Helen Keller: Lasting Legacy

 
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Overview

 Overview    Helen Keller: Lasting Legacy

            Helen Keller: Lasting Legacy
            by Rebecca Woosley and Cindy Clay

                *Please note - PREPARING FOR THE TASK should come before READING
                PROCESS in this module.
                Time magazine named Helen Keller as one of the 100 most influential people of
                the 20th century. After reading The Miracle Worker, a play about Helen Keller,
                students will read informational articles about ways Helen Keller improved the
                lives of people with disabilities. Students will write an essay in which they will cite
                specific evidence to support conclusions drawn from the articles.

                Grades: 7 8

                Discipline: ELA

                Teaching Task: Task Template 14 (Informational or Explanatory and Description)

                Course: 8th grade Language Arts

                Author Information:
                Rebecca Woosley (Kentucky)
                Cindy Clay (Jessamine County)
Section 1: What Task?

 TEACHING TASK

   Task Template 14 [1 Level]                                                 Informational & Description
      L1: How did Helen Keller help to improve the lives of people with disabilities? After reading The
      Miracle Worker, articles about Helen Keller from the American Foundation for the Blind and Helen
      Keller International, and a letter written by Miss Keller, write an essay to be shared with other
      students that describes specific ways she helped the disabled and addresses the question. Support
      your discussion with evidence from the text(s).

 STUDENT BACKGROUND

      You have read The Miracle Worker, the drama that ends with seven-year-old Helen Keller's
      mental awakening when her teacher Annie Sullivan helps Helen make the connection of
      language. Few students realize Miss Keller's accomplishments as an adult and her tireless efforts
      to help the handicapped and the less fortunate. You will read articles from the American
      Foundation for the Blind and Helen Keller International, and a letter written by Miss Keller about
      how she helped the disabled. Using information from the articles, you will explain how she
      became the catalyst for consolidating the efforts of many to help the disabled throughout the
      world.

