leadership in Rhode Island (2008)
                                             (RISEL)

                           Standard 1: Mission, Vision, and Goals
                  Education leaders ensure student achievement by guiding
                the development, articulation, implementation, and sustenance
         of a shared vision of learning and setting high expectations for each student.

Element IA: Mission, Vision and Goals for Teaching and Learning
The mission, vision, and goals establish clear and measurable high expectations for all students
and educators.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Use multiple sources of information and analyze data about current practices and
       outcomes to shape a mission, vision, and goals with high, measurable results for all
       students and educators.
    2. Align the mission, vision, and goals to school, district, state, and federal policies and the
       purposes of education in a democratic society.
    3. Recruit, support, and retain those who have the capacity to grow the organization in the
       direction of the mission, vision, and goals.
    4. Challenge the school community to ensure the alignment of programs and practices to the
       established mission, vision, and goals.

Element IB: Shared Commitments to Implement the Mission, Vision, and Goals
The process of creating and sustaining the mission, vision, and goals is inclusive, building
common beliefs and dispositions and genuine commitment among all stakeholders to implement
the mission, vision, and goals.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Establish, implement, evaluate, and revise processes for building the capacity of staff,
        students, families, and community members to develop, implement, and communicate the
        mission, vision, and goals.
    2. Engage multiple stakeholders with diverse perspectives in constructing shared
        understandings and commitments to high expectations for all students.
    3. Develop shared commitments and responsibilities among staff and the community for
        selecting and implementing effective improvement strategies, and assessing and
        monitoring progress toward the mission, vision, and goals.
    4. Celebrate and recognize progress in order to sustain a commitment to the mission, vision,
        and goals.

Element IC: Continuous Improvement toward the Mission, Vision, and Goals
Continuous improvement toward achieving the mission, vision, and goals requires the use of
research and best practices; effective district and school planning, adaptive change processes;
allocations of resources, prioritizing of activities, and systematically monitoring progress.

                                                16
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Create or utilize a data system that uses multiple sources of data to identify unique
       strengths and needs of students, gaps between desired performance and actual student
       performance, and areas for improvement.
   2. Use data-driven decision making, research, and best practices to monitor and revise
       plans, programs, and activities to achieve the mission, vision, and goals.
   3. Use effective change strategies that engage staff and community stakeholders in planning
       and implementing programs and activities.
   4. Identify and address barriers to achieving the mission, vision, and goals.
   5. Incorporate the mission, vision, and goals into planning and decision making processes.
   6. Align all resources to achieve the mission, vision, and goals.
   7. Revise plans, programs, and activities as indicated and warranted by systemically
       monitoring evidence about the effectiveness of programs.

                            Standard 2: Learning and Teaching
          Education leaders ensure the achievement and success of each student by
              monitoring and continuously improving learning and teaching.

Element 2A: Building a professional culture
Achieving the mission, vision, and goals requires a strong collaborative professional culture
focused on student learning and the development of professional competencies that lead to
quality instruction.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Develop a shared understanding and commitment to high standards for each student
         consistent with local, state, and federal expectations.
    2. Model openness to change and support initiatives that improve student learning.
    3. Develop a culture that promotes shared responsibility to continuously examine beliefs,
         values and practices in relation to the mission, vision, and goals.
    4. Use data for program evaluation that improves learning and teaching.
    5. Guide and support job-embedded, standards-based professional development that
         responds to diverse learning needs of educators/staff to support each student's
         achievement.

Element 2B: Rigorous Curriculum and Instruction
Effective, research-based instructional practices aligned with national and Rhode Island standards
are necessary to ensure that the diverse needs of each student are met.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Promote an understanding of Rhode Island and national curriculum standards throughout
        the school community.
    2. Support the development, implementation, and evaluation of a standards-based
        curriculum.
    3. Improve the capacity of the school community to differentiate instruction, analyze
        student work, monitor student progress, and redesign curricular and instructional
        programs based on student achievement results.
    4. Provide coherent alignment among curriculum, instruction, assessment, professional
        development and evaluation to ensure the effectiveness of instruction.

