LEARNING COMMUNITIES COURSE SUPPLEMENT - FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS ON THE NEW YORK CITY CAMPUS - Pace University

 
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LEARNING COMMUNITIES COURSE SUPPLEMENT - FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS ON THE NEW YORK CITY CAMPUS - Pace University
LEARNING COMMUNITIES                                                                    FALL 2019
        COURSE SUPPLEMENT
        FOR FIRST‑YEAR STUDENTS ON
        THE NEW YORK CITY CAMPUS

     www.pace.edu/orientationFall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

14366_Fall 2019 Course Supplement NYC Edit.indd 1                                                          4/25/19 12:00 PM
LEARNING COMMUNITIES
                                     COURSE SUPPLEMENT
                             Please review this instruction sheet before reading the learning community course descriptions.

                                                    This Learning Communities Course Supplement
                                                             includes three sections for:

                                                                      PFORZHEIMER HONORS                            CHALLENGE TO ACHIEVEMENT AT
                       FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
                                                                        COLLEGE STUDENTS                            PACE (CAP) PROGRAM STUDENTS

             A learning community links courses and disciplines so that students and professors share a coherent and enriched
             learning experience. For example, an English course might be paired with an introductory computer course, or an
             astronomy course might be linked to a math course.

             Pace University offers two types of learning communities:
             ■■ Two paired, integrated, and coordinated courses, each taught by a different professor in a different
                discipline. Students must register for both sections of the learning community.
             OR
             ■■ An interdisciplinary (INT) course taught by a team of two professors from different disciplines and
                focused on a particular theme.

             In either case, learning communities provide an ideal setting for college students to develop a sense
             of responsibility and community; experience increased interaction with faculty; engage in a rich,
             active, and collaborative learning environment; explore diverse perspectives; and gain a deeper
             understanding of course materials.

             * The 200-level designation of some courses is not important—these classes are without pre-requisites and designed for first-year students
               without backgrounds in the subjects.

             Instructions for all sections:
             Please carefully read through all the following first-year student learning community options. Some learning
             communities are major-restricted. In the section that applies to you (e.g., first-year, Honors, or CAP) choose
             and rank your preferences. You will be asked to input your selections when you register for Orientation.

        Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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FALL 2019 LEARNING COMMUNITIES FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
        1. Aesthetics: Theory and Practice (6 credits)                             4. Composing America (6 credits)
             Combines ART 165: Mixed Media and PHI 170:                               Combines ENG 110: Composition and AMS 102:
             Introduction to Aesthetics                                               Introduction to American Studies