 EXTENSION
Rubric
                                                 Approaches                   Meets
Scoring Elements         Not Yet                                                                       Advanced
                                                 Expectations              Expectations
         1                  1.5            2           2.5            3          3.5            4
                                                                                                      Addresses all
                                                                            Addresses
                                                                                                       aspects of
                       Attempts to             Addresses prompt               prompt
                                                                                                         prompt
                     address prompt,           appropriately, but          appropriately
     Focus                                                                                          appropriately and
                    but lacks focus or          with a weak or            and maintains a
                                                                                                       maintains a
                        is off-task.            uneven focus.              clear, steady
                                                                                                        strongly
                                                                              focus.
                                                                                                    developed focus.
                                                                           Establishes a              Establishes a
                       Attempts to                                        controlling idea          strong controlling
                                                 Establishes a
                       establish a                                          with a clear            idea with a clear
                                                controlling idea
 Controlling Idea    controlling idea,                                        purpose                    purpose
                                                with a general
                     but lacks a clear                                      maintained                 maintained
                                                   purpose.
                         purpose.                                         throughout the             throughout the
                                                                             response.                  response.
                                                                                                         Accurately
                                                                                                          presents
                                                                                                        information
                                                      Presents
                         Attempts to                                           Presents               relevant to all
                                                 information from
                    present information                                   information from             parts of the
                                                reading materials
                     in response to the                                         reading                prompt with
                                                  relevant to the
                      prompt, but lacks                                        materials                  effective
                                                  purpose of the
                       connections or                                       relevant to the            selection of
                                                prompt with minor
                      relevance to the                                        prompt with              sources and
Reading/Research                               lapses in accuracy
                       purpose of the                                        accuracy and              details from
                                                or completeness.
                    prompt. (L2) Does                                      sufficient detail.             reading
                                                   (L2) Begins to
                       not address the                                     (L2) Addresses            materials. (L2)
                                                    address the
                         credibility of                                    the credibility of        Addresses the
                                                    credibility of
                         sources as                                         sources when               credibility of
                                                   sources when
                          prompted.                                            prompted.               sources and
                                                     prompted.
                                                                                                    identifies salient
                                                                                                     sources when
                                                                                                         prompted.
                                                                                                          Presents
                                                                                                       thorough and
                        Attempts to                                            Presents
                                                                                                           detailed
                     provide details in                                   appropriate and
                                                     Presents                                          information to
                      response to the                                     sufficient details
                                               appropriate details                                   strongly support
                     prompt, including                                     to support the
                                                  to support the                                       the focus and
                    retelling, but lacks                                      focus and
                                                    focus and                                        controlling idea.
                          sufficient                                      controlling idea.
                                                 controlling idea.                                   (L2) Thoroughly
                      development or                                        (L2) Explains
  Development                                  (L2) Briefly notes a                                      discusses
                      relevancy. (L2)                                       relevant and
                                                     relevant                                           relevant and
                       Implication is                                          plausible
                                                implication or (L3)                                         salient
                    missing, irrelevant,                                     implications,
                                                    a relevant                                        implications or
                      or illogical. (L3)                                      and (L3) a
                                                 gap/unanswered                                       consequences,
                     Gap/unanswered                                            relevant
                                                     question.                                       and (L3) one or
                    question is missing                                   gap/unanswered
                                                                                                     more significant
                        or irrelevant.                                         question.
                                                                                                    gaps/unanswered
                                                                                                         questions.
                                                     Uses an
                                                   appropriate
                                                                                                       Maintains an
                                                 organizational
                                                                            Maintains an              organizational
                                                   structure to
                                                                            appropriate                structure that
                                                   address the
                        Attempts to                                        organizational           intentionally and
                                                     specific
                    organize ideas, but                                     structure to                 effectively
  Organization                                  requirements of
                      lacks control of                                      address the                enhances the
                                                the prompt, with
                         structure.                                           specific               presentation of
                                                 some lapses in
                                                                          requirements of             information as
                                                  coherence or
                                                                            the prompt.              required by the
                                                awkward use of
the organizational                         specific prompt.
                                           structure.
                                                                                    Demonstrates
                                                              Demonstrates a
                                                                                   and maintains a
                                                                 command of
                                                                                    well-developed
                                                                    standard
                                                                                     command of
                                                                     English
                                                                                  standard English
                                        Demonstrates an       conventions and
                                                                                   conventions and
                                        uneven command          cohesion, with
                     Attempts to                                                    cohesion, with
                                            of standard            few errors.
                    demonstrate                                                        few errors.
                                               English             Response
                  standard English                                                     Response
                                         conventions and            includes
                  conventions, but                                                       includes
                                          cohesion. Uses        language and
                lacks cohesion and                                                  language and
Conventions                            language and tone      tone appropriate
                      control of                                                  tone consistently
                                             with some        to the audience,
                 grammar, usage,                                                  appropriate to the
                                            inaccurate,          purpose, and
                  and mechanics.                                                        audience,
                                         inappropriate, or           specific
                 Sources are used                                                    purpose, and
                                        uneven features.       requirements of
                   without citation.                                                      specific
                                       Inconsistently cites       the prompt.
                                                                                   requirements of
                                              sources.          Cites sources
                                                                                      the prompt.
                                                                    using an
                                                                                  Consistently cites
                                                                  appropriate
                                                                                    sources using
                                                              format with only
                                                                                      appropriate
                                                                 minor errors.
                                                                                          format.
                                                                  Accurately         Integrates
                Attempts to include       Briefly notes
                                                                   presents         relevant and
                disciplinary content       disciplinary
                                                                  disciplinary        accurate
                  in explanations,     content relevant to
                                                              content relevant       disciplinary
                but understanding      the prompt; shows
   Content                                                      to the prompt       content with
                of content is weak;     basic or uneven
Understanding                                                   with sufficient       thorough
                      content is        understanding of
                                                                 explanations     explanations that
                      irrelevant,        content; minor
                                                                      that          demonstrate
                 inappropriate, or          errors in
                                                                 demonstrate           in-depth
                     inaccurate.          explanation.
                                                               understanding.      understanding.
STANDARDS

 Common Core Anchor Standards Reading
   R.CCR.1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
   from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from
   the text.

