MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021

 
MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
MIDDLE SCHOOL
SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET
            2021
MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
Contents
CHOOSING SUBJECTS IN YEARS 9 & 10 ................................................................................................................................ 3
YEAR 9 SELECTIONS ..................................................................................................................................................................... 6
YEAR 10 SELECTIONS .................................................................................................................................................................. 7
ENGLISH FACULTY ........................................................................................................................................................................ 8
MATHEMATICS ............................................................................................................................................................................ 10
SCIENCE .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 11
SOCIAL SCIENCE .......................................................................................................................................................................... 12
HPE .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 20
FOOD STUDIES ............................................................................................................................................................................. 22
LANGUAGES................................................................................................................................................................................... 23
ITAD FACULTY ............................................................................................................................................................................. 29
THE ARTS ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 32
BUSINESS & IT .............................................................................................................................................................................. 41
MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
CHOOSING SUBJECTS IN YEARS 9 & 10

PARENT INFORMATION
Parents and carers can help students successfully move through from the Junior Phase of Learning to the Middle
Phase of Learning by helping them identify the courses that suit their career goals and interests.
Parents should work with their student to:
 check school reports;
 identify their strengths and weaknesses;
 review student learning goals regularly.

Parents can also encourage their student to:
 visit career exhibitions and career or industry-related websites — for example, myfuture.edu.au or
    qcaa.qld.edu.au;
 talk to class teachers, Heads of Department or Guidance Officers about choices and pathways;
 learn about jobs, courses and career pathways.

Parents of Year 8 & 9 students are asked to consider the subject offerings in this booklet and assist their students to
make a selection appropriate to the abilities and interests of the individual student. The best advice the school can
offer to students working through this middle phase of learning is make choices about subjects based on what you are
good at and what you enjoy.

Please note that all the subjects in this booklet are able to be offered only if the number of students selecting a
subject is sufficient to form a viable class group. Also, timetabling of classes may not allow particular combinations of
subjects.

Post-Compulsory Schooling
Young people must stay at school at least until they finish Year 10 or turn 16, whichever comes first. This means that,
for most students, Year 9 and 10 form part of the compulsory phase of schooling.

A young person's post-compulsory participation phase starts when they stop being of compulsory school age (i.e. turn
16 or complete Year 10 whichever comes first) and ends when the person:
 gains a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE), Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement (QCIA),
    Senior Statement, Certificate III or Certificate IV;
 has participated in eligible options for two years after the person stopped being of compulsory school age;
 or
 turns 17.

In the post-compulsory participation phase, young people have more options. They don't have to go to school - but
they do have to be 'learning or earning'. That means there are a wider range of options, including continuing school,
studying at an institution like TAFE or university, doing a traineeship or apprenticeship or working full-time.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
STUDENT INFORMATION
There are many important decisions you have to make whilst at school. Some of the most important are concerned
with the choice of subjects to take in the senior school – Years 11 and 12. These are important decisions since they
may affect your career plans when you leave school. Your course selections can also directly affect how you feel about
school, and ultimately your success at school. Subjects chosen in Years 9 and 10 can help set you up for success in your
senior studies.

Overall Plan
As an overall plan, it is suggested that you choose subjects:
 you enjoy;
 in which you have already had some success;
 which will help you achieve your chosen career goals, or at least keep your career options open;
 which will develop skills, knowledge and attitudes useful throughout your life.

This may sound difficult, but if you approach the task calmly, follow the guidelines provided, and ask for help, you
should come up with a list of subjects which meet your needs.

Guidelines
Many students have thought about their future, but are still uncertain about courses or occupations they would like to
follow after they have finished school. It is wise, therefore, when looking at subject choice, to keep your options open.
This means choosing a selection of subjects that makes it possible for you to continue thinking about your career
choice over the next year before making more definite choices as you approach the end of Year 9. The Australian
Curriculum requires that you study a group of core subjects that include in Years 9 & 10:
 English;
 Mathematics;
 Science;
 a Social Science subject; and
 Health and Physical Education (not compulsory in Year 10).

These subjects provide excellent foundation skills not only for your future career but also for your personal life. You
will then be able to choose from a range of electives that are designed to develop your interests and practical skills.

Think About Career Options
It is helpful to have some ideas about possible career choices at this stage, even though you may change plans or
review decisions in the future.

Find Out About The Subjects Kedron State High School Offers
Even though you have studied a wide range of subjects in Years 7 and 8, it is important to find out as much as possible
about the subjects offered in Years 9 and 10. Some of the subjects will be new, others might be similar to what you
have studied in Years 7 and 8, but have different names.

To find out about the subjects:
 Read the subject descriptions in this booklet;
 Ask Heads of Departments and teachers of particular subjects;
 Talk to students who are already studying the subjects.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
Consider Senior Subject Recommendations
Remember too, that your choice of subjects now may affect your choice later in Year 11 and 12. The school outlines
minimum standards in Year 10 in order for students to be recommended to choose some subjects in the senior school.
This is because we know that for students to be able to be successful in years 11 and 12, they need to have achieved a
certain level of success in Year 10. These include:
 The necessity to be passing Year 10 Core Maths at a minimum of a C standard to select General Mathematics in
     Year 11 and 12.
 The necessity to be passing Year 10 Advanced Maths at a minimum of a C standard to select Mathematical
     Methods in Year 11 and 12.
 A minimum B standard in Year 10 Science to complete Chemistry and Physics.
 A minimum B standard in Year 10 English to select
 Music and Languages in the Senior years almost always require previous study in Years 9 and 10

Make A Decision About A Combination Of Subjects That Suits You
You are an individual, and your particular needs and requirements in subject selection may be quite different from
those of other students. This means that it is unwise to either take or avoid a subject because:
 someone told you that you will like or dislike it;
 your friends are or are not taking it;
 you like or dislike the teacher;
 it is considered a “boy” or “girl” subject (all subjects have equal value for male and female students).