             Description: The linked philosophical and studio                         Description: In this learning community, students will learn
             components of this learning community move back and                      about the process of writing while using the methods of
             forth between philosophical aesthetics and actual art-                   cultural studies to analyze contemporary US life. Students
             making as if the student were taking a course in ornithology             will read texts, view film, and go on field visits in order
             while training to become a bird. The readings for this                   to study the spaces, places, and practices that create
             course range from ancient to contemporary philosophy,                    the idea of America from both national and transnational
             while the art assignments will be executed in a variety of               perspectives. The final project is a case study about a
             media. No artistic talent or experience required, and it’s               space of the student’s own choosing (a neighborhood,
             open to all majors.                                                      building, public event, and so on) and through research and
                                                                                      observation, students will evaluate how certain American
        2. Art and Interactivity: Introduction to Digital                             ideals are reflected or come into contradiction within the
                                                                                      place they have chosen.
           Design and Computing (6 credits)
             Combines ART 186: Digital Design and CIS 101:
                                                                                   5. Computing and Business in the Digital Age
             Introduction to Computing
                                                                                      (6 credits)
             Description: This course brings together the disciplines                 Combines CIS 101: Introduction to Computing and
             of fine arts and computer science as they intersect in a                 BUS 101: Contemporary Business Practice
             blog space. The fine arts portion studies the fundamentals
             of digital design including imaging, collage, typography,                Description: Computer skills have become a fundamental
             composition, form, perspective, and color theory. Students               necessity for anyone in business. This learning community
             explore artwork and graphics on the Apple platform using                 integrates the teaching of computer skills with the learning
             Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and blogs. The                       of business basics. Students learn the principles of business
             computer science portion provides an understanding of                    through a series of computer simulations and learn computer
             the role of computers and the skill sets required. Each                  basics by designing spreadsheets and programs to assist in
             student’s creative abilities are identified and cultivated               making business decisions for these simulations. Students
             through the use of technology in a digital media context.                learn to apply Excel, HTML, and JavaScript applications to
             Key concepts in computing technology are studied                         simulations about pricing, production, marketing, investments,
             including software and hardware needs for digital media,                 distribution, human resources management, global trading,
             digital rights management, privacy, and security, as well as             labor relations, and other business topics.
             webpage design (HTML), programming (JavaScript), and
             building one’s own digital media presence. Students will              6. Domination and Resistance: Gender, Race,
             produce a functional and well-designed blog centered on
             their interests.                                                         and Class (6 credits)
                                                                                      Combines POL 102: Public Myth and Ideologies and
                                                                                      WS 166: Gender, Race, and Class
        3. Bridging the Divide: Traditional Media Meets
           Digital Technology (6 credits)*                                            Description: This learning community looks at the physical,
             Combines ART 289: Video I and ART 173:                                   political, legal, and cultural means that have been used by
             Graphic Design I                                                         dominant groups to exert power and shape the consciousness
                                                                                      of the less powerful. Students will examine the cultural, social,
             Description: This learning community examines traditional                and political strategies subordinate groups have employed to
             mediums in 3D along with new technologies of graphic                     oppose their unequal circumstances and liberate themselves.
             design. Students’ work will reflect a hybridization of                   WS 166 will focus on issues of domestic violence, rape,
             techniques in image making. Imagery will be generated                    pornography, and global violence against women, particularly
             digitally (e.g., using Photoshop or Flash) and then serve                in recent American immigrant or non-white communities.
             as a source for spatial design with simple construction                  POL 102 will investigate the legal, political, and cultural
             materials. Similarly, students will explore the possibilities of         subordination of women in American politics, also paying
             organic and inorganic forms for both aesthetic and practical             attention to three other groups: workers, the black community,
             three-dimensional objects.                                               and the LGBTQA+ community. The focus is on the lived
             Note: Only first-year students with a declared art major (BA             experience of domination and resistance as seen through film,
             or BFA) can take this learning community. All art majors are             biographical and autobiographical accounts, and theater.
             encouraged to take this learning community.