   R.CCR.2: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
   the key supporting details and ideas.

   R.CCR.4: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
   connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or
   tone.

   R.CCR.6: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

   R.CCR.10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
   proficiently.

 Common Core Anchor Standards Writing
   W.CCR.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and
   information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of
   content.

   W.CCR.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
   are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

   W.CCR.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
   trying a new approach.

   W.CCR.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
   research.

   W.CCR.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision)
   and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and
   audiences.

 Custom Standards
   W.8.2A: Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow: organize ideas, concepts, and
   information into broader categories.
8.W. 2B: Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details,
quotations, or other information and examples.

W.8.2F: Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information
or explanations presented
Section 2: What Skills?

 Selected Skills

    Preparing for the Task
      TASK ENGAGEMENT: Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills,
      experiences, interests, and concerns

      TASK ANALYSIS: Ability to understand and explain the task's prompt and rubric.

    Reading Process
      ACTIVE READING: Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text.

      ACTIVE READING: Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text.

      ESSENTIAL VOCABULARY: Ability to apply strategies for developing an understanding of text(s)
      by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts, or information.

      NOTE-TAKING: Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or
      paraphrase.

    Transition to Writing
      BRIDGING: Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.

    Writing Process
      CONTROLLING IDEA: Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant
      to task.

      PLANNING: Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an
      information/explanation task.

      DEVELOPMENT: Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      REVISION: Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as
      appropriate to audience and purpose.

      EDITING: Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.

      COMPLETION: Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.
Section 3: What Instruction?

 MiniTasks

    Preparing for the Task
      TASK ENGAGEMENT: Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills,
      experiences, interests, and concerns

         SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                         25 minutes

         In a quick write, write your first reaction to the task prompt.

         Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
         Students will answer the quick write in their writer's notebook. Students will participate in
         class discussion and take appropriate notes.

         Instructional Strategies:
         Students will share in class discussion their first reaction to the prompt.
         Explain to students that the play they read about Helen Keller ended with her realizing the
         concept of language when she was seven years old. Helen Keller overcame her
         handicaps, but she is noted for doing more than that.
         Explain that Helen Keller lived to be 87 years old and left behind a legacy of helping
         others. Tell students they will be reading articles to discover this legacy.
         Lead a class discussion about the following questions:
         What is a legacy?
         What does it mean to leave a legacy for others?
         -students will come to a consensus about the meaning of legacy. -students will write the
         definition and it will also be posted on bulletin board
         -share with students about Jarrett's Joy Cart, a legacy of Jarrett Mynear who was a former
         student at our school
         -share with students Reese's Bucket List, a legacy of Reese Kemp who is a former
         student at our school
         Lead a class discussion about how the disabled were treated during the time Keller was a
         child and how disabled people are treated today. Students will create a t-chart to show the
         differences/similarities.
         Tell students they will be reading articles to find information about what Helen Keller did to
         help others and how her accomplishments created her legacy.
         Link this task to earlier class content.
         Discuss student responses.
         Clarify timetable and support plans for the task.

         LIST                                                                               10 minutes
To determine what students know about Helen Keller's work with the disabled, fill in a
   chart and tell what you know (K),and what you want to know (W) about Helen Keller's work
   with the disabled.

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Students will fill in the chart with sufficient evidence.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Students will list what they know about Helen Keller and how she helped improve the lives
   of the disabled.
   Students will list what they need to know about Helen Keller and her work with the
   disabled in order to answer the essential question in the task.

TASK ANALYSIS: Ability to understand and explain the task's prompt and rubric.

   LIST                                                                              20 minutes

   In your own words, what are the important features of a good response to this prompt?