Be honest about your abilities and realistic with your occupational aims. There is little to be gained by continuing with
or taking advanced levels of subjects that have proved very difficult even after you have put in your best effort.
Similarly if your career aims require the study of certain subjects, do you have the ability and determination to work
hard enough to achieve the necessary level or results in those subjects?

Be Prepared To Ask For Help
If you need more help then ask for it. Talk to your parents, teachers, and guidance officer. Make use of the school
subject selection program.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
YEAR 9 SELECTIONS
COMPULSORY SUBJECTS:
There are five compulsory subjects in Year 9:
 English,
 Mathematics,
 Science,
 Health & Physical Education (one semester) and
 History (one semester).

ELECTIVE SUBJECTS:
Elective Models:
Students then choose electives following one of the models below.
  ELECTIVE MODEL ONE – INCLUDES A LANGUAGE                 ELECTIVE MODEL TWO – NO LANGUAGE
  Semester One                Semester Two                Semester One            Semester Two
  Chosen Language             Chosen Language                                      Two different
                                                            Two electives chosen
  + one other elective        + a different elective                                electives from the
                                                               from the table below
     from the table below           from the table below                              table below

In this way, students choose a Language which is studied for the whole year, plus two different electives studied for a
semester each;
OR
four different electives, studied for one semester each.

Elective Options:
It is preferable at this stage of schooling that students choose subjects from more than one area to broaden their
future options.

Electives available for year 9 students are:
                                      INDUSTRIAL
                                                               SOCIAL            HPE/
  ARTS          BUSINESS/IT             TECH &                                                       LANGUAGES*
                                                                SCIENCES           HOSPITALITY
                                          DESIGN
  Art           Business            Design                  Geography         Food Studies        Auslan
                    Studies              Technology                                              
  Drama                                                     Philosophy        HPE                 Chinese
                Digital             Engineering                                 Extension**      
  Media             Technologies         Technology                                                   French
                                                                                                 
  Music                              Manufacturing                                                   Japanese
                                          Technology                                                
                                                                                                       Spanish
*students can only choose a language they have studied in year 8
**invitation only subject

Students will have an opportunity to select a first and second choice for each semester. We will do our best to get
students into the subjects they select, but class sizes and numbers of students selecting subjects will mean that
students might select a subject for first semester and be allocated to that subject in semester two.

It is important to note again that there are rules around maximum class sizes, and students may not be able to study
their first choices. It is important that students return their subject selection form straight away as some subjects will
fill very quickly.

Please note that units listed in the following pages are reviewed regularly and may not always reflect exactly the
program of study.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
YEAR 10 SELECTIONS
COMPULSORY SUBJECTS:
There are four compulsory subjects in Year 10:
 English,
 Mathematics,
 Science,
 Humanities

Mathematics in year 10 is separated into Core and Advanced Maths. For more information, see the Mathematics
section of this booklet.

Humanities is studied as a general course by all students in semester one, and then humanities electives are chosen
for semester two. See the Social Sciences section of this booklet for more information.

ELECTIVE MODEL:
All students choose two elective subjects which are studied for the entirety of year 10.

Electives available for year 10 students are:
                                      INDUSTRIAL
                                                               SOCIAL             HPE/
  ARTS          BUSINESS/IT            TECH &                                                        LANGUAGES*
                                                                SCIENCES            HOSPITALITY
                                         DESIGN
  Art           Business            Design                  Geography          Food Studies       Cert II Auslan
                    Studies             Technology                                               
  Drama                                                     Philosophy         HPE                Chinese
                Cert I in           Engineering                                                 
  Media             IDMT                Technology                                HPE                French
                                                                                 Advanced        
  Music  Digital                    Manufacturing                                                   Japanese
                 Technologies           Technology                                                 
                                                                                                       Spanish
*students can only choose a language they have studied in year 9

It is important to note again that there are rules around maximum class sizes, and students may not be able to study
their first choices. It is important that students return their subject selection form straight away as some subjects will
fill very quickly.

Please note that units listed in the following pages are reviewed regularly and may not always reflect exactly the
program of study.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
ENGLISH FACULTY
ENGLISH (compulsory subject)
Subject Overview
The Year 9 and 10 English curriculum at Kedron aims to prepare students for the senior English curriculum through
exposing students to the content and assessment they will encounter in Years 11 and 12. The Year 9 curriculum allows
students to experiment and develop an understanding of concepts and in Year 10, students can consolidate their
learning and develop more sophisticated approaches to their assessment.

Year Nine
Unit 1 – Spectacular Speculations
Science Fiction, fantasy, the supernatural….all these and more are explored in Spectacular Speculations. Students will
ponder the question of “What if?” in their study of literary texts that fit under the umbrella of spec-fic in conjunction
with their study of non-fiction texts that will inspire their own short story writing. They will examine elements of
speculative creative writing, the stylistic features of authors, the development of narrative viewpoint and of
characterisation.
Unit Goals
Students will understand why writers construct speculative fiction texts.
Students will be able to identify the literary themes explored in speculative fiction texts. Students will be able to apply
literary themes and techniques in their own writing.
Assessment
Short story in response to stimulus.
Unit 2 – Engaging Asia
There are three billion people living in 48 countries in Asia and it’s essentially next door. The fascinating history,
culture, landscape, food, people, religions, festivals and stories, are all right there.
Throughout this unit, students learn about a variety of countries in Asia, and about their strengths and struggles. They
will create and present a multi-modal pitch in response to the driving question, ‘How can we, as young Australians,
promote Australia’s engagement with Asia?’
Unit Goals
Students will be able to create and present a multi-modal pitch to promote Australia’s engagement with Asia.
Students will be able to use persuasive devices to convince others of their point of view.
Assessment
Multi-modal presentation.
Unit 3 – Animal Allegory
Students will read and analyse a novel to understand how authors use text structures and language features to
construct animal allegories as representations of characters, ideas and issues. They will write an analytical essay in
response to an unseen question in exam conditions.
Unit Goals
Students will build their understanding of the ways particular text structures and language features are used for
specific purposes and effects.
Students will be able to write an effective analytical essay, to evaluate how an author has
constructed animal allegories as representations of characters, ideas and issues in the novel.
Assessment
Analytical Essay Exam
Unit 4 – The Teapot of Truth
Students will examine how poetry can be used to develop social, moral and ethical perspectives concerning issues that
are relevant to particular audiences and contexts. They will write a conversational essay to inform and persuade an
audience of the value and relevance of different forms of poetry in contemporary society.
Unit Goals
Students will develop their understanding of the stylistic features, text structures and language features of poetry and
consider how these elements combine to privilege perspectives.
They will develop their understanding of the conversational essay genre and produce their own conversational essay.
Assessment
Conversational essay