                                                                  Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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7.       Gender and Television (6 credits)*                                  10.    Fearless Texts: Don Quixote (6 credits)
                 Combines ENG 110: Composition and WS 296:                                  Combines ENG 120: Composition and SPA 154:
                 Girls on Film                                                              Spanish Culture
                 Description: Second-wave feminist Betty Friedan famously                   Description: Miguel de Cervantes’ novel Don Quixote
                 claimed that American television presented the American                    is a masterpiece of the Spanish Golden Age, as well as a
                 woman as a “stupid, unattractive, insecure little household                window into the way writing can be fearless at any point in
                 drudge who spends her martyred, mindless, boring days                      time, including our own. In this class, students will devote
                 dreaming of love—and plotting nasty revenge against her                    the semester to reading the novel that gave us the first
                 husband.” This learning community will test this claim and                 modern superhero and dared to connect real-life people
                 explore how gender was constructed and performed in                        and circumstances to the world of literature. Don Quixote
                 primetime television from the 1950s to the 1980s. It will                  was a critique of contemporary politics and a commentary
                 examine the presentation of marital roles, child rearing, the              on all the forms of writing during Cervantes’ time: novella
                 subaltern, sexuality, and the construction and subversion                  de caballeria, novella sentimental, novella picaresque,
                 of household normativity. Students will explore the                        novella pastoral, novella italianizante, and a variety of poetic
                 construction and performance of femininity, masculinity,                   forms. Through reading, discussion, writing assignments,
                 race, class, and sexuality in primetime television.                        in-class workshops, and site visits, students will bring this
                                                                                            text alive as the fearless experiment that it was for its time.
        8.       Environment in Flux, 1492–Present (6 credits)                              Don Quixote and other assigned texts originally written in
                                                                                            Spanish will be available in translation. Students are not
                 Combines ENG 110: Composition and ENV 110: Nature
                                                                                            required to speak Spanish.
                 and Culture—A Study in Connections
                 Description: This learning community will examine the               11.    Making Change Happen: Social and Political
                 profound impact of and interaction between humans
                                                                                            Activism in Global Context (6 credits)
                 and our natural environment. The English portion will
                 start in the past—the Columbian Exchange of animals,                       Combines SOC 113: Dynamics of Change, What’s Next?
                 plants, diseases, and people from the “old” world to the                   and WS 166: Gender, Race, and Class
                 “new.” This sets the stage for the environmental portion,                  Description: This learning community will examine
                 which will take students on a whirlwind tour through                       efforts of different groups to bring about social and
                 contemporary environmental issues. Students will explore                   political change in the attempt to identify practices and
                 the connections between environmental degradation,                         mechanisms that promote effective activism. The course
                 disease, the population boom, climate change, and energy                   will target topics such as collective identity and motivation
                 extraction from scientific, economic, political, and activist              for organization, the power that traditional and social
                 perspectives.                                                              media plays in facilitating or limiting change, and feminist
                                                                                            and anti-feminist forms of activism. Students will study the
        9.       Ethics in the Public Domain (6 credits)                                    American cases of the Suffrage Movement, the Civil Rights
                                                                                            Movement, the Tea Party, and the struggle for reproductive
                 Combines ENG 120: Critical Writing and POL 102:
                                                                                            rights, as well as international cases such as activism in
                 Public Myth and Ideologies                                                 times of conflict and feminist activism in Latin America and
                 Description: Publicly debated controversies about values                   the Middle East.
                 and standards of conduct will be analyzed and discussed
                 with attention paid to ideologies, collective behavior, and         12.    Man Trouble (6 credits)*
                 common practices. The issues confronted—from a political
                                                                                            Combines ENG 110: Composition and WS 268:
                 science and literature perspective—will include human
                 estrangement versus unity, equality, and power, and we will                Men and Masculinities
                 track these issues as they change from place to place and                  Description: The social and biological sciences as well
                 across time.                                                               as literary, cultural, and historical criticism reveal few, if any
                                                                                            stable definitions of “masculinity.” Masculinity is a social
                                                                                            construction—a cultural fiction—yet American culture still
                                                                                            looks nostalgically to “manly” culture heroes like John
                                                                                            Wayne and Clint Eastwood, or action heroes turned
                                                                                            politicians like Ronald Reagan and Arnold Schwarzenegger.
                                                                                            This learning community will explore the ways in which
                                                                                            masculinity is tied to notions of class, race, nationhood,
                                                                                            and sexuality. Students will discuss personal and extrinsic
                                                                                            concerns of gender identity and gender performance.

        * The 200-level designation of some courses is not important—these classes are without pre-requisites and designed for first-year students
          without backgrounds in the subjects.

        Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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13.      New York Studies: Sites and Sights (6 credits)*                     17.    The Sacred and the Secular in East Asia
                 Combines AMS 102: Introduction to American Studies                         (6 credits)*
                 and ART 297T: Drawing and Painting on Site                                 Combines HIS 131: The Asian World and RES 202:
                 Description: This is a learning community that links                       Great Ideas in Eastern Religious Thought
                 American Studies with perceptually based drawing                           Description: This learning community explores the
                 and painting. Through regular field trips and site visits,                 historical development of society and culture in China and
                 students will learn the interdisciplinary methods of cultural              Japan, with emphasis on the influence of religious traditions
                 studies by which we can analyze the place of New York in                   including Confucianism, Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, and
                 contemporary US life. Students will create a portfolio of                  Shinto. Two major components of this learning community
                 drawings and paintings, as well as a case study of a site of               will include field trips to local museums and film screenings.
                 their own choosing.
                                                                                     18.    War, Peace, and Democracy: International and
        14.      Paris 101—French Language and Culture                                      American Perspectives (6 credits)*
                 (6 credits)                                                                Combines HIS 254: The American Civil War and
                 Combines FRE 155C: Paris: A Tale of Two Cities and                         POL 111: Introduction to International Relations
                 FRE 101: Elementary College French I
                                                                                            Description: Democracy building, nation building, racial
                 Description: Students will have a unique opportunity to                    oppression, sectional conflict, retribution. The US faced
                 master the fundamentals of spoken and written French                       these issues dramatically in the mid-19th century, but
                 while simultaneously pursuing a course of study in the                     modern nations face the same issues and the same
                 culture, literature, and arts of Paris, the City of Light. FRE             challenges today. This course will discuss, both within the
                 155C will investigate French literature, language, and                     context of the US Civil War and how nations deal with each
                 the arts through the most significant trends and periods                   other around the world today, the causes of nationalism
                 of French culture. The pairing of the two classes will                     and ethnic conflict, war, peacemaking and peacekeeping,
                 encourage students to derive maximum benefit from a                        diplomacy, and human rights. Particular attention will
                 learning experience that will be more than the sum of its                  be paid to the challenges of democratization and nation
                 parts. “An artist has no home in Europe except in Paris.”—                 building throughout the world as they pertain to the factors
                 Friedrich Nietzsche                                                        needed to achieve political and economic stability while
                                                                                            building a just society among people and nations.
        15.      Performing Social Change (6 credits)
                 Combines ENG 110: Composition with AMS 102:                         19.    Work and Wealth: History and Literature of the
                 Introduction to American Studies                                           Rise of Big Business in America (7 credits)
                 Description: What does equality mean in an unequal                         Combines ENG 120: Critical Writing and HIS 113K:
                 world? What does inequality look like and how does it                      The American Experience—The City and the Workplace
                 happen? Most importantly, what can we do to bring about                    Description: Money, power, greed, ambition, schemes.
                 social transformation? This learning community explores                    How has work in America produced the rise of big business
                 the ways activists, artists, writers, and thinkers have gone               and great wealth? This course will begin with Alexander
                 about assessing and addressing the injustices at work in                   Hamilton’s plans to link the new nation to the interests of
                 contemporary US culture. Students will critically examine                  the affluent and then trace the development of America’s
                 and denaturalize the social, economic, and political                       major businesses through the 20th century. Students will
                 structures that undergird inequality in the US, and consider               use literary readings in ENG 120 to gain insight into how
                 the ways our actions as agents of culture act as a vital                   American society valued achieving wealth through work
                 force in reproducing systems of inequality.                                and the moral and ethical choices that acquiring wealth can
                                                                                            present to individuals.
        16.      The Economics of Sex (6 credits)
                 Combines WS 166: Gender, Race, and Class,                           20.    Writing and Media Change (6 credits)*
                 and ECO 106: Principles of Microeconomics                                  Combines ENG 110: Composition and LIT 205:
                 Description: This learning community examines how our                      Intro to Literature, Culture, and Media
                 consumption impacts the commonly held core values of our                   Description: This learning community offers an
                 society. The course will focus on issues of sex and sexuality              introduction to the study of literature while providing an
                 and analyze them through a lens of women’s and gender                      opportunity for students to develop their own research and
                 theory and basic principles of economics. The course                       writing skills. Drawing on literary studies and the related
                 will focus on changes in supply and demand, income                         fields of cultural and media studies, students will build a
                 distribution, consumer behavior, and other economic                        critical vocabulary that will be used to understand what
                 factors, as well as address how our consumption impacts                    literature is, why it matters, how the idea of literature has
                 what we believe about sexuality, pornography, gender, our                  changed over time, and how the study of literature provides
                 bodies, and our health.                                                    insight into ongoing struggles to achieve social justice.