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Students rewrite task in their own words and list five features of a of a good response to
   the task.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Read the task aloud with the class
   Have students underline what the task is asking them to do and circle the product
   Discuss with class that the task is NOT asking for a biography of Helen Keller
   Ask students what they will have to do before they begin writing
   -read articles; annotate articles; take notes; write outline
   Discuss what type of writing is required for the task (informative)and ask students to list
   the important features of a good response to this prompt. Have a students make a list of
   these features.
   Identify or invite students to identify key features of examples.
   -strong introduction and conclusion with thesis statement
   -logical organization
   -specific examples with explanation
   -topic sentences, concluding sentences
   -paraphrasing/quotes from text cited correctly
   Create a classroom list; students will write list in their booklet
   Students will write in their own words what the task is asking them to do

   Notes:
   Teacher will review student responses to make sure they understand the writing task.
NOTES                                                                             25 minutes

     Students will be given examples of informational articles and a list of key elements needed
     to receive a "3" answer. Students will label those elements in the articles.

     Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
     Students will use key elements to label the example articles.

     Instructional Strategies:
     Break students into groups of four and give each group an informational article about
     Helen Keller.
     Using the list students created about the key features of a well-written informational article,
     have students label the example articles.
     Teacher will check with groups to make sure they are labeling the articles correctly and
     will explain any misconceptions.

     LIST                                                                              60 minutes

     Rubric Analysis
     In small groups, list the "4" rubric in your own words and identify those elements in an
     example paragraph

     Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
     Students will meet expectations if they list the rubric in their own words.

     Instructional Strategies:
     Introduce rubric to class and give students 5 minutes to read over and highlight key terms.
     -each group will make a list of the key terms for each section of the "4" category
     -students will share their list and teacher will make chart to keep in the classroom

Reading Process
  ACTIVE READING: Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text.

     NOTES                                                    Four-five 45 minute class periods

     What is the author trying to accomplish? Which parts of the text show you that?

     Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
Teacher will check Writer's Notebook with students' highlighting and annotations for
   correctness.
   Students should have a variety of marks (circles, underlining, starts, highlighting) and
   should have written questions/comments in the margins that are specific to answering the
   teaching task.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Review essential question and writing task with students.
   Discuss with students what information about Helen Keller they will need and remind
   students they are not writing a biography.
   As a reading strategy, the class will discuss what they think the title of the first article
   means and how it might give a clue to the main idea of the article.
   Front load vocabulary synonyms for advocate, advocacy work, and foundation. Students
   record in Vocabulary Words Section of their Writer's Notebook. Introduce 2-3 new words
   each day from their reading.
   Instructions for the first article should be very explicit and include partner work and teacher
   modeling.
   Teacher reads the first section of the article and models active reading strategies using
   the document camera. Using Collaborative Summarizing Reading STrategy, the teacher
   will guide the students in identifying the 3-5 most important ideas from the reading.
   Students will underline those facts and write key words in the margins.
   Teacher will instruct students to circle any vocabulary words students struggle with and do
   not know the meaning. These words will be recorded in the Vocabulary Words section.
   Students will use context clues to determine the meaning of the words.
   Students will continue reading the article in pairs and will underline key ideas and annotate
   in the margins.
   Students will also be encouraged to write notes in the margins as they reflect upon what
   they have read in the article.
   Teacher will share his/her own annotations/highlights from the readings and students will
   add missing information.
   Students will take notes after reading each article (see note taking skills).
   Check each student's progress on the annotations/highlighting of the articles.
   Students actively read and annotate the remaining text with a gradual release of peer and
   teacher support.

   Notes:
   With collaborative classes, the teacher will read all articles aloud and model
   annotations/highlighting with the class. For more advanced classes, students will read
   more independently and annotate/highlight in class or for homework.

ACTIVE READING: Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text.

   SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE
What is the author trying to accomplish? Which parts of the text show you that?
   L2 What competing arguments have you encountered or can you think of?
   L3 What historical or current examples can you note that relate to the task prompt?

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Answers questions with credible response.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Invite students to brainstorm ways to figure out any authors intent.
   Invite students to share and discuss their answers for each text.
   After the discussion, allow them to add to their entries.

ESSENTIAL VOCABULARY: Ability to apply strategies for developing an understanding of text(s)
by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts, or information.

   LIST                                                                                   Ongoing

   In your notebook, list words and phrases essential to the texts. Add definitions, and (if
   appropriate) notes on connotation in this context.