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5. Monitor the effects of differentiated teaching strategies, curricular materials, and
       education technologies to address the diverse needs of each student.
    6. Collaborate with educators/staff to identify and implement research-based strategies and
       practices to ensure equity and close gaps in student opportunity and achievement.
    7. Ensure that systematic support and research-based interventions are provided for students
       who are not meeting the standards.

Element 2C: Assessment and Accountability
Appropriate strategies for assessment, evaluation, performance management, and accountability
are necessary to accurately monitorand evaluate progress toward the mission, vision, and goals
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Develop and use aligned standards-based accountability systems to set school
        improvement goals and improve the quality of learning and teaching.
    2. Use a variety of formative and summative assessments to inform, evaluate, and modify
        student learning, instruction, program quality, and supports.
    3. Guide the school community in the regular analyses of data about all students and
        subgroups to improve learning and teaching.
    4. Use appropriate psychometric and evaluation strategies to interpret data and
        communicate progress toward the mission, vision, and goals to the school community and
        other stakeholders.

                Standard 3: Managing Organizational Systems and Safety
    Education leaders ensure the success of each student by supervising and managing
  organizational systems and resources for a safe/ high performing learning environment.

Element 3A: Protecting the Welfare and Safety of Students and Staff
Leaders ensure a safe environment by addressing real and potential challenges to the physical and
emotional safety and security of the school community that interrupt learning and teaching.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Create and participate in systems that collaboratively support student and staff learning
       and well-being.
   2. Involve the school community in developing, implementing, and monitoring guidelines
       and norms for accountable behavior.
   3. Develop, monitor, and update a comprehensive safety and security plan.

Element 3B: Aligning and Obtaining Human Resources
Leaders establish an infrastructure for personnel that operates in support of learning and teaching.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Align resources (time, people, and space, money) to district/school mission, vision and
       plan.
   2. Implement practices to recruit and retain highly qualified personnel.
   3. Assign personnel and monitor placements to ensure diverse student needs, legal
       requirements, and equity goals are met.
   4. Supervise personnel and conduct standards-based evaluations in accordance with district
       requirements and state policies In order to enhance professional practice.

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Element 3C: Aligning and Obtaining Fiscal Resources
Leaders establish an infrastructure for finance that operates in support of improving learning and
teaching.

Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Operate within budget and fiscal guidelines to measurably improve student achievement.
   2. Allocate funds based on student needs within the framework of policy and regulations.
   3. Advocate for and secure resources needed to accomplish the vision.

Element 3D: Managing Operational Systems
Leaders collaborate to supervise both daily and ongoing management structures and practices that
enhance learning and teaching.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Use problem-solving skills and knowledge of strategic, long-range, and operational
       planning to continuously improve the operational system.
   2. Maintain the physical plant for safety, ADA requirements, access issues, and for direct
       support of student learning.
   3. Develop and facilitate communication and data systems that ensure the timely flow of
       information.
   4. Oversee the acquisition and maintenance of equipment and technology.
   5. Use data systems to evaluate and revise processes to continuously improve the
       operational system.

                     Standard 4: Collaborating with Key Stakeholders
                  Education leaders ensure the success of each student by
    collaborating with stakeholders to respond to diverse community interests and needs
           and mobilize community resources that improve student achievement.

Element 4A: Collaborate with Families and Other Community Members
Leaders partner with families and community members to develop and evaluate programs,
services, and staff outreach to improve student learning.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Understand and apply strategies for developing family and local community partnerships.
    2. Bring together the resources of schools, parents, guardians, family members, and
        community to positively affect student and adult learning.
    3. Involve families in decision making about their children's' education.
    4. Develop a comprehensive strategy for positive community and media relations.
    5. Use effective public information strategies and technologies to communicate with
        families and community members about the mission, vision and priorities of the district
        and school community.

Element 4B: Community Interests and Needs
Leaders respond and contribute to community interests and needs to provide the best possible
education for students and their families.