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MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
Year Ten
Unit 1 – Shakespeare
In this unit, students will be exposed to the language and universal themes of the immortal Bard. They will compare
and contrast the original text of a Shakespearean play with an adaptation thereof. They will examine the two texts and
their themes and evaluate the ways the two texts represent the same theme/s. They will analyse the way in which the
play’s attitudes, values and beliefs have been altered or maintained for a contemporary audience. They will further
develop their ability to write a conversational essay to inform and/or persuade their audience.
Unit Goals
Students will understand the theme/s of the play and how they have been represented in an adaptation.
Students will be able to write a conversational essay that demonstrates their knowledge and understanding.
Assessment
Conversational essay
Unit 2 – Be Like Greta
As issues of sustainability grow more urgent in the face of increasingly frequent extreme weather events, species
extinctions, rising sea levels, frighteningly enormous piles of waste going to landfill, and damning statistics that show
that the world’s non-renewable resources are running out, the need to take action and persuade others to get
involved is becoming increasingly apparent.
Students will create a presentation to contribute to the #BuildaBetterFuture Livestream, persuading their audience to
take action on an issue of their choosing (in consultation with their teacher).
Unit Goals
Students will develop their understanding of a range of issues of sustainability, then choose one to explore in greater
depth
Students will build upon their understanding of persuasive techniques and expand their ability to apply these with
precision, depth and sophistication.
Assessment
Multi-modal presentation
Unit 3 – The Hero’s Journey
Students will read, analyse and evaluate texts that follow the narrative arc of the Hero’s Journey. They will further
develop their understanding and control of elements of creative writing, of the stylistic features of authors, of
narrative viewpoint and of characterisation. They will analyse the concepts of growth, change and evolution, and
demonstrate these through short stories which trace a Hero’s Journey.
Unit Goals
Students will understand and be able to identify elements of creative writing, stylistic features, narrative viewpoint
and characterisation.
Students will be able demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of growth, change and
evolution, through a short story which utilises the narrative arc of the Hero’s Journey.
Assessment
Short story
Unit 4 – In Time
Students will analyse a novel to explore the importance of its setting in time, and how this shapes the cultural
assumptions, attitudes, values and beliefs of the text. They will examine how the author makes use of aesthetic
features to position his or her readers to view these. They will write an analytical essay in response to an unseen
question in exam conditions.
Unit Goals
Students will be able to construct an analytical essay which examines the techniques used by the author in
constructing the representation of the time setting in a novel they have studied. They will consider the impact of this
on the cultural assumptions, attitudes, values and beliefs displayed in the text.
They will further develop their control of the highly formal, academic tone of an analytical essay.
Assessment
Analytical essay exam

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MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT INFORMATION BOOKLET 2021
MATHEMATICS
YEAR NINE
SUBJECT OVERVIEW
In the Middle School, all students will study the same basic programme. The sequence of subject matter in Year 9 is
arranged in a core and extension format. All students will be required to attempt mastery of a core programme.

Units Studied
The range of topics to be studied includes the following: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, Statistics
and Probability.

It is hoped that many students will be encouraged to apply themselves to a variety of problems, familiar and
unfamiliar, and to understand what they are doing in completely mathematical tasks. It is the aim to develop in
students the ability to use mathematical concepts and processes in situations ranging from familiar to unfamiliar and
in both practical and theoretical contexts.

Assessment/Homework
Students are expected to complete their homework as instructed by their teacher. Homework is set so students have
the opportunity to consolidate their understanding.
The assessment program, for year is:
 1 Assignment
 3 End of term exams – assessing Fluency Understanding and
 Problem Solving and Reasoning.

YEAR TEN
SUBJECT OVERVIEW
The year 10 course is structured into two separate curricula. Students who obtain a high C or better in Year 9 will initially
study the Advanced Mathematics course in Year 10 and will only remain in the advanced course throughout Year 10 if
they maintain that achievement level.

Students who are unsuccessful in attaining or maintaining a high C will study the Year 10 Core Mathematics course.

For Mathematics Methods and Specialist Maths at Year 11, students are advised that the Year 10 Advanced
Mathematics course is the pre-requisite course.

Assessment/Homework
Students are expected to complete all homework set and access tutorials should they need assistance. The assessment
structure for the Year 10 curriculum includes 3 exams and 1 assignment.

Assessment for the 10A course for the year consists of 1 assignment, 3 exams (the last exam will be based on a whole
semester of work). These exams will be separated into two parts: Tech Active and Tech Free.

ADJUSTED MATHEMATICS
In consultation with the Administration, Learning Support, and EAL/D Departments, it was considered desirable to
offer an adjusted mathematics course to those students who experience difficulties with this subject.

The course has been structured so that the topics learned in the Adjusted Mathematics program are parallel to those
topics studied in Junior Mathematics, only not to the same degree of difficulty and with a focus on real-life skills. Upon
consultation with both the Head of Department and subject teachers, students who show ability in the adjusted
course may be eligible to transfer to core mathematics in the future.

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SCIENCE
SUBJECT OVERVIEW
The Australian Curriculum is implemented in Year 9 and 10 Science. Students learn scientific concepts in these units:
 Biological Sciences;
 Chemical Sciences;
 Earth and Space Sciences; and
 Physical Sciences.