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Lists appropriate words and phrases.
   Provides accurate definitions and sentences.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Teacher will list in Writer's Notebook initial vocabulary (legacy, activist) that students will
   encounter in their readings.
   Using the Frayer Model, students will create a poster for the words legacy and activist.
   As students encounter unknown words in their articles, they will list them, attempt a
   definition for the word based on context, check the definition in the dictionary and add the
   word to their Vocabulary Words notes.
   Students will also write the word in the sentence it is used in the article.
   At the end of each article, students will share any new words they have listed in their
   notebook.
   Students will write words and definitions on Post-it notes and place them on vocabulary
   wall to share with the class.

NOTE-TAKING: Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or
paraphrase.

   NOTES                                                       Four-five 45-minute class periods
From each text, make a list of the elements that look most important for answering the
      prompt.

      Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
      Identifies relevant elements.
      Includes information to support accurate citation (for example, page numbers for a long
      text, clear indication when quoting directly.

      Instructional Strategies:
      Students will be given note-taking templates and will take notes about what Helen Keller
      did to improve the lives of the disabled.
      Teacher will model note-taking (After the first article is read and annotated) in the following
      way:
      -Write the title of the article and bibliographic information at the top of the note-taking
      page.
      -Using a bullet format, list the essential information contributed by the students on the
      note-taking page in the WRiter's Notebook.
      -Ask students to choose one direct quote from each article that supports the thesis and list
      at the bottom of note-taking page (make sure students identify who said the quote and tell
      who that person is).
      -Students will write a 25-word summary of the text and then share the summary with a
      partner who will circle ideas that they find similar to their own.
      -After students share their summaries, the teacher will then provide his/her own summary
      for correctness.
      After reading each article students will take notes in their Writer's Notebook.
      Teacher will then share his/her notes to five the students any notes they may have
      omitted.
      Teacher will check periodically to see that students are taking through notes in the correct
      format.

      Notes:
      Teacher will check student notes to make sure essential information is given in the correct
      format.

      Accommodations and Interventions:
      For collaborative students, the teacher may read more articles aloud and have students
      work together in note-taking.

Transition to Writing
  BRIDGING: Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.
SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                         60 minutes

List what Helen Keller did to improve the lives of others.
Categorize this information into big picture ideas.

Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
Teacher will check students' lists for correctness.
Teacher will check the students' supporting ideas.

Instructional Strategies:
Teacher will ask students what themes emerged in the text and what themes they could
use to narrow the information from the text.
Teacher will guide students in a discussion and help them categorize these areas into big
picture ideas about what Helen Keller did to improve the lives of the disabled.
Students will list information in their Writer's Notebook. Also, a class list will be made using
poster paper and/or document camera for reference throughout the writing stages.
(For example-How Helen Keller's own life was an example for other people with
disabilities, and Helen's efforts to help others through her work with veterans, the
American Foundation for the Blind, Helen Keller International,the Lions Club, and other
groups.)

SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                         60 minutes

Students will evaluate sample essays written in response to the task.

Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
Meets expectations if:
Students participate in discussion and write their explanations for scoring samples on a
piece of paper to be turned in as an exit slip. Written explanations must include the
following information:
-the score they would give the essay
-rubric categories that were strengths and rubric categories that were weaknesses for the
sample.
-2 sentences that give guidance as to how the sample could be improved.

Instructional Strategies:
Teacher will review the writing prompt to clarify the task.
Teacher will review the translated rubric students produced earlier.
All students will read a model essay.
- Using the first component "Focus", the teacher will lead a class discussion on the score
for that component.
- Students will highlight words from the component that match the writing exhibited in the
sample.
- Students will also have a class discussion, partners first then, whole class, to share their
      feedback on the following components: controlling idea, reading/research, development,
      and organization.

      Accommodations and Interventions:
      Less advanced students will focus on fewer components.

      SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                        45 minutes

      Students will read examples of in-text citations and will take sample quotes and
      paraphrases and will write a paragraph using in-text citations.

      Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
      Work Meets Expectations If:
      Students will write paragraph using in-text citations.

      Instructional Strategies:
      Students will read examples of in-text citations in sample paragraphs,
      Students will take sample quotes and paraphrases from article and will write a paragraph
      using in-text citations.
      -teacher will circulate to check paragraphs
      -students will make corrections based on teacher feedback.

      Notes:
      Students have been taught how to do in-text citations earlier in the year. This will be a
      review.

Writing Process
  CONTROLLING IDEA: Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant
  to task.

      SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                         20minutes

      Write a thesis statements that addresses the question in the prompt.

      Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
      Students will write a thesis statement that establishes the main idea of their essay while
      supporting the key points.

      Instructional Strategies:
Have students reread writing prompt.
-review the key points of the prompt
Teacher will ask students the purpose of a thesis statement and will list student
responses.
Students will generate thesis statement for the prompt.
-students will share with the class
and teacher will record 4-5 thesis statements
-students will read thesis statements and discuss strengths and weaknesses with a
partner and share in a class discussion
Students will have 10 minutes to write their own thesis statement and then will share with
their partner for feedback.

Notes:
Teacher will collect and check student thesis statements and provide feedback.

LIST                                                                            40 minutes

Write an opening paragraph that includes a controlling idea and sequences the key points
you plan to make in your composition

Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
Writes a concise opening paragraph
Provides direct answer to main prompt requirements.
Establishes a controlling idea.
Identifies key points that support development of argument.

Instructional Strategies:
Have students reread writing task.
-review the key points of the task
Discuss with class the importance of the opening paragraph (Hook, background
information, thesis)
Share with students examples of strong opening paragraphs. Ask students to discuss the
key elements and effectiveness of the paragraphs.
Pair students and give them an additional paragraph and have them identify key elements
that make it effective. Review as a class.
Have students review their thesis statements and pair/share and make changes in their
own thesis statements if necessary.
Allow time for students to write their opening paragraphs
-circulate and read paragraphs and offer suggestions for improvement.
-share with class good examples of opening paragraphs students have written and lead
short discussion on why paragraphs are strong.
Allow time for students to improve their paragraphs
Notes:
   Teacher will collect opening paragraphs and give feedback.

PLANNING: Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an
information/explanation task.

   OUTLINE                                                                           60 minutes

   Create an outline based on your notes and reading in which you state your claim,
   sequence your points, and note your supporting evidence.

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Creates an outline or organizer.
   Supports controlling idea. Uses evidence from texts read earlier.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Discuss importance/purpose of organization
   Review text requirements:
   -review task
   - use evidence from a minimum of three different texts in their essay
   -cite texts correctly
   Discuss outline template in writer's notebook
   -review each section of outline (thesis, topic sentence, supporting details, transitional
   words)
   Have students review the big ideas categories they created earlier about how Helen Keller
   helped improve the lives of disabled people
   Using these big ideas, have students write in the outline template the topic sentences for
   each supporting paragraph.
   Allow time for students to complete outline using information from notes they have taken.
   Students will pair and give feedback on outlines and will revise if needed.
   Encourage students to use key vocabulary from the list they have compiled in their
   Writer's Notebook.
   Encourage students to highlight or check information in notes they use in their outline.

   Notes:
   Teacher will collect student outlines and check for correctness.
   Teacher will give feedback.

DEVELOPMENT: Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

   LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                         90 minutes
Write an initial draft complete with opening, development, and closing; insert and cite
   textual evidence.

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Provides complete draft with all parts.
   Supports the opening in the later sections with evidence and citations.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Review writing task and "4" rubric.
   Have students read opening paragraphs they have written and have them underline the
   thesis statement.
   Teacher will show students example of supporting paragraphs and will have students label
   key parts
   -topic sentences, supporting details, textual evidence, quotes and explanation of quotes,
   transition words, concluding sentence.
   Using outline as a guide, students will write the first supporting paragraphs.
   -Teachers will check paragraph for correctness.
   Encourage students to re-read prompt partway through writing, to check that they are on
   track.