                                                19
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Participate in the community to better understand values, interests, and needs.
   2. Identify and engage key stakeholders, including individuals and groups with competing
       perspectives.
   3. Use appropriate assessment strategies and research methods to understand community
       conditions and dynamics and to accommodate diverse student needs.
   4. Seek out and collaborate with community programs serving students with diverse
       learning needs.
   5. Recognize and celebrate diversity as an asset to the educational programs of the school
       community.
   6. Engage communities in a culturally-competent manner to share responsibilities that
       improve education and achievement of all students.

Element 4C: Maximizing Community Resources
Leaders collaboratively maximize opportunities through sharing the resources of schools, districts
and community organizations and agencies to provide critical support for all children and
families.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Understand the network of available community resources and collaborate with agencies
        to provide health, social, and other services to families and children.
    2. Develop mutually-beneficial relationships with business, religious, political, educational,
        and service organizations to share both school and community resources.
    3. Use public resources and funds appropriately and effectively.
    4. Secure community support for seeking and sustaining the resources necessary to address
        student needs.

                             Standard 5: Ethics and Integrity
                  Education leaders ensure the success of each student by
         modeling personal development, ethical behavior and acting with integrity.

Element 5A. Maintains Ethical and Legal Standards of the Profession
Leaders demonstrate appropriate ethical and legal behavior.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Model personal and professional ethics, integrity, justice, and fairness and expect the
       same of others.
   2. Protect the rights and appropriate confidentiality of students, families, and staff.
   3. Behave in a trustworthy manner, using their influence to serve the best interests of each
       student, to enhance education, and promote the common good.

Element 5B. Personal Values and Beliefs
Leaders continuously examine their personal assumptions, values, beliefs, and practice to achieve
the mission, vision, and goals for student learning.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Demonstrate respect for the inherent dignity and worth of each individual.
    2. Model respect for diverse community stakeholders and treat them equitably.

                                               20
3. Demonstrate respect for diversity by developing cultural competency skills and equitable
       practices.
    4. Assess personal assumptions, values, beliefs, and practices that guide the improvement of
       student learning.
    5. Lead others in safely examining and challenging deeply held assumptions and beliefs that
       may conflict with the mission, vision and goals.

Element 5C. Maintain high standards for self and others
Leaders perform the work required for high levels of personal and organizational performance by
acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capacities needed to fulfill responsibilities for
accountability for student learning.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Reflect upon their work based on professional standards, analyze strengths and
        weaknesses, establish goals, action plans, benchmarks, and engage in activities for
        professional growth.
    2. Model the continual deepening of understanding and practice related to content,
        standards, assessment, data, teacher support, evaluation, and professional development
        strategies in order to lead others in those same practices.
    3. Develop and use understanding of educational policies and accountability expectations to
        ensure that short and long term goals are met, including those within school and district
        strategic plans.
    4. Assist educators and the community to understand and focus on mission, vision, and
        goals for students within the context of political and financial constraints and influences.
    5. Sustain personal motivation, optimism, commitment, energy and health by balancing
        personal and professional responsibilities and encouraging similar actions for others.
    6. Make decisions based on sound principles, research, data, and policy.
    7. Respect and support the systems of authority at the state, district, and school levels
        through ethical and professional behavior.

                               Standard 6: The Education System
                    Education leaders ensure the success of each student by
          influencing interrelated educational systems of political, social, economic,
               legal, and cultural contexts in response to needs of their students.

Element 6A. Professional Influence
Leaders improve the broader political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context of education
for all students and families by participating and exerting professional influence in the local
community and the larger educational policy environment
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Facilitate constructive discussions with the public about federal, state, and local laws,
          policies, regulations, and statutory requirements affecting continuous improvement of
          educational programs and outcomes.
    2. Develop appropriate relationships with a range of stakeholders and policymakers to
          identify, respond to, and influence issues, trends, and potential changes that affect the
          context and conduct of education.