        * The 200-level designation of some courses is not important—these classes are without pre-requisites and designed for first-year students
          without backgrounds in the subjects.

                                                                   Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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PFORZHEIMER HONORS COLLEGE LEARNING COMMUNITIES
        Section Open to Honors Students Only

        1. Antiquity through the Middle Ages in Art and                             3. Classical Civilization Living Learning Community
           History (6 credits)*                                                        (at 182 Broadway) (6 credits)
             Combines ART 102: Art History: Ancient through Gothic                      Combines PHI 113: Ancient Philosophy and HIS 102:
             and HIS 102: Ancient and Medieval History through the                      Ancient and Medieval History through the 14th Century
             14th Century                                                               Description: In this learning community, students will
             Description: This learning community provides an                           examine Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy and literature
             introduction to centuries of the unique achievements of the                beginning with the work of the poets Homer, Hesiod,
             world’s major cultures, from the prehistoric era through the               and Sappho, continuing with representative samples of
             gothic, using the disciplines of history and art history. Works            Greek tragedy and comedy, of the philosophy of Plato and
             of literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, and other                Aristotle, and concluding with examples of Roman literature
             artifacts are studied with special attention to the development            and philosophy. In addition to the curriculum materials
             of style, historical context, and interaction with other societies.        discussed in classes, there will be field trips and additional
             The social, economic, political, cultural, and geographical                extracurricular activities to enrich learning experiences. This
             backgrounds will be explored in order to lend context to the               is a living learning community with a residential component.
             art, architecture, and literature. This course includes a private          All members of this learning community will live together on a
             tour through the Metropolitan Museum of Art.                               floor in 182 Broadway.

        2. Bridging the Divide: Traditional Media Meets                             4. Drama of Social Change (6 credits)*
           Digital Technology (6 credits)                                               Combines LIT 211J: American Voices and PAGE 274:
             Combines ART 140: Beginning Drawing and ART 186:                           Theater and Social Justice
             Basic Digital Design                                                       Description: The revolution will not be televised—it will be
             Description: Paint and pixels; creativity in old and new                   staged. This course combines applied theater, a specialized
             media. This learning community examines the traditional                    field that uses theater as a means for social change, with
             medium of painting along with new technologies of digital                  performance studies and sociology. Students enrolled in
             design. Students’ work will reflect a hybridization of                     this course will spend the first half of the semester
             techniques in image making. Imagery will be generated                      volunteering at nonprofit organizations working on pressing
             digitally (e.g., using Photoshop or Flash) and then serve as               societal issues and the second half of the semester creating
             a source for painting. Similarly, paintings may be scanned                 public performances around the issue they have been
             digitally and then manipulated. No experience in art required.             engaged in. Performances will take place in traditional theater
                                                                                        spaces in addition to site-specific locations throughout the
                                                                                        University and the city. The final project will be a presentation
                                                                                        of one-act plays and monologues created by the students.
                                                                                        Note: This course is only open to students who have college
                                                                                        English credit or who have a score of 4 or 5
                                                                                        on either AP English test.

        * The 200-level designation of some courses is not important—these classes are without pre-requisites and designed for first-year students
          without backgrounds in the subjects.

        Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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5. Modern Migrations: Mapping Migration                                      7. Understanding Business in the Digital Age
           in Sociology and Literature (6 credits)*                                     (6 credits)
             Combines LIT 211D: The Individual and Society and                           Combines CIS 101: Introduction to Computing and BUS
             SOC 227: Border Crossings: Immigration and Society                          101: Contemporary Business Practice
             Description: This learning community will examine                           Description: In today’s business environment, business and
             sociological and literary perspectives on migration with a focus            information technology are so inextricably linked that it is not
             on the US. From the sociological view, students will examine                possible for a business to succeed without the support of
             US immigration policy and laws, the “push” and “pull” factors               information technology. Accordingly, this Honors-level learning
             that spur migration, and the consequences of migration for                  community integrates professional computer applications and
             both sending and receiving societies. Through a literary lens,              software with the fundamentals of business. Students will
             students will read novels and short stories about journeys from             learn about the functioning of a business through a computer
             the Caribbean, Latin America, India, and Nigeria. These works               simulation that mimics real-world decisions faced by managers.
             explore migration issues such as cross-cultural identity, second            Students will also learn how to apply their mastery of
             generation experiences, NYC’s status as a global destination,               spreadsheets, presentation software, and web design software
             and the impact of migration on personal and cultural memory.                to the business functions of accounting, finance, management,
             Note: This course is only open to students who have college                 and marketing.
             English credit or who have a score of 4 or 5
             on either AP English test.

                                                                                     8. The (Virtual Poets) Walk (6 credits)*
                                                                                         Incorporates aspects of LIT 211: The Individual and Society
                                                                                         with ART 298B: Mobile Media
        6. Reacting to the Past: Conflict and Revolution
           in Early America (7 credits)                                                  Description: Students in this learning community will
                                                                                         read medieval and Renaissance poetry and create virtual
             Combines HIS 113M: The American Experience—The Early
                                                                                         experiences with contemporary media which enact these
             American Legacy and ENG 120: Critical Writing                               works within the landscape of NYC. Students will explore
             Description: This course will assign texts that will prepare                and use geographic and mobile-based media to form a
             students for role-playing reenactments of famous intellectual               reinvented landscape suffused with classic poetry but mixed
             and political confrontations in early America. First, the course            with contemporary sites. Inspired by the Poet’s Walk in
             will engage in the debates that surrounded women, power,                    Central Park, students will create an audio-visual experience
             community, and theology in Puritan Massachusetts during the                 embodying their poets in Central Park using the contemporary
             trial of Anne Hutchinson (1637). Second, students will become               potential of mobile device media. The course makes
             residents of NYC in 1775–1776, debating the causes of revolt,               connections between the poets and their poetry, from
             enduring the chaos of revolution, and justifying or repudiating             12th century troubadour poets to William Shakespeare,
             violence in the pursuit of political power. Using a series of               as well as the history and contexts of the medieval and early
             political texts of the period and related literary works, students          modern period.
             will analyze, argue, and ultimately become subsumed in these                Note: This course is only open to students who have college
             conflicts.                                                                  English credit or who have a score of 4 or 5 on either AP
                                                                                         English test.

        * The 200-level designation of some courses is not important—these classes are without pre-requisites and designed for first-year students
          without backgrounds in the subjects.

                                                                  Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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CHALLENGE TO ACHIEVEMENT AT PACE (CAP) PROGRAM
        LEARNING COMMUNITIES
        Section Open to CAP Students Only

        1. Culture and Identity (8 credits)                                 3. Gender, Race, and Class (8 credits)
             Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:                           Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:
             Composition and Rhetoric, and ANT 101: Introduction               Composition and Rhetoric, and WS 166: Gender,
             to Anthropology                                                   Race, and Class