The Science Inquiry Skills and Science as a Human Endeavour strands are integrated into the Science Understanding
strands in the teaching program.

YEAR NINE
In Year 9, students consider the operation of systems at a range of scales. They explore ways in which the human body
as a system responds to its external environment and the interdependencies between biotic an abiotic compounds of
ecosystems. They are introduced to the notion of the atom as a system of protons, electrons and neutrons, and how
this system can change through nuclear decay. They learn that matter can be rearranged through chemical change and
that these changes play an important role in many systems. They are introduced to the concept of the conservation of
matter and begin to develop a more sophisticated view of energy transfer. They begin to apply their understanding of
energy and forces to global systems such as continental movement.

YEAR TEN
In Year 10, students explore systems at different scales and connect microscopic and macroscopic properties to explain
phenomena. Students explore the biological, chemical, geological and physical evidence for different theories, such as
the theories of natural selection and the Big Bang. Atomic theory is developed to understand relationships within the
periodic table. Understanding motion and forces are related by applying physical laws. Relationships between aspects of
the living, physical and chemical world are applied to systems on a local and global scale and this enables students to
predict how changes will affect equilibrium within these systems.

CONTINUATION TO SENIOR
For Senior Science subjects Physics and Chemistry, a minimum B in Year 10 Science is recommended and for Biology
and Earth and Environmental Science, a minimum C in Year 10 Science is recommended.

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SOCIAL SCIENCE
YEAR 9
In Year 9 all students study a semester of History. Students may also choose Geography and/or Philosophy as
electives.

YEAR 9 HISTORY
This subject is offered for a single semester and begins with an introduction to sources and key historical concepts for
the semester.

UNITS STUDIED
Unit 1 Industrial Revolution
How did new ideas and technological developments contribute to change in this period? (The Agricultural Revolution,
Power and Technology, Slavery and Child Labour, Social Unrest, Unions and Reform.)
Assessment: Research Essay

Unit 2 Making of Modern Australia
What were the origins, developments, significance and long-term impacts of colonization in Australia? (Colonialism:
From convict to settler, Eureka, Workers’ Rights and a National Identity, Why Federation?)
Assessment: Knowledge/Response to Stimulus Test

Unit 3 World War 1
What was the significance of World War I for Australia and its national identity?
(Colonial Envy, Total War: British homeland asks for help, Conscription and Propaganda, Gallipoli, The ANZAC Legend:
How significant to modern identity?)
Assessment: In-class Essay

HOMEWORK
Homework will involve students preparing a variety of research tasks for assessment as well as complementary
activities to class work.

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GEOGRAPHY
There are two units of study in the Year 9 Curriculum for Geography.

UNITS STUDIED
UNIT 1 Biomes and Food Security
This focuses on investigating the role of the biotic (living) environment and its role in food and fibre production. This
unit examines the biomes of the world, their alteration and significance as a source of food and fibre, and the
environmental challenges and constraints on expanding food production in the future. These distinctive aspects of
biomes, food production and food security are investigated using studies drawn from Australia and across the world.

UNIT 2 Geographies of Interconnections
This focuses on investigating how people, through their choices and actions, are connected to places throughout the
world in a wide variety of ways, and how these connections help to make and change places and their environments.
This unit examines the interconnections between people and places through the products people buy and the effects of
their production on the places that make them. Students examine the ways that transport and information and
communication technologies have made it possible for an increasing range of services to be provided internationally,
and for people in isolated rural areas to connect to information, services and people in other places. These distinctive
aspects of interconnection are investigated using studies drawn from Australia and across the world.

The content is organised into two strands: Geographical Knowledge and Understanding and Geographical Inquiry and
Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated manner, and in ways that are appropriate
to specific local contexts.

ASSESSMENT
   Short Response Test
   Research Task

CRITERIA ASSESSED
   Geographical knowledge and understanding
   Analysing and interpreting
   Communicating

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PHILOSOPHY
Why Study Philosophy?
Philosophy is the only subject to actively address all of the 21st century thinking skills.

These skills have been identified as vital for maximizing success in a rapidly changing globalized environment. From
the Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority:
 critical thinking
 creative thinking
 communication
 collaboration and teamwork
 personal and social skills
 ICT skills.

Philosophy helps students develop logical frameworks through which to sift information so as to avoid accepting
erroneous information in a post-truth world. Students develop their ability to form perspectives, justify those
perspectives, synthesis information and engage in community of inquiry style learning

LEARNING EXPERIENCES
Year Nine
Introduction to Logic
 Students develop an understanding of inductive and deductive reasoning, identifying fallacies, constructing
     arguments and developing philosophical questions concerning current events.
Ethics
 Students engage with ethical frameworks including utilitarianism and deontology in order to discuss, “What is the
     good?”

Year Ten
The Mind/Body Problem
 Students address questions such as, “Are mind states brain states?” and “What is the nature of consciousness”
An introduction to epistemology (What can we know?) and skepticism
Philosophy of Religion
 Exploring the underlying principles of a range of world religions
Existentialism – the nature of existence through the lens of the human experience

ASSESSMENT
Students complete a range of analytical essays and spoken tasks
Student engage in communities of inquiry

CONTINUATION TO SENIOR and beyond
Student may choose to continue to do Philosophy and Reasoning in the senior phase of learning which has application
for a wide range of fields including but not limited to: law, politics, government and public administration, medical
ethics, education and journalism. Those students who do not choose senior Philosophy and Reasoning will still find
that the junior course helps develop a range of skills that are of significant assistance in achieving success in their
senior subjects.

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YEAR 10
All students in Year 10 will study History in Semester 1. In Semester 2, students can select one of:
 Ancient History
 Modern History
 Legal Studies or
 Geography

YEAR 10 HISTORY (SEMESTER 1)
The Modern World and Australia
The Year 10 Curriculum provides a study of the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present,
with an emphasis on Australia in its global context. The twentieth century became a critical period in Australia’s social,
cultural, economic and political development. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political
turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia’s
development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region, and its global standing.

The history content at this year level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical
Skills.