                                                 21
3. Advocate for equity and adequacy in providing for students' and families' educational,
         physical, emotional, social, cultural, legal, and economic needs to meet educational
         expectations and policy requirements.
Element 6B. Managing Local Decisions within the Larger Educational Policy Environment
Leaders manage effective local decision-making that both adheres and contributes to policies and
political support for excellence and equity in education.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
    1. Uphold federal, state, and local laws, policies, regulations, and statutory requirements on
         a consistent basis.
    2. Collect and accurately communicate data about educational performance in a clear and
         timely manner, relating specifics about the local context to improve policies, and inform
         political dialogue.
    3. Communicate effectively with key decision-makers in the community and in broader
         political contexts to improve public understanding of federal, state and local laws,
         policies, regulations, and statutory requirements.
    4. Advocate for increased support for excellence and equity in education.

Element 6C. Policy Engagement
Leaders engage policy makers to inform and improve education policy.
Indicators
Educational leaders in Rhode Island:
   1. Build strong and appropriate relationships with the school board, district and state
       education leaders, and other policy makers to inform and influence policies in the service
       of children and families.
   2. Support public policies that provide for needs of children and families and ensure equity
       and excellence in education.
   3. Advocate for public policies that ensure appropriate and equitable human and fiscal
       resources that improve student learning and eliminate achievement gaps.
   4. Work with community leaders to collect and analyze data on economic, social, and other
       issues that impact district and school planning, programs, and structure.

_______________________________
A complete version of the Standards for Educational Leadership in Rhode Island (2008) can be found
on the Rhode Island Department of Education website: http://www.ride.ri.gov

                                                22
Appendix B
                    National Policy Board for Educational Administration
                    Professional Standards for Educational Leaders 2015
                                           (PSEL)

                 STANDARD 1. MISSION, VISION, AND CORE VALUES
                   Effective educational leaders develop, advocate, and enact
                            a shared mission, vision, and core values
       of high-quality education and academic success and well-being of each student.
Effective leaders:
    a) Develop an educational mission for the school to promote the academic success and well-
        being of each student.
    b) In collaboration with members of the school and the community and using relevant data,
        develop and promote a vision for the school on the successful learning and development
        of each child and on instructional and organizational practices that promote such success.
    c) Articulate, advocate, and cultivate core values that define the school’s culture and stress
        the imperative of child-centered education; high expectations and student support; equity,
        inclusiveness and social justice; openness, caring and trust; and continuous improvement.
    d) Strategically develop implement, and evaluate actions to achieve the vision for the
        school.
    e) Review the school’s mission and vision and adjust them to changing expectations and
        opportunities for the school, and changing needs and situations of students.
    f) Develop shared understanding of and commitment mission, vision, and core values
        within the school and the community.
    g) Model and pursue the school’s mission vision and core values in all aspects of leadership.

                   STANDARD 2: ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL NORMS
       Effective educational leaders act ethically and according to professional norms
                   to promote each student’s academic success and well-being.
Effective leaders:
    a) Act ethically and professionally in personal conduct, relationships with others, decision-
        making, stewardship of the school’s resources and all aspects of school leadership.
    b) Act according to and promote the professional norm of integrity, fairness, transparency,
        trust, collaboration, perseverance, learning, and continuous improvement.
    c) Place children at the center of education and accept responsibility for each student’s
        academic success and well-being.
    d) Safeguard and promote the values of democracy, individual freedom and responsibility,
        equity, social justice, community, and diversity,
    e) Lead with interpersonal and communication skill, social-emotional insight, and
        undernding of all students’ and staff members’ backgrounds and cultures.
    f) Provide moral direction for the school and promote ethical and professional behavior
        among faculty and staff.

              STANDARD 3: EQUITY AND CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS
        Effective educational leaders strive for equity of educational opportunity and
 culturally responsive practices to promote each student’s academic success and well-being.
Effective leaders:
    a) Ensure that each student is treated fairly, respectfully, and with an understanding of each
        student’s culture and context.

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