   Notes:
   Students will have been taught paragraphing and citing textual evidence earlier in the
   school year. They will have also have written several articles/essay throughout the year.

   LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                        30minutes

   Students will read examples of concluding paragraph and will then write a concluding
   paragraph of their own

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Students will write concluding paragraph with needed information.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Show students example of concluding paragraph and lead discussion about the elements
   of that paragraph.
   Read additional example of concluding paragraphs and have students list key elements
   and share with the class in a short discussion.
   Allow time for students to write a concluding paragraph.

REVISION: Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as
appropriate to audience and purpose.
LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                        45 minutes

   Refine compositions analysis, logic, and organization of ideas/points. Use textual evidence
   carefully, with accurate citations. Decide what to include and what not to include.

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Provides complete draft with all parts.
   Supports the opening in the later sections with evidence and citations.
   Improves earlier edition.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Discuss peer review handout
   Review rubric to show proficient qualities
   Show students example of article that has been revised
   Pair students to give feedback on rough draft
   -have students use symbols in the margins to show they have sufficient evidence:
   TS - topic sentence
   TE - textual evidence
   QU - Quote
   S-signficance of quote or textual evidence
   CS - Concluding sentence
   TRANS - transitions
   Encourage students to mark in margins where information in unclear or where extra
   information is needed
   Sample useful feedback that balances support for strengths and clarity about weaknesses.
   Assign students to provide each other with feedback on those issues.

EDITING: Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.

   LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                        45 minutes

   Revise draft to have sound spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. Adjust
   formatting as needed to provide clear, appealing text.

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Provides draft free from distracting surface errors.
   Uses format that supports purpose.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Briefly review selected skills that many students need to improve.
   Make collective list of words most likely to be misspelled with this topic
   Review correct way to cite sources in text
   Review list of proofreading marks
Have students edit their own essay before sharing essay with peer
   Assign students to proofread each other's text a second time using a red pen
   Allow time for students to correct their own writing before creating final copy

   Accommodations and Interventions:
   Collaborative classes may need teacher to help edit.

COMPLETION: Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.

   LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE                                                         45 minutes

   Turn in your complete set of drafts, plus the final version of your piece

   Scoring Guide (Work Meets Expectations If):
   Fits the Meets Expectations category in the rubric for the teaching task.

   Instructional Strategies:
   Review rubric and have students self assess the qualities of their rough draft before
   beginning final copy. Have students make adjustments to writing if necessary.
   Have students turn in final copy and rubric
   Have students turn in rough draft and outline

   Accommodations and Interventions:
   Collaborative classes make need more than 45 minutes to complete final copy
Resources

  Selected Articles
            Helen Keller.
    (http://modulecreator.com/ModuleCreator/#page=login&moduleId=22573&scrollTo=articles)
    Helen Keller (Great Neck Publishing) (2005)Stevenson, Keira
    Presents a biography of activist and writer Helen Keller. Background; Childhood case of scarlet
    fever, which left her blind, deaf and mute; Her relationship with her teacher, Anne Sullivan; Details
    of her education in sign language and lip reading; Highlights of her writings; Activism on behalf of
    the handicapped; Interest in social issues as a result of the high rate of blindness in poor
    communities; Pacifism; Details of films based on her life.
                                                                                                                      1090L

            Ordinary People.
    (http://modulecreator.com/ModuleCreator/#page=login&moduleId=22573&scrollTo=articles)
    Humanist (Nov/Dec96)Wolfe, Kathi
    Comments on the sentiment, stereotype, ignorance and curiosity that comprises society's attitude
    toward the disabled. Reasons for misperception surrounding people with disabilities; Media's
    creation of societal attitudes toward the disabled; Criticism of the portrayal of the character
    Quasimodo in the Walt Disney animated movie `The Hunchback of Notre Dame.' INSET:
    Quotable Keller...
                                                                                                                       950L

  Uploaded Files
            Sample informational essay.TIF
    (http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/teacherresourceuploads/22573/867288927_May_12_2014_103147132.TIF)

    Example of Informational Essay

  Keywords

  Links*
    * These Lexile measures were computed automatically and did not undergo human review. They
    are not certified measures and should not be published or recorded in any way.