The key inquiry questions at this year level are:
 How did the nature of global conflict change during the twentieth century?
 What were the consequences of World War II? How did these consequences shape the modern world?
 How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in this period?

OVERVIEW
Overview content for The Modern World and Australia includes the following: the inter-war years between World War
I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression.

UNIT 1 - World War II (1939-45)
Students investigate wartime experiences through a study of World War II in depth. This includes a study of the
causes, events, outcome and broader impact of the conflict as an episode in world history, and the nature of
Australia’s involvement.
ASSESSMENT: Response to Stimulus Exam

UNIT 2 - Rights and Freedoms (1945 – present)
Students investigate struggles for human rights in depth. This will include how rights and freedoms have been ignored,
demanded or achieved in Australia and in the broader world context.
ASSESSMENT: Response to Stimulus Essay

UNIT 3 - The Globalising World, Migration Experiences (1945 – present)
Students investigate: the development of global influence during the twentieth century; the waves of post-World War
II migration to Australia, including the influence of significant world events; investigating the nature of the waves of
migration such as the countries that were the source of migrants, and the numbers of migrants from those countries;
and trends in migration since World War II such as increasing migration from the Asian region to Australia
ASSESSMENT: Research essay

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SEMESTER 2

YEAR 10 ANCIENT HISTORY
Three (3) units of work are studied by students within one semester of Ancient History.

UNIT 1: From Stone to Steel (7 Weeks)
This unit follows humanity’s path to becoming civilised. It establishes how our past influences both our present and
future by tracing the origins of human existence and highlighting major achievements and to create links to our own
modern lifestyles.

Depth Study One: What is Pre-history?
A comparative study is made of the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic cultures based on fragmented evidence that
focuses on the evolutionary process of early humans developing into sophisticated citizens.
Topics include:
 Early humans – theories and controversies surrounding the theory of evolution.
 How did civilisations begin to emerge from Neolithic villages?
 How did advances in technology bring about changes to society?
 Cave art and significant sites from fossil remains
 Case study: Mesopotamia
ASSESSMENT: In-class essay

UNIT 2: Interpreting the Archaeological Record (3 Weeks)
This unit involves a study of archaeology and examines the archaeological record of an ancient civilisation such as
Ancient China and may include a visit to the Classics and Antiquities Museum at the University of Queensland for a
tour and archaeological workshop.
Topics include:
 The role of the archaeologist.
 The location of archaeological sites.
 How sources have survived and methods of preservation.
 Excavation and dating techniques.

UNIT 3: Sophisticated Societies (8 Weeks)
This unit aims at realising the ‘sophistication’ of some of the ancient civilisations, by comparing them with each other
and our own modern times. While examining one civilisation, we will also consider what was going on elsewhere at
the same time through the use of time lines and multi-modal presentations.
ASSESSMENT: Research Essay

Study Focus: Comparative Societies: everyday life, religion, arts and architecture, political and social structures,
technologies and legacies

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YEAR 10 LEGAL STUDIES

This is a subject for those who want to become ‘legally aware’ citizens so that they will know their rights and how the
Law will and does already impact on their daily lives. It showcases the fundamental principles of law making; as well as
the practical applications of these laws to everyday matters.

We start by examining the ‘basics’ of law making, through the parliament and court systems. We consider the
democratic principles of Australian society and how our rights and responsibilities are protected through local, state,
federal and international laws, charters and conventions.

Studying Legal Studies in Year 10 serves to form a basis for further study in Years 11 and 12. There are two units of
study we will engage in:
    1. “To Protect and to Serve”: In this unit we will define the concept of ‘Law’ and identify our expectations of the
        legal system as a form of protection to serve our best interests. We will look at how our laws are made,
        enforced and interpreted through the government, courts and police. We consider the types of public and
        private law that is in place through both the criminal and the civil justice systems.
    2. “In the Pursuit of Justice”: As one of our expectations of the legal system is to provide fair and equitable
        outcomes – the belief of doing the right thing equates with society’s sense of Justice. In this unit we explore
        the concepts of rights and responsibilities for the law abiding citizen. We look at how disputes are resolved
        beyond the courtroom.

We then narrow our focus to minority groups and how they are treated and protected by the Law. Our case study
centres on young people and their specific rights, needs and issues. Topics will include: employment, consumer rights
and juvenile justice.
We conclude the course by evaluating the Law to determine if justice is truly served.
Key Activities:
 Mock trials Role plays
 Debates and Discussions Media evaluations
 Legal Research Case studies Guest Speakers
 Possible excursions to: Supreme/District Courts, Parliament House, Queensland Police Museum

Assessment: Short Response Test; Research Essay

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YEAR 10 MODERN HISTORY

Unit 1: Genocide (10 weeks)
This depth study requires students to investigate:
 Definitions and UN position on genocide, controversies regarding definition, reasons for introduction –
     look/review Holocaust (never again cartoons)
 Rwanda – colonial background, reasons why US etc. didn’t intervene (Somalia), division between Hutu and Tutsi –
     Hotel Rwanda
 The steps to Genocide and theories relating to Rwanda and Holocaust, Genocide Denial, Responsibility of
     International community
ASSESSMENT: Multi-modal presentation

Unit 2: Terrorism – Are they ‘freedom fighters’ or terrorist? (8weeks)
What is the most significant moment in the history of terrorism?
 Anarchist Terrorism
         o (Gunpowder Plot, French Revolution’s Reign of Terror, assassinations of Russian, French and US leaders,
             Bombing of Greenwich Observatory)
 State Terrorism - Governmental control through means of dictatorship
         o (Nazi Germany, Argentina, North Korea, Iran, bombing of the Rainbow Warrior)
 International / Jihadist Terrorism
         o (USS Cole, September 11 Twin Towers, Nairobi Embassy, Bali Bombing, London Bombing, Boston
             Marathon, Paris Attacks, Chechnya, Boko Haram)
 Nationalist Terrorism – Terrorists or Freedom Fighters?
 Impact of Imperialism/Colonialism/Neo-Colonialism
         o (Tamil Tigers, ETA, PKK, KKK, East Timor, Colombian/Mexican drug wars, PLO, IRA)
 Focus on IRA – Terrorists or Freedom Fighters?
         o (Imperialism / Colonialism impact, Source deconstruction and analysis, Remember the 5th of November)
 Focus on PLO – Terrorists or Freedom Fighters
         o (Imperialism / Colonialism impact, Source deconstruction and analysis)
ASSESSMENT: Extended Essay in exam conditions

ASSESSMENT
Assessment is structured to assist students who choose to continue further studies in Social Science for Years 11 and
This is done by using the same assessment criteria as in Years 11 and 12 and similar assessment techniques.