             Description: The theme of this learning community                 Description: This learning community examines the
             is the relationship between culture and identity. The             interdependence of gender, race, and class in a variety
             anthropology component will begin with a brief survey of          of literary genres, media, and in contemporary lives.
             human evolution, followed by a closer look at subsequent          Through written assignments and class discussion,
             cultural developments. The English component will explore         students will examine how gender, race, and class roles
             attempts made through fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction,       are constructed, negotiated, and manipulated through
             and film to voice the conflicts in consciousness that arise       literature and other media.
             from this cultural history. Both courses will examine socio-
             cultural changes shaped by significant events such as war,
             globalization, and economic decline. Students will look
             closely at how such major changes are reflected in books,      4. Normative Ethics: Contemporary Moral Problems
             music, television, film, drama, and fashion.
                                                                               (Two Sections) (8 credits)
                                                                               Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:
                                                                               Composition and Rhetoric, and PHI 115: Normative
        2. Future Visions: Computers, Technology, and                          Ethics—Contemporary Moral Problems
           Society (8 credits)                                                 Description: This course is a philosophical examination
             Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:                           of such issues as abortion, sexuality, prostitution, criminal
             Composition and Rhetoric, and CIS 101: Introduction               punishment, euthanasia, medical ethics, business ethics,
             to Computing                                                      civil disobedience, and just and unjust wars. Discussion
                                                                               of these issues will be framed by an examination of major
             Description: The merger of human and machine in the               ethical theories.
             cyborgs of science fiction echoes a similar merger in our
             everyday lives. As we have grown increasingly intertwined
             with our technology, many writers, social scientists, and
             philosophers have begun to examine how this may be
             changing us. Through film and readings in nonfiction and
             fiction, this learning community will explore the impact
             of 21st century technology on the way we relate to each
             other, the way we imagine ourselves and society, and what
             we envision for the future.

        Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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5. Religions of the Globe (8 credits)                                    7. The American Experience: The US and
             Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:                                the World (8 credits)
             Composition and Rhetoric, and RES 106: Religions                       Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:
             of the Globe                                                           Composition and Rhetoric, and HIS 113: The American
                                                                                    Experience—The US and the World
             Description: This learning community focuses on a
             study of the major religious systems of the globe and                  Description: This learning community focuses on the
             the formative influences they have on human culture.                   international crises that America faced during the 20th
             Consideration will be given to Hinduism, Buddhism,                     century. Special emphasis will be placed on World War
             Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.                I, World War II, and the Cold War. Students will read a
                                                                                    variety of historical, literary, and nonfiction works in these
                                                                                    courses. These readings will be enriched by watching
                                                                                    films and taking at least one out-of-classroom field trip.
        6. Technology and Writing (Two Sections)
           (8 credits)
             Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:
                                                                                 8. The Worlds of Psychology (Two Sections)
             Composition and Rhetoric, and CIS 101: Introduction
                                                                                    (9 credits)
             to Computing
                                                                                    Combines ENG 110: Composition, ENG 105:
             Description: This learning community examines where                    Composition and Rhetoric, and PSY 112: Introduction
             computing and writing intersect. As students explore this              to Psychology
             idea, they will experience how computing can reinforce
             writing. Students will apply what they learn in CIS 101                Description: This learning community will integrate
             when they compose essays and present their work in                     the study of psychology with critical reading and writing.
             ENG 110. They will learn to collaborate as a community                 Analysis of texts representing current issues in the field
             of learners, develop essays over multiple drafts, design a             will serve as a stimulus for discussion, research, and
             website, and present their writing to peers.                           enhancement of academic writing skills. This course
                                                                                    will serve as an introduction to psychology including
                                                                                    coverage of research, human development, personality,
                                                                                    testing and assessment, abnormal psychology, treatment
                                                                                    of psychopathology, health and wellness, social
                                                                                    cognition, and social influence.

                                                                Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

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For more information, please contact us:

                                                                CENTER FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE
                                                                          163 William Street
                                                                               17th Floor
                                                                         New York, NY 10038
                                                                        Phone: (212) 346-1386
                                                                         Fax: (212) 346-1520

                                                                      www.pace.edu/cae

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                                                                        Elisabeth Haub School of Law
                                                                Lubin School of Business | School of Education
                                                      Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

                                                                                                                               14366

        Fall 2019 Learning Communities for First-Year Students on the New York City Campus

14366_Fall 2019 Course Supplement NYC Edit.indd 10                                                                        4/25/19 12:00 PM
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