  Other Resources
            Daniels, Patricia. "Helen Keller:Both Deaf and Blind, Helen Keller Became a Writer and
    Activist." "About.com 20th Century History, Web 15 July 2013.

            Gibson, William. The Miracle Worker. New York: Pocket Books, 2002.
"Helen Keller: Author, Political Activist and Advocate." American Foundation for the Blind,
n.d. Web 1 Nov. 2013.

        "Helen Keller: Beyond the Miracle." Legacy.com, n.d. Web 15 July 2013.

        "Helen Keller Biography." American Foundation for the Blind, n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2011.

        "Helen Keller International - About Us." Helen Keller International, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

        "Helen Keller Statue Unveiled at Capitol." Cable News Network, n.p 7 Oct. 2009 Web. 30
Oct. 2013.

        Interview with Keller Johnson-Thompson. Scholastic.com 29 Oct. 2009.

        Keller, Helen. "Knights for the Blind." Milipitas Host Lions Club, n.p. 30 June 1925, Web. 31
Oct/ 2013.

        "Leading the Vision Loss Community." American Foundation for the Blind, n.d. Web. 1 Nov.
2013.

        "Lions Work to Improve Sight and Prevent Blindness." Lions Club International, n.p. Web 30
Oct. 2013.
Section 4: What Results?

 Classroom Assessment Rubric
      Not Yet
     Focus              Attempts to address prompt but lacks focus or is off-task.
Reading/Research        Attempts to present information relevant to prompt.
 Controlling Idea       Controlling idea is weak and does not establish a purpose and/or address a research question.
                        Tends to retell rather than present information in order to answer questions, solve problems; lacks
  Development           details to develop topic. *L2 Implications are weak or not relevant to topic. L3 Does not identifies a
                        relevant gap or unanswered question.
  Organization          Applies an ineffective structure; composition does not address requirements of the prompt.
                        Demonstrates a weak command of standard English conventions; lacks cohesion; language and tone
  Conventions
                        are inappropriate to audience and purpose.
Meets Expectations
     Focus              Addresses prompt with a focused response.
Reading/Research        Presents and applies relevant information with general accuracy.
                        Establishes a controlling idea that states the main purpose and/or question for the tasks. L2 Addresses
 Controlling Idea
                        the credibility of sources.
                        Presents sufficient information in order to examine or convey topics or issues, answer questions, solve
  Development           problems; identifies salient themes or features; explains key information with sufficient detail. *L2
                        Discusses relevant implications to topic. L3 Identifies a gap or unanswered question.
  Organization          Applies a generally effective structure to address specific requirements of the prompt.
                        Demonstrates a command of standard English conventions and cohesion; employs language and tone
  Conventions
                        appropriate to audience and purpose.

 Classroom Assessment Task

       No Classroom Assessment Task for this module

 Exemplar Work

    Uploaded Files
       Sample A.TIF (Advanced)
       (http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1232102546_May_01_2014_14090859.TIF)

       Sample A Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"

       Sample B.TIF (Meets Expectations)
       (http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1231179025_May_01_2014_141028611.TIF)

       Sample B Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"

       Sample C.TIF (Approaches Expectations)
       (http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1230255504_May_01_2014_14115343.TIF)
Sample c Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"

Sample D.TIF (Not Yet)
(http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1229331983_May_01_2014_141228769.TIF)

Sample D Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"

Sample E.TIF (Not Yet)
(http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1228408462_May_01_2014_14131168.TIF)

Sample E Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"

Sample F.TIF (Approaches Expectations)
(http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1227484941_May_01_2014_141334534.TIF)

Sample F Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"

Sample G.TIF (Meets Expectations)
(http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1226561420_May_01_2014_141357916.TIF)

Sample G Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"

Sample H.TIF (Advanced)
(http://literacybytechnology.s3.amazonaws.com/worksampleuploads/22573/1225637899_May_01_2014_141424247.TIF)

Sample H Informational - "Helen Keller Legacy"
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