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YEAR 10 GEOGRAPHY
The key inquiry questions for Year 10 are.
 How can the spatial variation between places and changes in environments be explained?
 What management options exist for sustaining human and natural systems into the future?
 How do world views influence decisions on how to manage environmental and social change?

Unit 1: Geographies of Human Wellbeing (8 weeks)
This unit focuses on investigating global, national and local differences in human wellbeing between places. This unit
examines the different concepts and measures of human wellbeing, and the causes of global differences in these
measures between countries. Students explore spatial differences in wellbeing within and between countries, and
evaluate the differences from a variety of perspectives. They explore programs designed to reduce the gap between
differences in wellbeing. These distinctive aspects of human wellbeing are investigated using studies drawn from
Australia, India and across the world asappropriate.
ASSESSMENT: Short Response Test

Unit 2 Environmental Change and Management (8 weeks)
This unit focuses on investigating environmental geography through an in-depth study of a specific environment. The
unit begins with an overview of the environmental functions that support all life, the major challenges to their
sustainability, and the environmental world views that influence how people perceive and respond to these challenges,
including those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Students investigate a specific type of environment
and environmental change in both Australia and one other country. They apply human-environment systems thinking
to understand the causes and consequences of the change and geographical concepts and methods to evaluate and
select strategies to manage thechange.
ASSESSMENT: Report (a valuable skill/tool across a range of real life workplaces)

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Health & Physical Education & Hospitality
HPE
SUBJECT OVERVIEW
Health and Physical Education provides students with knowledge, understanding and skills to explore and enhance
their own and others’ health and physical activity in diverse and changing contexts.
Health and Physical Education provides a philosophical and educative framework to promote deep learning in three
dimensions: about, through and in physical activity contexts. Students optimise their engagement and performance in
physical activity as they develop an understanding and appreciation of the interconnectedness of these dimensions.

YEAR 9 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
HPE CORE
The year 9 course is a continuation of the content and skills students have developed learnt in junior HPE. It
maintains a focus on physical activity with two lessons a week dedicated to physical activity and one dedicated to
theory. The Year 9 course is compulsory for all students and runs for one semester.
Content and Assessment:
    PRACTICAL UNITS                        THEORY UNITS
    Touch football, Netball and            Unit 1: Alcohol and you
     1500m run                              Unit 2: Fitness Training
    ASSESSMENT:                            ASSESSMENT:
    Ongoing assessment of:                 Alcohol and You: Students investigate and apply key decision making
    Basic personal / game skills            and problem solving skills in the context of alcohol use. The assessment
    Leadership skills and qualities         specifically focuses on the impact of peer pressure and potential
    Application of skills in modified       outcomes of the decision making process. Students respond via both a
     and full game situations                written evaluation and a video presentation of potential outcomes.
    Evaluation and decision making         Fitness Training: Students plan, write and undertake a personal training
     skills in game situations.              program for the 1500m run. A written evaluation is developed once the
                                             program has been completed.

HPE Extension (HPX)
is offered (invites issued in late term 3) to selected Year 9 students who have demonstrated high levels of
achievement, behaviour and effort in Year 8 HPE. HPX is designed to extend year 9 students with the units studied
being based around the complex topics studied in senior Physical Education. This provides an excellent opportunity for
invited students to gain a head start should they choose Physical Education in Years 11 and 12. The physical activities
chosen for HPX will be selected from a list of options as there is scope for flexibility in this subject.
Content and Assessment:
    PRACTICAL UNITS                        THEORY UNITS
    Ultimate disc and Multi-sport          Unit 1: Access and Equity in Sport
    ASSESSMENT:                            Unit 2: Biomechanics
    Ongoing assessment of:                 ASSESSMENT:
    Basic personal / game skills           Access and Equity in Sport– Analytical essay exploring enablers and
    Application of skills in modified       parries to equitable participation in physical activity through the use of
     and full game situations                Figueroa’s Framework and Maslow’s Hierarchy of human needs.
    Evaluation and decision making         Biomechanics – Multi-modal presentation on a selected principle and
     skills in game situations.              sport of own choice. The presentation focuses on self-performance with
                                             technical and biomechanical improvement strategies for optimal
                                             performance.

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YEAR 10 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
In year 10, HPE is an elective subject students may choose one of 2 subjects, both of which run for the whole year.
Students may not select both HPE ADVANCED and HPE CORE.

HPE ADVANCED
HPA is designed as a preparatory course for students who wish to study the general subject of Physical Education in
years 11 and 12. HPE Advanced has a much greater theoretical focus where by students learn experientially through
three stages of an inquiry approach to make connections between the scientific bases and the physical activity
contexts. Through their purposeful engagement in physical activities, students gather data to analyse, synthesise and
devise strategies to optimise engagement and performance. They engage in reflective decision-making as they
evaluate and justify strategies to achieve a particular outcome. In order to prepare students for the Senior Physical
Education course, student achievement is predominantly assessed via written tasks (75%) with practical performance
only accounting for 25% of overall achievement.

HPE CORE
HPE focuses more on the acquisition of movement skills and concepts to enable students to participate in a range of
physical activities – confidently, competently and creatively. As a foundation for lifelong physical activity participation
and enhanced performance, students acquire an understanding of how the body moves and develop positive attitudes
towards physical activity participation. They develop an appreciation of the significance of physical activity, outdoor
recreation and sport in Australian society and globally. The increased focus on physical performance is reflected in the
assessment weighting, where student achievement is assessed equally via written tasks (50%) and practical
performance (50%).

                                  UNIT 1                 UNIT 2                  UNIT 3                 UNIT 4
10 HPE         Integrated         Ethics and             Sports                  Physiological          Biomechanics
ADVANCED       unit topic         Integrity              Psychology              responses to           with selected
                                                                                 training               physical activity

               Assessment         Written essay          Multimodal digital      Exam                   Multimodal Folio
                                                         presentation                                   (including physical
                                                                                                        performance
                                                                                                        evidence)
10 HPE CORE    Theory topic       Fitness training       Tournament              Coaching               Officiating
                                                         management
               Physical           Swimming /             Basketball              Various                Volleyball
               Activity           Aquatics
               Assessment         In class Essay         Folio – written plan Folio – written plan Exam
                                                         and practical session and practical session

CONTINUATION TO SENIOR
For senior Physical Education, a minimum B in Year 10 English and HPE ADVANCED is recommended. It is an advantage
to have studied Year 10 HPE ADVANCED but not compulsory.

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FOOD STUDIES
SUBJECT OVERVIEW
Food Studies aims to address some of the biggest challenges students face. It prepares students with life-skills that will
prepare students for adulthood.

This includes making informed decisions in the promotion of healthy food choices (to address the rising obesity
problems in Australia), sustainability issues (to help each of us to do our bit to preserve our planet) and choosing
recipes and products suitable to meet design challenges (informed consumerism and decision making).

Both HPE and Technology Key Learning Areas of the Australian Curriculum form the basis of this subject.

The main focus of Food Studies is skill development through the production of healthy, budget conscious, family
friendly meals within limited time frames.

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT/ EXPENSES (both year levels)
A4 display folder, plastic polywallet, ingredients, apron, 2 tea towels, and container to take home cookery each week.
Leather closed-in shoes are required for all cookery lessons.

YEAR NINE
The Year 9 course is for one semester.
Topics Studied
   Food hygiene and safety
   Food preparation and presentation skills
   Focus on Australian Healthy Eating Guidelines
   Breakfast
   Snacks

Assessment
Weekly cookery tasks and work plans, and practical cookery tasks with a written component. Year 9 includes a Snacks
research assignment.

YEAR TEN
The Year 10 program (2 semesters) builds upon the skills developed in Year
9, however Year 9 is NOT a pre-requisite.
Topics Studied
   Term 1: Cultural food focus
   Term 2: Hospitality focus- Market Day
   Term 3: Nutrition focus
   Term 4: Hospitality focus- Let’s party!

Assessment
Weekly cookery tasks and work plans, and practical cookery tasks with a
written component. Year 10 includes a research paper, written exam and
event journal work.

SUBJECT CHARGE
Due to the nature of the subject, students who select Food Studies in Year 10
will be charged an additional fee of $20.

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LANGUAGES
    At Kedrons SHS, we proudly offer study in 5
     languages:                                                   To continue to study a language in year 9 and/or
    Auslan                  Japanese                             10, students must have studied the language in the
    Chinese                 Spanish                              previous year at school.
    French

AUSLAN
WHY STUDY AUSLAN?
    Auslan is the sign language of the Australian Deaf community. The term Auslan is an
     acronym of ‘Australian sign language’.
    Deaf students have attended Kedron State High school for over thirty years and in
     2008, Auslan was introduced as a language subject for both hearing and deaf students,
     as a way of fostering the development of Auslan skills as well as introducing hearing
     students to Deaf language and Deaf culture through integrated language classes.
    Deaf students are able to access classes through Auslan and hearing students of Auslan
     have the opportunity for immediate practice of the language they are learning by
     participating in classes with their deaf peers who are fluent users of sign language.
    While a Teacher of the Deaf delivers the program a deaf adult also attends classes as an
     Auslan Language Model, providing an invaluable insight into Deaf culture and the use
     of Auslan by a first language user.
                                                                                                   

LEARNING EXPERIENCES
Year 9
In Year 9 students will continue to develop their receptive and expressive vocabulary while learning some of the skills of
interpreting. In Deaf history and Deaf culture, students will investigate Deaf politics and human rights exploring the
Deaf holocaust and the Deaf civil rights movement. Students learn about many inspirational Deaf people throughout
history. They conduct a role play of a signed interview with a holocaust survivor and participate in Auslan Idol. Both
the theoretical and practical content provides students with a highly motivating opportunity to use their developing
Auslan skills.

Year 10: Certificate II in Auslan
Certificate II is available to students interested in studying Auslan in Year 10. This is a fascinating year where students
explore Auslan in the context of work, education and language development. Students have the opportunity to
participate in a variety of excursions; the Deaf festival and the Deaf expo as part of the National Week for Deaf People.
The course culminates in a two day voice-off Auslan Camp where students participate in a variety of activities
immersed entirely in Sign Language.

ASSESSMENT
 Students are assessed on theory and practical applications
 The Auslan story and Idol are evaluated on criteria based assessment
 Vocabulary, grammar, knowledge of Deaf history and Deaf culture are all assessed.
The Year 10 Certificate II Auslan course is competency based with 3 units containing both practical and theoretical
assessment.

CONTINUATION TO SENIOR
Auslan is not offered in the Senior School. Students may continue their studies at TAFE after completing the Certificate
II in Year 10
CONTRIBUTION TO FUTURE CAREER
Auslan skills provide numerous vocational paths for students who are interested in perusing options after school.
Possible career opportunities include interpreting and working as an Auslan Language Model (deaf students), Teacher
of the Deaf and speech and language therapy. There are many social and sporting clubs that users of Auslan could

                                                                                                                       23
participate in, if they are interested in extending their involvement in the Deaf community.

                                                                                               24
CHINESE
WHY STUDY CHINESE?
   Kedron opened its own Confucius Classroom in 2014, bringing a wealth of resources and materials to the Chinese
    Program. The knowledge from Junior Chinese is reviewed and progressed as students elect the subject for one
    year in Years 9 and 10 to build strong foundations to advance students into the senior Chinese course.
   China is quickly emerging as the next global, economic super-power. The ability to communicate in Chinese will be
    invaluable for a broad range of engaging international careers including interpreting, translating and language
    teaching.
   Knowledge of Chinese fully complements other disciplines including business, commerce, finance and foreign
    affairs.
   Studying a language encourages neural connections in the brain which promote cognitive development through
    creative and flexible thinking.
   Students who study languages have greater intercultural understanding and empathy towards others.
   Chinese is one of the six official languages of the UN

LEARNING EXPERIENCES
Year 9
Students extend their Chinese character base and work on topics relating to healthy eating, clothes and shopping.
They will also discuss the Olympic Games, hobbies, and Chinese fairy tales.

Year 10
Year 10 students focus on topics about the weather, home, neighbourhood, school, locations and daily routine.
Students continue to extend their character knowledge.
 Students are exposed to a range of culturally rich activities including restaurant visits, movies and immersion
    days, which are run in conjunction with the Confucius Institute at QUT.
 Chinese study at Kedron State High School is accentuated every two years with the offer of a trip to China.
    Students are given the opportunity to bring their classroom language alive by experiencing the people, customs
    and culture of China first hand.
 Students are invited to host students from study tours from China.

ASSESSMENT
   Exams are modelled off the senior system assessing skills in communicating and understanding
   Students are regularly given short diagnostic quizzes to check learning and understanding.

CONTINUATION TO SENIOR and beyond
Students must achieve a C in Year 10 Chinese to display competency in Chinese to smoothly progress into the senior
curriculum. Students receiving a sound achievement or higher in a senior language course will receive 2 bonus rank
points towards their university entrance.

Native/proficient background speakers are encouraged not to choose Chinese in Years 9 or
10. However, such students may choose in senior years. For more information, please see the Head of
Department/Languages in Q Block.

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FRENCH
WHY STUDY FRENCH?
       Greater preparedness to communicate and operate in a fast-paced global
        environment
       Improved literacy skills in English
       Enhance cognitive intelligences such as problem solving and creative thinking
       Greater intercultural understanding and empathy towards others
       Strong links to future careers in journalism, diplomacy, hospitality and so much
        more
       French is spoken in more than 40 countries and is the official language of many
        multinational organisations
       French is one of the six official languages of the UN

LEARNING EXPERIENCES
Year 9
Students reinforce their learning from Years 7 and 8 and extend to the following topics: Food, My town, My life and
Holidays. They engage in a range of cultural activities to supplement their learning.

Year 10
Students learn about French culture in movies and song as well as Health and Australia/France relationships.

French study at Kedron State High School is accentuated every two years with the offer of a trip to France and our
sister school Lycée Saint Louis in Saumur, situated in the Loire Valley. Students are given the opportunity to bring their
classroom language alive by experiencing the people, customs and culture of France first hand. Students are also
invited to host students from our sister school in the alternate year.

ASSESSMENT
       Exams are modelled off the senior system assessing skills in communicating and understanding
       Students are regularly given short diagnostic quizzes to check learning and understanding.

        CONTINUATION TO SENIOR and beyond                                     
        Students must achieve a C in Year 10 French or display
         competency in French to smoothly progress into the senior
         curriculum. Students receiving a sound achievement or higher in a
         senior language course will receive 2 bonus rank points towards
         their university entrance.
        Native/proficient background speakers are encouraged not to
         choose French in Years 9 or 10. However, such students may
         choose French in senior years. For more information, please see
         the Head of Department/Languages in Q Block

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JAPANESE
WHY STUDY JAPANESE?
   Japan is Australia’s second largest trading partner. Australia exported
    $24.4 billion worth of goods (9% of total Australian exports) to Japan in
    2019.
   In an increasingly global economy, having a second language is
    considered a huge asset when applying for jobs.
   Greater preparedness to communicate and operate in a fast-paced
    global environment
   Improved literacy skills in English
   Enhance cognitive intelligences such as problem solving and creative
    thinking
   Greater intercultural understanding and empathy towards others
   Strong links to future careers in journalism, diplomacy, hospitality and
    so much more
   Japan remains one of Australia’s major trading partners. Proficiency in
    Japanese opens doors to a wide range of exciting career opportunities including, but not limited to, interpreting,
    translating and language teaching.
   Knowledge in a second language positively augments other disciplines, including business, law and international
    relations.

LEARNING EXPERIENCES
Year 9
Students consolidate the hiragana script and are introduced to katakana. Kanji
study is continued through the year. Students study topics which include daily
routine, sports & hobbies, shopping & dining and weather events.

Year 10
The Year 10 course is characterised by the reinforcement and continuation of the
study of the three Japanese scripts. Students engage in topics which include
making arrangements, school, location, directions, jobs and popular culture.

Japanese study at Kedron State High School is accentuated every two years with the offer of a trip to Japan and our
sister school in Fukuoka. Students are given the opportunity to bring their classroom language alive by experiencing
the people, customs and culture of Japan first hand. Students are also invited to host students from our sister
school every alternate year.

ASSESSMENT
   Assessment tasks and examinations are modelled off the senior system assessing skills in communicating and
    understanding
   Students are regularly given short diagnostic quizzes to check learning and understanding.
                                                            CONTINUATION TO SENIOR and beyond
                                                            Students must achieve a C in Year 10 Japanese to display
                                                            competency in Japanese to smoothly progress into the
                                                            senior curriculum. Students receiving a sound
                                                            achievement or higher in a senior language course will
                                                            receive 2 bonus rank points towards their university
                                                            entrance.

                                                            Native/proficient background speakers are encouraged
                                                            not to choose Japanese in Years 9 or 10. However, such
                                                            students may choose Japanese in senior years. For more
                                                            information, please see the Head of
                                                            Department/Languages in Q Block.

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